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COVID-19: 1,199 new cases and 3 new deaths reported in OC, 16 new cases in Newport Beach

Orange County experienced a three-day spike of 3,458 new cases of COVID-19 between November 23-25, including 39 newly reported cases in Newport Beach in that time. OC Health Care Agency reports that there have been 73,152 cumulative cases of COVID-19, with 1,199 new cases reported on Wednesday, 837 new cases reported on Tuesday and 1,422 new cases reported on Monday.

Sadly, the county reports that 1,559 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including three new deaths reported on Wednesday. There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 1,433 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of 16 cases on Wednesday and 74 cases since last Wednesday’s report.

The county reports that 30 percent of ICU beds and 64 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 479 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (+16 since Tuesday’s report – includes ICU); 115 are in ICU (-1 since Tuesday’s report).

The county estimates 58,608 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

Editor’s Note: The county did not provide updates yesterday due to the Thanksgiving holiday; please check back later today for Friday’s update.

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 25, as reported by the county; click here to visit page that is updated daily


COVID-19: 1,199 new cases and 3 new deaths reported in OC, 16 new cases in Newport Beach

Orange County has experienced a three-day spike of 3,458 new cases of COVID-19, including 39 newly reported cases in Newport Beach in that time. OC Health Care Agency reports that there have been 73,152 cumulative cases of COVID-19, with 1,199 new cases reported today (November 25), 837 new cases reported yesterday, and 1,422 new cases reported on Monday.

Sadly, the county reports that 1,559 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including three new deaths reported today. There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 1,433 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of 16 cases today, 39 cases in the last three days, and 74 cases since last Wednesday’s report.

The county reports that 30 percent of ICU beds and 64 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 479 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (+16 since yesterday – includes ICU); 115 are in ICU (-1 since yesterday).

The county estimates 58,608 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 25 20 1

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 25, as reported by the county; click here to visit page that is updated daily


COVID-19: 2,259 new cases reported in OC in last two days, 23 new cases in Newport Beach

Orange County has experienced a two-day spike of 2,259 new cases of COVID-19, including 23 newly reported cases in Newport Beach in that time. OC Health Care Agency reports that there have been 71,953 cumulative cases of COVID-19, with 837 new cases reported today (November 24) and 1,422 new cases reported yesterday.

Sadly, the county reports that 1,556 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including two new deaths reported today. There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 1,417 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of 23 cases in the last two days and an increase of 65 cases since last Tuesday’s report.

The county reports that 28 percent of ICU beds and 66 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 463 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (+35 since yesterday – includes ICU); 116 are in ICU (+11 since yesterday).

The county estimates 58,289 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 24, as reported by the county; click here to visit page that is updated daily


Entertainment returns in force to the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza

Segerstrom Center for the Arts has announced that live performances on the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza are returning.

The Center will kick things off to celebrate Thanksgiving with three-time Emmy® Award-winning comedian Louie Anderson on November 27, followed by Tony® Award nominee Megan Hilty on December 11 and Grammy Award winner Steve Tyrell ringing in the New Year on December 29 and 30. All performances are at 4 and 7 p.m.

Entertainemtn returns Anderson

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Courtesy of SCFTA

Comedian Louie Anderson

Anderson is one of the country’s most recognized and adored comics, named by Comedy Central as “One of 100 Greatest Stand-Up Comedians of All Time.” His career has spanned more than 30 years. He is a best-selling author, star of his own standup specials and sitcoms, and he continues to tour the country performing to standing-room-only crowds worldwide. Making his national television debut on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson in 1984, he went on to appear on Leno, Letterman, The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert and Comic Relief. Showtime, HBO and CMT specials followed, including hosting the legendary game show Family Feud, making him a household name and opening doors for him as an actor. Anderson has also guest starred on a variety of TV sitcoms and dramas. Cost: $240 per pod; maximum six people per pod.

Entertainment returns Hilty

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Courtesy of SCFTA

Actress Megan Hilty

Hilty is most recognizable for her portrayal of seasoned triple-threat Ivy Lynn in NBC’s musical drama Smash. She followed up the series with a starring role on the NBC comedy Sean Saves the World. Additional television credits include recurring roles on Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce, The Good Wife, Braindead and Louie, among many others. Hilty received critical acclaim for her role of Brooke Ashton in the Roundabout Theater Company’s revival of Noises Off. She earned nominations for a Tony Award, Drama Desk Award and Drama League Award and won a Broadway.com Audience Award for Favorite Featured Actress in a Play. She regularly performs with orchestras and symphonies across the country. Her solo show – including her sold-out Carnegie Hall debut – has received critical acclaim. Cost: $450 per pod; maximum six people per pod.

Segerstrom Center Tyrell

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Photo by McHugh Photography

Vocalist/Producer Steve Tyrell

Ever since his surprise version of “The Way You Look Tonight” in the 1991 film Father of The Bride paved the way for his extraordinary second career, Tyrell has been setting A New Standard for interpreting the Great American Songbook – most notably on Songs of Sinatra, and his most recent Concord Records release, It’s Magic: The Songs of Sammy Cahn. On his 11th album, That Lovin’ Feeling, he celebrates what he calls “the Great American Songbook 2; the next generation of the Songbook,” recording seminal rock era classics penned by legendary songwriters (many renowned for hits penned at New York’s famed Brill Building) who are also cherished longtime friends. Cost: $480 per pod; maximum six people per pod.

Many familiar Plaza events are also returning, including Movie Nights: Mary Poppins (November 20), Sister Act (November 21), Elf (December 18) and Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer and Frosty the Snowman (December 19). Check in is at 5:30 p.m. with 6:30 p.m. movie start times. Cost: $30 per pod; maximum six people per pod.

In addition, there will be Wellness Classes (November 18, December 2, 9 and 16) for $10 per person and the annual “Holidays Around the World” (December 5 and 6) at a cost of $15 per pod; maximum six people per pod.

“We are thrilled to be able to welcome people back to the Center, safely distanced and protected with our new protocols, for cultural celebrations by many of our audience-favorite artists and special events on the Argyros Plaza,” said Center President Casey Reitz. “Each honors one of the great art forms that we have all shared here: Broadway, jazz, cabaret, motion pictures and the diversity of cultural traditions. And this is just a start.”

For more information, go to www.SCFTA.org or call 714.556.2787 (Open Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.).

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


Protocols being implemented at JWA for safe holiday travels

Holiday travel may look different this year, and airports across the country are implementing safe travel measures for what is traditionally one of the busiest travel seasons. Passengers utilizing John Wayne Airport (JWA) during the Thanksgiving holiday (November 20 through November 30) can expect to experience a number of measures designed to keep airport guests safe.

Protocols Connector Bridge Terminals A and B

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Courtesy of John Wayne Airport

Connector bridge between Terminals A and B at John Wayne Airport

–To help prevent the spread of COVID-19, everyone needs to wear face coverings inside any indoor public space as required by the CDPH.

–Airlines servicing JWA have established procedures to enhance the health and safety of passengers. Passengers can visit www.ocair.com/flightinformation/airlines to find out the specifics for boarding their particular aircraft. 

–Passengers are encouraged to arrive 90 minutes to two hours prior to scheduled departure times for domestic flights and three hours for international flights to find parking, allow for luggage check and to go through security screening.

–TSA is allowing one liquid hand sanitizer up to 12 ounces per passenger in carry-on bags until further notice

–Prospective passengers may enroll in TSA’s pre-check at www.tsa.gov/precheck to expedite screening and reduce touch points.

–There are specific rules and exceptions for passengers traveling with infant care items. Visit TSA Tips for Traveling with Children for more information.

For additional travel tips and information about John Wayne Airport, visit www.ocair.com.


Holiday food drive to benefit those in need

The Back Bay/Monte Vista PTSA (BBMV PTSA) is organizing a holiday food drive on Saturday, Dec. 5 from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. to benefit those in need in our community.

The food drive will take place as a drive-through event whereby volunteers will be wearing masks and gloves. Donors can come to the Back Bay/Monte Vista High School parking lot and pop open their car trunks filled with their donations to minimize community contact. 

Needed items:

–Peanut butter and jelly

–Boxed pasta and pastas sauces

–Macaroni and cheese

–Cans of chicken, tuna fish and beef

–Cans of fruits and vegetables

–Boxed cereal or oatmeal

–Bags of rice or beans

–Ramen soup

–Snacks to include pretzels, cheese fish crackers and popcorn

–Gift cards to Stater Bros., 99 Cents Only Store, Ralphs and Walmart ($10-$20)

Please, no glass jars and where possible, bring items in cans or plastic containers. No expired food. Your donations can fill shopping bags or boxes.

Back Bay/Monte Vista High School is located at 390 Monte Vista Ave., Costa Mesa.

For additional information, contact Cynthia Strasmann, BBMV PTSA president, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 949.351.7192.


COVID-19: 1,422 new cases reported in OC, 13 new cases in Newport Beach

Orange County experienced a spike of 1,422 cases of COVID-19 yesterday (November 23), including 13 newly reported cases in Newport Beach. OC Health Care Agency reports that there have been 71,116 cumulative cases of COVID-19 in OC.

Sadly, the county reports that 1,554 people have died due to COVID-19 in OC. There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 1,407 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date. This represents a per capita rate of 16.139 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 25 percent of ICU beds and 66 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 428 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 105 are in ICU.

The county estimates 58,102 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 23, as reported by the county; click here to visit page that is updated daily


Celebrate the winter season at Newport Dunes

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort is presenting the 30th Annual Lighting of the Bay beginning at dusk on Friday, Nov. 27 and continuing through January 1, 2021. The bay is illuminated every evening at dusk and the event is free.

New this year, guests will have the opportunity to celebrate responsibly while dining fireside or hosting private holiday drive-in movies and events with the stunning backdrop of the bay adorned with festive floating lights. 

Celebrate Lighting of the Bay

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Photos courtesy of Newport Dunes

The 30th Annual Lighting of the Bay illuminates Upper Newport Harbor from November 27 through January 1, 2021

Schedule of Newport Dunes Holiday Happenings:

Christmas Tree Lot is now open and continues through December 21: As one of Southern California’s premier locations to pick top-of-the-line pines, Newport Dunes receives its trees from Salem, Ore. in five to six farm-to-lot deliveries before Christmas. The highest quality, fragrant trees are handpicked and delivered within 16 hours of being cut, given a second cut upon arrival and immediately placed in stands with fresh water. Choose from Noble, Nordman, Grand and Douglas firs. Christmas Tree Lot customers receive complimentary parking. Seek out your perfect evergreen and stay to view the Lighting of the Bay. In addition, you will find fresh wreaths, garlands and accessories including ornaments, hats, cards, lights and more. Open 10 a.m.-9 p.m. daily until trees are sold out. Prices vary. For more information, visit www.newportdunes.com/christmas-tree-lot/.

Celebrate Christmas Tree Lot firs

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Choose from a variety of fresh and fragrant firs at the Christmas Tree Lot

30th Annual Lighting of the Bay from November 27 - January 1, 2021:

Upper Newport Bay is illuminated every night at dusk. The event is free of charge and open to public viewing. Parking rates apply. On-site parking starts at $10 per car. Limited street parking is available.

Fireside Dining on December 4 and 5, December 11 and 12, and December 18 and 19. Two seatings: 5-7 p.m. and 7:30-9:30 p.m. Get cozy with the family or loved ones at a private fire pit. Enjoy food from Moe B’s Munchies that will be served to the firepit, and roast marshmallows for s’mores. Sip on seasonal beverages and be immersed in the holiday spirit as you take in the picturesque bay aglow with more than 40 electric Christmas trees and holiday decorations lighting up the bay. Firepits serve two to six people and include firewood and Adirondack chairs. Prices start at $26 for two. For more information and to view dinner package options, go here. A limited number of packages are available.

Private Holiday Drive-in Events: For those looking for a way to responsibly gather this holiday season, Newport Dunes helps guests reimagine their personal or corporate holiday parties as physically distant drive-in celebrations. Complete with a large screen, a stage, a sound system which broadcasts through FM radios, and even food and beverage concessions, Newport Dunes’ helpful staff handles all set-up needs and day-of organization. To inquire about your private event, call the Newport Dunes Sales Office at 949.729.3800.

Book a Stay: To get the full Lighting of the Bay experience, book a stay at the resort to view the enchanting display just steps from your accommodations. Rent a cozy, single-family, one-bedroom Beach Cottage, or reserve an RV campsite. For those who don’t own an RV or would like to try camping, Newport Dunes works with local RV rental companies that will deliver a sanitized luxury RV to your campsite set up and ready to enjoy.

Newport Dunes continues to monitor local, state and CDC guidelines. Guests are required to practice physical distancing and wear face coverings when they are unable to keep a six-foot distance from other guests.

For more information, visit www.NewportDunes.com, or call 949.729.3863.

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort is located at 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach.


City offers up info for safe operation of portable gas-fired heaters

As businesses are forced to move operations outside, the increased use of portable gas-fired heaters comes into play. The City of Newport Beach is offering information to help local businesses operate portable gas-fired heaters safely and effectively.

The following, which has been prepared by the Orange County Fire Authority, is information based on the California Fire Code (CFC) and the California Code of Regulations (CCR) and should help to answer most questions concerning the use of portable gas-fired heaters. 

–All portable heaters used by a business must be UL listed for commercial use. Guards and tip-over protections are required. 

–Portable gas-fired heaters may only be used outside in well-ventilated areas. See manufacturer’s specifications for distance from umbrellas.

–The following are prohibited outside locations: inside of tents, canopies and other membrane structures; within 5 feet of buildings; within 5 feet of combustibles; within 5 feet of exits; or on exterior balconies. 

–All propane tanks must only be stored outside, with the following separations: 5 feet from a building with two means of egress; 10 feet from a building with one means of egress; and 10 feet from combustible materials.

 –A maximum of seven 20 lb. tanks are permitted at any single business, including empty tanks. 

Businesses are encouraged to contact the Newport Beach Fire Department’s Fire Prevention Division at 949.644.3106 for assistance.


Giving thanks...from A to Z

By AMY SENK

For about a decade or so, I’ve written columns on Thanksgiving about things and people I’m grateful for, using a simple A to Z format that causes me to stop and think. It’s a cathartic exercise I should do more than once a year. And this year, I’ll be honest – it’s been a challenge. I was nearly finished when the county reverted back to a more restrictive COVID level, making me reevaluate some of my more precious entries. But the fact is, I have a lot more to celebrate in my life than to cry about. Trying times sometimes make you see that more than ever. So, without further comment, here is my list for Thanksgiving 2020.

A. Amazing sunsets. They never get old, they never get ugly, they never cause panic or anxiety. They are a daily reminder of how lucky we are to live here. 

B. Bob Garrett, my State Farm insurance agent. We had a flood from a water main break, and he was on scene, making calls and helping us within minutes.

C. Corona del Mar’s Fire Station. Crews from Newport Engine 65 and 63 pumped water from our house after the abovementioned flood. Thank you, Dan Chapman, Tommy Van Andel, Brandon Kent, Rick Lazar, Adam Davenport, Jeff Terzo and Javier Gonzalez. Your efforts, kindness and compassion were stupendous. 

Giving Thanks CdM fire

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Photos by Joy Brenner

The crew from the Corona del Mar Fire Station (L-R) Adam Davenport, Jeff Terzo, Tommy Van Andel, Rick Lazar and Dan Chapman

D. Desi Engle, the Lakers’ No. 1 fan who can be seen making coffees at Bruegger’s Bagels when she’s not rolling around in her human-size bubble and making international headlines. Her passion and positivity are a balm for these crazy times. 

E. End of election season. There are lingering issues, to be sure, but most of the signs and uncivil behavior are behind us at long last. 

F. Farmers’ market. This summer, we rediscovered the Corona del Mar farmers’ market while trying to limit grocery store visits. Thank you, vendors and farmers, for all the fresh produce and smoked salmon spread. 

G. Grocery workers. When we stayed inside, except for food, grocery store workers went every day to make sure we had access to basics. Everyone thanks doctors and nurses and scientists, but the people who made sure we could safely get supplies – sometimes scarce ones like flour, yeast or toilet paper – they deserve gratitude.

H. Jeff Herdman. Jeff has been a friend since before he was elected to the Newport Beach City Council, and although he will be leaving after a really ugly election, I am thankful for his service, the times he showed up to events like the Corona del Mar Residents Association meetings and CdM High School ribbon-cutting ceremonies. I applaud his hard work and devotion to this city.

I. Independent local journalism. I am so grateful to be a part of Stu News, just like I was proud to publish Corona del Mar Today many years ago. Having a news source that is both independent and locally produced is incredibly valuable to all of us, especially with all the noise and dubious news sources out there in the world. Thank you, Tom, Lana and Shaena, for all of it.

J. Jon Langford, president of the Friends of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter. Volunteers helping animals – who doesn’t appreciate that?

K. Kim Cohen, who was behind the effort to organize a Corona del Mar High School Class of 2020 drive-by ceremony around Fashion Island in June. With no prom, in-person ceremony, or grad night, it was a highlight for our senior class who was missing out on so much.

L. Linda Leonhard, president of the Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce. She works tirelessly to make the CdM village a more fun and beautiful place, and this year, she’s had to often run in circles and cancel beloved events because of COVID. Nonetheless, she came up with a plan to provide assistance (including masks) to businesses, and when a local resident came up with the idea of creating signs to offer support of the Newport Beach Police Department, Linda helped organize their distribution. Thank you, Linda, for all you do. 

M. Masks. I appreciate masks, especially cute and comfy ones, and I appreciate those who wear them in public. 

N. Norm Ellis, a longtime CdM resident, who I got to know through the CdMRA. He walks for miles every day in the wee hours, often calling police when he sees suspicious activities. I love talking to him – he’s the kind of person who makes life here interesting.

O. Onyx Avenue. Balboa Island/Onyx Avenue is my new temporary home, and I love it here. If your house gets flooded and you have nowhere to go, landing on the island this time of year is definitely something to be grateful for. 

P. Pattersons. Mark and Josette Patterson, who own the eponymous jewelry store on East Coast Highway, are amazing designers and artists. They give back to the community, have published a book on their fantastic creations and are friends as well as leaders in the CdM business world. 

Q. Quarantine. I know, I know – we all hated the quarantine last spring and summer. But in August, when I moved both my children to new homes in college towns thousands of miles away, I realized how meaningful it was to have had that close, connected family time for a short and incredible window before it all went away. 

R. Road trips. I have had three road trips this year, including one where I drove solo from Ohio to California back in March. Traveling during COVID is not fun or easy, but I was grateful to see some of the world outside my own home, and to the people I met along the way. 

S. Sejuiced proprietor Kelly Meeker, for her colorful and healthy juices and bowls that fuel my family.

T. Teachers. They shifted to online learning, they shifted to hybrid models. I’m grateful to the teachers who kept their students’ education a priority in spite of all the chaos.

U. Unconditional love and support. We’ve been bouncing from hotels to rentals while trying to figure out what is happening with our flooded house, and during that time, friends have made us dinners and sent well wishes and have just been there for us. Tressa, Nora, Jill, Kim and Ben, Karla, Carrie, Cynthia and John – all of you I haven’t named here – thank you, thank you.

V. Vaccines. Positive news about COVID vaccines coming our way – I am very thankful.

W. Weekly menu planning. When you are limiting grocery trips or deliveries, being organized is key. We began weekly menu planning that we’ve kept up, even as things loosened up this fall. It saves trips to the store, saves money and helps keep things (sort of) healthy and efficient. 

X. (Space) X. We love space and astronauts but seeing successful launches and landings during COVID was a highlight.

Y. Ron Yeo. He’s a CdM architect and artist who had a show this summer at Sherman Library & Gardens, a show of sculptures he created from discarded items and trash he found at the beach or on walks through town. He’s clever and involved and one of the best people I know in town, and I’m thankful to count him as a friend. 

Z. Zoom, for keeping us going with HOA and CdM meetings, and with virtual social get-togethers. I’m thankful especially for all the Zoom cocktail hours with Danny and Lorna.

Giving Thanks Amy and Chief

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Amy Senk with CdM Fire Battalion Chief Nick Stocks

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Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 20+ years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association. She and her husband have two children attending college at the University of Missouri and Duke University.


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach

Newport Beach A Look Back 11.24.20

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Aerial photograph of Bayside Drive and Balboa Island, 1948

Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are currently closed to the public. Purchases can be made online. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Newport views and blues

Newport views and blues

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

Setting our sights on boats and beautiful shades of blue


Wave show

Wave show

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Photo by Todd Walker (Instagram @twalkerphotograph)

Front row seats to the wave show in Newport Beach


SCAPE gallery extends Dawn Chorus exhibition

SCAPE gallery in Corona del Mar is extending its exhibition Dawn Chorus through December 15. On display are works by Lawrence Fodor and Marietta Patricia Leis.

SCAPE gallery Fodor's Koan Box

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Photos courtesy of SCAPE gallery

Lawrence Fodor’s “Kôan Box,” Red/Alizarin/Paynes Grey oil, alkyd resin, wax and 23 kt. gold on a wood cigar box with embedded items, 10.5’ x 8.25”

Fodor, born in Los Angeles, studied at Orange Coast College and Otis Art Institute. He has traveled the world extensively, drawing, painting and researching art history in museums on four continents, and believes strongly in the intellectual, intuitive and emotional power of mark-making. He approaches drawing and painting as a language – a vernacular he is consistently expanding and one through which he believes he communicates best. His studio practice includes painting with oil paint and watercolor on canvas, wood panels, cigar boxes and paper juxtaposing figurative, landscape and abstract idioms and is best described as resonant gestural abstraction. In addition to painting and drawing, he also has a lifelong interest in photography, which he pursues with equal commitment. His work is included in the permanent collections of the New Mexico Museum of Art, New Mexico History Museum and the Modern Museum of Art, Fort Worth, Texas, among others. He currently lives and works in Los Angeles and Santa Fe.

SCAPE gallery Leis Seed Series

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Marietta Patricia Leis’ “Seed Series” Installation

Leis, born in East Orange, N.J., received her BA and MA from Antioch College, and her MA/MFA from the University of New Mexico. She is a visual artist from Albuquerque (where she lives and works), by route of New York City and Los Angeles. She works in several media including painting, photography, sculpture and video. Her art is concerned with the preservation of our planet; regardless of medium, it resonates with the beauty of our natural environment. “Color of place” is an element that she enlists to create a visceral recording of her travels. As travel informs her work, she has been awarded numerous artist residencies nationally and internationally including Connamara Conservancy, Dallas; Weir Farm Trust, Conn.; Schneider Museum/Crater Lake, Ore.; Gullkistan Center for Creativity, Iceland; Ionian Center for Arts and Culture, Greece; Fundacion Valpariso, Mojacar, Spain; and Cawdor Estate, Cawdor, Scotland. Her work can be found in many public collections including Museo Italo Americano, San Francisco; Albuquerque Art Museum, N.M.; Harwood Museum, Taos, N.M.; the Holtze Hotel, Denver; Ross Laboratories, Columbus, Ohio; and the State Capitol Building, Santa Fe, N.M. 

For more information, visit www.scapesite.com.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Despite these trying times, it’s still a time to be thankful

Fair Game Tom Johnson newIt’s Thanksgiving. Did you know that in 1621, the Pilgrims celebrated in Plymouth by offering up a feast, with their thanksgiving, for a recently attained good harvest. They shared in that celebration with nearby Native Americans who had helped them get through the previous winter, when they gave the Pilgrims food while they were suffering through their own scarcity.

Nearly 400 years later it’s a message that should ring true to all as many of those around us suffer through the struggles caused by the pandemic.

These struggles include health worries and challenges, loss of jobs, businesses closing, economic hardship, the inability to see loved ones and more. Most of us didn’t expect these challenges a year ago.

This year, through all of the holiday season, we should remember that Pilgrim message to the Native Americans and show thanksgiving. 

Unfortunately, too much of life today involves strife. We need to get back to those days where we cared about our neighbor, a time when you needed milk, you simply walked across the street and asked; when someone offered up an opinion different than yours, you calmly disagreed, shook hands and carried on with life; when you went on vacation, neighbors watched your house, picked up your mail and their kid watered your yard.

I miss those times.

So, why not this holiday season give thanks for what you “have” and remember those around you that aren’t as fortunate. And, if you’re in a position to help, do it. 

It’ll just make our world a better place to live.

• • •

And, as long as we’re on the subject of Thanksgiving in 1621, did you know what that meal was like? 

Historians figure the feast probably included a meat, most likely venison and some type of waterfowl.

The waterfowl was probably goose, duck, or swan, but it could’ve even included a wild turkey or passenger pigeon, which were all probably served with chunks of onions and herbs.

Then, of course, they had bread, but made out of corn, not wheat. Add in some nuts, probably chestnuts, walnuts, or beechnuts. Vegetables of that time probably included corn, beans, turnips, carrots, onions, pumpkins and squashes.

Another meal component of that time was seafood, something that has obviously fallen by the wayside over the years in favor of turkey. Popular choices of seafood would’ve been any smoked fish, eel, lobster, oysters, clams and mussels.

All sounds delicious. Whatever you’re serving, I hope that in these strange days of COVID that you’re still able to enjoy family, loved ones and a bountiful of blessings. 

The promise of better days ahead is something for all of us to look forward to.

Happy Thanksgiving.

• • •

Governor Gavin Newsom has begun curfews and modified stay-at-home orders. But the question is, who enforces these orders?

Well, according to Orange County Sheriff Don Barnes, “Let me be clear – this is a matter of personal responsibility and not a matter of law enforcement. Orange County Sheriff’s deputies will not be dispatched to, or respond to, calls for service to enforce compliance with face coverings, social gatherings, or stay-at-home orders. Deputies will respond to calls for potential criminal behavior and for the protection of life or property.”

There you go…it’s not him.

• • •

If you’re a small business struggling financially against today’s COVID-19 challenges, this loan program might be for you.

“On November 20, Governor Newsom announced the creation of the California Rebuilding Fund, a loan program to support California’s small businesses. To be eligible, a business must have 50 or less full-time equivalent employees and gross revenues of less than $2.5 million in 2019.”

You can check out the Fund’s website for eligibility details. 

The program offers loans of up to $100,000 with a fixed rate of 4.25 percent. Interested small business owners can apply at www.CALoanFund.org.

• • •

A note with “heartfelt thanks” was sent out last week from Nancy Scarbrough following her unsuccessful quest for the Newport Beach City Council District 2 seat. 

First off, Nancy acknowledged the decision by Newport Beach voters in choosing to retain Brad Avery.

That being said, I was very excited about what she mentioned next, “I will continue my involvement and activism for the next four years and I plan to run in the 2024 election in District 2. As a citizen activist, I will continue to advocate for the residents and small businesses of Newport Beach just as I have for the past several years.”

Keep an eye on Scarbrough. She ran a strong, clean campaign and seems to have the “creds” to be what Newport Beach needs from their future elected officials.

Her website to contact, connect, or donate is https://nancyfornewport.com.

• • •

Finally, Simon & Garfunkel, 1966, The 59th Street Bridge Song: “Slow down, you move too fast – You got to make the morning last – Just kicking down the cobblestones – Looking for fun and feeling groovy – Ba da-da da-da da-da, feeling groovy.”

That leads me into a request and reminder by the Newport Beach Police Department. November 16th through the 29th is the Statewide Speeding Campaign encouraging everyone to just “slow the fast down.”

“We are seeing changes in driving behavior, and the number of people traveling at excessive and extremely dangerous speeds is alarming,” said, Newport Beach Police Lieutenant Damon Psaros. “COVID-19 puts the value of protecting lives in perspective, and practicing safe driving is one simple way everyone can keep themselves and others safe.”

So, just do what you need to do.


Hoag receives additional $7.5 million gift from Argyroses to expand renowned nursing services

Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian yesterday announced another $7.5 million gift from philanthropists Julia and George Argyros that will further enhance Hoag’s nationally renowned nursing services. The transformative contribution from the Argyros family extends an already remarkable legacy of giving that spans nearly four decades and has played an important role in growing Hoag’s reputation as one of America’s leading health care providers.

“For many years, I have watched with great admiration as Hoag has used its resources to thoughtfully develop what is without question one of the nation’s finest nursing services,” said Julia Argyros. “Hoag’s nurses are incredibly talented, dedicated and compassionate.” 

Since the 1980s, Julia and her husband, Ambassador George Argyros, have given tens of millions of dollars to Hoag to advance care in numerous areas, including cancer, diabetes, nursing, and heart and vascular. This latest gift by the Argyros family builds upon ongoing generous philanthropy directed to Hoag’s nursing, which now totals a remarkable $15 million. In recognition of the family’s long history of leadership giving, including a prior gift of $7.5 million in 2016, Hoag that year established the Julia Argyros Center for Nursing Excellence.

Hoag receives Julia Argyros

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Submitted photo

Philanthropist Julia Argyros for whom Hoag’s Julia Argyros Center for Nursing Excellence is named

“As a direct result of Julia Argyros’ extraordinary generosity and kindness, her name has become synonymous with Hoag’s commitment to nursing excellence,” said Flynn A. Andrizzi, Ph.D., president of the Hoag Hospital Foundation. “The enormity of the impact of her gifts is incalculable. It is safe to say that every nurse scholar at Hoag, and every patient and family member whose lives they touch, has good reason to be grateful to her. All of us at Hoag certainly are.”

Dr. Andrizzi noted that Julia’s gifts have provided scholarships to more than 1,300 Hoag nurses, enabling them to pursue advanced education. As a result, 83.2 percent of Hoag nurses have received their Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degrees, and many have gone on to receive advanced degrees, including their Master of Science in Nursing. Due in large part to this focus on continued education, Hoag’s nursing services was once again redesignated for the prestigious Magnet recognition in 2020. Awarded by the American Nurses Credentialing Center, the designation is the highest honor an organization can receive for professional nursing practice. Only 8 percent of U.S. hospitals achieve Magnet recognition, and only 3 percent have achieved the distinction four times in a row.

According to Rick Martin, Ed.D., MSN, RN, Hoag’s senior vice president of clinical operations and chief nursing officer, “Mrs. Argyros’ amazing gift will allow us to build upon the momentum of her earlier gifts, propelling our nursing services beyond our current capabilities while significantly broadening the reach of the Julia Argyros Center for Nursing Excellence.” Describing the gift as a “watershed,” Dr. Martin added that it will help “drive Hoag beyond generalized nursing to a comprehensive corps of nurse specialists, laying the groundwork for the next transformation of nursing at Hoag.”

Dr. Martin said Julia’s gift will “elevate Hoag’s care by exponentially expanding advanced nursing education. The gift will be used to strengthen Hoag’s ability to further increase its BSN rate and master’s level learning opportunities.”


City Manager’s Updates

From the desk of Grace Leung

Grace Leung

Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung

Community members, 

After a few months of relative stability, COVID-19 cases have surged throughout California. 

In response, Governor Newsom took a series of steps last week to tighten restrictions: 

The first was an emergency action announced Monday, Nov. 16 that places 28 counties, including Orange County, into the most restrictive (purple) tier of the Blueprint for a Safer Economy. The directive went into effect Tuesday, Nov. 17.

The purple tier status reduces indoor retail capacities and prohibits indoor dining and fitness centers. For more information on the activities and industries permitted in this and other tiers, visit https://covid19.ca.gov/safer-economy/

In a second action, Newsom on Thursday, Nov. 19 announced a limited stay-at-home order that prohibits non-essential business and gatherings between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. from November 21 through December 21. Click here to read the order. 

In addition to the statewide increase, Orange County has also seen an increase in its average daily case numbers, which are now at 10.8 cases per 100,000 residents. The County’s test positivity rate has climbed to 4.6 percent, as only the health equity metric remained stable, at 5.5 percent. 

As Orange County returns to the purple tier, all essential services in the City of Newport Beach will continue uninterrupted, as they have throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. We will continue to emphasize education when it comes to maintaining the critical behaviors necessary to effectively combat the virus during these upcoming winter months. 

The health of our community is our top priority. We ask everyone to stay vigilant, continue to wear face coverings and wash hands frequently, and limit contact with those outside your household during the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday. 

COVID-19 Cases in Newport Beach 

As of November 19, the total number of COVID-19 cases in Newport Beach was 1,367 and the total cases in Orange County was 67,167. The number of recovered COVID-19 patients countywide as of November 19 was 57,326. These figures are provided to Orange County by the California Department of Public Health. 

CDD Third Quarter Report (July – September 2020) 

The Community Development Department (CDD) Third Quarter Activity Report is now available at www.newportbeachca.gov/cdd. The report compiles operational statistics to illustrate the volume of business activity that the department handles on a quarterly basis. In this past quarter, CDD continued to face operational challenges due to the COVID-19 crisis. In spite of this, CDD has maintained service levels that meet the high demand of the development community. 

Homelessness Update 

Addressing homelessness continues to be a priority in the City’s ongoing COVID-19 response, working closely with contractor City Net and regional partners throughout the county and state. The City Net hotline number is 714.451.6198. Those who call the hotline may leave a detailed voicemail message for themselves or others in need and City Net staff will respond within 48 hours. For immediate assistance call the County’s Crisis Prevention Hotline at 877.7.CRISIS or 877.727.4747. 

Success Stories 

–The Homeless Liaison Officer, the Homeless Coordinator and the City Net team assisted a young couple staying by the Newport Pier who lost their jobs due to COVID-19. The man now works for a yachting company in Newport Beach and the woman started a retail job. Both were hired for second jobs to boost their income. The Homeless Liaison Officer helped to shelter them in a motel to facilitate their employment. The couple moved into their new apartment this week. City Net is assisting with providing housing navigation resources and ongoing counseling services. 

–A mother and son living in their car were enrolled into City Net services. Staff secured a motel room for the pair and continue to provide housing navigation resources to locate permanent housing. 

–Two people in Newport Beach who are living in their cars were enrolled into City Net services. City Net staff completed Vulnerability Index Intake Assessments for each. The assessments are used to screen clients to determine proper placement in the County’s Continuum of Care system. Some assessment factors include age, health issues and length of time being unsheltered. 

–A man staying near Channel Place Park was enrolled into City Net services and is awaiting a referral to a shelter. He plans to enter a sobriety counseling program. 

–City Net staff continues to provide support and case management to several people sheltering in motels while they await placement into permanent, supportive housing. 

Treasury Report 

The September 2020 Treasury Report is available on the City’s website at: www.newportbeachca.gov/treasury.

 As of September, the City’s portfolio totaled just over $279 million. Approximately $66 million of the portfolio was invested in very liquid investments available for day-to-day operations and major construction expenditures. 

The short-term portfolio ($210 million) had a weighted average effective maturity of 1.82 years. The trailing twelve months’ total return was 3.82 percent. Our benchmark for the same period, the ICE B of A 1-3 Year Treasury index, returned 3.58 percent. The income return on the portfolio, a better measure of income earned from the portfolio, was 2.18 percent.

Santa Ana River 

Friday, November 20 will end the lower Santa Ana River flood control project that started in late September. 

This project is a joint effort between the County of Orange, Newport Beach Public Works Department and the Fire Department’s Lifeguard Division. The purpose is flood control for the lower Santa Ana River. The secondary benefit is adding more high-quality sand to nourish the mid jetties and provide protection from erosion. The lifeguards will continue to monitor the deposit areas through the end of the year, to satisfy Coastal Commission guidelines. 

Newport Beach – 30 Years as Tree City USA

Newport Beach has been recognized as a Tree City USA for its 30th consecutive year by the Arbor Day Foundation, a nonprofit conservation and education organization. The Tree City USA program provides communities the nationwide framework necessary to manage and expand their urban forest. To achieve the status of Tree City USA, the City must continue to meet the core standards: Tree Committee, Tree Ordinance, Budget for Trees related to Population and Observation of Arbor Day. In addition to meeting Arbor Day criteria, the City has gone above and beyond in its tree program by increasing the frequency of trimming in its contract with Great Scott Tree Services, expanding its tree planting efforts, providing added public outreach and creating tree-related volunteer opportunities. 

A recent review of our tree maintenance data shows the following. Street tree pruning has increased over 36 percent from 17,525 in 2015 to 23,919 in 2019, which is over 60 percent of the City’s tree inventory. City trees are on a grid schedule for pruning, where the majority of city trees are on a 2-year cycle, and some trees require annual pruning. Palms, Corals, Ficus and many of the Eucalyptus trees are on an annual pruning schedule in order to increase safety. In contrast, Pines are trimmed during the cooler months to decrease the amount of sap that drips from the cuts. 

Proper pruning allows for trees to grow new, strong limbs, which increases safety during wind storms. Pruning involves the removal of dead wood; or crossed, split or storm damaged limbs from the trees to allow the crown of the tree to open and reducing the number of competing limbs. 

In addition to pruning, staff continues to inspect City trees for pests and diseases, and coordinates the removal of trees when necessary, as well as finding locations suitable for new tree plantings. The good news is that street tree plantings have outpaced removals over the past two years. In 2019, we planted 556 trees, and removed 482 trees. So far in 2020, we have planted 215 trees, and removed 164 trees. As a result of our maintenance and outreach efforts, the City tree inventory has grown from 33,736 in 2014 to 34,277 this year. We continue to engage the community to take part in our efforts to care for and grow our urban forest. With the community’s help, we can look forward to a flourishing urban forest. 

Storm Season Preparations 

Public Works staff are once again prepared to hand out filled sandbags on Fridays from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. for Newport Beach residents. Filled and unfilled sandbags are available for pick up at the Corporation Yard on Fridays, 7 a.m. to 2 p.m., from now until April. Additionally, sandbags will also be available to Newport Beach residents between 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the day before and the day of a storm event. Sandbags are limited to 10 per resident, with proof of Newport Beach residency only. 

Insider’s Guide for the Newport Beach City Council Meeting on November 24, 2020 

Our next City Council meeting is today, Tuesday, Nov. 24. Items that may be of interest are highlighted below. The entire agenda, and all reports, can be viewed here

Study Session: 

The Council will hold a study session at 4 p.m. on the City’s residential refuse and recycling collection. Staff will provide an update on current and pending State mandates, along with potential operational changes to the commercial and residential refuse collection. 

The Regular Meeting begins at 6 p.m. and the following are items of note:

On the Consent Calendar is: 

–Petition certification and next steps for formation of Underground Utility Assessment District No.120. At least 60 percent of residents within a 2-block area of Santa Ana Avenue have signed a petition to underground utilities. Next steps will be for the City to advance funds to prepare an Engineer’s Report and to circulate ballots for a property owner vote on the assessment. 

–An update on the City’s FY 2020-21 Community Programs Grants and Special Events Grants. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, an update is provided on which events and community programs have taken place and received grant funds thus far. Additionally, as requested by City Council, the Newport to Ensenada Yacht Race (NOSA) and Orange County Coastkeeper organizations have provided additional information on their event/program in support of their requests. Staff’s recommendation is to award $10,000 to NOSA and $6,000 to OC Coastkeeper. 

Public Hearings and Current Business include: 

–Proposed amendments to Residential Design Standards will be considered by City Council. Generally, the proposed amendments would reduce bulk and mass associated with future residential development by clarifying the definition of gross floor area, regulating third floor decks and expanding application of third floor and open volume standards to all single-unit and two-unit residential developments. 

–A partnership agreement with the City of Costa Mesa for the funding, development and shared use of a temporary homeless shelter facility now under construction in Costa Mesa and expected to be operational in March 2021. Under the agreement, Newport Beach would provide a one-time payment of $1.6 million for construction costs and furnishings, and $1 million a year in operating costs, with exclusive access to 20 beds of the total 70 beds at the shelter. The Costa Mesa City Council approved the agreement November 17. 

–Financial reports for the fiscal year-end 2019-20 and first quarter of fiscal year 2020-21. The City’s General Fund revenues ended the fiscal year 2019-20 better than estimated at $229.8 million, $10.9 million higher than the projected budget, and expenditures were $211.1 million, $3.9 million lower than the projected budget. First quarter FY 2020-21 results indicate positive data to date. With these positive results, the Council will consider staff recommendations to make an additional $5 million discretionary payment to CalPERS to aggressively pay down our unfunded liability, replenish the fleet equipment reserve fund with $500,000, and move $2.3 million to fully fund the General Fund contingency reserve at 25 percent of operations. With the continued unknowns regarding the fiscal impact of the global pandemic, staff is continuing to closely monitor revenues and expenditures. 

–Consideration of contract extension options as staff negotiates with CR&R, the City’s refuse collection service provider, to make the necessary changes to comply with State law regarding recycling. 

Editor’s Note: The City Manager’s Updates was released on Friday, Nov. 20.


COVID-19: 552 new cases and 3 new deaths reported in OC, 6 new cases in Newport Beach

Sadly, OC Health Care Agency reports that 1,554 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including three new deaths reported today (November 22). There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 69,694 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 552 cases today. The county reports that “according to the California Department of Public Health, the State’s system is undergoing maintenance and this weekend’s case and test counts may appear lower as a result.”

The county reports that there have been 1,394 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of six cases today. This represents a per capita rate of 15.990 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 27 percent of ICU beds and 67 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 380 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 91 are in ICU.

The county estimates 57,833 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 22 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 22 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 22 20 3

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 22, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


COVID-19: 806 new cases and 11 new deaths reported in OC, 11 new cases in Newport Beach

Sadly, OC Health Care Agency reports that 1,551 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including 11 new deaths reported today (November 21). There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 69,142 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 806 cases today.

The county reports that there have been 1,388 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of 11 cases today. This represents a per capita rate of 15.921 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 30 percent of ICU beds and 66 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 365 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 88 are in ICU.

The county estimates 57,723 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 21 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 21 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 21 20 3

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 21, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


COVID-19: 1,169 new cases and 3 new deaths reported in OC, 10 new cases in Newport Beach

Sadly, OC Health Care Agency reports that 1,540 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including three new deaths reported today (November 20). There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 68,336 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 1,169 cases today.

The county reports that there have been 1,377 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of 10 cases today. This represents a per capita rate of 15.795 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 27 percent of ICU beds and 65 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 333 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 102 are in ICU.

The county estimates 57,556 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 20 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 20 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 20 20 3

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 20, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


SPOTLIGHTON

Are you doing your fair share?

Philanthropy is the lifeblood of nonprofits throughout our community and across the country. Kindness funds help to the homeless and downtrodden; children, who in many cases, would have to do without; medical and health support for so many who are out of other options; and so much more.

Our Spotlight on Philanthropy is designed to show you the inner workings of programs touching our community and, hopefully, encourage you to take a closer look.

Featured Charitable Organization:

Spotlight on Art & Creativity for Healing logo

What does Art & Creativity for Healing (ACFH) do?

Since 2000, the driving mission of ACFH has been to support emotional healing through art and creative expression for those living with pain, grief, fear or stress. ACFH was founded with a vision that the creative process and emotional healing often intersect when words are not adequate, and pain is too deep. 

ACFH assists children, women, men, families and military personnel suffering from the emotional impacts of abuse, illness, grief, fear or stress using their Art4Healing® method. 

Their workshops, designed for non-artists and artists alike, provide expression, encouragement, clarity and insight, and are held at their facility in Laguna Hills, and on-site at hospitals, treatment centers, schools, military facilities, family resource centers, shelters and other nonprofit centers. 

They serve all individuals, regardless of race, creed, sex, age, or emotional stability. 

How many adults/kids does ACFH impact annually?

ACFH provides programs and services for approximately 4,000 Orange, Los Angeles and San Diego county residents each year. 

Why give to ACFH?

From the very beginning, Art & Creativity for Healing has strived to offer their Art4Healing® workshops free of charge to 45+ community partner agencies. They have applied for grants to support these programs and also receive support from foundations and individual donations. Donations are crucial to keep their healing mission thriving and growing. 

Just one workshop or bedside visit can be a life-changing event:

“I healed my loss of a loved one with silence and becoming numb. After taking an Art4Healing® workshop, I feel that I have now healed with love, strength and understanding. I haven’t felt this full since I lost that person until now.”

Whether it is $20 for a Healing Art Box or $50 for a workshop space to any participant you wish to impact, any amount helps strengthen their mission to give pain a voice. 

Spotlight on Art & Creativity for Healing Art Box

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Photos courtesy of Art & Creativity for Healing

This child is delighted to open her Healing Art Box

How to give to ACFH?

Workshops to the 45+ partner agencies are provided free of charge to participants. These workshops include an Art4Healing® Certified Facilitator and art supplies with 10 items needed in order to complete three final paintings. 

The organization also fundraises for the Healing Art Box annual campaign in order to donate 1,500 boxes to the children of the deployed, children in long-term hospital care, children exposed to domestic violence and children whose families are experiencing financial hardship or homelessness. 

Throughout the year, ACFH also contributes to partner agencies and local nonprofits with smaller art bags/projects in order to continue to reach all of their demographics. 

Can I volunteer? 

Yes. ACFH hosts orientations for individuals in the Orange County area to come and learn more about their volunteer program. In the orientation, those who are interested will learn more about the organization and four different volunteer categories. The volunteer requirements include:

–Must attend Art & Creativity for Healing Volunteer Orientation.

–Must be at least 18 years of age.

–Commitment to volunteer at least once every six months.

For more information, visit www.art4healing.org/volunteer/.

What is the ACFH HeARTS for Healing Women’s Guild? 

A compassionate, energetic and creative group of women helping fulfill the mission of Art & Creativity for Healing is the HeARTs for Healing Women’s Guild. Their mission is to be Art for Healing Ambassadors, to support, advocate and fundraise for ACFH in the community. For more information, visit www.art4healing.org/volunteer/.

Spotlight on Art & Creativity for Healing young artist

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A blooming young artist painting his unique creation

What are your major fundraisers and when do they take place?

ACFH hosts an annual Healing Art Box campaign in order to give pain a voice to the underserved and underprivileged children in the community. 

A Healing Art Box is a shoebox filled with 10 brand new art supplies distributed into the hands of children of the deployed military at Camp Pendleton, children whose families are experiencing financial hardship or homelessness, children in long term hospital care and children exposed to domestic violence.

You can coordinate a group to help assemble boxes, help with a Healing Art Box Delivery and Distribution, or start a fundraising page as a leader at www.art4healing.org/artboxes

Names of the leadership group

Administrative Team

Laurie Zagon – Founder & Executive Director

Taylor Arias – Program Manager

Amy D’Urso – Program Coordinator

Board of Directors

Rose Aebig – Founder/Director of Ignite HR Partners

Lino Cambaliza – Partner at LT Cambaliza LLP

Dr. Carolyn Cherie – Psychologist, PsyD

Sherri Elgas – Community Advocate and Speaker

Don Goodwin – Executive Vice President of Goodwin Co.

Dipika Kaur – Counseling Psychologist 

Kyle Rooke – Senior Sales Executive at Robinson Pharma

Kathleen Strukoff – Vice President of AON

Tina Van Dam – Attorney

Laurie Zagon – Founder/Director of Art & Creativity for Healing

Art & Creativity for Healing, Inc.

23011 Moulton Parkway, Suite i-5

Laguna Hills, CA 92653

949.367.1902

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Spotlight on Philanthropy is underwritten by 

OneRoot Foundation Logo


Even Santa will be zooming this holiday season

This is a year like no other, and as such, even some of Christmas’ most prized traditions are subject to change. Case in point, visits with Santa Claus.

But don’t worry, Fashion Island is still planning to make this holiday season memorable by offering virtual visits with Jolly Old St. Nick.

Parents can delight the children and family with a safe, convenient and fun personal visit from Santa Claus. 

For $25, connect with Santa via a video call for a magical holiday experience. Parents pick a day and an hour that’s convenient to them. Then, their phone or tablet will get VIP access directly to the North Pole. Each visit will be personalized. Children will be able to share their holiday wishes directly with Santa.

No crowds, no lines and socially safe.

Schedule a magical virtual Santa visit now.

The program runs from Saturday, Nov. 21 through Christmas Eve day, Thursday, Dec. 24.


Pet of the WeekDog and Cat print

Stu News Newport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

Silly kitten Mary is amazing in every way. At only 16 weeks in age, you can tell that she’s going to have the best temperament as an adult. She’s fairly mellow already and outwardly shares her very soft, silly ways. She’d be a great addition to a family that has an established cat, or she’ll be absolutely endearing as your one and only. If you’ve been considering adding a friendly feline to your love-filled world, then Mary is an absolute must-meet.

Pet of the Week Mary

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Courtesy of Newport Beach Animal Shelter

Meet Mary

If you’d like to learn more about Mary or have any questions, feel free to contact the shelter at 949.718.3454 or email your interest to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Newport Beach Animal Shelter adoption fees:

–Adult Dogs - $150

–Puppies - $225

–Adult Cats - $90

–Kittens - $110

The shelter requires adoption applications as part of the adoption process; the easiest way to obtain the application is to head to the shelter’s website at www.FONBAS.org. There you will find the application plus more information about the shelter now and its goals for the future. 

Also, consider becoming a member of an incredible nonprofit that supports the city’s efforts with providing wonderful opportunities to stray, injured, ill and owner surrendered domestic pets.


Christmas comes to the Dunes as trees arrive on Sunday

It’s that time of year again and the Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort will get into the swing of things by opening its Christmas tree lot this Sunday, Nov. 22. 

The Dunes be closed on Thanksgiving Day, otherwise it will be open daily from 10 a.m.-9 p.m.

Christmas comes Santa

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Photos courtesy of Newport Dunes

Santa making a previous visit to the Newport Dunes’ Christmas tree lot 

The trees coming to the Dunes are from Salem, Oregon, and are hand-picked, cut and then delivered within 16 hours. That’s fresh.

Upon arrival to the Dunes lot, a second tree cut occurs and then the trees are immediately placed in stands with fresh water.

Christmas comes foliage

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Festive Christmas firs, fresh wreaths, poinsettias and garland

The Dunes will offer the following types of Christmas trees: Noble, Nordmann, Grand and Douglas. Additionally, fresh wreaths, garland and other accessories such as ornaments, hats, cards and lights will be available.

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort is located at 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach.


Newport Bay Conservancy offers online shopping for your holiday gifts

The Newport Bay Conservancy (NBC) is enthusiastic that so many people are finding solace in nature in and around the bay during these trying times. These past months have dragged on, but December is fast approaching, and the Conservancy wants Upper Newport Bay to continue to be part of our lives, particularly during the holiday season.

You can help the Conservancy by visiting its website to shop early for your holiday gifts. All items can be mailed directly to you from www.newportbay.org.

NBC UNB hat, books

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Photos courtesy of Newport Bay Conservancy

Upper Newport Bay items make the perfect holiday gifts, inspired by the outdoors

Check out the Conservancy’s online shop to order packages that include items that will make anyone a nature lover. Choose from themed books such as day hikes in Orange County and how to improve your survival skills to bugs, collecting insects and under the sea activities and creative play for kids. A variety of specific Upper Newport Bay gifts range from hats and beverage containers to guides on birds you’ll spot, local maps and tide tables.

NBC Under the Sea

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Nature books, activities and creative play instill a love of discovery in youngsters

The Conservancy is also offering small group kayak tours for family members and friends in your “safe circle.” The 50th anniversary book Saving Upper Newport Bay is now available on the site, too. 

If you would like to join the Conservancy, you can make a donation that would be gratefully appreciated.

For more information, visit www.newportbay.org.


Farm to Table: Our local food sceneFork

By LANA JOHNSON

Celebrate Thanksgiving safely together

It is the time of year to give thanks and embrace the joys of the holiday season with friends and family. For most of us, Thanksgiving is a favorite, because we get to eat so many wonderful foods that just somehow taste better all on the same plate. This year has made us rethink social gatherings. Many Newport Beach restaurants will prepare a memorable meal, adhering to safety precautions and/or with advance orders and take-home dinners available.

Here are offerings from some of our local restaurateurs.

Farm to Table Bayside turkey and sides

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Courtesy of Bayside Restaurant

Enjoy a dine-out or take-home dinner at Bayside Restaurant

Bayside Restaurant – Enjoy a special three-course prix fixe meal, featuring a choice of seasonal starters and a turkey dinner, complete with brioche vegetable herb stuffing, Yukon gold mashed potatoes and your choice of dessert. Seating starts at 12 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 26. A children’s menu and limited a la carte menu are available. Legendary OC pianist Ron Kobayashi will hit the keys beginning at 4:30 p.m.

If you are planning to spend Thanksgiving at home, a special Thanksgiving dinner with advanced orders must be reserved by Monday, Nov. 23. Costs: Three-course prix fixe meal for adults, $65/person; Three-course prix fixe meal for youngsters, $30/person. Menus: www.baysiderestaurant.com/menu. Reservation or take-home orders, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call 949.721.1222. 900 Bayside Drive, Newport Beach.

Farm to Table Balboa Bay tablescape

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Photos courtesy of Balboa Bay Resort

Balboa Bay Resort’s festive tablescape with Newport Harbor as the backdrop

Balboa Bay Resort – Offering an alfresco Thanksgiving dinner on the resort’s newly expanded Bayfront Lawn with seatings at 1 and 4 p.m. With ample space for social distancing and capacity for up to 60 guests, enjoy a multi-course family style feast with starters such as roasted pumpkin and honeynut squash bisque or fennel and apple salad, main courses including free range turkey with cranberry compote, giblet gravy and English pea, Chilean seabass or a 35-day dry-aged ribeye steak and sides such as mashed potatoes with giblet gravy, corn bread and brioche stuffing, sweet potato puree and Brussels sprouts. For dessert, indulge in a mini pecan tart with bourbon and caramel or classic pumpkin pie with candied pumpkin, brown butter, mascarpone and Valrhona chocolate. Full menu available on request. Costs: $98/per adult ($120 for ribeye steak selection).

Farm to Table Balboa Bay A+O

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Pouring your favorite libation from the roaming whiskey cart

To jumpstart the flavors of fall (and lasting well into 2021) is A&O Kitchen+Bar’s new Smoked Cocktail Concierge – a roaming whiskey cart available on Thursdays through Sundays from 5:30-9 p.m. All of the smoked cocktails are hand-crafted and made with mesquite, applewood, cherrywood and hickory BBQ wood chips. 1221 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach.

Farm to Table Bosscat.jpg Credit Bosscat

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Courtesy of Bosscat Kitchen & Libations/Instagram

Maple bourbon brined turkey is one of the entrée choices for your take-home meal from Bosscat Kitchen & Libations

Bosscat Kitchen & Libations – Choose between a juicy maple bourbon brined turkey or a brown sugar baked ham. Sides include caramelized garlic mashed potatoes, spicy mac and cheese, pecan crusted sweet potato, cornbread stuffing and green vegetables. For dessert, there’s apple cobbler or pumpkin pie for an additional $20. Order online a week ahead for pick-up on Wednesday, Nov. 25 and Thursday, Nov. 26. Visit www.bosscatkitchen-newport.com/thanksgiving2020. 4647 MacArthur Blvd., Newport Beach.

Farm to Table Cafe Gratitude pies

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Photos courtesy of Café Gratitude Newport

Pre-order your holiday pies from Café Gratitude

Café Gratitude Newport – Specials include cranberry roasted butternut squash and garnet yams, cauliflower mashed potatoes with garlic confit, truffled porcini gravy, maple miso Brussels sprouts, pear and pomegranate chutney, French lentil and butternut squash loaf, and persimmon and pomegranate salad. Try the raw and gluten-free pumpkin pie, chocolate coconut cream pie or baked apple pie to end your meal. Pre-order at www.cafegratitude.com/products.

Farm to Table Cafe Gratitude Cookbook

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Café Gratitude’s Executive Chef Seizan Dreux Ellis’s “Love is Served” cookbook is filled with plant-based recipes from Southern California

For those having plant-based relatives over for Thanksgiving, order Executive Chef Seizan Dreux Ellis’s Love is Served cookbook – perfect for healthy home cooking or a gift for loved ones. Visit www.cafegratitude.com/products/love-is-served. AA, 1617 Westcliff Drive, #112, Newport Beach.

Fable & Spirit – Allow Fable & Spirit to select the wines and cocktails to accompany your menu. Share your Thanksgiving menu and Sommelier Ali Coyle will recommend the perfect pairings. If you’re looking for a cocktail to begin or end your meal, Director of Spirits Drew Coyle is creating a special “fabled spirit” to celebrate Thanksgiving 2020. Orders can be placed by Tuesday, Nov. 24 for pick-up between 4 and 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 25. Fable & Spirit will be closed on Thanksgiving Day. Contactless curbside pick-up. Order by phone or via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. www.fableandspirit.com. 3441 Via Lido, Ste. A, Newport Beach.

Farm to Table Five Crowns turkey

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Photo by Anne Watson

Five Crowns offers oven roasted free range turkey and all the trimmings for your Thanksgiving feast

Five Crowns – Celebrate like royalty with a seasonal menu, warm hospitality and an unforgettable festive atmosphere. With seatings from 11 a.m. until 8 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day, patrons will be immersed in the holiday spirit from thoughtfully spaced tables in the restaurant’s tented Backyard Patio and Garden.

Executive Chef Alejandra Padilla has created a holiday menu of classic and seasonal dishes including prime ribs of beef served in the traditional manner with au jus, Yorkshire pudding, organic whipped cream horseradish and choice of side. Thanksgiving features free range turkey with stuffing, mashed potatoes, gravy, buttered Blue Lake green beans and house made cranberry compote. 3801 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. For reservations and takeout visit www.thefivecrowns.com.

Farm to Table Gracias Madre

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Courtesy of Gracias Madre

Flavorful tamales highlight Gracias Madre’s holiday menu

Gracias Madre – Chef Alan invites vegans and non-vegans alike to partake in Gracias Madre’s holiday tamale offerings, which include Jackfruit Birria and Black Mole Mushroom. Pre-order on the restaurant’s website by Sunday, Nov. 22. www.graciasmadre.co/tamales. 1617 Westcliff Drive, Newport Beach.

Marché Moderne – Look no further than Marché Moderne’s luxe Thanksgiving dinner boxes. Nourish four guests with roasted free range Canadian turkey breast and confit leg meat. Indulgent sides include duck confit and mushroom stuffing, Brussels sprouts, Robuchon mashed potatoes, cranberry orange walnut rolls and an autumn salad.

Sweet lovers need to go for the French macaron with a seasonal twist on flavors like pumpkin and spiced vanilla. Marché Moderne will only be serving 100 boxes. Order by Monday, Nov. 23 by calling 714.434.7900 for pick-up on Thursday, Nov. 26 between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. 7862 E. Coast Highway in the Crystal Cove Shopping Center, Newport Coast.

Farm to Table Sushi Roku

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Courtesy of Sushi Roku

Sushi Roku Family Pack

Sushi Roku – If you’re less traditional when it comes to Thanksgiving, opt for Sushi Roku’s Hot Family Pack or Sushi Family Pack ($109 each). These feature the freshest fish, prepared with the kind of artistry that can only be executed by a seasoned sushi chef.

Available for curbside pick-up for lunch and dinner, each Family Pack feeds up to four guests with a diverse menu that unites traditional Japanese cuisine and vibrant global flavors with a California seasonal bounty. Orders for pick-up  can include purchasing wine and sake by the bottle for 50 percent off regular price, beer and the restaurant’s signature cocktails packaged to go. Call 949.706.3622 or visit www.sushiroku.com. 327 Newport Center Drive (Fashion Island), Newport Beach.

Tavern House kitchen + bar – Make plans for a traditional herb roasted turkey and all of the fixings including mashed potatoes, creamed corn, maple-bacon glazed Brussels sprouts, whipped butternut squash, cornbread-pine nut stuffing, cranberry relish and giblet gravy. Save room for the restaurant’s famous pumpkin pie. In addition to dinner to go, a three-course menu is available for dine-in on Thursday, Nov. 26 from 2-7 p.m. Order ahead by calling 949.673.8464 for pick up on Wednesday, Nov. 25. For menus and reservations, visit www.tavernhousekb.com. 333 Bayside Drive, Newport Beach.

Farm to Table The Winery

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Courtesy of The Winery

The Winery’s shrimp and scallops dish on the dine-in menu

The Winery Restaurant & Wine Bar – Offering a traditional Thanksgiving turkey dinner to go as well as a dine-in option.

To Go Menu: Chef Yvon Goetz’s take-home dinner menu features a roasted free range Diestel turkey, apple-sundried cherry dressing, cranberry-orange relish and Pinot Noir-sage gravy. Begin with a fall organic baby greens salad with dried cranberries, roasted squash, toasted pumpkin seeds, croutons and Dijon vinaigrette. A choice of two sides with options includes mashed potato casserole, butternut squash-potato gratin, roasted Brussels sprouts, bacon and sundried tomato, green beans almondine, maple syrup roasted garnet yams and honey-thyme glazed carrots. Finish with pumpkin cheesecake with caramelized pecan-vanilla bean Chantilly. For six guests, $350. Purchase wines by the bottle or craft cocktails. Call 949.999.6622. Orders must be placed by 3 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 23 for pick-up on Wednesday, Nov. 25 between 1:30 and 8 p.m.

Dine-in Menu: Chef is offering a prix fixe menu of traditional Thanksgiving options, along with Winery favorites. The meal begins with a choice of roasted butternut squash bisque, The Winery house salad, Scottish smoked salmon, pumpkin and ricotta ravioli, or organic heirloom tomatoes and fresh burrata. Entrée choices include traditional maple-glazed free range turkey, king salmon “a la plancha,” Maine scallops and jumbo wild white shrimp, grilled beef flatiron steak, and maple glazed Kurobuta pork chop. End with a choice of streusel pumpkin pie or chocolate cheesecake. Meals are priced at $75++ per guest with a “Little Buddies” kids’ menu being offered for $24.95.

Thanksgiving dinner at The Winery Restaurant & Wine Bar on Thursday, Nov. 26 from 12- 8 p.m. and reservations are recommended online at www.thewineryrestaurants.com. Call 949.999.6622. 3131 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach.


COVID-19: 582 new cases and 9 new deaths reported in OC, 8 new cases in Newport Beach

Sadly, OC Health Care Agency reports that 1,537 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including nine new deaths reported yesterday (November 19). There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 67,167 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 582 cases yesterday.

The county reports that there have been 1,367 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of eight cases yesterday. This represents a per capita rate of 15.680 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 29 percent of ICU beds and 65 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 304 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 83 are in ICU.

The county estimates 57,326 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 19 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 19 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 19 20 3

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 19, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Get ready, with purple comes curfews

Fair Game Tom Johnson newYesterday, California Governor Gavin Newsom announced that a curfew, designed to quiet the concern of an anticipated COVID-19 spread, would go into effect across the state beginning tomorrow night. The order would limit the gatherings and movements of people nightly from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. 

The design is to stop families from interacting with others during those hours, except for those specifically required to do so. One goal is probably to create a roadblock to Thanksgiving celebrations.

Is the curfew the right call? Don’t know. But when that very same Governor is using questionable judgment and dining out with a lobbyist (of all people) at the noted Yountville French Laundry restaurant, it’s hard to stomach his ask.

One can easily argue that there are two sets of rules here in California. One for the citizenry and one for him. Afterall, this is not the first time.

Still, the increasing spread of COVID seems to be real as we wait for a vaccine. In a good news-bad news scenario, while numbers of cases are moving up, the death rate percentages seem to have significantly dropped from the earliest days.

No enforcement plans were announced with the Governor’s announcement, but I don’t expect the police to pull you over if you’re out and about.

• • •

Another response to the state’s recent actions to move Orange County back into the Purple Tier was with the Orange County Board of Supervisors’ move to assist restaurants. 

On Wednesday of this week, the Board launched the Orange County Restaurant Outdoor Dining Grant Program to support local restaurants. The Program will make funds immediately available to award $1,000 grants to 1,000 eligible restaurants through CARES Act federal funding.

The grants are intended to help alleviate financial hardships to restaurants. And, trust me, there have been many.

Restaurants are required to submit an application on the County’s website to be considered for the grant funding. Eligible applications will be funded on a first-come, first-served basis.    

• • •

And with these COVID times, it seems as though it’s one store closing after another. So anytime a new one opens it’s a good thing, right? 

Case in point, Monique Lhuillier, an internationally recognized luxury designer, is opening in the Saks Fifth Avenue Wing at South Coast Plaza. Monique Lhuillier offers entire ready-to-wear collections of bridal, footwear, handbags, accessories and fragrance collections, along with their debut of the ML Monique Lhuillier contemporary and new intimate apparel collections.

They are now OPEN.

• • •

Usually we run local crime activities under Police Beat or Police Files here in Stu News. But we’ve been watching one series of cases in particular recently and are very happy to report here the perfect outcome.

A week or so ago, Stu News was notified of a series of burglaries hitting various locations around the Harbor targeting fishing gear, tens of thousands of dollars’ worth. The alleged thief was even so brazen, as to allegedly return to the scene of one of the crimes a second time, only to be caught on surveillance video.

Well, as Newport Beach Police do, more often than not, they seem to have gotten their man. Detectives this week arrested one Christopher Adam Garofalo, 27 years old, from Santa Ana.

Seems his alleged burglaries included multiple locations on Shipyard Way, Harbor Island Drive, W. Coast Highway, Anchorage Way and Back Bay Drive.

But in the end, with the victims working closely with the PD, together posting photos and videos online seeking help, help finally came in the way of an arrest.

So what does Mr. Garofalo face? Try grand theft from boats, receiving stolen property with a value greater than $950 and burglary from boats.

And the really good news is that he won’t be fishing anytime soon.

A couple of the victims were the Stanalands, John of real estate fame and wife Rachel, a noted veterinarian. 

An NBPD spokesperson credited both of them with their diligent follow-up and dogged determination in the case.

See, good things do happen to good people.

• • •

Speaking of good people, Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris will partner with the Power of One Foundation tomorrow for a Thanksgiving Food Distribution Drive

 If you or someone you know is in need, contact her office at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Allegiant connects eight new cities to the OC

Allegiant on Tuesday, Nov. 17, announced eight new routes to John Wayne Airport from Idaho, Colorado, Oregon, Utah, Nevada, Montana and Washington. 

“We’re excited to offer customers another gateway to Southern California in 2021,” said Drew Wells, Allegiant’s vice president of planning and revenue. “We are continuing to expand Allegiant’s network to provide customers with even more convenient, nonstop options for any travel occasion.”

The new routes to/from John Wayne Airport include Boise, Grand Junction (Colo.), Medford (Ore.) and Provo, all beginning February 12, 2021, and Las Vegas, Missoula, Reno and Spokane starting on February 18, 2021.

Allegiant jet

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Courtesy of Allegiant

The new nonstop routes will operate twice weekly. Flight days, times and the lowest fares can be found at www.allegiant.com.

“It is exciting to welcome Allegiant to John Wayne Airport,” said Airport Director Barry Rondinella. “Allegiant’s introduction of new destinations and additional service to favorite destinations delivers a superior level of value and convenience for our guests. John Wayne Airport’s expanded route map now includes more than 30 nonstop destinations.”

Allegiant is focused on connecting customers with premier leisure experiences from vacations to hometown family entertainment. Since 1999, Allegiant Air has linked travelers in small-to-medium cities to world-class vacation destinations with all-nonstop flights and industry-low average fares.


Chamber announces that the 2020 Boat Parade is sunk by COVID-19 concerns

The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce issued a statement Wednesday announcing that “after diligent, thoughtful and thorough consultation with City of Newport Beach officials, our Parade committee members, Chamber Commodores Club, Board of Directors and health professionals, (we have) made the painful but prudent decision to cancel this year’s 112th Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade. We realize this decision has impacts on many levels for our sponsors, businesses, residents, visitors to our community and especially our dedicated boat owners and home participants. It is one of the most cherished traditions in Newport Beach, relying upon hundreds of donated volunteer hours and expertise and has become a signature event in Southern California.”

Newport Beach Mayor Will O’Neill recognized the difficult decision, “I know how much the tradition of the Boat Parade means to the Chamber, the residents, business owners, and visitors to the City. Even so, the Chamber is to be commended for their leadership and sacrifice. I look forward to a bigger and better celebration in 2021.” 

The Chamber acknowledges that the decision to cancel was not made lightly saying, “Clearly, many people will be disappointed, including us. Unfortunately, these are unprecedented times and the deep impact from COVID-19 has affected almost every large event in Southern California and around the nation, including parades and festivals.”

Chamber announces Two are Better than

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Photo by Bleu Cotton Photography

“Two Are Better Than One” by Kyle Miller took home the honors for ‘Best Boat Under 30 Feet’ in a previous Christmas Boat Parade

Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Steven Rosansky noted, “It was our hope that conditions would improve or at least remain static. However, looking at what is happening across the country, as well as in our own backyard, that is simply not the case. Governor Newsom made it clear at his recent press conference that conditions are worsening across the State of California and that we need to put on the ‘emergency brake’ to slow the spread of coronavirus.”

One bright spot is that the sister event to the Parade, The Rings of Lights, will still proceed. Residences on the harbor’s perimeter who decorate and enter will still be judged and eligible to win in a number of categories. 

Those winners will be announced on December 15th. Homes interested in registering for the Ring of Lights can go to www.christmasboatparade.com

Parade Co-Chair Larry Smith reflected on the meaning of the Boat Parade, “(It) has a century long tradition of being Newport Beach’s Christmas Card to the World. This year our message must clearly reflect the safety and well-being of all concerned.” 

Marie Case, Skipper of the Commodores Club, said, “We want to thank all of those boaters who have signed up for the Parade and the Boat Parade Committee volunteers for all the time and effort they have already invested in this year’s Parade. The spirit of our Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade tradition will be felt this year as lights shine for the holiday season around the harbor and will shine even more brightly in 2021.”

For more information, visit www.christmasboatparade.com.


Difficult times call for difficult decisions, Christmas Boat Parade canceled for 2020

By GARY SHERWIN

The virus hates joy.

As the pandemic now sweeps across the nation and here in California, we’ve learned that COVID-19 is like a fire looking for dry timber to burn. It doesn’t care where it goes and the damage it causes. It’s a biological wrecking machine.

And Wednesday it claimed another victim, the 112th Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade.

After considerable thought given the Governor’s announcement this week that Orange County has been demoted to the most restrictive Purple COVID-19 tier, the Chamber of Commerce made the reluctant decision to forego the parade this year.

The Christmas Boat Parade, our annual holiday card to the world, was perhaps the only large event in the region to soldier on this year despite the virus. The goal was to offer a bit of Christmas joy in a year when we really needed it.

Gary Sherwin

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Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Gary Sherwin

Initially, with the county in a lower restrictive tier, it was thought that as an outdoor event the parade could be held safely. People would be encouraged to socially distance and mask up. The usual grand events, like the Grand Marshal kick off at Marina Park, were scrubbed early on to protect spectators.

But as pandemic’s caseloads grew and the Governor started his more restrictive crackdowns and encouraged people to stay home, it was apparent that the event would be fatally jeopardized.

The day after the parade was canceled, we also learned of the Governor’s office’s nightly curfew starting at 10 p.m., which would have made the parade now impossible since Newsom would have frowned on all evening events.

There were also concerns about optics and whether having people gathering on places like Balboa Island was wise given how fast the infection rate has grown in the last few weeks. Large crowds could not only be unsafe and be potential super spreaders to locals and visitors, but also attract unfavorable media coverage at a time when the attention should be on celebrating the season.

Yes, this seriously sucks. However, the festivities are not entirely dead. The Ring of Lights, the harbor’s home holiday décor showcase, will continue for people to enjoy. Many boat owners are expected to still continue to decorate their boats and will be cruising the harbor. There is even talk of a contest for boat owners who submit a photo of their decorated vessel.

But for restaurants, which normally are packed with parade guests, this is more bad news. They are already handicapped as of this week with mandatory outdoor dining restrictions. If a dining establishment on the harbor is without outside access, their guests wouldn’t be able to enjoy the parade anyway this year. This is especially unfortunate since the restaurant industry has had the most difficult year ever with capacity restrictions and constantly changing rules from the state.

I also feel badly for our Frontline and Community Grand Marshals, along with five deserving charities, who were to get some well-deserved public accolades for everything they’ve done to get us through 2020. 

This year, instead of a well-known celebrity, a different person each night from the hospitality, education, health and public safety sectors would be recognized and lead the parade, each representing thousands of people they work with during the pandemic. These are our local heroes who are still there assisting us through all of this mess, often times risking their own health in the process.

The parade may not happen but our gratitude to these people will remain.

Spectators are still encouraged to safely enjoy the lights on evening walks or cruise the harbor but the rush of people gathering in large groups will be discouraged. The parade may not happen, but the Newport Beach holiday spirit will not be squashed. 

In fact, Visit Newport Beach is putting together a digital Holiday Pass to provide locals and visitors with a one-stop guide to the holidays in Newport Beach including a Christmas Lights Trail, Festive Dining for Take Out, Holiday Shopping, Seasonal Activities and Winter Hotel Deals. Sign up at www.visitnewportbeach.com/holiday.

There are some who will loudly dispute canceling the parade, and everyone understands their disappointment. All of us who love the parade and what it represents to our history and culture are devastated.

Trust me, it was not done for political reasons but because of the hard realities of the pandemic and the restrictions associated with it. The Chamber had a tough call to make and I applaud them. This is not dissimilar to when the city shut the beaches down during the past July 4th, another controversial decision that was done to protect resident and visitor public health.

Many of us thought we could hold the parade and keep people safe while bringing some much-needed happiness and holiday joy to people.

It was a great idea, but the virus had other plans. 

Gary Sherwin is President & CEO of Visit Newport Beach and Newport Beach & Company.


November events at OC Fair & Event Center

The OC Fair & Event Center is offering these November happenings, whereby you can enjoy them safely.

Here’s the lineup:

Visit Centennial Farm to see the piglets. This is by reservation only so check out the link to book your spot. https://ocfair.com/centennial-farm/public-reservations/reserve-your-spot/

November events piglets

Photos courtesy of the OC Fair & Event Center

Come visit the piglets

The Certified Costa Mesa Farmers’ Market at the OC Fair open every Thursday from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. OC Farm Bureau certified farmers and merchants are on hand to sell produce, fresh flowers, fish, hummus, honey, hot sauce and more. Some vendors also sell hot food for lunch such as tamales and tacos/burritos. Located in Lot D in front of the Pacific Amphitheatre. Free admission and parking. Enter at Gate 3. www.ocfarmbureau.org

November events Farmers' Market

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The Farmers’ Market offers fresh produce, flowers and more

COVID-19 Drive Thru Supersite continues through December 31 from 7 a.m.-3 p.m. by appointment only. Takes place at Lot E and Lot F (enter through Gate 4). Closed November 26 and 27. Visit www.360clinic.md to make an appointment. For information on COVID-19 in Orange County, visit www.covid19info.ocgov.com, or contact the Orange County Health Care Agency.

Power of One Foundation Emergency Food Assistance Drive-Through Distribution on Saturday, Nov. 21 from 8 a.m.-12 p.m. by appointment only

Power of One Foundation, Official No One Left Behind, CAP OC Food Bank, OC Fair & Event Center and other partners have teamed up to combat hunger in Orange County’s communities. Enter at Gate 3 off Fairview at Merrimac Way. Register in advance at https://forms.gle/4LxD7pkQBf7DSsX79. For more information, visit www.poweroffoundation.org.

Seasonal Adventures Christmas Tree Lot from November 27-December 18, 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Takes place in Lot C at the corner of Fairview Road and Fair Drive. Free admission and parking. Tree prices vary. www.seasonaladventures.com

The OC Fair & Event Center is located at 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.ocfair.com.


SPIN receives $200,000 grant from B of A

Serving People in Need (SPIN) has been named as a 2020 Bank of America Neighborhood Builders® awardee. The nonprofit was selected for its work in the Orange County community to address issues fundamental to economic mobility, specifically food insecurity and homelessness. 

As an awardee, the organization receives a $200,000 grant, a year of leadership development for the executive director and an emerging leader, a network of peer organizations across the U.S. and the opportunity to access capital to expand their impact. 

“As we consider many of the challenges that our community is facing – from the health and humanitarian crisis brought on by the coronavirus pandemic – the Neighborhood Builders program is a relevant and timely initiative to support the communities we serve,” said Allen Staff, Orange County market president for Bank of America. “Basic needs must be met to achieve economic mobility. This program enables partners Serving People in Need to plan strategically for growth and long-term sustainability, and we look forward to seeing how this investment helps these nonprofits make even greater strides to address food insecurity and homelessness.”

SPIN receives B of A grant

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Photo by Ann Chatillon

(L-R) SPIN Executive Director Jean Wegener and Director of Marketing and Events Kim Frazier proudly display grant check from B of A

With a 98 percent efficacy rate in keeping the people they serve in their homes, SPIN will enhance its ability to support the growing need for Guided Assistance to Permanent Placement services including providing housing assistance, financial resources and support services to families who have been affected by the coronavirus pandemic. SPIN has seen a 120 percent increase in requests for rental assistance and a 40 percent increase in requests for move-in costs for housing from homeless families with children. Funds will be used to help these families secure or maintain housing, assist with ongoing rent and utilities, and connect them with community resources to help them continue to maintain housing stability.

“SPIN is honored and so very pleased to have been selected as a recipient of the Bank of America 2020 Neighborhood Builders Award,” said Jean Wegener, SPIN CEO. “SPIN will be able to assist more families impacted by COVID-19 who are facing numerous challenges – maintaining housing, finding new employment and childcare – through diversion, prevention, rental assistance and housing. We look forward to strengthening our leadership skills within our organization.”

The Neighborhood Builders program is an opportunity to provide relevant skills development and topics to help nonprofit leaders address current and future community challenges. Each year, Bank of America refines the Neighborhood Builders Leadership Program to include topics ranging from strategic storytelling to human capital management, and highlights themes that are critical to moving the nonprofit sector forward within a broader societal and economic context. 

Since 2004, Bank of America has invested more than $260 million in 50 communities through Neighborhood Builders, partnering with more than 1,300 nonprofits and helping more than 2,600 nonprofit leaders strengthen their leadership skills. In the past 15 years, through its Neighborhood Builders program, Bank of America has partnered with 25 nonprofits in Orange County, investing $5 million to advance economic mobility for Orange County residents, from workforce development to basic needs, to wraparound services and housing within the Orange County area.


School Notes

Two new hires announced for Special Education

Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) has announced the selection of Myla Candelario and Dr. Michael Tincup as special education coordinators. 

“We are excited to welcome Ms. Candelario and Dr. Tincup to our special education team; their experience and commitment to supporting staff in addressing student needs will be a strong addition to the work we are doing within the special education department,” said Assistant Superintendent of Student Support Services Dr. Sara Jocham.

School Notes Myla Candelario

Photos courtesy of NMUSD

Myla Candelario

Candelario joins the program from Capistrano Unified School District where she most recently served as coordinator of special education technology support.

Prior to becoming a coordinator, she served as a program specialist and technology teacher. She has well rounded experience in the design and implementation of professional development training that maximize technologies to track and improve student outcomes.

Candelario received her Bachelor of Arts in Political Science - International Relations from the University of California, Berkeley and her Master of Arts in Special Education from California State University, Long Beach.

School Notes Dr. Michael Tincup

Dr. Michael Tincup

With more than 20 years of experience in education, Dr. Tincup also joins NMUSD as special education coordinator. He most recently served as director of special education with Rowland Unified School District. 

He began his career in education as a school psychologist and served as a program specialist and coordinator at various school districts, supporting elementary and secondary education. He is knowledgeable and has extensive experience in dispute resolution, mediation, implementation of Multi-Tiered Systems of Support (MTSS) and has a great understanding of mental health services. 

Dr. Tincup received his Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from the University of California, Irvine; his Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology from Pepperdine University; and his Doctorate of School Psychology from the University of Northern Colorado.


Nationally renowned cancer researcher named as Physician-in-Chief at City of Hope OC

City of Hope Orange County announced Tuesday, Nov. 17, that preeminent oncologist Edward S. Kim, M.D., M.B.A. has been appointed as the senior vice president and vice physician-in-chief at City of Hope and Orange County physician-in-chief. 

In recruiting this leading expert, City of Hope is fulfilling the promise of enhancing access to cancer breakthroughs in Orange County and becoming a model for the nation in revolutionizing the delivery of cancer treatment and research.

“Dr. Kim has a depth and breadth of cancer expertise that is well-matched for the expansion of City of Hope into Orange County,” said Michael A. Caligiuri, M.D., president of City of Hope National Medical Center, physician-in-chief and the Deana and Steve Campbell Physician-in-Chief Distinguished Chair. “We needed a clinician-scientist who embraces the innovation and energy of the region and is up to the challenge of transforming health care delivery so that breakthroughs are significantly more accessible to those who need them. With this appointment, our vision for the future of cancer care in Orange County is being fulfilled.” 

Nationally renowned Edwin S. Kim, M.D.

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Courtesy of City of Hope

Preeminent oncologist Edward S. Kim, M.D., M.B.A.

Dr. Kim, named a U.S. News and World Report “Top Doctor,” will lead City of Hope Orange County’s esteemed team of clinician-scientists with unique cancer expertise. As City of Hope Orange County’s chief physician, he will be responsible for driving innovation in cancer care and delivery for the Orange County network of care and the planned Irvine campus. Specifically, he will encourage and develop new paradigms for translating state-of-the-art research into practice within the community – including introducing new therapies – as well as champion and advocate for cancer patients and their families.

Dr. Kim comes to the new position with a distinguished history of pioneering cancer research and leadership positions at the Levine Cancer Institute in North Carolina and University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. He is among the country’s foremost experts in molecular prognostication for lung, head and neck cancers, which greatly advances cancer detection and personalized therapies. As part of his lifelong commitment to ongoing oncology research, Dr. Kim is also the principal and co-principal investigator on numerous studies and protocols and the author or co-author of more than 200 published original articles, book chapters and reviews in top-tier journals, such as The Lancet, The Lancet Oncology, the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Cancer Discovery, Cancer, Nature Medicine and Cancer Prevention Research.

Before joining City of Hope, Dr. Kim was the chair of Solid Tumor Oncology and Investigational Therapeutics, the Donald S. Kim Distinguished Chair for Cancer Research, and medical director of the Clinical Trials Office at the Levine Cancer Institute, Atrium Health in Charlotte, North Carolina, and a professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Prior to the Levine Cancer Institute, he held many leadership positions including associate professor (tenured) in the Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Additionally, Dr. Kim has recently completed his Masters in Business Administration at the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler School of Business.

“My appointment to City of Hope Orange County is the culmination of my career thus far. The vision of City of Hope to redefine the accessibility of cancer treatments is well-aligned with my personal commitment to continually meet unmet needs,” said Dr. Kim. “Along with my prestigious colleagues, we will be creating opportunities for strategic and team-oriented translational research that is delivered through a comprehensive network of care spanning the breadth of the Orange County region.”


Orange County hospitals join nationwide effort to #maskup

One hundred of the nation’s top health care systems, representing thousands of hospitals in communities across the U.S., have come together with an urgent plea for all Americans – mask up, because wearing a face mask is our best chance at slowing the surging COVID-19 pandemic now.

Local Orange County hospitals including City of Hope, MemorialCare, CHOC, UCI and Providence are joining in this nationwide effort.

More than 11.5 million Americans have tested positive for the virus – including an additional one million in just the past week – leading to nearly 250,000 deaths. 

The current trends are daunting and frightening. If the nation stays on its current course, hospital leaders are increasingly concerned that more health care facilities will be overwhelmed as shortages of healthy caregivers make it difficult to handle a rapidly increasing number of patients. Unfortunately, this is already happening in parts of our country.

Orange County hospitals mask

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Submitted photo

“Mask Up” is a nationwide public service campaign

The next several months will be critical. Though there has been positive news about vaccine development, no one knows when those vaccines will be ready for widespread use. In the meantime, everyone must remain vigilant, take precautions and follow public health orders.

The country has reached a tipping point. The power to do what is right is now in the hands of everyone everywhere.

Beginning yesterday, a public service message is running in the New York Times, USA Today, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post and Los Angeles Times. Additionally, hospitals and health systems across the country will continue to unite to share these messages regionally.

The message reads:

“As the top nationally ranked hospitals, we know it’s tough that we all need to do our part and keep wearing masks. But, here’s what we also know: The science has not changed. Masks slow the spread of COVID-19. So, please join us as we all embrace this simple ask: Wear. Care. Share with #MaskUp. Together, wearing is caring. And together, we are saving lives.”

In an effort to reach a broader audience, the public service effort will also include messages on digital platforms, social media, online information, links to vital health resources and more. 

In addition to masking, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests that everyone minimize the number of non-household contacts, maintain a physical distance of at least six feet, and limit the amount of time around others, especially while indoors and in poorly ventilated areas.

For further information from the CDC about masking guidelines, how to choose a mask and how to properly wear a mask, go here.

To connect with the Mask Up campaign, visit www.everymaskup.com.


Take Five: Meet Jonathan Langford, president of FONBAS

By AMY SENK

In this crazy, upside-down world we live in, our pets are often literally saving our sanity. And in Newport Beach, the Friends of Newport Beach Animal Shelter’s nonprofit helps make sure that vulnerable animals are cared for so they can be adopted into loving homes. The organization also helps fund special equipment, provides scholarships for education of people in the veterinarian tech field and is working to acquire a permanent home facility for the shelter. I caught up with Jonathan Langford, president of the Friends of Newport Beach Animal Shelter (FONBAS), to learn more. 

Take Five Jon and Peppermint

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Photos courtesy of Jonathan Langford, FONBAS

Jonathan Langford and his family’s furry friend, Peppermint

Q: Can you tell me about the nonprofit’s history and mission?

A: It makes sense that Newport Beach residents are so in love with their pets – you can bring them almost anywhere. Newport Beach’s beaches, parks, restaurants and shops are so friendly and accommodating to our furry family. When the city decided to run its own animal shelter five years ago, our group of local residents knew that community collaboration was key to making this a permanent solution. A new, beautiful animal shelter built by attentive Newport Beach residents would guarantee our animals would be taken care of forever. We also wanted to make sure our animals get amazing medical treatment –treatment they wouldn’t get from the city alone. We’ve come alongside to supplement costly surgeries and care.

Q: What are your biggest obstacles, and what are you most proud of?

A: The world is complicated and noisy. It can be hard for our message to break through, but once someone hears about the Newport Beach Animal Shelter and what we’re doing, they’re hooked. The passionate response of Newport Beach residents makes me most proud. They understand the need and they’ve exceeded the challenge. It’s something we can all be proud of.

Q: What do you think would surprise most people in our community when it comes to the city’s animal shelter?

A: We haven’t always had an animal shelter in Newport Beach. It’s relatively new. We formerly outsourced our animals to private facilities outside our community. A few years ago, our City Council prioritized this vital service, and FONBAS is working hard to guarantee our animals are cared for locally forever.

Take Five puppies

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Puppies born at the Newport Beach Animal Shelter

Q: You clearly are an animal lover. Would you tell me about your current pet? 

A: Our current pet, Peppermint, was rescued from China. She was destined for human consumption, but an Orange County nonprofit rescued her family and other dogs from their grim fate. They flew them to LAX, picked them up in a big van and drove them to a large property in La Habra Heights to get cleaned up and cared for. Pepper now lives the Newport Beach lifestyle with runs through Crystal Cove State Park and golf cart rides in CdM. You could never tell now that she was abused and doomed. She brings so much joy to me, my wife, Lara, and our young children, Lily and Jack.

Q: How can people get involved and help? 

A: Become a member, make a donation, purchase items for the animals directly off their Amazon Wish List, or follow us on social media. We just launched our final campaign, “Raise the Roof,” to assemble the final funding for the construction of the shelter. Generous donors have already delivered millions of dollars during previous campaigns to purchase the site and get plans drawn. Funding this final campaign will hopefully get construction completed before the end of 2021– an inspiring achievement for us all. Eva Le Bon, on our board of directors, sold me on her vision of the “Fur Ball” – an elegant evening soiree for animal lovers. It’s a super fun idea and I’d love to see it happen someday. Please visit www.FONBAS.org to find out more about us.

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Amy Senk is a longtime resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


State issues limited Stay at Home Order to slow spread of COVID-19

In light of an unprecedented, rapid rise in COVID-19 cases across California, Governor Gavin Newsom and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) yesterday (November 19) announced a limited Stay at Home Order requiring generally that non-essential work, movement and gatherings stop between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. in counties in the purple tier. The order will take effect at 10 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 21 and remain in effect until 5 a.m. Monday, Dec. 21. This is the same as the March Stay at Home Order but applied only between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. and only in purple tier counties that are seeing the highest rates of positive cases and hospitalizations.

“The virus is spreading at a pace we haven’t seen since the start of this pandemic and the next several days and weeks will be critical to stop the surge. We are sounding the alarm,” said Governor Newsom. “It is crucial that we act to decrease transmission and slow hospitalizations before the death count surges. We’ve done it before and we must do it again.”

This limited Stay at Home Order is designed to reduce opportunities for disease transmission. Activities conducted during 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. are often non-essential and more likely related to social activities and gatherings that have a higher likelihood of leading to reduced inhibition and reduced likelihood for adherence to safety measures like wearing a face covering and maintaining physical distance.

“We know from our stay at home order this spring, which flattened the curve in California, that reducing the movement and mixing of individuals dramatically decreases COVID-19 spread, hospitalizations and deaths,” said California Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly. “We may need to take more stringent actions if we are unable to flatten the curve quickly. Taking these hard, temporary actions now could help prevent future shutdowns.”

“We are asking Californians to change their personal behaviors to stop the surge. We must be strong together and make tough decisions to stay socially connected but physically distanced during this critical time. Letting our guard down could put thousands of lives in danger and cripple our health care system,” said Dr. Erica Pan, the state’s acting Public Health Officer. “It is especially important that we band together to protect those most vulnerable around us as well as essential workers who are continuing their critical work amidst this next wave of widespread community transmission across the state. Together we prevented a public health crisis in the spring and together we can do it again.”

COVID-19 case rates increased by approximately 50 percent in California during the first week of November. As a result, Governor Newsom and California’s public health officials have announced a list of measures to protect Californians and the state’s health care system, which could experience an unprecedented surge if cases continue their steep climb.

On Monday, the state pulled an emergency brake in the Blueprint for a Safer Economy putting more than 94 percent of California’s population in the most restrictive tier. The state will reassess data continuously and move more counties back into a more restrictive tier, if necessary. California is also strengthening its face covering guidance to require individuals to wear a mask whenever outside their home, with limited exceptions.

Late last week, the state issued a travel advisory, along with Oregon and Washington, urging people entering the state or returning home from travel outside the state to self-quarantine to slow the spread of the virus. The travel advisory urges against non-essential out-of-state travel, asks people to self-quarantine for 14 days after arriving from another state or country, and encourages residents to stay local.


On the Harbor: Newport Beach’s 10 most interesting yachts

By LEN BOSE

I spent a couple of days cruising the harbor previewing yachts that I have seen over this past season. My Top 10 choice countdowns were made by what I believe are the most interesting and demonstrate the character of our unique harbor. Most of the watercrafts I have selected are custom and have been in the bay for a long time. To be honest, I am hoping to get the listing on these or at least be invited aboard.

Your comments are always well received, so let me know which boats I should add next year.

This is the first in a two-part series. My next column will cover my Top 10 sailboats.

On the Harbor 10. FORGER

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Photo by Len Bose

No. 10 – “FORGER”

FORGER is a 74-foot vessel commissioned in 1988 at the German Bültjer Shipyard in Ditzum to a Beeldsnijder design. It is immediately obvious that she is definitely a different sort of motor yacht. Her iroko (a large hardwood tree from the west coast of tropical Africa that can live up to 500 years) topside gleam has countless coats of varnish. She came to town 10 years ago and is berthed on the end of Linda Isle. 

On the Harbor 9. WASABI

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Photo by Len Bose

No. 9 – “WASABI”

The 61-foot Nordland WASABI was built in 1983 and shows in better than new condition. If I am not mistaken, she has spent most of her life here with only two owners. Today, she is berthed on a mooring in front of the Balboa Yacht Club and can be found at Whites Landing, Catalina in the summer months. Pride of ownership exudes, which keeps her as one of the best-looking yachts in the harbor.

On the Harbor 8. INVICTUS

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Photo by Larry Tenney/Instagram

No. 8 – “INVICTUS”

INVICTUS is a 216-foot, 7-inch luxury motor yacht. She was built by Delta Marine in 2013. With a beam of 42 feet and a draft of 13 feet, she has a steel hull and aluminum superstructure. This adds up to a gross tonnage of 1,485 tons. She is powered by engines of 2,575 HP each giving her a maximum speed of 17 knots and a cruising speed of 16 knots. The motor yacht can accommodate 12 guests in six cabins with an exterior design by Delta Design Group. This gorgeous megayacht really should not be on this list because she is not berthed in Newport Beach, yet when it is in the turning basin each summer she commands everyone’s attention. Owned by Rick Caruso, an L.A.-based billionaire developer, her name is derived from Latin, meaning unconquerable or undefeated.

On the Harbor 7. LA FORZA del DESTINO

Photo by Len Bose

No. 7 – “LA FORZA del DESTINO”

LA FORZA del DESTINO splashed here in 2018. The 32-foot center console is built by Hunt Yachts and is a clear standout to the many center consoles starting to appear in our harbor over the last five years. It is kept at the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club and features a Seakeeper gyro stabilizer, which midgets 95 percent of the ocean’s roll. She is powered by twin 300 HP Yamaha engines and can reach top speeds of 50 knots. She is a must have for any yachtsman wanting the best. 

On thr Harbor 6. SHENANDOAH

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Photo by Len Bose

No. 6 – “SHENANDOAH”

This 44-foot Hinckley Talaria was built in 2004. How can this powerboat not catch a discerning yachtsman’s eye with her deep ocean blue color and seductive lines? She grabs one’s attention at first glance. Perfection is the first thought that comes to mind when viewing this Michael Peters design. SHENANDOAH is kept on an end tie just west of the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club. 

On the Harbor 5. VENDETTA

Courtesy of Billy Black

No. 5 – “VENDETTA”

This 57-foot Gatsby-era commuter yacht designed by Doug Zurn and built by Director in 2005 is absolutely stunning and will take your breath away. I am a huge fan of commuter-style yachts and had noticed VENDETTA as soon as she arrived in town. I immediately thought to myself how perfect she would be over at Catalina. With a reported speed of 47 knots, the new owner can make it over to the island in less than an hour and accommodate up to six guests. The original owner was musician Billy Joel. She can be found at the end of Balboa Peninsula.

On the Harbor 4. AIFOS

Photo by AIFOS Yachting Group

No. 4 – “AIFOS”

A 73-foot Wally Performance Yacht, AIFOS features twin V-12 1650 HP Mann diesels complemented by KaMeWa jet drives with top speeds of 40 knots. Her unique styling separates her from the rest of the fleet. She is berthed in the harbor along Mariner’s Mile and can be found at Moonstone Beach in Cambria during the summer. Her open transom, huge cockpit along with the ease of operating offers the owner the perfect getaway.

On the Harbor 3. SHANAKEE

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Photo by Len Bose

No. 3 – “SHANAKEE”

This 78-foot Nordland Ed Monk design splashed here in 2008. Designed for passages off the Pacific Coast and the glacial runways of the Inside Passage, SHANAKEE was constructed with a high-tech composite structure and just screams perfection. Built with a sailor’s eye, her beauty will last longer than the best French wine. If she is in town, you can find her just east of the Newport Harbor Yacht Club.

On the Harbor 2. CAZADOR

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Photo by Len Bose

No. 2 – “CAZADOR”

This 115-foot Nordland Expedition Yachtfisher is a long-range cruiser, with a main level master stateroom, three guest staterooms, three crew staterooms, a large salon and galley, and a top-level pilothouse. Specs include 3,200 HP from twin CATs, 7,000 gallons of fuel, 1,200 gallons of water and twin Northern Lights gen sets at 65 kw each. Dimensions: 115-foot length, 25-foot beam and 6-foot 2-inch draft. Splashed here in 2018, CAZADOR can be seen at the end of the Lido peninsula next to the Newport Beach Shipyard.

On the Harboe 1. FOLLOWING SEA

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Courtesy of Following Sea Boating Group

No. 1 – “FOLLOWING SEA”

This 56-foot Bertram is what Newport Beach is all about. The original owner was a member of Newport Harbor Yacht Club who commissioned Ray Hunt to design a 52-foot yacht for extended offshore cruising. Built by Dick Bertram in 1964, the construction was cold molded and was said to be the lightest and fastest cruising sport fishing boat on the west coast with a cruise speed of 20 knots. Restored to perfection by one of Newport’s best boat builders, FOLLOWING SEA can be found in the Newport Marina.

Sea ya.

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Len Bose is a yachting enthusiast, yacht broker and harbor columnist for Stu News Newport.


112th Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade canceled

The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce after diligent consultation with the City of Newport Beach, Boat Parade committee members, NB Chamber Commodores Club, board of directors and health professionals, has made the decision to cancel this year’s 112th Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade. Newport Beach Mayor Will O’Neill recognized the difficult decision by the Chamber to cancel the Parade this year. More details will be available in the Friday, Nov. 20 edition of Stu News Newport.


COVID-19: 628 new cases and 2 new deaths reported in OC, 7 new cases in Newport Beach

Sadly, OC Health Care Agency reports that 1,528 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including two new deaths reported today (November 18). There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 66,585 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 628 cases today.

The county reports that there have been 1,359 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of seven cases today. This represents a per capita rate of 15.588 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 27 percent of ICU beds and 65 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 291 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 90 are in ICU.

The county estimates 57,094 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 18 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 18 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 18 20 3

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 18, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


COVID-19: 352 new cases reported in OC, 5 new cases in Newport Beach

OC Health Care Agency reports that there have been 65,957 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 352 cases today (November 17).

Sadly, the county reports that 1,526 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County. There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 1,352 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of five cases today. This represents a per capita rate of 15.508 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 32 percent of ICU beds and 64 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 270 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 79 are in ICU.

The county estimates 56,786 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 17 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 17 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 17 20 3

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 17, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


City considering second anchorage

The City of Newport Beach established a trial anchorage west of Lido Isle during 2015, 2016 and 2017. These trials were well received and have now led to the city pursuing a request for consideration from the U.S. Coast Guard for a longer-term anchorage designation for the same general area.

The effort is to provide Newport Harbor’s boating community an additional public anchorage location and reduce the potential of crowding and over-capacity use in the harbor’s only existing designated anchorage located east of Lido Isle. 

A new section of the Harbor Department’s website has been developed to provide additional information regarding the proposed West Anchorage, and to solicit feedback from the public, through a brief online survey.

If you would like to learn more about the West Anchorage Proposal and participate in the survey, visit the City’s website at www.newportbeachca.gov/anchoragesurvey. The West Anchorage survey will remain open through Dec. 31, 2020.

Comments and/or questions may also be submitted directly to Kurt Borsting, City Harbormaster, via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by telephone at 949.270.8158.


NBPL brings a holiday classic to your home

The Newport Beach Public Library (NBPL) presents a favorite holiday tradition – The Nutcracker for Kids ballet performance featuring the Festival Ballet Theater – offered virtually beginning December 5 at 9 a.m. You can view the ballet performance for free here.

NBPL Nutcracker scene

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Courtesy of NBPL

A scene from the Nutcracker for Kids during a past live performance at Newport Beach Public Library

The Festival Ballet Theater performs an abridged and narrated version of the classic – a perfect way to introduce the holiday favorite to little ones. This presentation was previously performed live at the Newport Beach Public Library in a past season. NBPL is pleased to offer this video performance for viewers to enjoy in the comfort of their homes this holiday season. 

 This event was funded by generous donations from the Friends of the Library. The Newport Beach Public Library presents a variety of programs that foster cultural arts enrichment. For more information, contact the library at 949.717.3800, option 2, or visit the website at www.newportbeachlibrary.org.


Shop the ENC Artisan Marketplace on December 6

On Sunday, Dec. 6 from 11 a.m.-4 p.m., visit the Environmental Nature Center (ENC) and shop for locally made handmade gifts from 50 artisans offering a variety of eco-friendly, sustainable arts & crafts. Artisans will be selling great items throughout the ENC parking lot, patio and along the trails (under canopies), rain or shine.

Shop ENC Artisan unique apparel

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Photos courtesy of ENC

Unique apparel and accessories at the Artisan MarketplaceWreaths Across America honors our veterans laid to rest

The holidays are here, and you have a chance to be a positive part of our local economy. Your friends and family will appreciate that you cared enough about them to think about our planet by supporting artisans when you purchase their unique gift.

Come spend the day outside in nature instead of a shopping mall. The $2 entry fee donation goes directly to ENC’s environmental education programs. Click here to see some of the artisans featured so far, and for more information.

Shop ENC Artisan shoppers

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Shoppers peruse handcrafted ceramics and potteryWreaths Across America honors our veterans laid to rest 

COVID Safety: The entire event will be held outside, with booths spaced apart more than usual. Masks are required for all staff, vendors and guests. Please remain physically distanced.

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach.


As holidays approach, OC Board of Supervisors calls for COVID-friendly connections with senior residents

With the holiday season rapidly approaching, the Orange County Board of Supervisors is calling on residents to safely connect with their elderly neighbors amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Happy Holidays Neighbor! is a public awareness micro-campaign targeted at raising awareness of the dangers related to senior isolation and suggesting ways everyday citizens can reach out and make a difference.

“No one should be alone during the holidays,” said Chairwoman Michelle Steel, Second District Supervisor. “The Happy Holidays Neighbor! micro-campaign connects seniors with local neighbors who can provide help and support.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website, there are many public health risks linked to social isolation and loneliness. With one-fourth of adults aged 65 and older considered to be socially isolated, this makes seniors more susceptible to increased risk of serious medical conditions, such as dementia and heart disease. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic threatens to further cut off seniors from regular social engagement as well as limit their ability to access needed food, supplies and medication. During the holiday period, seniors face further challenges related to gift buying, mailing packages and decorating their home exteriors.

“Seniors are among the most at-risk for contracting COVID-19, which is why many have chosen to isolate themselves for the past nine months,” said Vice Chairman Andrew Do, First District Supervisor. “Because of this, seniors have never felt more isolated than they do now. Reaching out to a senior neighbor, in a safe way, can help reduce their loneliness and anxiety. The County’s Office on Aging provides many handouts and other resources to help you get started.”

“It’s all about taking action,” indicated Supervisor Donald Wagner, Third District. “One call, one errand, or one holiday connection can be the difference in making this holiday season special to a senior.”

The Happy Holidays Neighbor! public awareness micro-campaign suggests ways to connect with and support seniors this holiday season in COVID-safe ways that focus on physical distancing but still maintain a social connection. It features a printable postcard that neighbors can fill out and send to local seniors, asking what assistance they need and providing the neighbor’s contact information. Additionally, the micro-campaign provides information about County and local senior resources that are important during the holiday season.

“Connecting people during the holidays can make all the difference,” said Supervisor Doug Chaffee, Fourth District. “Seniors who are home-bound or physical distancing during COVID-19 may look forward to a cheerful greeting or holiday helping hand.”

“The physical health of our seniors is critical, but we can’t overlook the importance of mental health,” stated Supervisor Lisa Bartlett, Fifth District. “The holidays are a time to come together to show how much we care for the health and well-being of our seniors.”

For more information, visit the County’s Office on Aging website at https://officeonaging.ocgov.com/.


Local writers published in book of short stories and essays inspired by COVID-19

A bad case of cabin fever got you down? A cure for pandemic boredom is reading a good book. Writing in Place: Stories from the Pandemic (Mars Street Press) features short stories and essays by local writers. The book was inspired by COVID-19 and the range of emotional experiences brought about by this surreal time. 

Barbara DeMarco-Barrett, author of Pen on Fire: A Busy Woman’s Guide to Igniting the Writer Within, and host of the public radio show and podcast Writers on Writing, brings together 17 writers from her long-term writing workshops, Writers Block Party and the Literary Possé, to produce this eclectic collection. 

Local writers bookcover

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Submitted photo

“Writing in Place: Stories from the Pandemic” available on Amazon 

According to DeMarco-Barrett, the editor of this collection and a longtime resident of Corona del Mar, “The pieces range from the dystopian to the apocalyptic. There are mystery stories, as well as stories exploring love and grief. Together, the compilation celebrates the triumph of the human spirit and the importance of art during dark times.”

This diverse roster of writers includes Dina Andre, Nancy Carpenter, Cindy Trane Christeson, Angela Cybulski, Amelia Dellos, Barbara DeMarco-Barrett, Phil Doran, Anne Dunham, Jennifer Irani, Stephanie King, Jan Mannino, Rosalia Mattern, Marla Noel, Lisa Richter, Dianne Russell, Catherine Singer, Marrie Stone, Laurie Sullivan and Judy Wagner.

To purchase on Amazon, click here.

After you purchase the book, please be sure to leave a review. 

For more information, contact Barbara DeMarco-Barrett at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


When a vaccine is made available

Although talk recently has speculated that the country is getting close to a vaccine, there are currently none approved to prevent COVID-19. According to “California For All,” there is a possibility that one or more vaccines will be available before the end of the year. 

Should that happen, California is planning to distribute and administer vaccines as quickly as possible. This will be done only after a vaccine’s safety has been reviewed and approved by a panel of top health experts.

California’s distribution of COVID-19 vaccines will be guided by the following overarching principles: 

–The vaccine meets safety requirements.

–The vaccine is distributed and administered equitably. People with the highest risk of infection will get the vaccine first.

–Community stakeholders are brought in from the outset for transparency.

A safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine will be one of the most important tools to end the COVID-19 pandemic. California will be transparent, careful and above all, equitable in efforts to provide a COVID-19 vaccine to everyone in California who needs and requests vaccination.

For more information, visit:

–CDPH’s COVID-19 vaccine planning.

–CDC’s Vaccine Information for You & Your Family.


Reflections of Newport Harbor, then and now

By DUNCAN FORGEY

Cruising Newport Harbor can be like a carnival ride, combining beauty and an opportunity to experience a unique history. Time on the “largest natural small boat harbor” in the country is well worth it. Whatever your mode of transportation – a standup surfboard, 45-foot catamaran, a Duffy, or the 216-foot super yacht Invictus, the varying views of Newport Harbor never stop impressing.

Long-term residents have spent their entire lifetimes on the bay growing up relishing hard work, success and play. History books tell us of an incredible transition from a swamp into today’s world-famous city. Historical times, houses and yachts have all changed over the decades, but Newport Harbor remains basically the same.

For more than 100 years, fishing boats, tiny sailboats and prestigious yachts have painted the bay’s blue waters against ghosts of multi-masted schooners, Snowbirds and powerful fishing boats. Generations have lived in grandeur with the Pacific Ocean as their best friend.

Reflections Collins Island aerial

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Sherman Library

An aerial of early Collins Island

Since the city’s inception, bayfront homes have been the talk of the town.  Ringing the bay like harbingers of goodwill as well as statements of great egos, these homes provide envy for the rest of us.

Newport’s 50 miles of waterfront was born by silt-laden streams depositing sand over alluvial fans near the mouth of the Santa Ana River. In 1825, a major flood swung south, building sandbars and creating a swamp. Early settlers described the bay as a desolate place, home for frogs and seabirds. By 1888, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers financed the deepening of a channel between the peninsula and the bluff allowing a usable bay.

With Newport Beach’s incorporation in 1906, additional government monies dredged the entrance, existing sandbars and other identifiable hazards. Useless mudflats vanished and island neighborhoods appeared. Over the next seven decades, Balboa, Bay, Harbor, Lido, Newport, Little, Collins and Linda islands were built upon the backs of risk takers and dredging machines. Thousands of new harbor-front homesites were made available and the wealthy jumped aboard.

Reflections Collins Castle

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Sherman Library

Collins Castle, a Venetian-style mansion, was built by Balboa Island developer William Collins

The earliest trendsetter of living in the extravagance of the bayfront came with Balboa Island developer William Collins. He built a Venetian-style mansion with an arched entrance and large boat dock. Pergolas and multiple gardens were awash with ceiling murals of nymphs and cherubs. His outlandish home was later purchased by actor James Cagney and used by the Coast Guard during World War II. There are currently eight homes on Collins Island today. 

Equally impressive was the mansion of oilman William Bartholomae. Located on the tip of the peninsula, this gargantuan adobe brick home and expansive grounds was built on nearly two acres of prime Newport bayfront. Protected by a seawall and huge grassy yard, the home typified Newport Beach’s extravagant lifestyle, especially when his gorgeous motorsailer Sea Diamond sat out front. This dream life ended with his stabbing death by a “love-jilted” maid, putting a dark cloud over the property. There are now six homes on the Bartholomae property.

Reflections China House

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Sherman Library

William Lindsay’s famous China House in Corona de Mar

One of Newport’s icon properties was the China House. Built by William Lindsay for his wife in 1929, the home sat for decades on the Corona del Mar side of the entrance channel. It was the prime landmark when entering the harbor. The China House was torn down in the 1980s. Two homes were built at the China House site.

Reflections Gillette estate

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Sherman Library

Vintage photo of the Gillette estate near the Wedge

Across the bay from the China House was King Gillette’s famous estate. His wealth was derived from razor blades and he built his home on the bayfront near the Wedge. Local lore tells of a nasty feud between two surviving sons that resulted in the boarding up of accesses and hallways connecting the two wings of the large home. It was later sold and converted into two homes. One was purchased by local surf guitar phenom Dick Dale.

John Wayne’s sprawling one-story Bayshores home was a landmark until his death. Living up to his large on-screen image, the “Duke” typified the great energy of the city. Whether sitting on his lanai, entertaining at the Balboa Bay Club, driving his pop-top 1975 Pontiac station wagon, or relaxing aboard his converted 136-foot minesweeper the Wild Goose, Wayne’s love of Newport Beach was forever stamped upon the town.

Across the basin from Duke’s home was one of the world’s most beautiful estates. Owned by Howard Ahmanson, it was originally built in 1938 for violin virtuoso Jascha Heifetz. The property took up multiple developable lots and faced due west into the setting sun. It had a large grassy expanse with the dock adorned by Ahmanson’s racing boats, Sirius and Sirius II.

A short list of other bayfront notables includes developers Koll, Kilroy and Warmington; a “friendly dentist” named Beauchamp; television visionary Robert Bennett; LA Times’ Chandler family; potato chip’s Laura Scudder; as well as Buddy Ebsen, Nicholas Cage, Madame Helena Modjeska and Joey Bishop. 

Currently, developer George Argyros, Irvine Company’s Donald Bren, philanthropists Phil and Mary Lyons, Simple Green’s Bruce Fabrizio and city guardian Jean Watt are a few of our bayfront residents. Newcomer Palmer Luckey, a 28-year-old tech wiz and owner of Oculus VR, shows that an entirely new generation of wealthy opt to be bayfront homeowners. 

Reflections Sunset

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Duncan Forgey

A memorable sunset over Newport Harbor

Newport Harbor began with lonely clipper ships delivering wares and has grown to more than 9,000 boats. Bayfront residences have also grown in number, each and every one personalized by the pride of some of the country’s wealthiest people. 

Architects today are hired to maximize square footage and build soaring ceilings with huge glass walls that emphasize bay vistas. These “monster” homes are being built upon the same sand that once supported “grandma-grandpa” beach cottages, designed with tiny windows and ill-placed fireplaces to maximize and capture heat during the winter months. During Newport Beach’s classic early years, views were simply not important, while today, the well-to-do pay large sums of money to look at the old swamp.     

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Duncan Forgey, a lifelong resident of Newport Beach, now makes his home in Hawaii. He is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


City Manager’s Updates

From the desk of Grace Leung

Grace Leung

Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung

Community members, 

Orange County’s COVID-19 case numbers under the state’s Blueprint for a Safer Economy showed improvement this week, but county health officials are concerned with recent increases in the number of daily cases that could potentially set us back into a lower tier in the coming weeks. For now, though, Orange County still remains in the “substantial” (red) tier. 

The state system tracks three COVID-19 metrics: average daily case rates per 100,000 population, the percentage of positive tests, known as the positivity rate and the health equity metric. The results are generally reported on Tuesdays. 

In the numbers released this week, Orange County recorded 5.6 average daily cases, down from 6.0 average daily cases last week. The test positivity rate decreased from 3.6 percent to 3.3 percent this week, which would qualify Orange County to move into the “moderate” (orange) tier, if not for the higher case numbers. The health equity metric decreased slightly this week, from 5.7 percent to 5.5 percent. The equity metric needs to be below 5.2 percent to move into the moderate tier. For more on the status of Orange County and others, visit www.COVID19.ca.gov.

COVID-19 Cases in Newport Beach 

As of November 12, the total number of COVID-19 cases in Newport Beach was 1,307 and the total cases in Orange County was 63,460. The number of recovered COVID-19 patients countywide as of November 12 was 55,777. These figures are provided to Orange County by the California Department of Public Health. 

Residences at Newport Center: Notice of Preparation and Public Scoping Meeting 

On Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020, the Community Development Department released a notice of preparation and initial study for the Residences at Newport Center Project (PA2020-020). The proposed Project is located at 150 Newport Center Drive and consists of the demolition of an existing carwash and construction of 28 condominium units and common space areas over a two-level below grade parking garage. A detailed project description is available in the Initial Study (linked below). 

The notice of preparation includes an invitation for public input regarding what should be evaluated in the Environmental Impact Report (EIR). The 30-day public comment period runs from November 5, 2020 through December 7, 2020. An electronic copy of the notice of preparation and initial study are available online: www.newportbeachca.gov/ceqa and hard copies are available to view at City Hall and the Central Library. All comments or other responses to this notice should be submitted in writing via mail or email to: Liz Westmoreland, Associate Planner, City of Newport Beach, Community Development Department, 100 Civic Center Drive, First Floor Bay B, Newport Beach, CA 92660, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., 949.644.3234. 

The City will also conduct a public scoping meeting where attendees can learn more about the EIR process and provide comments on the scope of the information and analysis to be included in the EIR. The meeting will be held virtually via Zoom on Monday, Nov. 30, 2020 at 5 p.m. If you wish to participate, please visit the link below to register for the meeting using a valid email address. You will receive a confirmation email allowing you to join the meeting. https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_TaDlB-MRtyo4TfojHQ5HQ 

You may also participate via telephone/audio only by calling 669.900.9128. The webinar ID is 974 8209 9307. 

Workshops Seeking Community Input on the Future of Housing 

How should Newport Beach grow in the future? The community is invited to discuss that question and provide input during two interactive, virtual workshops – one was held on November 16 and the other is being held tonight, November 17. The City must plan for an additional 4,834 housing units over the next decade to comply with the Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA). These workshops will help shape the City’s “suitability analysis” of housing densities, which will be included in an update to the General Plan. 

The first workshop, held on November 16 at 6 p.m., focused on the Airport area and Western portions of the City, including West Newport and West Newport Mesa. 

Tonight’s workshop (November 17), also beginning at 6 p.m., will focus on Newport Center and the Coyote Canyon Landfill. 

The workshops are being offered over Zoom with additional input opportunities offered online. The November workshops continue a series of virtual workshops, online activities, and educational videos to engage Newport Beach residents in the General Plan update. The workshops are discussion-based, with polls and surveys incorporated. 

–November 16, Part 1: Airport area and Western portions of the City, including West Newport and West Newport Mesa. 

–November 17, Part 2: Newport Center and Coyote Canyon Landfill from 6-8 p.m., hosted through Zoom (register here) 

–The workshops will be recorded and available at www.NewportTogether.com. More information is available here as well.

If you are not able to attend the live workshops, you can watch the recordings and provide input at your convenience. 

The City’s General Plan Housing Element details the City’s strategy for enhancing and preserving community character and identifies strategies for expanding housing. The Circulation Element governs how cars and people move through the City on local roadways, buses, ferries and trails. Over the next few months, the City of Newport Beach will host more opportunities to provide input into the Housing and Circulation Elements, as well as environmental justice policies for the General Plan Update. 

Visit www.NewportTogether.com to register and learn more. 

District 1 Virtual Town Hall November 19 

Please join us for a virtual town hall meeting for residents of Council District 1 (Peninsula area) on November 19 from 5-6:30 p.m. via Zoom. 

The topics will include Oceanfront Boardwalk safety, recent changes to short-term rental housing regulations enacted by the City Council, the new City fire station near Lido Isle, and the Lido water main replacement project. 

Please register for the Town Hall in advance at this link

Emergency Sewer Repairs on Via Lido 

Starting yesterday (Monday) and for the next two weeks, the Utilities Department will be working to replace (open cut) a 200-foot stretch of 15-inch sewer pipe on Via Lido between Via Oporto and Via Malaga. A northbound and southbound lane will be closed for the duration of the work to allow room for the construction equipment and dewatering. (There will be one open traffic lane in each direction.) The construction work is expected to be difficult because of the 10+ foot pipe depth and groundwater conditions and the City’s contractor will work as quickly as possible to reduce the impacts. The work is being coordinated with local surrounding community and businesses. 

Homelessness Update 

Addressing homelessness continues to be a priority in the City’s ongoing COVID-19 response, working closely with contractor City Net and regional partners throughout the county and state. The City Net hotline number is 714.451.6198. Those who call the hotline may leave a detailed voicemail message for themselves or others in need and City Net staff will respond within 48 hours. For immediate assistance call the County’s Crisis Prevention Hotline at 877.7.CRISIS or 877.727.4747. 

Success Stories 

–City Net helped secure an apartment for a woman who had been sleeping in her car. The woman moved in this week. City Net provided housing navigation resources and a kit with household items. 

–City Net placed two elderly women from Newport Beach into a local shelter. The women had been sleeping in a small car for several weeks. 

–The Homeless Liaison Officer assisted a young couple staying by the Newport Pier who lost their jobs due to COVID-19. The man now works for a yachting company in Newport Beach and the woman started a new retail job this week. The Homeless Liaison Officer helped to shelter them in a motel to facilitate their employment and is coordinating rental housing in the City of Orange. City Net is assisting with providing housing navigation resources. 

–A woman who had been homeless for several weeks was reunited with her family in Wisconsin, through assistance from the Homeless Liaison Officer. The woman lost a teaching position due to COVID-19 and could no longer afford her rent in Newport Beach. In addition, her wallet and identification were stolen during the time she was unsheltered. The Homeless Liaison Officer contacted the woman’s family to make travel arrangements, collaborated with the Transportation Security Administration at John Wayne Airport to allow her to fly without an ID, and transported her to the airport for her flight. 

–Two people in Newport Beach experiencing homelessness were enrolled into City Net services. City Net staff completed Vulnerability Index Intake Assessments for each. The assessments are used to screen clients to determine proper placement in the County’s Continuum of Care system. Some assessment factors include age, health issues, and length of time being unsheltered. City Net completed two housing assessments for people enrolled in their services. 

–City Net staff continues to provide support and case management to several people sheltering in motels while they await placement into permanent, supportive housing.


COVID-19: 380 new cases reported in OC, 4 new cases in Newport Beach

OC Health Care Agency reports that there have been 65,605 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 380 cases yesterday (November 16).

Sadly, the county reports that 1,526 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County. There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 1,347 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of four cases yesterday. This represents a per capita rate of 15.451 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 31 percent of ICU beds and 65 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 257 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 85 are in ICU.

The county estimates 56,548 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 16 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 16 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 16 20 3

Click on photos for larger images

Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 16, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


2020 Election results

2020 Election results 11.16.20


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

The votes are in and so is Petrie-Norris, while Moorlach eyes Steel’s Supervisorial seat

Fair Game Tom Johnson newAlthough there were several close races during the final tallies of votes, the one remaining “too close to call” was the 74th Assembly race. Incumbent Cottie Petrie-Norris was battling Newport Beach City Council member and former Mayor Diane Dixon.

Well, the ballots eventually ran out for Dixon, but not before she closed the margin to less than 2,700 votes of the 265,000 total cast.

Petrie-Norris said, “I am very grateful for the opportunity to continue working on the critical public health and economic issues facing our state. I want to thank the residents of Orange County for making their voices heard in this historic election, and I also want to thank our frontline workers and election volunteers who gave so much of their time and efforts to make our democratic process successful. I’m looking forward to the work ahead.”

Dixon graciously accepted the end of the road, “The election is over and the results are in. We came very close – within about one percentage point – but in the end, incumbent Cottie Petrie-Norris prevailed. Rather than focusing on the loss, I will choose to focus on the great many things for which we can be proud.”

I’ve recently mentioned that Will O’Neill garnered more votes for City Council this year than anyone in the City’s history, besting former Mayor Steve Bromberg’s count of 32,804, with this year’s almost 41,000.

Well, Dixon also has something to be proud of. Her total count of more than 130,000 votes this year is reportedly the highest total that any Newport Beach City Council person has ever received for public office.

Congrats to her on a well-run campaign.

Petrie-Norris, meanwhile, returns to Sacramento to serve as Chair of the Assembly’s Accountability and Administrative Review Committee and as Chair of the Select Committee on Student Debt. She also serves on the Assembly’s committees for Appropriations, Revenue & Taxation and Veterans Affairs.

• • •

Get his old desk and chair ready because apparently State Senator John Moorlach, 37th District, wants his old job back.

From @JohnMWMoorlach was this announcement: “BIG NEWS: Proud to announce that I’m running for the soon-to-be-open Orange County Board of Supervisors seat, District 2. Look for a formal announcement (this) week, but I’m definitely in.”

Moorlach is obviously talking about the seat to soon be vacated by Michelle Steel, who just beat Harley Rouda for the 48th Congressional seat. A special election will soon be scheduled to fill her Orange County Board of Supervisors seat in District 2.

Moorlach previously served as a Supervisor from December 2006 until January 2015. Prior to that he was Orange County’s Treasurer-Tax Collector for 10+ years. 

Following those, he headed to Sacramento to serve in the State Senate, before he was defeated two weeks ago by challenger Dave Min.

John’s a Republican and should be a formidable foe for others on that side of the aisle thinking of the position.

But don’t expect him to just breeze into office. As a resident of Costa Mesa, Moorlach might only have to look across town for his potential opponent, Mayor Katrina Foley. Foley, a Democrat, is said to be in serious consideration for a run.

First things first, Orange County Registrar of Voters Neal Kelley will have to schedule an election date. That is expected to be mid to late March.

• • •

If you want to get into the holiday spirit, why not check out the 39th Annual Segerstrom Family Tree Lighting virtually this Thursday, Nov. 19, at 7 p.m. 

The tree always goes up in the Town Center Park opposite the Westin South Coast Plaza. The white fir will be decorated with 100,000 lights and will be on display through the end of the year.

The 15-minute program, at www.southcoastplaza.com, will be hosted by Misty Copeland, the principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre.

Also on hand will be Santa Claus, entertainment by the Orange County School of the Arts and a welcome from Segerstrom Center for the Arts President Casey Reitz.


Newsom announces Purple Tier, but City says essential services will be uninterrupted

The emergency action announced yesterday, November 16, by Governor Gavin Newsom and state health officials places 28 counties, including Orange County, into the most restrictive (purple) tier of the Blueprint for a Safer Economy. The directive, which goes into effect Tuesday, addresses a dramatic increase in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations throughout the state. 

In Orange County, the average number of daily cases has nearly doubled in recent days.

Impacted industries and activities in Orange County will have 24 hours in which to comply with this action and make necessary modifications. The state made this directive to address the significant increase in the number of lab confirmed COVID-19 cases and protect the state’s health care system.

According to City of Newport Beach spokesperson John Pope, “All essential services in the City of Newport Beach will continue uninterrupted, as they have throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. We will continue to emphasize education when it comes to maintaining the critical behaviors necessary to effectively combat the virus during these upcoming winter months. We will work closely with our health care partners, including Hoag Hospital and the County of Orange, to help reduce the current spike in cases. 

“The health of our community is our top priority. We ask everyone to stay vigilant, continue to wear face coverings and wash hands frequently, and limit contact with those outside your household during the upcoming holidays. For more information on the activities and industries permitted in each tier, visit https://covid19.ca.gov/safer-economy/.”

For schools, K-12 schools that have NOT reopened for in-person instruction will have to remain online. K-12 schools that are currently in a phase-in process to reopen – i.e. within a single campus, some grade levels have reopened while the remaining are scheduled to reopen in the next weeks or months – will have to submit a request to continue with This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. However, K-12 schools that have fully reopened prior to today for in-person instruction are not required to close.

Higher education institutions under the Purple Tier must close indoor lectures and student gatherings. Some courses conducted in certain indoor settings, like labs for essential workers and studio arts, may be open.

California has had 1,029,235 confirmed cases of COVID-19, resulting in 18,263 deaths.

The County of Orange is responsible for 65,008 of those cases, resulting in 1,526 deaths. Sunday reflected a one percent increase with 668 new cases and two new deaths reported. Yesterday’s report showed another 379 new cases, with zero new deaths.

The Purple Tier is the most restrictive level of the state’s system that limits activities based on risk of spreading COVID-19. This means that indoor operations at restaurants, gyms, places of worship and movie theaters must end, according to state’s guidelines.

Purple Tier Restrictions and Guidelines

–Hair salons: open indoors with modifications

–Retail: open indoors at 25 percent capacity

–Malls: open indoors at 25 percent capacity and food courts closed

–Nail salons: open indoors with modifications

–Electrolysis: open indoors with modifications

–Personal care services (body waxing, etc.): open indoors with modifications

–Tattooing and piercing: open indoors with modifications

–Museums, zoos and aquariums: outdoor only

–Places of worship: outdoor only

–Movie theaters: outdoor only

–Hotels: open with modifications

–Gyms: outdoor only

–Restaurants: outdoor only

–Wineries: outdoor only

–Bars and breweries: closed

–Family entertainment centers: outdoor only, like mini golf, batting cages and go-kart racing

–Cardrooms: outdoor only

–Non-essential offices: remote work only

–Professional sports: no live audiences

–Theme parks: must stay closed


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach

Newport Beach A Look Back 11.17.20

Click on photo for larger image

Harold Caldwell, a local fisherman, sharing his catch with his cat in 1957

Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday - Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday - Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


School Notes

District will recognize three outgoing Board members at tonight’s meeting

The Newport-Mesa Unified School District Board of Education will meet this evening at 6 p.m. Public comments can be made before the meeting at the link here. The meeting can be watched via Zoom at the link here. 

The following are some of the noted highlights: The Board will recognize outgoing trustees.

–The first will be Dana Black who will receive the Board’s Distinguished Service Award for her 24 years of service.

–Next the Board will recognize Martha Fluor also with its Distinguished Service Award. She will be recognized and commended for her 29 years of service.

–Finally the Board will recognize Vicki Snell for her service with Special Recognition.

–As a precursor to the installation of the CdMHS security fencing, the District will approve soil testing for the site.

–Consideration of an MOU with Huntington Beach Union High School District for adult education for the 2020 through 2023 school years.

–Approval for the purchase of World Book License Subscription for Eastbluff Elementary School.

–Approval of an MOU between the NMUSD and the Newport-Mesa Federation of Teachers regarding working conditions during the 2020-21 school year for level 2, instructional model.

–Approval of an MOU between NMUSD and OC Superintendent of Schools to enact the Mental Health Services Act Partnership.

–Approve setting of BOE Annual Organizational Meeting recommended to be held December 15 at 6 p.m. in the District Education Enter.

To view the entire agenda, click here.

NMUSD reports minimal cases of COVID-19 in local schools

Latest records by the NMUSD show the impacts of COVID-19 on each school. Two schools have three confirmed cases to date, Newport Heights (491 students) and Newport Harbor (2,421).

One school, Corona del Mar MS/HS (2,346), reported two cases. 

Schools reporting one case to date include Eastbluff (374), Newport Elementary (367) and Ensign (1,053).


Sunset from the bridge

Sunset from the bridge

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

Looking south at sunset from the Balboa Island bridge


In 10 years, Hoag Orthopedic Institute has become the best of the best

Hoag Orthopedic Institute (HOI) is celebrating its 10th anniversary this month. During that time, HOI has grown into the largest orthopedic hospital on the West Coast, earning many national accolades affirming its high quality of care. HOI has performed more than 148,00 procedures since 2010 and is the highest volume provider of joint replacements in California for the past eight years. 

Established in 2010 through a unique partnership between Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian and a group of visionary Orange County orthopedic physicians, HOI is a specialty hospital that focuses exclusively on orthopedics.

In its history, HOI has grown to include a specialty hospital in Irvine, two medical clinics in Orange County and ambulatory surgery centers located in Newport Beach, Mission Viejo and Orange. Most recently, HOI has expanded operations to Los Angeles County with a fourth ambulatory surgery center in Marina Del Rey.

Four Orange County orthopedic surgeons, Carlos Prietto, M.D., James Cailloutte, M.D., Robert Gorab, M.D. and Alan Beyer, M.D., were the principal forces to organize and build HOI. In 10 years, HOI’s medical staff has grown to more than 80 orthopedic surgeons and a medical staff of more than 300. 

In 10 years HOI balloons

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Hoag Hospital Orthopedic Institute

Hoag Orthopedic Institute celebrates 10 years

“Every single employee and physician contributed to HOI’s incredible patient outcomes, accomplishments and successes,” said Robert Gorab, M.D., chief medical officer of Hoag Orthopedic Institute. “HOI has delivered outstanding results because the HOI team is outstanding.”

At its inception, HOI’s vision was to become a trusted leader in orthopedics both locally and nationally. HOI’s vision was realized over the course of 10 years, after earning several prestigious awards including recognition as the number one orthopedic hospital in Orange County for hip and knee replacement by U.S. News and World Report as well as Press Ganey’s “Pinnacle of Excellence” and “Guardian of Excellence” awards. Additionally, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has awarded HOI a five-star patient experience rating for five consecutive years. 

HOI has received Consumer Reports’ highest rating for hip and knee surgery and was ranked first place by Nerd Wallet for knee and hip procedures. HOI has also received the highest possible rankings from Becker’s Hospital Review for orthopedic programs and its low readmission rates. HOI was recognized as a top performer in the treatment of fragility fractures and bone healthcare by the American Orthopaedic Association. Moreover, its unique and effective model of care has been profiled in a case study authored by researchers from Harvard Business School.

“HOI began with a vision to create a new model of muskoskeltal care to deliver exceptional outcomes with a commitment to continuous improvement, transparency and value,” added Jennifer Mitzner, CEO of HOI. “I’m truly honored to be a part of what Hoag Orthopedic Institute has become and the impact HOI has had on the community.”

HOI routinely gives back to the community, providing charitable care, volunteering for local high school sporting events, offering free community lectures and educational events. Additionally, Dr. Alan Beyer and Dr. Jonathon Kaplan provide free sports medicine advice on the HOI sponsored weekly radio show “Doctor in the Dugout” on KLAA-AM. 

To learn more about HOI, visit www.orthopedichospital.com.


Beaming beauty

Beaming beauty

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

Another show-stopper in Newport Beach


Orange County back to Purple Tier in state’s COVID-19 system

It was announced today, Monday, Nov. 16, that the County of Orange has been moved back into the Purple Tier of the COVID-19 scale effective immediately.

California has had 1,029,235 confirmed cases of COVID-19, resulting in 18,263 deaths.

The County of Orange is responsible for 65,008 of those cases, resulting in 1,526 deaths. Yesterday reflected a one percent increase with 668 new cases reported and two new deaths. Today’s report showed another 379 new cases, with zero new deaths.

The Purple Tier is the most restrictive level of the state’s system that limits activities based on risk of spreading COVID-19. This means that indoor operations at restaurants, gyms, places of worship and movie theaters must end, according to state’s guidelines.


COVID-19: 2 new deaths and 639 new cases reported in OC, 10 new cases in Newport Beach

Sadly, OC Health Care Agency reports that 1,526 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including two new deaths reported today (November 15). There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 65,225 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 639 cases today.

The county reports that there have been 1,343 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of 10 cases today. This represents a per capita rate of 15.405 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 27 percent of ICU beds and 65 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 242 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 90 are in ICU.

The county estimates 56,280 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 15 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 15 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 15 20 3

Click on photos for larger images

Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 15, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


COVID-19: 2 new deaths and 528 new cases reported in OC, 15 new cases in Newport Beach

Sadly, OC Health Care Agency reports that 1,524 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including two new deaths reported today (November 14). There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 64,586 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 528 cases today.

The county reports that there have been 1,333 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of 15 cases today. This represents a per capita rate of 15.290 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 30 percent of ICU beds and 65 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 235 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 90 are in ICU.

The county estimates 56,154 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 14 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 14 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 14 20 3

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 14, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


COVID-19: 2 new deaths and 598 new cases reported in OC, 7 new cases in Newport Beach

Sadly, OC Health Care Agency reports that 1,522 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including two new deaths reported today (November 13). There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 64,058 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 598 cases today.

The county reports that there have been 1,318 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of seven cases today. This represents a per capita rate of 15.118 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 30 percent of ICU beds and 64 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 244 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 95 are in ICU.

The county estimates 56,018 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 13 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 13 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 13 20 3

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 13, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


Local writers published in book of short stories and essays inspired by COVID-19

A bad case of cabin fever got you down? A cure for pandemic boredom is reading a good book. Writing in Place: Stories from the Pandemic (Mars Street Press) features short stories and essays by local writers. The book was inspired by COVID-19 and the range of emotional experiences brought about by this surreal time. 

Barbara DeMarco-Barrett, author of Pen on Fire: A Busy Woman’s Guide to Igniting the Writer Within, and host of the public radio show and podcast Writers on Writing, brings together 17 writers from her long-term writing workshops, Writers Block Party and the Literary Possé, to produce this eclectic collection. 

Local writers bookcover

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Submitted photo

“Writing in Place: Stories from the Pandemic” available on Amazon 

According to DeMarco-Barrett, the editor of this collection and a longtime resident of Corona del Mar, “The pieces range from the dystopian to the apocalyptic. There are mystery stories, as well as stories exploring love and grief. Together, the compilation celebrates the triumph of the human spirit and the importance of art during dark times.”

This diverse roster of writers includes Dina Andre, Nancy Carpenter, Cindy Trane Christeson, Angela Cybulski, Amelia Dellos, Barbara DeMarco-Barrett, Phil Doran, Anne Dunham, Jennifer Irani, Stephanie King, Jan Mannino, Rosalia Mattern, Marla Noel, Lisa Richter, Dianne Russell, Catherine Singer, Marrie Stone, Laurie Sullivan and Judy Wagner.

If buyers purchase today, November 13, it will help the book reach a wider audience by getting on Amazon’s top-seller list. 

To purchase on Amazon, click here.

After you purchase the book, please be sure to leave a review. 

For more information, contact Barbara DeMarco-Barrett at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Hoag has been cleared for takeoff at John Wayne Airport

Hoag and John Wayne Airport (JWA) officials announced plans for the Fly Well Clinic, a first-of-its-kind health care facility offering travelers health services including office visits, telehealth consultations, immunizations, treatment of cold and flu symptoms and prescriptions.

The partnership represents the first airport health clinic in Orange County and comes at a time of heightened health awareness among passengers and airport employees.

In advance of the Fly Well Clinic’s official opening next spring, Hoag is hosting a Pop-up Health Fair at JWA, which began yesterday. Located across from Gate 10 in Terminal B (post security), Hoag is offering airport guests complimentary flu vaccinations and screenings, nutrition and exercise tips for travelers, virtual reality health demonstrations and more.

Hoag has been cleared

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Courtesy of Hoag Hospital

Rendering of Hoag Fly Well Clinic at John Wayne Airport

“The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world’s travel habits, shining a spotlight brighter than ever on passengers’ health and travel safety,” Hoag President and CEO Robert T. Braithwaite said. “Hoag is proud to partner with John Wayne Airport to address the health care needs of the 10 million people who fly to or from the airport every year.”

“John Wayne Airport continually innovates to help our guests connect to their travel destination in a way that is safe and secure, and this partnership aligns perfectly with our mission,” said Airport Director Barry Rondinella. “As the highest-ranked health care provider in Orange County, Hoag is uniquely positioned to address our guests’ specific health care needs, as well as the needs of the nearly 900 people who work at the airport. We are excited by what the Fly Well Clinic will mean to airport guests, employees and tenants.”

The permanent 850-square-foot Fly Well Clinic, opening in spring 2021, will offer an onsite licensed health care provider, general health and wellness information and other services, including:

–On-site office visits.

–Treatment of cold and flu symptoms.

–Rapid COVID-19 testing.

–Vaccinations including flu shots.

–A Virtual Reality demonstration, including relaxation and mindfulness journeys.

–Blood pressure and other vital screenings.

–On demand telehealth appointments.

The Fly Well Clinic will also provide travelers and airport employees with the ability to access Hoag doctors through on-demand telehealth appointments including video visits.

“Hoag believes in meeting people where they are on their health care journey. In this case, we are taking that philosophy literally,” Braithwaite said. “Hoag is excited to be JWA’s partner in providing travelers access to health care services on their travel journey.”


Wreaths across America returns to Pacific View Memorial Park

National Wreaths Across America Day will be celebrated on Saturday, Dec. 19. We can help remember, honor and teach by recognizing our local heroes at Pacific View Mortuary & Memorial Park in Corona del Mar at 9 a.m. Help the NBCC Dewsweepers & Friends respect those who have served by sponsoring a wreath. To date, this group has sponsored wreaths for 1,368 of the 8,000 veterans at this local cemetery.

You can sponsor a wreath for $15 at Pacific View by visiting www.wreathsacrossamerica.org/CA0551.

Wreaths Across America cemetery

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Courtesy of Wreaths Across America

Wreaths Across America honors our veterans laid to rest

Each sponsorship goes toward a fresh balsam veteran’s wreath that will be placed on the headstone of an American hero as we honor veterans laid to rest.

There are also opportunities to volunteer to hang wreaths.

Dewsweepers & Friends is a group that comprises about 24 gentlemen who play golf together at Newport Beach Country Club (NBCC). They try to tee it up early in the morning, hence the name Dewsweepers. Longtime NBCC member Doug Forde connected with Wreaths Across America to help recognize fallen soldiers locally.

“We are really looking forward to adding more than 1,500 additional wreaths to Pacific View due to the generosity of the NBCC Dewsweepers & Friends,” said Forde. “Everyone is invited to help place the wreaths on our honored service men and women. Old and young are invited to help.”

To date, Wreaths Across America has placed more than two million sponsored veterans’ wreaths at more than 2,200 participating sites nationwide.

Pacific View Mortuary & Memorial Park is located at 3500 Pacific View Drive, Corona del Mar.


BCYC raises funds for “Home for the Holidays” program for Marine Special Forces

With a tough 2020 almost behind them, the holiday season will be a lot brighter for a select group of United States Marines stationed at Camp Pendleton thanks to the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club’s (BCYC) “Special Forces Home for the Holidays” program, spearheaded by BCYC member and former Marine, Richard (Dick) Stone. To date, BCYC has raised the funds necessary to send more than 1,000 Marines home to spend the holidays with their families since the program began in 2004. “Home for the Holidays” is focused on three Marine units that include the First Force Reconnaissance Company, the First Marine Special Operations Battalion and the First Marine Radio Battalion. 

Thanks to generous donations and support from club members, each year Stone has meticulously arranged transportation for Marines who might not otherwise be able to travel home for the holidays – and this year, Stone says it is even more important due to the COVID pandemic and lockdown, which has restricted travel for many. 

BCYC Opening Day 2019

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Courtesy of BCYC

U.S. Marines at the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club, opening day in 2019

“We started ‘Home for the Holidays’ in 2003 with BCYC hosting 10 Marines from the First Force Recon to enjoy the Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade.  The next year, more were invited to opening day ceremonies, then prime rib nights, and Las Commodores began hosting luncheons for wives of deployed Marines. That has expanded to our annual Toy Drive in support of the Battalion Christmas Party, which has also morphed to our successful ‘Home for the Holidays’ program,” said Stone. 

“The success of the program is a result of the support of our members who have generously donated funds, hosted events, and lent their time and resources in support of our troops. These Marines are the first to fight and we want them to know how much they are appreciated, as well as acknowledge the sacrifices their families make when they are deployed,” Stone explained.

Stone was honored in 2017 for his efforts when the United States Marine Corps named him their chosen recipient of the “Spirit of Hope Award,” which he accepted during a ceremony held at the Pentagon presented by then Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis. General Paul J. Selva, Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Brigadier General Dennis A. Crall, Director, C4/Chief Information Officer of the U.S. Marine Corps, presented the award. 

The Spirit of Hope Award is presented for outstanding service to the United States of America and is awarded to men and women of the United States Armed Forces, entertainers and other distinguished Americans and organizations that exhibit extraordinary patriotism and service. Bob Hope was designated the first honoree for his decades of entertaining the troops, both in peacetime and in combat zones. The honor was bestowed by the United State Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton.

For more information about Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club’s “Special Forces Home for the Holidays” program, visit www.bcyc.org.


Newport Beach Public Library presents Sunday Musicale with cello trio

Newport Beach Public Library (NBPL) presents three cellists – Ashley Kim, Inhee Na and Wonsun Keem – in its next virtual Sunday Musicale, beginning November 15 at 9 a.m.

The three cellists will be performing music from different periods and styles with various techniques of cello playing. From Beethoven and Bach, to the contemporary composer Shostakovich, and from classical music to the famous movie soundtrack from Studio Ghibli, you will enjoy hearing familiar repertoires performed by the cello trio.

Newport Beach Public Library Ashley Kim

Photos courtesy of NBPL

Ashley Kim

Ashley Kim is a cello teacher and performer who resides in Orange County. She received a BA from Seoul National University and MM from the Juilliard School. She also studied at USC. She is a winner of prestigious competitions such as Dong-a International and the Korean Broadcasting System competition. She appeared as a soloist with Seoul City Orchestra, Korean Broadcasting Symphony, Daejeon City Orchestra and I Artisti Orchestra. She was a principal cellist at Del Gesu Strings and has had concert tours around the world including Chile and Ecuador. Kim continues to perform recitals throughout Orange County and Seoul, Korea. She is a chairperson of Chamber Music Connect and regularly appears at Chamber music concerts of CMC at Concordia University. She teaches orchestra classes at Savanna School District, Centralia School District and Santiago Canyon College.

Newport Beach Public Library Inhee Na

Inhee Na

Inhee Na earned her Bachelor of Music from Korea National University of Arts, continuing her education in Vienna, Cologne (Master), and Berlin (Konzertexamen). She received additional training in master classes with world famous cellists, such as Mstislav Rostropovich and Janos Starker. She received first prize at the Felix-Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Domenico-Gabrielli, Joong-Ang and KBS competitions, as well as the Kronberg Cello Festival. A dedicated educator, Na has held teaching positions for cello and chamber music at Korea National University of Arts, Chung-Ang University and Suk-Myung Women’s University. She is the featured soloist with all major Korean orchestras, the LA Sinfonietta and the Korean-American Youth Orchestra at Walt Disney Hall. She has performed throughout Europe and Asia, and is currently the principal cellist of the LA Sinfonietta and a member of the cello quartet LA Cellisten.

Newport Beach Public Library Wonsun Keem

Wonsun Keem

Wonsun Keem started playing the cello when she was 13 years old and graduated from Seoul Arts High School, received her Bachelor of Music at Seoul National University, and her Master of Music at Yale University. Throughout her music career, she has won numerous major music competitions including the Korea America Corporation Music competition and Baroque String Competition as a soloist. While attending Yale School of Music, she performed in a piano trio, string quartet and piano quartet. She has performed countless times in the Seoul Arts Center, Sejong Arts Center, Maria Callas Hall, Kumho Arts Hall, Tokyo Opera City Hall, Osaka Symphony Hall, Sprague Hall, Carnegie Hall in New York and Walt Disney Hall in Los Angeles. Since moving to Los Angeles, Keem has joined the Landmark String Quartet and Dream Orchestra. She also believes in giving back through music education, and teaches the next generation of musicians throughout the Los Angeles area.

This concert was filmed locally as part of NBPL’s Virtual Programming. Music lovers can view the concert for free at www.newportbeachlibrary.org/ebranch/virtual-programming.

This event is funded by generous donations from the Friends of the Library.  Newport Beach Public Library presents a variety of programs that foster cultural arts enrichment. For more information, contact the library at 949.717.3800, option 2, or visit the website at www.newportbeachlibrary.org.


COVID-19: 6 new deaths reported in OC, 4 new cases in Newport Beach

Sadly, OC Health Care Agency reports that 1,520 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including six new deaths reported yesterday (November 12). There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 63,460 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 295 cases yesterday.

The county reports that there have been 1,311 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of four cases yesterday. This represents a per capita rate of 15.038 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 30 percent of ICU beds and 64 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 251 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 89 are in ICU.

The county estimates 55,777 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 12 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 12 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 12 20 3

Click on photos for larger images

Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 12, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


2020 Election results

2020 Election results


Beauty from above

Beauty from above

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Photo by Emily Kaszton (Instagram @thedroneangel)

Basking in the beauty from above along the coast of Newport Beach


CdM resident wins baseball’s National League MVP

Corona del Mar resident Freddie Freeman of the Atlanta Braves has won the 2020 Most Valuable Player Award for the National League. The award was announced yesterday.

Freeman received 28 of 30 first-place ballots that were voted on by members of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America.

Mookie Betts of the Los Angeles Dodgers finished second in the overall voting and also received the other two first place ballots.

San Diego Padres third baseman Manny Machado was third.

Freeman and his wife, Chelsea, moved to CdM with their young son in 2019 and spend the off-season in town.

Freddy grew up playing baseball in Orange at El Modena High School.


District 1 Town Hall to discuss area concerns

Diane Dixon will host a District 1 virtual Town Hall meeting on Thursday, Nov. 19 at 5 p.m. and the public is invited.

Topics on the agenda include:

–Oceanfront Boardwalk safety.

–Recent changes to short-term rental housing regulations.

–New City fire station.

–Lido water main replacement.

Registration in advance is required. Go here to sign up. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Measurable progress being made on the City’s homelessness front

Tom headshot 8 1.25.20The homelessness issue is always a difficult one to find solutions to, primarily because of the old adage not in my backyard

For example, past discussions for a Newport Beach solution have included a possible homeless facility being built in the City’s Corporation Yard on Superior Avenue. But, as you might expect, the City of Costa Mesa didn’t like that idea because residents of the facility would primarily spill out into Costa Mesa during the daytime, forcing them to probably deal with any related issues.

When other areas or neighborhoods in Newport Beach were brought up, people objected.

Well, the City has been venturing down a couple of paths in recent time. The first is “working with a recommended developer to build up to 50 units of permanent, supportive housing within the City.”

That idea still doesn’t answer the “where” issue.

Another path is an offer from Costa Mesa to create a regional partnership for shelter services to be shared with Newport Beach.

Discussions on that front are heating up. A possible facility in the Airway Avenue area is being bandied about, with both cities seriously discussing and hopefully finalizing the idea over the next month or so.

That plan would be for a 70-bed facility to be constructed, utilizing a $2.5 million grant from the County of Orange. Newport Beach would then lease 20 of those beds for their use.

It seems like a potential win-win.

It’s also nice that the leadership of both cities seems to be amicably working together to get this issue handled.

If all goes to plan, we could have a completion date of sometime in March.

Currently, how is the homeless issue progressing in Newport Beach these days?

A report presented to City Council last month shows major progress, stating that “many previously homeless individuals and families have been sheltered in motels during the past several months under the statewide initiative known as Project Roomkey. Others were placed into sober-living facilities, supportive housing, congregate living and other housing arrangements.”

City staff estimates that the number of homeless individuals in the City has gone from an average of 60-70 at any given time in early 2020, to between 20-30 as of last month.

According to the report, here are some of the specific signs of progress:

–Under Project Roomkey, 33 people who were housed in local motels during the pandemic continue to stay there and remain off the streets.

–A longtime Newport Beach resident, who has been homeless for six years, moved into a sober living home and is now employed full-time after successfully completing a rehabilitation program.

–A veteran, who previously lived in a tent near the Balboa Pier, has been placed in “new supportive housing.”

–A family of four that was living in a van is now in permanent housing.

–Several other recently homeless have rejoined out-of-state family members and are leaving the area.

–A facility called The Cove is operating with 12 units of affordable housing specifically designed for military vets.

So how is the City accomplishing these successes? Well, the “City utilizes an interdepartmental Rapid Response Team to quickly address homeless issues and related concerns. The team includes a full-time Homeless Coordinator and a Homeless Liaison Officer from the police department. These efforts are supplemented with contracted support from City Net, a homeless outreach agency, and Orange County social service agencies.

“Newport Beach and City Net staff work together to engage regularly with homeless individuals and direct them to appropriate county, state and federal resources with a goal of permanently sheltering all those who are experiencing homelessness.”

All of this has translated into 1,287 outreach meetings conducted with homeless individuals since March. 

The City, from the Mayor through staff is to be commended.

• • •

Last issue we mentioned the King Tides coming this Sunday and Monday. According to Newport Beach Utilities Director Mark Vukojevic, the City is prepared.

“The Utilities and Public Works Departments are ready for this weekend’s King Tides and, knock on wood, tides and weather seem to be looking good,” said Vukojevic. “We do expect some localized flooding from seawall leaks (and such), and we will have extra crews roving to respond to pump those down.

  “Two physical metrics we look for are forecasted weather and the difference between actual and predicted tides. So far this week, the actual vs. predicted tides are tracking very close to each other. In other words, the actual high tide is not much higher than the predicted high tide. 

“Last week was a different story, where we saw the actual high tide was about eight inches higher than the predicted.”

The weather calls for sunny skies this weekend with no rain or high winds. The first high tide is expected Sunday at 8:23 a.m. at +6.89 ft. and Monday at 9:02 a.m. at +6.85 ft. Corresponding low tides those days will be -1.27 ft. at 3:23 p.m. on Sunday and -1.28 ft. at 4:13 p.m. on Monday.

• • •

It’s tough enough in normal years to plan and organize an auction for a community fundraiser. One can only imagine trying to put one together in today’s environment.

Well, the always popular Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce Christmas Boat Parade Auction is being forced to go virtual this year. The auction is the fundraising backbone for the Chamber in conducting their business to successfully manage said Boat Parade.

Bottom line, they need donations. Your item will be listed in their online auction catalog that will go to thousands of people, it will also be promoted on the Chamber’s website and in their promotional emails. Join in by simply clicking www.christmasboatparade.com/auction/, fill out the form and the Chamber will follow up. If you have questions you can call 949.729.4400.


Take Five: Meet Amanda Boyer, Activities Director for Newport Harbor High School

By AMY SENK

Newport Harbor High School students have returned to campus, along with other high schoolers in the Newport-Mesa district, all part of the latest COVID adjustments leading to the current hybrid schedule. But even last spring and earlier this schoolyear, when classes were held online instead of on campus, when sports were junked and rallies and dances put on hold, school spirit has been strong and persistent – thanks to the students and staff who comprise Associated Student Body, or ASB, groups on each individual campus. I caught up with Amanda Boyer, Newport Harbor’s activities director, to learn more about how school spirit survives a pandemic.

Take Five Amanda Boyer

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Courtesy of Amanda Boyer

Amanda Boyer

Q: What kinds of activities do the Newport Harbor ASB students plan over the course of a typical year?

A: In a typical year, ASB students plan things like registration and first day of school hospitality, club rush, pep rallies, homecoming festivities, dances and events, lunchtime activities, kindness week, culture night, welcome aboard events for incoming freshmen, senior class events and much more. They also support many of the programs and events on campus, from guiding lost parents at back-to-school night, to cheering on the field hockey team in a big game, to attending a play in our theater, they are always looking for ways to build school spirit on our campus. ASB students also participate in district task forces such as the Human Relations Task Force and Mental Health Task Force, district-wide kindness week and beach clean-up and other community events. 

Q: Obviously, this is not a typical year. How have things been changed to deal with remote learning rather than on-campus events?

A: This has been a dramatic change for ASB. The students are passionate about working towards a positive, inclusive and fun school culture where students exude Sailor pride in all they do. This is often most achievable when they can have shared experiences with their classmates and come together to support one another, but since they weren’t able to gather in person, ASB students have been forced to get creative online. We started our Hybrid Schedule (earlier this week) and went to a Level 2 Hybrid Model, and it was really nice to see students on campus again. From a giant poster wall to yard signs welcoming students back to music playing in the quad to NH masks everywhere, it was a great morning filled with Sailor Spirit. We look forward to getting creative with all that being on campus now allows when it comes to school spirit and shared experiences.

Q: What has happened with school dances and events like the Battle of the Bay rally?

A: As we transition to hybrid, we are hopeful that we will be able to come up with some fun and creative ways to gather students in a safe way. Since CIF pushed the sports calendar back, we are also hopeful that we will still have Battle of the Bay athletic competitions and a rally where we can continue to have fun with the longtime rivalry against that one school across the bay. 

Q: How have ASB students been handling this strange situation?

A: Overall the ASB students have kept their spirits high. They have had to think outside the box, get creative and work together in a new way. 

Q: What have been the most successful new events and traditions to come out of this situation?

A: Social media has been the biggest platform for ASB so far this year. They have worked hard to create content online for social media to connect students to one another and to Newport Harbor. From contests to teacher takeovers to a virtual tour of campus to funny videos with teachers, such as “Chemistry on Halloween,” they have had to get creative with their content. They have also used their Instagram platform to highlight and promote the videos that many other programs have created to perform such as Dance Team and Vocal Music. We (also) currently have 57 clubs at NHHS. Our Club Rush this year was virtual, and most clubs have been meeting at their Faculty Advisor’s Zoom code during lunchtime. The club presidents have been very active in promoting their clubs and running meetings so that students can get connected to something they are passionate about. 

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk is a longtime resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Nominators share Stu News/Spa Gregorie’s Promotion winners

Stu News Newport is excited to publish the winning submissions for our “Rest for the Best: De-stress. Refresh. Restore. Promotion” in partnership with Spa Gregorie’s. Thank you to the nominators who shared their compelling emails about those deserving of a luxurious pampering experience at Spa Gregorie’s Newport Beach. We look forward to hearing from each of the winners about their memorable spa day.

Winner: Sarah Jay

Nominator: Darcie Dodds Schott, co-worker and friend

I’d like to nominate my co-worker for the “gift of a treatment” promotion at Spa Gregorie’s.

I have worked with Sarah Jay for four years and have gotten to know her as a friend as well. Less than a week before the COVID quarantine shut everything down in March and mandated everyone stay at home, Sarah accepted the placement of an 11-year-old foster daughter in her home. Sarah had been preparing to be a foster mom, and hopefully adopt the right placement, for several years. Who would have predicted the intensity in which this chapter of her life would play out! Sarah is single, faithful, and knew that her fate included welcoming a daughter into her life, though she expected to ease into the process with time to adjust while she was at work, the daughter at school...not all day, every day together from day one.

Sarah went from working in our Santa Ana-based office – where we serve low-income and foster kids like the one now living with Sarah (www.thinktogether.org) – to working remotely from home indefinitely, with 24-7 parenting on her plate.

Sarah has stepped into her new role with respect and humility, caring for a pre-teen girl who comes with a hefty amount of emotional needs, and it’s been rewarding but also demanding in ways she couldn’t have imagined. The girl Sarah had met a handful of times leading up to March has been in foster care for years because her birth mother is an addict and in prison. The girl’s father is out of the picture and also in and out of prison.

Sarah is committed to bringing light to the girl’s mostly dark world, and this has resulted in plenty of days weighted down by intense conversations, occasional arguments, and all the rest that comes along with raising a pre-teen girl. She has done an amazing job of balancing the young girl’s unique needs, supporting monitored visits with the birth mom who is for the time being out of prison, and trying to remember her own well-being during the minimal time she has when her foster daughter is at church under another adult’s supervision.

I would be moved to know that Spa Gregorie’s would give Sarah a little TLC to recharge her body and mind with some well-deserved indulgence.

Thanks for taking the time to read my request,

Darcie Dodds Schott

Winner: Tasha Gillespie

Nominator: Jerry Weichman, boss

I would very much like to nominate one of my team members for the Spa Gregorie’s giveaway.

Here’s some background:

My husband and I run a pediatric and adolescent mental health practice, the Weichman Clinic at Hoag Neurosciences Institute. Our team of clinicians treats pretty much every mental health issue a child or teen can deal with and we are supported by an incredible administrative team.

During pre-COVID times, our front desk team regularly fielded calls from stressed out parents looking for ways to help their children’s mental health and our team does an incredible job showing empathy, support and responsiveness. However, since the COVID crisis, the frequency of full-panic, emotional parent phone calls has gone through the roof. But one of our employees stands out in particular, Tasha Gillespie.

Tasha is a single mom of a preschool age daughter and in addition to working with us, she also is putting herself through college online to fulfill pre-nursing requirements. She also supports her mother, who also lives with them. Her plate has always been very full, and she never complains.

When the COVID quarantine hit, Tasha’s partner at our front desk decided that due to health reasons they had to work remotely for the next year. While understandable, this left Tasha alone at our front desk to field these phone calls completely solo plus help handle all of our other administrative needs. The stress level of the families we treat has increased consistently since March, the types of urgent and intense calls coming to Tasha from parents looking for help for their children has sky-rocketed, and the emotional meltdowns occurring via phone are at an all-time high. In addition to handling scheduling for 17 doctors and therapists and troubleshooting telehealth issues for our remote patients, Tasha has also found herself as a surrogate therapist to some of these parents who need to vent to ANYONE about all of the things going wrong.

Her attitude is upbeat and positive, she never complains, and she does an incredible job handling the challenges with grace and dignity. We can tell she is stressed out from her workload and definitely deserves some pampering but would never take the time to treat herself. We think she would be an outstanding candidate to receive this treat from Spa Gregorie’s. She truly has been on the frontlines of the mental health crisis created by COVID-19.

As an aside, Spa Gregorie’s was the only source of disinfectant we could find in the early COVID days and due to them we were able to keep our offices sanitized for the patients who needed to be seen in person. We were so grateful for their pivot and in a way, they really did help us stay open so we could continue helping others.

Thanks for the consideration!

Cara Weichman on behalf of Jerry Weichman


Steel, Petrie-Norris and Min win seats for Washington and Sacramento

Although election results have not been certified as final, it is apparent that Michelle Steel, Cottie Petrie-Norris and Dave Min have all won their races.

Steel, who ran against Harley Rouda in the very hotly contested 48th Congressional race, accepted his concession earlier in the week in announcing her victory.

Steel finished with more than 200,000 votes and edged Rouda 51 to 49 percent.

In his concession, Rouda hinted at a possible return in two years to challenge Steel for another shot at the seat.

Another race that has remained extremely close is the 74th State Assembly races between incumbent Cottie Petrie-Norris and Newport Beach City Councilwoman Diane Dixon.

Although several thousand votes remain throughout Orange County, Petrie-Norris’ lead appears to be insurmountable. She presently leads in the counting with 132,776 of the votes, compared to Dixon’s 130,072.

In the 37th State Senate, challenger and UC Irvine Law professor Dave Min beat incumbent John Moorlach in gaining more than 51 percent of the vote.

City council races in Newport Beach had incumbents Will O’Neill and Brad Avery winning, and challenger Noah Blom convincingly beating incumbent Jeff Herdman with nearly 60 percent of the vote.

Mayor O’Neill’s vote total is far and away the highest council total in city history with 40,799.

Another city race was the Measure Z Harbor Commission ballot initiative that easily passed with 55 percent of the vote.

Finally, the Newport-Mesa School Board will welcome three new Trustees in Leah Ersoylu, Carol Crane and Krista Weigand.

The vote totals are below and will be updated again once certified.


Workshops seek community input on the future of housing

Newport Beach faces a challenge imposed by Governor Gavin Newson of planning for an additional 4,834 housing units within the City over the next decade. The question city officials are facing is where do they go?

With that in mind, the city is inviting the community to discuss issues faced with the Regional Housing Needs Allocation being imposed. Two collaborative, virtual workshops are scheduled for Monday, Nov. 16 and Tuesday, Nov. 17.

The first workshop on November 16 at 6 p.m. will focus on the airport area and western portions of the city, including West Newport and West Newport Mesa. The second one on November 17, also beginning at 6 p.m., will focus on Newport Center and the Coyote Canyon Landfill. 

Both workshops will take place over Zoom with additional input opportunities offered online.How should Newport Beach housing grow in the future? The community is invited to discuss that question and provide input during two collaborative, virtual workshops scheduled for Nov. 16 and 17. | November 9, 2020 These workshops will help shape the city’s “suitability” of housing densities, which will be included in an update to the General Plan.

These workshops continue a series of virtual workshops, online activities and educational videos to engage Newport Beach residents in the General Plan update. The workshops will be discussion-based, with polls and surveys incorporated. 

To attend the meeting, residents must register here, or for more information visit www.NewportTogether.com.

If you are not able to attend the live workshops, you can watch the recordings at www.NewportTogether.com and then provide input at your convenience.

The city’s General Plan Housing Element details the city’s strategy for enhancing and preserving community character and identifies strategies for expanding housing. The Circulation Element governs how cars and people move through the city on local roadways, buses, ferries and trails. Over the next few months, the City of Newport Beach will host more opportunities to provide input into the housing.


You Must Remember This: The Broering family

By NANCY GARDNER

The Broering family has a long history in our city. Hans and Marge lived on Amethyst on the Island with their three children – Ann, Bubba (Larry) and Weegee (Gretchen). Aunt Gretchen, for whom Weegee is named, lived in an apartment over the garage. Aunt Gretchen was a working woman, and that is my memory of her – in a well-tailored, well-designed suit with excellent shoes. I’m sure she wore casual clothes at some point, but I can’t remember an instance.  Weegee was quite a bit younger than her siblings, I so I never knew her well. I knew Bubba a bit better. It was an accepted fact – with as much viability as many accepted facts – that he only ate two things growing up...hamburger meat and ice cream. Despite that limited diet, he grew up a healthy specimen who easily qualified to be a summer lifeguard for the city. For those of us who knew him it was amazing that he passed the test, not because he wasn’t a good swimmer but because he was practically blind. When he guarded at Little Corona, the regulars acted as an extra set of eyes to be sure he didn’t miss a flailing swimmer.

As for the parents, Marge was famous for the sweaters she knitted. I don’t know that I appreciated her talent that much until I attempted to knit one for my then-husband. He was 5’10” with a swimmer’s build. The sweater I ended up with would have looked big on LeBron. I realized then just what a talent Marge had.  As for Hans, the most remarkable thing about him to me as a child was his name.  Other fathers had names like John and Mike and Bob. Hans sounded very exotic.  The only other one I could think of was Hans Brinker. However, compared to the boy with his finger in the dike, Hans didn’t seem very heroic. Little did I know.  Many years later when doing some research, I discovered his significant role in our city’s history. He was one of the Young Turks (YTs) in the early 50s that wrested political power from the Balboa set that ran the city for years. Working together, the YTs developed the city charter and got it passed by voters, paving the way for our city’s evolution. If you look at the charter, he’s one of the signers.  He also served on the city council. Maybe not as dramatic as a finger in the dike, but certainly noteworthy.

You Must Remember Broering

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Courtesy of Nancy Gardner

(L-R) On the stand – Nancy Gardner, Christin Neal and Ann Broering who is waving her hat. In front is Marge Broering taking the photo next to Ann’s horse, Annie. This image took place at the Pasture in the 1950s, long before any development in the hills.

I don’t know that Ann and I had much choice being friends in our early years since our mothers were good chums, but we became good friends on our own, partly drawn together by our love of horses. It was Ann and I along with Christin Neal who climbed down one side of Morning Canyon and up the other to discover a horse which we followed until we came upon Al Beltran. We persuaded our parents to buy the horse ($60) and pay for the board ($12/month) to roam what is now Crystal Cove State Park plus Cameo Shores. We were soon followed by lots of other girls (and a few boys) and the establishment of the Pasture. We eventually all got our own horses: mine a pale palomino called Rangle, Ann’s a chestnut named Annie, and Christin’s black and white pinto called Glory Be – and charged around in heady equestrian freedom.

Ann was very creative. Whenever we put on a horse show, she would design the posters that the rest of us put together under her direction and which the various businesses in Corona del Mar let us put in the window. I don’t recall a single person ever coming to one of our horse shows as a result, but we had the satisfaction of seeing the announcements as we walked through town. Ann had wanted to be a teacher for as long as I knew her. Graduating with her general credential she started teaching elementary school and found she hated it! She worked at the Five Crowns for a period while she determined her next step and then tapped into her creative streak and became an interior designer, working for the Warmingtons, among others.

She was very astute in her choice of husbands. Don Roberson was probably the most upbeat person I’ve ever met. He also went into real estate, and I remember seeing him during one of those periodic collapses of the housing market. The industry was hemorrhaging jobs, including Don’s. He scrambled to find work and ended up in the sort of situation that sends the average person into a deep depression. Not Don. It was honest work and he was glad to have a job – the original lemonade guy. I imagine that kind of character wears well in a marriage.

Ann and Don lived in the desert for a period because of work, spent some time in North Laguna, but after Don’s death – way too soon – Ann moved back to Newport which seems appropriate given her father’s legacy as one of the shapers of its success. 

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, longtime resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Shredding Newport

Shredding Newport

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Photo by Stan Sievers (Instagram @stansievers)

 Surfer Tom Rezvan enjoys surfing a nice set


Crystal Cove Conservancy cancels tree lighting

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, following health and safety guidance from the state and county departments of health and California State Parks, Crystal Cove Conservancy has canceled its annual tree lighting and holiday bazaar.

The Crystal Cove holiday tradition, typically held in early December, has been bringing community and families together for holiday cheer for 23 years.

Crystal Cove shack and tree

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Courtesy of Crystal Cove Conservancy

Crystal Cove decorated during the holiday season

“We are of course sad not to be able to host this wonderful event again this year, but the health and safety of our members, park-goers, staff and volunteers remains our top priority. We look forward to gathering with our neighbors again next year to welcome Santa back to the beach,” said Kate Wheeler, Conservancy president and CEO. “Through this crisis, we’ve all seen how important protected natural spaces like Crystal Cove are to communities, and we hope our neighbors and supporters will find their way here to explore the quiet of the park in winter until we can gather together again,” she added.

While in-person gatherings are on hold for now, the Conservancy continues to provide important environmental education programs via distance learning through virtual field trips, hands-on home explorations and engaging virtual materials, helping inspire underserved students from some of the most under-resourced schools. Each of these programs is tied to real conservation projects in the Park and to rigorous Next Generation Science Standards, ensuring that important habitat restoration projects continue and that the programs are meeting real needs of teachers struggling to adapt curriculum to remote learning. 

For more information, visit www.crystalcove.org.


Local group completes Marriott Hotel purchase and plans large investment

By GARY SHERWIN

Many in the Newport Beach business community were surprised and even a bit concerned when the city’s largest hotel, the 532room Newport Beach Marriott Hotel and Spa, was sold last week to a local investment group for a reported $200 million.

Was it because of the business downturn related to COVID-19? Was the property in distress? Why were they selling it now? I fielded several calls from some anxious local people concerned about the future of the property and its General Manager and prominent business leader, Debbie Snavely.

It turns out the worries are unfounded. Ultimately, it was about a signature Newport Beach hotel and some local residents who saw an opportunity to reinvigorate a prized asset.

The Pickup and Martin families, who live here and already own the Balboa Bay Resort and the Newport Beach Country Club, thought they could be good stewards of a hotel they drive by every day on their way to work in Newport Center.

Gary Sherwin

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Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Gary Sherwin

The Pickups and Martins’ real estate investment entity, Eagle Four Partners, joined with Lyon Living, founded by the late real estate icon General William Lyon and CEO Frank Suryan, to buy the property – reportedly the largest hotel deal in California this year. 

The Marriott purchase adds to Four Eagle’s hospitality assets which include hotels in Denver, San Diego, Napa and Reno.

Kory Kramer, an Eagle Four Partner and who previously served on the Newport Beach Planning Commission, put the deal together in a little more than two months, which is remarkable since the offer was unsolicited. HOST Hotels and Resorts Inc, a real estate investment company based in Bethesda, Md., owned the hotel for decades and made it clear that it wasn’t for sale.

But that didn’t stop Eagle Four from pursuing it. Kramer said that he and the family obviously knew the hotel well and saw tremendous opportunity in their hometown.

“We saw the hotel property as being a jewel in Newport Center, but we thought it had so much more potential,” Kramer said in an interview this week.

Perhaps most importantly, the purchase adds a fifth major Newport Beach hotel to be put into local ownership. In addition to the Irvine Company that owns Pelican Hill and Fashion Island Hotel, local developer Bob Olsen controls Lido House. Eagle Four purchased the Balboa Bay Resort and Club in 2012.

Having owners nearby is a great thing for Newport Beach and having that many under local control is highly unusual. Local owners usually have a greater vested interest in the health and maintenance of their hotel assets, and they have a commitment that is often times very personal to them.

That’s the case here and this deal is a particular point of pride for the Pickups, Martins and Lyon Living.

Kramer said that Newport Beach residents can expect a completely reimagined Marriott experience when the renovation, already scheduled for next year, is completed. HOST was already underway with a $30 million upgrade to the property starting in April. New ownership plans to spend tens of millions more.

“It will be a completely different experience from the arrival, to the pool area, event lawn area, spa and the guest room product,” Kramer said. Completion is expected by the end of 2021 just as the tourism industry recovers from the pandemic. “It is an important location at the heart of Newport Beach. We thought it needed good local ownership and stewardship like we’ve done with the Balboa Bay Resort and Newport Beach Country Club.”

Marriott will continue to manage and operate the hotel under a long-term agreement and to the relief of many, Debbie Snavely will continue to serve as General Manager. Snavely is active in many local organizations and was named by the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce as Citizen of the Year in 2018.

Snavely will be a vital part of the renovation and was involved during the sale process. “Part of buying a hotel is also securing the intellectual property and team members and Debbie is critical to that objective,” Kramer said. Snavely has been GM in Newport Beach for a decade.

Additionally, Eagle Four is exploring new synergies with the adjacent Newport Beach Country Club, but Kramer indicated that nothing has been finalized to date.

Did COVID-19 play a role in the sale? Perhaps. While the hotel wasn’t for sale, HOST has acknowledged that the pandemic has played havoc with a lot of their assets. That includes the 1,966-room Marriott Marquis Hotel in New York City, which has essentially been a tourism ghost town for months. A little unexpected cash right now was probably welcome.

The additional investment by Eagle Four and Lyon Living into the Marriott’s renovation will be a major game changer for the Newport Beach tourism scene; the biggest since they bought the Balboa Bay Resort and pumped millions into it.

When they purchased that property, it was a bit tired but is now a sleek contemporary property that has permitted them to go after higher rated business which has helped increase the city’s transient occupancy tax. They know how to reinvent hotels.

“We’re bullish on Newport Beach’s future and we believe strongly in the city. This is a pivotal asset in a beautiful urban village. Our goal is to create a really great experience for our community and guests,” Kramer said.

As Donald Bren, Chairman of the Irvine Company and developer Bob Olsen know, when you seriously invest in a luxury quality hotel product in Newport Beach, you rarely go wrong and the upside is pretty massive. 

The key point is that we’re fortunate that we have businessmen in town like Eagle Four and Lyon Living that when they can put their money anywhere, especially during an economic downturn, they choose to invest here. 

That’s an amazing statement of faith in our city and tourism industry.

Gary Sherwin is President & CEO of Visit Newport Beach and Newport Beach & Company.


Poolside snow and premier Boat Parade viewing at Balboa Bay Resort

This holiday season, Newport Beach’s premier waterfront resort, Balboa Bay Resort, will transform its outdoor pool into a Winter Wonderland with snow, warming cocktails, holiday movies and our community’s historic and iconic boat parade.

For the past 111 years, the Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade has floated through Newport Harbor, showcasing crafts of all sizes – from kayaks to multi-million-dollar yachts – decorated with hundreds of thousands of holiday lights. Balboa Bay Resort offers some of the best views of the parade. This year, the crowds and parade might look a little different, but ones of the perfect places to view the holiday spectacular has not changed.

To celebrate the parade taking place from December 16-20 and overall holiday season, the property will pop up a snowy Winter Wonderland at its outdoor pool, where the weather is notoriously warm and sunny each season. On select evenings (December 4 and 5, December 11 and 12, all nights of the boat parade and Christmas weekend) guests and Balboa Bay Club members will be treated to snow, holiday cocktails, hot chocolate and evening holiday movie screenings, or a live stream of the boat parade.

Poolside Boat Parade

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Photos courtesy of Balboa Bay Resort

The Balboa Bay Resort provides premier seating for the Christmas Boat Parade

Winter Wonderland Movie Schedule with snow begin falling at 6 p.m. and movies starting at 7 p.m.:

–Friday, Dec. 4 - Elf

–Saturday, Dec. 5 - The Nightmare Before Christmas

–Friday, Dec. 11 - The Grinch

–Saturday, Dec. 12 - Home Alone

–Wednesday, Dec. 16 through Sunday, Dec. 20 - The 112th Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade stream

–Friday, Christmas Day Dec. 25 - The Santa Clause

–Saturday, Dec. 26 - The Polar Express

The Winter Wonderland package, perfect for staycations or travelers who prefer palm trees over pine trees, includes:

–One-night stay in premier accommodations (all rooms have balconies – some of which have bird’s-eye views of the parade and others of Winter Wonderland movies.)

–VIP tickets to the Winter Wonderland event, which include:

~A dedicated private daybed, decorated for the holidays to view the movies.

~A curated holiday box amenity with s’more fixings, popcorn, pretzels, cookies and more.

–A cozy holiday blanket.

–Two smoked whiskey cocktails from A&O Kitchen+Bar’s new whiskey concierge.

Poolside Daybed

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A private daybed, poolside and decorated for the holidays, is the perfect cozy space to view the movies...complete with snow

Starting rates for the package begin at $439. Guests can book their stay any time based upon availability at www.BalboaBayResort.com, or by calling 949.630.4238. You do not need to purchase the package to participate in the Winter Wonderland festivities. Balboa Bay Club members can purchase tickets through reservations for $10 each.


Tickets to go on sale for Nights of 1000 Lights at Sherman Library & Gardens

Tickets go on sale to the general public on Tuesday, Nov. 17 for Sherman Library & Gardens’ “Nights of 1000 Lights.” Pre-sale tickets for members are available now through November 16.

Nights of 1000 Lights takes place for 10 days only: December 10 (Members Night), 11, 12, 13, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 and 22 from 5-9 p.m. each night.

Tickets to go on sale light tunnel

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Courtesy of Sherman Library & Gardens

The technicolor light tunnel is a highlight of this festive event

Stroll through Sherman Gardens safely this holiday season and experience a dazzling display of lights and entertainment. Listen to old-time Appalachian music, boogie through the Disco Inferno, strut down the technicolor light tunnel, add your wish to the wishing tree and discover surprises throughout the gardens.

Nights of 1000 Lights is happening with the comfort and well-being of Sherman Library & Gardens’ members, volunteers, guests and staff as the top priority.

The event features advance ticket sales only; no tickets will be sold at the gate. Tickets are $15 for Members, and $25 for Non-Members. Children 3 and under are free. All guests must wear a face covering and choose a time ticketed entry to ensure safe physical distancing to adhere to protocols. This beloved annual event will sell out.

Visit https://thesherman.org/event/nights-of-1000-lights-4/ for tickets.


2020 Election results

2020 Election results1112

 


COVID-19: 2 new deaths reported in OC, 7 new cases in Newport Beach

Sadly, OC Health Care Agency reports that 1,514 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including two new deaths reported today (November 11). There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 63,165 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 335 cases today.

The county reports that there have been 1,307 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of seven cases today. This represents a per capita rate of 14.992 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 31 percent of ICU beds and 63 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 244 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 83 are in ICU.

The county estimates 55,559 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 11 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 11 20 2

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 11, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


Rouda concedes as Steel will head to Washington

Congressman Harley Rouda acknowledges his defeat in 48th District race against Michelle Steel and looks to a possible rematch in 2022.

“We did not win this election,” said Rouda. “And while it isn’t the outcome we had hoped for, it’s never been more important for our leaders to hear the voice of the people, and to accept their judgement. I do.”

“While one campaign ends today, another is just beginning,” added Rouda. “I look forward to having voters compare my opponent’s two years in Congress with my accomplishments on November 8, 2022.”

Steel, on the other hand, accepted victory, “To the voters of Orange County, thank you for entrusting me to be your representative in Congress. In this election, you weren’t simply voting for a person, but also for the idea that the American Dream is alive and well in Orange County.”

The vote counts as of Tuesday night (Nov. 10) showed Steel with 199,133 votes or 51 percent, compared to Rouda with 191,341 votes and 49 percent.

Other races have Cottie Petrie-Norris still narrowly ahead of Diane Dixon in the race for the 74th Assembly. Petrie-Norris has 50.5 percent of the vote, with a vote count lead of 2,745 votes.

The 37th State Senate has Dave Min still ahead of John Moorlach with 51.2 percent of the vote.


2020 Election results

2020 Election results1111


COVID-19: 3 new deaths reported in OC, 4 new cases in Newport Beach

Sadly, OC Health Care Agency reports that 1,512 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including three new deaths reported today (November 10). There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 62,830 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 267 cases today.

The county reports that there have been 1,300 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of four cases today. This represents a per capita rate of 14.912 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 32 percent of ICU beds and 64 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 224 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 79 are in ICU.

The county estimates 55,330 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 10 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 10 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 10 20 3

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 10, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


Pets of the WeekDog and Cat print

Stu News Newport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

It is with the utmost excitement that the Newport Beach Animal Shelter has been given the opportunity of getting this sweet, bonded pair ready for adoption – Kary and Kandy.

Pets of the Week Kary and Kandy

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Courtesy of Newport Beach Animal Shelter

Meet Kary and Kandy

Meet Kandy and Kary. As a bonded pair for 10 years, they are both kind, completely loving and it’s wonderfully endearing to watch Kandy be Kary’s lead through this life. Both dogs are fun-loving senior chihuahua mixes. Kandy has the shorter coat and Kary has a longer coat. Kary requires grooming and she is blessed in her eyesight with being able to see shadows. Both dogs love everyone and bring light to all those they meet.

If you’ve been thinking about adoption and have been waiting to find a beautiful pair, then Kandy and Kary are definitely a dream come true. If you’d like to learn more about these gentle pups, feel free to contact the shelter at 949.718.3454 or email your interest to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Newport Beach Animal Shelter adoption fees:

–Adult Dogs - $150

–Puppies - $225

–Adult Cats - $90

–Kittens - $110

The shelter requires adoption applications as part of the adoption process; the easiest way to obtain the application is to head to the shelter’s website at www.FONBAS.org. There you will find the application plus more information about the shelter now and its goals for the future. 

Also, consider becoming a member of an incredible nonprofit that supports the city’s efforts with providing wonderful opportunities to stray, injured, ill and owner surrendered domestic pets.


Nordstrom Local arrives at Westcliff

With the goal of being closer to customers to better serve them on their terms, leading fashion retailer Nordstrom opened a 1,193-square-foot Nordstrom Local service hub at 2043 Westcliff Drive, Ste 103, Newport Beach on Friday, Nov. 6. 

“Opening Nordstrom Local service hubs in the Los Angeles area is part of the continuation of our market strategy in one of our largest markets to provide customers with greater access to merchandise selection and faster delivery while increasing convenience and connection through our services,” said Ken Worzel, chief operating officer at Nordstrom. “Nordstrom Local customers who engage with our services at a Local including curbside pick-up, returns, alterations and styling spend more than two-and-a-half times compared to other customers.”

Nordstrom Local customer

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Courtesy of Nordstrom

A customer checking out the new Nordstrom Local in Westcliff

At Nordstrom Local Newport Beach, customers will have access to the following services:

Order Pickup: Order today from www.Nordstrom.com, www.NordstromRack.com or www.HauteLook.com and pick it up in your neighborhood.

Contactless Curbside Pickup: Place an order online and choose curbside pick-up. When you arrive at your Nordstrom Local, they’ll bring your order out and place it in the trunk of your car.

Fast and Easy Returns: Dropoff your returns from Nordstrom, Nordstrom Rack, Haute Look, Trunk Club and other online retailers. They will take care of the rest.

Alterations: Get expert alterations on your purchases from Nordstrom, other retailers or items from your own closet. Need it fast? Enjoy same-day hems, sleeve shortening, sizing adjustments, simple repairs and more. Their alterations experts will make sure you have the perfect fit.

Styling: Expert stylists can help with everything from styling tips to helping advise on a complete wardrobe refresh at no cost to you.

Gift wrapping: Leave the wrapping to Nordstrom Local. In addition to complimentary signature silver boxes, they offer complimentary gift wrapping for all Nordstrom purchases. Gift-wrapped items can also be picked up in-store or via Curbside Pickup. Plus, the gift wrap is 100 percent recyclable. Non-Nordstrom purchases can be wrapped for $8 per package.

BEAUTYCYCLE: Bring in your empty beauty packaging to be recycled for free with Nordstrom BEAUTYCYCLE.

Clothing donation drop-off: In support of Nordstrom’s commitment to local communities, bring in your gently used fashion for drop-off at their donation box, which will be distributed to a local non-profit. 

Nordstrom Local’s operating hours are Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-8 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Sunday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Call 949.763.2922.


Local recognized for service by Assemblywoman this Veterans Day

Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris will be honoring six Orange County residents tomorrow, November 11, as 2020 Veterans of the Year.

The veterans were nominated by community members from the six cities comprising the 74th Assembly District. They are being honored for their service in the armed forces and in their communities. 

“Their service records span from World War II to current active duty and are reflective of the diversity and wealth of experience in our district,” said Petrie-Norris.

Local recognized Nancy Ise

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Submitted photo

Nancy Ise of Newport Beach, U.S. Navy Captain, retired

Nancy Ise has been selected to represent Newport Beach. Her employment career includes being the Assistant Director/Investigator for the Department of Labor-Veterans’ Employment and Training Service. During her 23 years she carried out the mission to prepare America’s veterans, service members and their spouses for meaningful careers, provide them with employment resources and expertise, protect their employment rights and promote their employment opportunities.

Ise was a Captain, U.S. Navy-retired. She served on active duty and in the Reserves during Vietnam through the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT). Other assignments included time as a Line Officer including communications, logistics, strategic planning, transportation and leadership training. 

Other representatives receiving honors as 2020 Veterans of the Year include Carol Singleton, U.S. Army from Costa Mesa; David Hayward, U.S. Air Force from Huntington Beach; Mohamed Omar Diab, U.S. Marine Corps. from Irvine; Anthony Michael Page, U.S. Army from Laguna Beach; and Gary Bain, U.S. Air Force from Laguna Woods.

A special Facebook live event will take place at 11 a.m. The community is invited to come together to celebrate them, and the sacrifices of so many like them.


“Raise the Roof” campaign begins to raise remaining funds for new City animal shelter

Furry friends who are lost, abandoned, or need a place to go when their owners are unable to care for them will have a new home thanks to Friends of Newport Beach Animal Shelter (FONBAS). 

A recently launched campaign, “Raise the Roof,” is underway seeking the remaining $500,000 to build a state-of-the-art animal shelter for Newport Beach. The initial campaign by FONBAS raised $2 million to buy the property and start planning for the building.

Two major donors, Doug and Eva Le Bon and the Audrey Steele Burnand family, joined to provide the initial funds to purchase an existing kennel property on Riverside Drive in Santa Ana Heights, very close to the City’s currently operated animal shelter. 

Now, the Le Bons have offered a matching challenge grant of $250,000 to kick off this next campaign, so every donated dollar is doubled.

Raise the Roof Valerie and Jonathan

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Courtesy of FONBAS

Valerie Schomburg, Newport Beach Police Department Animal Control Supervisor, Officer Bubbles (the dog) and Jonathan Langford, president of the board of directors, Friends of Newport Beach Animal Shelter (FONBAS)

“’Raise the Roof’ is the final step in a four-year campaign to benefit the animals and residents of the City of Newport Beach,” said FONBAS President and Corona del Mar resident Jonathan Langford. “Plans are in place to complete construction by the end of 2021.” 

FONBAS is dedicated to serving the needs of animals to restore their wellbeing and reunite them with their owners or find new forever homes. It was founded in 2017 by a group of local community leaders in a public-private partnership with the City of Newport Beach,

FONBAS supplements funding for the current Newport Beach Animal Shelter to provide upgraded amenities and medical care and is dedicated to providing a permanent animal shelter for the City of Newport Beach.

The public can participate at any level either by donating money or becoming a FONBAS member. To donate to “Raise the Roof” or become a FONBAS member go to www.FONBAS.org.


Newport Beach Central Library features Youth Ocean Art exhibition

The Newport Beach City Arts Commission, in conjunction with Bow Seat Ocean Awareness Programs, Sierra Club Angeles Chapter and the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce, presents an exhibition of Youth Ocean Art on display at the Newport Beach Central Library gallery through January 8, 2021 during the library’s modified operating hours.

This mixed-media collection calls for care for our friends in the oceans, who suffer from our increased use of plastic since the COVID-19 pandemic started. A study showed plastic in the oceans will triple in 20 years. These young artists use creative and thought-provoking messages to call for change.

Newport Beach Central Library Trashimi

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Photos courtesy of NBPL

“Trashimi” by Jennifer Kim, age 13, is part of the exhibition

“Through my research of ocean pollution, I was shocked by the sheer number of trash thrown away into the sea, as well as the thousands of dead fish from oil spills in the ocean,” said Jennifer Kim, 13, who created her artwork, titled Trashimi. “The pollution is symbolized by a sick-looking fish with a soda can body, to represent ‘sashimi’ on the plate that the food we eat ends up on. Around it are garnishes for the ‘sashimi’ which are trash, such as cigarette butts, plastic water bottles, and so on. The ‘soy sauce’ is made of petroleum, and there are ‘lemon’ garnishes of old tires. I used acrylic paint to emphasize the fish along with several other ‘garnishes’ on watercolor. Around the plate are old articles concerning pollution. I named this piece Trashimi to reflect on the items from the sea that we will eventually consume, but also as ‘trashme’ because the trash that we humans throw away just come back to us in a cycle,” explained Kim.

Newport Beach Central Library Float One

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“Float One” by Emmanuel Ramirez, age 18, is among the mixed-media collection

According to NBPL, for our children, our environment and our economy, we must support every business and policy that aim at plastic reduction – now. And most importantly, each of us must lead by example – with a sense of duty and a vision for the future.

All the artwork on display was created by students for a Bow Seat Ocean Awareness contest.

Newport Beach Central Library is located at 1000 Avocado Ave, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.newportbeachlibrary.org.


YMCA of Orange County’s annual “Stockings for the Troops” donation drive in full swing

The YMCA of Orange County (YMCAOC) is determined to keep its tradition of sending hope and gifting joy alive with the organization’s annual “Stockings for the Troops” donation drive from now through November 13. The event helps bring holiday cheer to military personnel overseas who are away from their families and friends during the holiday season, which is especially important during the exacerbated hardships of COVID-19.

YMCA girls with stockings

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Photos courtesy of YMCA Orange County

Girls at the YMCA holding stockings waiting to be filled with items for military personnel overseas

YMCAOC is asking the community for donations of edible treats such as candy canes, individual snack packs, trail mix packs, and protein bars, as well as personal care essentials including toothbrushes, toothpaste, floss, socks, hand warmer packets and small size baby wipes packs. Items will be collected at YMCAOC Child Care Sites, Health & Wellness Centers and the Association Office in Tustin. YMCAOC students and staff will then sort the donations and fill stockings. Last year, they collected enough to stuff 748 stockings, and are hoping to surpass that number this year.

To make the gifts more meaningful, YMCAOC is also asking for handwritten letters or cards, so that every stocking is accompanied with a special message letting the recipient know how much their service is appreciated. This year’s stocking stuffing parties will look different, with social distancing and masks required, but the goal of spreading holiday cheer will be the same. Nonprofit Words of Comfort, Hope & Promise will pack and ship all stockings overseas to troops.

YMCA Happy Holidays cards

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Handmade holiday cards with warm wishes accompany the stuffed stockings for our troops

The YMCA of Orange County is dedicated to serving their surrounding communities and making the community a better place for all. To accomplish this goal, YMCAOC created its “Stockings for the Troops” program to support our troops, while also teaching YMCAOC students the importance of giving back. Students are given a chance to do something special and meaningful for someone they won’t ever meet, but it also helps them to understand what it means for people to serve our country and the sacrifices they make, especially during the holidays.

Get all the details and see a full list of donation requests and drop-off locations at https://ymcaoc.org/donation-drives/.

The Newport-Mesa Family YMCA is located at 2300 University Drive, Newport Beach.


CdM Highway of Flags seeks volunteers

The Corona del Mar Flag Committee is looking for volunteers to help place the traditional American flags up and down Pacific Coast Highway in Corona del Mar for Veterans Day, Wednesday, Nov. 11. 

If you are able to help in this patriotic effort, meet in front of the Corona del Mar Chamber office (between Starbucks and the Port Theater) at 2855 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar on Saturday, Nov.11 beginning at 6 a.m. for setup and/or takedown at 4:30 p.m. at the same location.

CdM Highway of Flags

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Courtesy of CdM Chamber of Commerce

(L-R) Danielle Rivas, Renee Pepys Lowe and Michelle Peschel

This will only take about an hour of your time and your assistance is greatly appreciated.

The committee requests you please arrive on time for instructions. For more information, call 949.300.3068 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Community invited to “Full Steam Ahead,” free family event and virtual benefit for Child Creativity Lab

On Thursday, Nov. 12, the entire community is invited to a free and fun family event from 6-6:30 p.m. benefiting Child Creativity Lab (CCL), a nonprofit that many residents in Newport Beach have supported since its start in 2012.

The benefit is aptly named “Full Steam Ahead” – whereas other organizations were recently forced to slow down, Child Creativity Lab sped up to do more. Like steam, CCL pivoted and transformed, expanding its virtual learning options as well as meeting the increased demand for robot kits.

To experience the mission, guests have the option to order a free robot making kit. The tight 30-minute program will feature an insider tour led by CEO Tracey Hill. 

Community invited to Dutch

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Courtesy of Marty Dutch

Marty Dutch, vice president, director of Philanthropy Services at First Foundation and previous Child Creativity Lab board member

According to Newport Beach resident Marty Dutch, vice president, director of Philanthropy Services at First Foundation, who previously served on the board of CCL, “When you step through the doors of Child Creativity Lab, you must pause to absorb it all. Your creativity feels sparked as you enter into a world of industrial bins filled with treasures. You see feathers, fabric, glitter, paint, Legos and ‘trash,’” said Dutch. “Yes, what we normally toss away as trash, is now repurposed with glue guns and spray paint. Children are invited to use their individual imagination and creativity. In addition to the Makers Center, CCL has recently stepped up to provide more STEAM Kits to teachers and nonprofits who crave new ideas for student engagement. I am so happy to support this small organization as it continues to ignite creativity in kids throughout Orange County.”

Child Creativity Lab has a mission to foster the next generation of critical thinkers, problem solvers, innovators and leaders through unique hands-on creativity exploration programs. The community supports the mission by donating up-cyclables including common refuse products that can be converted to robot making kits. Using unconventional materials makes STEM more inclusive and less intimidating to children no matter their family’s professional demographic.

Community invited to child

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Courtesy of Child Creativity Lab

This youngster’s imagination is sparked by creating a sculpture from treasured up-cyclables

Another Newport Beach native and CCL supporter, Carol DiStanislao, managing director of Octane’s Enterprise Solutions, shared, “As a technology sector executive, I am so impressed with the work of Child Creativity Lab. They are educating our future workforce which aligns with Octane’s goal to create 55,000+ new technology sector roles in Southern California by 2030. As a mom who knows the power of STEAM, I support this organization’s innovative efforts to ensure that every child enjoys learning. Additionally, the Octane Foundation for Innovation partners with CCL who participated in the first cohort of our nonprofit accelerator program https://octaneoc.org/octane-foundation-for-innovation/#npa.”

Community invited to Marble Ramp

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Courtesy of Child Creativity Lab

Kids get excited exploring marble ramps at Child Creativity Lab

Giving back matters to CCL. With that, the nonprofit continues to donate STEAM kits to childcare locations open to essential workers and first responders. CCL ensures that K-8th grade students throughout Orange County have access to high-quality Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math (STEAM) educational programming. 

When California schools began to close because of the COVID-19 pandemic, CCL canceled its workshops and events in line with California’s “Stay at Home” mandate and immediately pivoted its STEAM + Creativity programming to a virtual model. These past months, more than $6,000 worth of STEAM Challenge Kits were dispersed along with fabric for face masks. CCL strives to best meet the needs of schools, students and parents by adapting avenues of distribution throughout the public health crisis. 

Parents, like teachers, see the value Child Creativity Lab offers in the joyful eyes of their children. According to Amie Boston Escalette of Newport Beach and mom of an early learner, “CCL provides a safe and fun environment for children to cultivate creative critical thinking. By utilizing up-cycled materials, kids have an opportunity to really use their imagination as they learn.”

As Orange County navigates the challenges of 2020, Child Creativity Lab remains committed to helping children become well rounded critical thinkers, problem solvers, innovators and future leaders.

To learn more, visit www.childcreativitylab.org. Questions can be directed to the event chair Suzanne Ellingson via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and guests can register here.

If you and your business would like to get involved, contact CEO Tracey Hill  at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or by phone at 310.739.0072.


Heroes Hall reopens with new exhibit: WWll paintings from the South Pacific

Heroes Hall at the OC Fair & Event Center has reopened, and on display is a new exhibit, Private Charles J. Miller: WWII Paintings from the South Pacific.

Featured is the visual diary of Miller, who chronicled his military service in the South Pacific theater during WWII. He was a self-taught artist who had been drawing throughout his lifetime, teaching himself perspective, anatomy and drawing and painting techniques.

Heroes Hall framed paintings

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Courtesy of OC Fair & Event Center

Heroes Hall features the new exhibit – “Private Charles J. Miller: WWII Paintings from the South Pacific”

During the three-and-a-half years he fought in World War II, Miller sketched nearly 700 scenes of a soldier’s life, and 83 are featured in this exhibit. He drew the familiar horrors – firefights, destruction, wounded carried back from battle – but also less-documented moments: boredom, distraction, even silliness.

He drew on whatever he had available, from large sheets of paper to the insides of cigarette cartons and painted with children’s watercolor sets. With these humble materials Miller created powerful works of art, full of wonderful color and skilled draftsmanship, with dramatic action and keen observation.

Miller, from Nashua, N.H., sketched all or most of the scenes onsite, completing unfinished works and adding or expanding his written comments when back in the barracks. These comments are an intricate part of this exhibition.

Kept in a brown paper bag for most of his life, Miller gave the paintings to his sister for safekeeping. Miller’s niece and her husband, Nancy and Robert Dennis, vigilantly preserved his artwork and, along with the Wright Museum of WWII in New Hampshire, made this show possible. The exhibit is on loan from the Wright Museum of WWII.

For more information, visit www.ocfair.com/millerexhibit.


Neither vandals nor viruses can stop The White Dress’ dream gowns and CdM Christmas month

By AMY SENK

I’ve known Marlis Fyke for years, and while I’m long past the days of being in the market for a wedding dress, I’ve always loved walking by The White Dress at 2853 E. Coast Highway. I enjoy sneaking a peek in the window at all the gowns, and the corks collected from bottles of bubbly that celebrated a bride-to-be finding the dream dress. Sometimes you see an actual bride celebrating.

It was great to see them opening after the COVID shutdowns, but then Fyke had to board up the windows when protesters publicized plans to visit Corona del Mar. Those precautions turned out to be unnecessary – we had no looters or rioters in CdM. Yet in September, a man walking past the shop at 3 a.m. smashed the front window for no apparent reason, an act of vandalism that was caught on camera. The window was repaired, but in late October, vandals struck again. (I also remember taking a photo of a boarded-up window there in September 2018. It’s like a magnet for vandals.)

Neither vandals White Dress 2018

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File photo by Amy Senk

A bridal gown and boarded-up window at The White Dress, 2018

Cameras once again captured the most recent crime, which Fyke said was a drive-by shooting with a BB gun-type weapon. A rug shop at 2831 E. Coast Highway also was damaged.

A police spokeswoman said that officers were dispatched about 1:10 a.m. on October 27 after a burglary alarm report. They don’t know if the incidents are related; there did not appear to be entry made into either business. Fyke said one dress in the window was ruined by the shattered glass. 

Neither vandals White Dress boarded up

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Photo by Amy Senk

A recent photo of The White Dress boarded up 

I reached out to Fyke recently, expecting her to complain about this streak of bad luck, and the stupidity and waste of vandalism. But instead, she said she feels grateful to be running a business she loves with a staff that is like family.

“These incidents are hard on your psyche,” Fyke said. “But everyone is healthy and is fine. We’re thriving as a business. I care so much about my staff, and every day, we help women find the dress of a lifetime. That makes me happy.”

The uplifting stories far outweigh the negative incidents that piled up in awful 2020, she said. One of her favorites, ever, is about a man who brought fancy Champagne and flowers to the shop in advance of his fiancé’s appointment – he knew she would find her dress that day, and he wanted to surprise her with a top-notch celebration, with Fyke’s help.

“I had such a wonderful experience at the White Dress! I didn’t have much time to find a dress and had never tried on dresses before, so I was a bit nervous going into the experience, afraid I wouldn’t find what I wanted or that they wouldn’t be able to get it to me in time for my wedding,” said Jill St. Geme, a recent customer and CdM High School graduate. “Katie, the manager of the White Dress and stylist of 12 years, was my stylist and was amazing. She made me feel so comfortable and made the whole process so easy and enjoyable. She helped me find the dress of my dreams in about 30 minutes and made sure I would get it in time for the big day.”

I have hated seeing her business needlessly harmed, and I was impressed with her attitude. She’s an inspiration. 

• • •

Many people I know are working hard to make the best out of bad situations. Take the Corona del Mar Christmas Walk, which has been an annual event for more than four decades. Each year, thousands of locals and visitors jam the streets of Corona del Mar’s business district on a Sunday in early December. There would be stilt-walkers, Santa, bands, free snacks, a beer and wine garden, balloons, tons of people, all jammed together. Not COVID-friendly, not in the least.

Neither vandals CdM Walk

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Photo by Amy Senk

Santa poses with a couple and their adorable Frenchie at last year’s CdM Christmas Walk

But instead of canceling the entire event and claiming it as another virus casualty, CdM Chamber of Commerce President Linda Leonhard worked all summer with city officials, business leaders and others to reimagine the event. Late last month, the chamber announced that this year, the Christmas Walk would be a month-long event, with a storefront holiday lighting contest and possible pop-up entertainment events and more. There will be a guide with December discounts and activities mailed to CdM residents or available at the Chamber office, so keep an eye out for more information.

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 20+ years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association. She and her husband have two children attending college at the University of Missouri and Duke University.


Nominators share Stu News/Spa Gregorie’s Promotion winners

Stu News Newport is excited to publish the winning submissions for our “Rest for the Best: De-stress. Refresh. Restore. Promotion” in partnership with Spa Gregorie’s. Thank you to the nominators who shared their compelling emails about those deserving of a luxurious pampering experience at Spa Gregorie’s Newport Beach. We look forward to hearing from each of the winners about their memorable spa day.

Winner: Lisa Moloney

Nominator: Kirsten Daffron, best friend

Hi! Here is my pick for someone who really, really deserves a massage!

My best friend is Lisa Moloney. Lisa is a former California Teacher of the Year runner-up so you can imagine how much she adores her middle school students. Since Covid, she has had to suddenly learn to be a virtual teacher to her over 100 students while working out of her own home.

Lisa’s husband has suffered several strokes the past few years and isn’t able to help out with the household duties as much as he would like. Her son has autism and although works his tail off to help, is also frustrated being stuck at home all day, and cannot do everyday chores, so they are left for Lisa to have to do.

They also have a “farm” of animals that all need taking care of. Again, Lisa is the main caretaker for them. As if this wasn’t enough of a burden, her daughter got a 3rd degree burn on the bottom of her foot and has been on crutches.

Lisa has basically been doing four people’s jobs at home while still trying to maneuver a new world of teaching in these crazy times. I’m thinking she could really use a deep massage right about now. 

Kirsten Daffron

Winner: Jennifer Joiner

Nominator: Faith Joiner, daughter

Dear Stu News Newport and Spa Gregorie’s,

Twenty-twenty has been a difficult year for all of us, but for my mom it has been exceptionally challenging.

My younger sister has struggled for years with an undiagnosed disease which has taken away her ability to walk, talk properly, and use her hands, therefore, my mother has become her caretaker. Several weeks ago, my sister endured a major surgery which brought her a great deal of pain. The pain became so great that it caused her to have seizures so bad that she had to be hospitalized and eventually placed into a coma. My mom stayed by her side for hours on end, reading books, singing to her, and praying for her constantly. I know that seeing her own daughter in such an unsteady state must have been unimaginably difficult, yet she remained strong in the midst of it all.

Selfless giving has always been one of her most beautiful attributes, yet this time I am hopeful that she will be able to receive something back for all she has given. Since she has always given her best and will continue to do so, I believe she deserves some well needed rest.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Sincerely,

Faith Joiner


Studio88 hosts donation site to benefit HomeAid Orange County

This year, Studio88, the coworking space for interior designers, is leading efforts in supporting HomeAid Orange County in its mission to end homelessness by becoming part of HomeAid’s Homelessness Awareness Month Committee.

Studio88, in collaboration with studio member Design Tec, is hosting a donation site at the studio at 20371 Irvine Ave., Suite 240, Newport Beach. They are inviting interior designers – and everyone in the local community – to donate canned food items and $20-$25 grocery gift cards from 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Monday-Friday, through November 13. With your generous donations, their team will create Thanksgiving Meal Boxes for families and individuals in need this holiday season. For a list of items that are in need, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Studio88 four ladies

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Photo by Katy Erin

(L-R) Anne Guggisberg, Lana Canova, Alicia Turner and Chris Johnson (founder) at Studio88’s coworking space for interior designers

Studio88 and Design Tec are also looking for at least five sponsors for this year’s initiative, at levels ranging from $1,500-$10,000. They would like to recognize and thank their first two sponsors, Kaiser Permanente and HomeStreet Bank. If you’re in a position to sponsor, them hope you’ll reach out. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

HomeAid Orange County was founded 31 years ago by the OC Chapter of the Building Industry Association. Simply put, they develop housing options for other nonprofits that serve those experiencing homelessness in our community. Since it was first founded by the BIASC, HomeAid OC has developed 71 different forms of housing that almost 72,000 have been able to call home.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, HomeAid OC is working to support those most in need in our community by providing them with a Thanksgiving meal this holiday season.

If you have questions or want more details about HomeAid’s Homelessness Awareness Month and Thanksgiving Meal Drive, visit https://studio88.com/events-create-and-connect/ and click on events.


United to End Homelessness encourages community to participate in November events

United to End Homelessness is raising awareness and drawing attention to the issue of homelessness leading up to and during Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week. A variety of virtual education and advocacy events and community outreach opportunities are scheduled. 

Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week is slated to take place from Sunday, Nov. 15 through Sunday, Nov. 22.

“Many people in our community are experiencing homelessness or are on the verge of becoming homeless. This has been a trying time for all but especially for our neighbors without a home,” said Becks Heyhoe, executive director of United to End Homelessness. “It is our collective responsibility to make sure everyone in Orange County has safe, stable housing and our hope is that we can rally the community during Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week to raise much-needed awareness for this critical issue.”

The following free virtual events and initiatives are open to participation from the public: 

–Hunger and Homelessness Awareness “Essential” Social Media Campaign

This year’s social media campaign will seek to raise awareness about how essential a home is in solving homelessness as well as highlighting the different resources that are currently available. On your own social media platforms, educate your friends, families and coworkers about the several essential elements required to end and address homelessness, including but not limited to service providers also known as our “Unsung Heroes.”

Learn how to correctly utilize the social media kit by attending a social media kit workshop on November 5 from 12-12:30 p.m., or 6:30-7 p.m. Go here to RSVP.

To sign up to receive the social media kit, click here.

–Community Chats

Attend virtual interviews and discussions with industry experts about various topics related to the current COVID-19 pandemic and homelessness.

~Thursday, Nov. 11 – Veterans Day Series

-9:30-10 a.m. – “An Overview of Veteran Homelessness.” RSVP here.

-12-12:30 p.m. – “Property Owners Ending Homelessness.” RSVP here.

-4-4:30 p.m. – “Service Providers Supporting Those Who Served.” RSVP here.

~Thursday, Nov. 19 from 12-12:30 p.m. – “Stability is Essential.” RSVP here.

-Confirmed speakers include David Gillanders, executive director of Pathways of Hope; Karyn Hay, housing stabilization coordinator for Friendship Shelter; and Shay Sorrells, chief program officer for Orangewood Foundation.

~Friday, Nov. 20 from 12-12:30 p.m. – “Prevention is Essential.” RSVP here.

-Confirmed speakers include David Cordero, executive director of the Apartments Association of Orange County; Victor Cao, vice president of public affairs for California Apartment Association; and Elizabeth Andrade, chief executive officer of Family Assistance Ministries.

–Homelessness 101 Class

Gain a better understanding of the homeless system in Orange County, including the most up-to-date statistics and best practices for solving homelessness in our community.

~Thursday, Nov. 12 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. RSVP here.

–Housing Champion Advocacy 101 Class

Learn how to be an effective voice for more supportive and affordable housing in your community, how to move housing projects towards approval and how to deliver strong public comments at key city council and commission board hearings.

~Wednesday, Nov. 18 from 6-7:30 p.m. RSVP here

For more information about United to End Homelessness, visit the website at www.unitedtoendhomelessness.org/.


COVID-19: 308 new cases reported in OC, 7 new cases in Newport Beach

OC Health Care Agency reports that there have been 62,583 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 308 cases yesterday (November 9).

Sadly, the county reports that 1,509 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County. There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 1,296 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of seven cases yesterday. This represents a per capita rate of 14.866 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 31 percent of ICU beds and 65 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 205 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 76 are in ICU.

The county estimates 55,063 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 9 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 9 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 9 20 3

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Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 9, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

With Steel off to D.C., who fills her spot on the Board of Supervisors and when?

Tom headshot 8 1.25.20The results of last week’s election have yet to be certified, but it appears that Orange County Supervisor Michelle Steel will be moving on to a new home representing the 48th Congressional District. Steel presently has a 7,600+ vote lead while taking 51 percent of the vote. It appears she’ll replace one-term incumbent Harley Rouda.

Assuming Steel wins, what then happens to her seat with the Board of Supervisors representing the Second District? Well, to get the answer I checked in with none other than Neal Kelley at the Orange County Registrar of Voters for the answer. As you might imagine, Kelley has been kind of busy as of late.

“As for timing, the county charter would have the special election (for the vacancy) falling likely in early/mid-March,” said Kelley. “I haven’t been completely focused on this, but we are working on a few calendar scenarios and it’s dependent on exactly when the vacancy would occur. But that time frame is very likely.” 

The next question becomes who runs for that then open seat? 

A couple of names already have open campaign accounts ticketed for Supervisor 2022, so they’d have to be considered fairly serious. They are Newport Beach City Councilman Kevin Muldoon and Huntington Beach City Councilman Mike Posey.

Muldoon’s account, in fact, has had recent activity according to his July 31, 2020 Committee Candidate Statement filing. 

In the filing period through July 31, 2020, Muldoon raised $23,335, spent $6,280, leaving him with an account ending cash balance of $65,278.

Similar action with Posey who gathered just more than $29,000 in contributions during the same period leaving him with an ending cash balance of $23,348.

Either one would need a lot more money than that to truly run a meaningful campaign. 

For example, Steel’s 2018 filing shows that she spent more than $240,000 in the final year leading up to her election to win that seat.

What other names might join in the mix? How about Diane Dixon, who looks like she’ll lose a very close Assembly run against Cottie Petrie-Norris? She’d probably be looking for something else to do because she’d be termed-out here in Newport Beach for council duties.

Another one might be Costa Mesa Mayor Katrina Foley who won in a romp for re-election and come two years she’ll also be termed out with no place to go.

State Senator John Moorlach, Costa Mesa City Councilman Allan Mansoor and former Assemblyman Matthew Harper are all out of a place to hang their hats moving forward, so I’d be surprised if one or more didn’t take a look.

Here’s one for you, how about Newport Beach Mayor Will O’Neill? I figure he was probably more poised for a 2022 congressional run had Steel lost this year, but with that issue off the table, what’s next? 

I asked the Mayor about the Supervisor spot: “I endorsed Michelle Steel for Congress and I’m encouraged to see her progress at this point,” said O’Neill. “The ‘What Is’ has required so much of my attention as Mayor this year, so I haven’t had significant time playing ‘What If.’ I place a high premium on good, competent local leadership and appreciate the faith people have placed in me for this position in a tough year.”

O’Neill certainly appears to have the creds and support. The 40,000+ votes he received last Tuesday are nearly 10,000 more than any other council candidate has ever received in Newport Beach. 

Still, the geography for the Board of Supervisor Second District is bigger than just Newport Beach. It also encompasses Costa Mesa, Cypress, Huntington Beach, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Seal Beach, Stanton, the unincorporated area of Rossmoor, and portions of Buena Park and Fountain Valley. So name recognition and money will be the keys.

So, just when you thought election season was in the rearview mirror, buckle up, there’s apparently more to come.

• • •

Before we get away from the November results, as I mentioned above, Petrie-Norris probably will be spending two more years in Sacramento after narrowly defeating Newport Beach City Councilwoman Dixon for the 74th Assembly spot and newcomer Dave Min should join her on the 37th Senate side by beating Moorlach.

There’s also great news on the Newport-Mesa Unified School District front, with three new Trustees. Leah Ersoylu appears to have ousted incumbent Vicki Snell in Area 1, joining newcomers Carol Crane and Krista Weigand who both won vacant seats in Areas 3 and 6.

Lots of work ahead for that group to get this community back on board and positively engaged. The good news is that I believe we have the right team to do that.

• • •

Speak Up Newport will hold a Zoom webinar tomorrow afternoon from 4-5 p.m. The subject is a look into the new Newport Beach Animal Shelter.

Featured will be panelists Jon Langford, President of Friends of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter (FONBAS), and Valerie Schomburg, City Animal Control Officer. The two will discuss the move from limited rented facilities into a permanent new state-of-the-art home. 

In order to do so, FONBAS originally set out to raise some $2 million. Well, I’m told that last week an anonymous donor delivered the final funds to the tune of $250,000. 

Thank you, thank you, thank you.

Get the shovels ready, it appears there’s a groundbreaking on the horizon.

To attend the Zoom, go here to register.

• • •

Sports editor, sportswriter and now twice published author Richard Dunn will have a book launch of One Pitch Wonder, a baseball memoir and tribute to his young son Julian, who passed away of brain cancer at only nine years of age in 2013. The celebration for Rich and Julian will take place at Sgt. Pepperoni’s Pizza at 2300 SE Bristol St. on Sunday, Nov. 22 from 5-6:30 p.m.

The book will be available that evening and also on Amazon. All proceeds benefit Julian’s LEGO Corner at CHOC.

I have to ask, is there anything better than supporting a cause that raises funds to finding a cure to combat cancer for our children? I think not. Hope I’ll see you there.


King Tides will hit town Sunday and Monday

King Tides are expected to hit Newport Beach Sunday and Monday, Nov. 15-16. They are the highest high tides of the year, about a foot or two higher than average tides, which corresponds to the one to two foot rise in sea level expected during the next few decades. 

The first High Tide is expected Sunday at 8:23 a.m. at +6.89 ft. and Monday at 9:02 a.m. at +6.85 ft. measured at the entrance to Newport Bay. Corresponding low tides those days will be -1.27 ft. at 3:23 p.m. on Sunday and on Monday, -1.28 ft. at 4:13 p.m.

Newport Beach’s Utilities Director Mark Vukojevic says the city will be ready and will formulate a plan according to anticipated weather and rain conditions later in the week.

Although King Tides are not caused by the rising sea levels, according to the California King Tides Project, the sea level rise being experiencing now and in the future is caused by burning fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas. Carbon dioxide in our atmosphere acts like a blanket, trapping in heat that would otherwise escape. When fossil fuels are burned, they’re adding more carbon dioxide, “thickening the blanket” and warming the planet and ocean.

Sea level is then rising because land-based glaciers and ice sheets are melting into the ocean and also because water expands in volume when it warms. The amount of sea level rise will ultimately depend on how quickly fossil fuels are stopped from burning.

The King Tides simply offer a look into the future as to what the sea level rise issues could cause.


School Notes

Newly elected Board members share what’s on their mind

The 2020 Election brought about three new members to the Newport-Mesa Unified School District’s seven-person board. All three new Trustee-elects have offered up their comments concerning their election victory and their priorities and goals.

Leah Ersoylu (Area 1 includes Early College, Estancia, TeWinkle, Adams, California and Killybrooke)

“Running against an incumbent, during a pandemic, was no small feat. I knew this would be an uphill battle when I decided to run last year.

“This would have not been possible without the support of the community. Hundreds of individual donors helped us raise nearly $30,000 and added to the $17,500 from the teachers union, so we had enough funds to be viable. These funds were critical to helping us get the word out to voters – we sent mailers, ran Facebook ads and had fliers dropped throughout the district door-to-door, twice. 

“In addition, dozens of parent volunteers worked tirelessly getting those fliers out, sharing social media posts and talking to neighbors. 

“I am grateful for all of the support. People wanted change and they were willing to work for it – it was true democracy in action.

“Top of mind, I’m interested in getting settled in, meeting the other Board members and key staff, as well as all principals in my Area. 

“As far as projects, I’m interested in making sure the community is both aware and has input into the location of the $32 million Estancia Theater. I’ve been vocal about what I think of tree removal and want to be sure other options are exhausted. I’m also interested in learning where we are in terms of a vision of mathematics, given such a large proportion of our middle and HS students are not performing at grade level. 

“Overall, I’m excited to get to work for all of our families and will always be open to listening to the community.” 

Carol Crane (Area 3 includes Back Bay/Monte Vista, Corona del Mar and Eastbluff)

“The short game is to assess, monitor and adjust NMUSD’s current pandemic learning models in order to mitigate the loss of learning and provide the (educational and social emotional) support that our students, teachers and staff need to be successful; to be sure that CdMHS construction stays on track; and to meet and get to know my fellow trustees. 

“The long game is to focus heavily on quality of education, social/emotional health, communication and transparency; trustee visibility and outreach in order to regain and maintain the confidence and trust of the community and its stakeholders (we have experienced a flight to private schools – how do we/will we get those families back?); build and sustain the mission of the Human Relations Task Force; and, Superintendent search to select an individual that will execute the above.

“I am honored to have been elected as the next trustee for Area 3 and I am eager to roll up my sleeves and get to work. I am looking forward to working with the new Board in formulating policy that will benefit our district.” 

Krista Weigand (Area 6 includes Harper PreSchool, Kaiser, Mariners, Newport Heights and Woodland)

“I want to thank everyone who supported my campaign and helped elect me as a Trustee for Newport-Mesa Unified School District. 

“Since I announced my candidacy, I have met so many wonderful people who all share the same goal of making our district second to none. This campaign was truly a family effort with my husband and I, along with our wonderful volunteers, knocking on over 6,000 doors. Meeting voters face-to-face has taught me a lot about what’s important to the residents of Newport-Mesa. 

“I also want to thank the other three candidates in the race who put themselves out there with the common goal of benefiting our students and community.

“As a Trustee, my top issue is getting our kids safely back on campus and keeping them there. I am passionate about making sure our kids have the best education possible during this difficult time. I also want to make sure our district has the correct leaders in each position that will set our schools up for success.

“With my background in project management, I want to put concrete processes and reporting procedures in place to make sure that we are never behind the eight ball on any project whether that be construction or reopening our schools.”


Workshops seek community input on the future of housing

How should Newport Beach grow in the future? The community is invited to discuss that question and provide input during two interactive, virtual workshops scheduled for November 16 and 17.

The city must plan for an additional 4,834 housing units over the next decade to comply with the Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA). These workshops will help shape the city’s “suitability analysis” of housing densities, which will be included in an update to the General Plan.

The first workshop, on November 16 at 6 p.m., will focus on the airport area and western portions of the city, including West Newport and West Newport Mesa. The November 17 workshop, also beginning at 6 p.m., will focus on Newport Center and Coyote Canyon Landfill. Both workshops will take place over Zoom with additional input opportunities offered online.

The November workshops continue a series of virtual workshops, online activities and educational videos to engage Newport Beach residents in the General Plan update. The workshops will be discussion-based, with polls and surveys incorporated.

November 16. Part 1: Airport area and Western portions of the City, including West Newport and West Newport Mesa.

–November 17. Part 2: Newport Center and Coyote Canyon Landfill.

To register via Zoom go here.

The workshops will be recorded and available at www.NewportTogether.com. If you are not able to attend the live workshops, you can watch the recordings and provide input at your convenience. 

The City’s General Plan Housing Element details the city’s strategy for enhancing and preserving community character and identifies strategies for expanding housing. The Circulation Element governs how cars and people move through the city on local roadways, buses, ferries and trails. Over the next few months, the City of Newport Beach will host more opportunities to provide input into the Housing and Circulation Elements, as well as environmental justice policies for the General Plan Update.


I’ll take remembrances for $800: Trebek will be missed by his viewers in Newport Beach

I'll take remembrances

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Nadine Turner

On a walk around Balboa Island yesterday, Nadine Turner of Newport Coast came across this sand sculpture by Chris Crosson remembering Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek who passed Sunday of cancer. Trebek was the host of the show for the last 36 years. He will certainly be missed by many.


Falling for fall

Falling for sunset

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Stan Sievers

 November colors paint the sky in Newport Beach


2020 Election results

2020 Election results


City Manager’s Updates

From the desk of Grace Leung

Grace Leung

Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung

Community members, 

Orange County’s COVID-19 case numbers have been trending upward, although the County still remains in the “substantial” (red) tier of the state’s Blueprint for a Safer Economy

The state system tracks three COVID-19 metrics: average daily case rates per 100,000 population, the percentage of positive tests, known as the positivity rate and the health equity metric. 

As of this week, Orange County recorded 6.0 average daily cases, up from 5.1 average daily cases last week. The test positivity rate increased from 3.2 percent to 3.6 percent this week, which would qualify Orange County to move into the “moderate” (orange) tier, if not for the higher case numbers. The health equity metric decreased slightly this week, from 6.0 percent to 5.7 percent. The equity metric needs to be below 5.2 percent to move into the moderate tier. 

For more on the status of Orange County and others, visit www.COVID19.ca.gov.

COVID-19 Cases in Newport Beach 

As of November 5, the number of COVID-19 cases in Newport Beach was 1,270 and the total cases in Orange County was 61,112. The number of recovered COVID-19 patients countywide as of October 30 was 54,429. These figures are provided to Orange County by the California Department of Public Health. 

COVID-19 Resources 

The Blueprint for a Safer Economy is the state’s four-tiered, color-coded system for re-opening California’s businesses. Counties move through each of the four tiers based on two key metrics: case rates and the percentage of positive tests. 

Moving from tier to tier requires a 21-day wait time and counties will be required to meet the metrics for the next tier for two weeks in a row. 

The County of Orange COVID-19 data and information can be found at https://occovid19.ochealthinfo.com/coronavirus-in-oc.

The County of Orange Healthcare Agency’s COVID-19 hotline can be reached at 714.834.2000, or by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. County staff monitors the hotline and email box and answers questions about industry reopening and activity resumption, current guidance and more. 

The county maintains a list of FDA-approved testing sites for county residents at https://occovid19.ochealthinfo.com/covid19-testing-and-screening for testing information. The SOS Health Center in Newport Beach is an approved community testing site. Call 949.270.2100 for an appointment. 

District 1 Virtual Town Hall November 19 

Please join us for a virtual town hall meeting for residents of Council District 1 (Peninsula area) on November 19 from 5-6:30 p.m. via Zoom. 

The topics will include Oceanfront Boardwalk safety, recent changes to short-term rental housing regulations enacted by the City Council, the new city fire station near Lido Isle and the Lido water main replacement project. 

Please register for the Town Hall in advance at this link

We Want to Hear From You! Visit www.NewportTogether.com

Due to the October 2021 state-mandated deadline to submit an adopted Housing Element, the city is currently focused on updating the Housing and Circulation Elements and we need your participation to do that. 

On October 20, 2020, the city hosted its first virtual housing workshop via Zoom and conducted several polling activities. These included providing input on which types of housing products (i.e., single-family residences, multi-family structures, etc.) would be best suited for each area of the city, as identified during the Listen & Learn efforts in 2019. If you did not make it to that workshop, then don’t worry. The same activities have been provided online here. You can register or sign in, access the mapping tool, and drop pins for where you believe the state-mandated 4,834 new housing units should be planned. In addition, you can provide input on which type of housing is best suited for each location. 

The next virtual housing workshops are planned for Monday, Nov. 16 and Tuesday, Nov. 17 both beginning at 6 p.m. The entire community is invited and encouraged to participate in the discussion. For more information on the Wednesday, Nov. 11 Holiday Closure – Veterans Day; Thursday, Nov. 12 Zoning Administrator Meeting City Hall, City Council Chambers 100 Civic Center Drive (See agenda for instructions on how to participate) 10 a.m.; Thursday, Nov. 12 City Arts Commission Meeting Virtual Commission Meeting (See agenda for instructions on how to participate) at 5 p.m. and upcoming opportunities to get involved and to provide input virtually, visit www.NewportTogether.com. Be sure to register to stay informed and stay engaged. The city needs and appreciates your input. 

Homelessness Update 

Addressing homelessness continues to be a priority in the city’s ongoing COVID-19 response, working closely with contractor City Net and regional partners throughout the county and state. The City Net hotline number is 714.451.6198. Those who call the hotline may leave a detailed voicemail message for themselves or others in need and City Net staff will respond within 48 hours. For immediate assistance call the county’s Crisis Prevention Hotline at 877.7.CRISIS or 877.727.4747. 

Success Stories 

–The Homeless Liaison Officer assisted a woman by reuniting with her family in Wisconsin. The woman lost her teaching position due to COVID-19 and could not afford her rent in Newport Beach. The woman’s wallet and identification were stolen while she was unsheltered for several weeks. The Homeless Liaison Officer contacted the woman’s family to make travel arrangements, collaborated with the Transportation Security Administration at John Wayne Airport to allow her to fly without an ID, and transported her to the airport for her flight. 

–A young couple who experienced homelessness in Newport Beach for the past seven months recently rented a room from a family member. They continue to work with the Homeless Liaison Officer, City Net staff, and the Homeless Coordinator for ongoing support, access to job resources and counseling services.

–The Homeless Liaison Officer reunited a woman with her family in Northern California. The woman fled south during the fires and came to the Orange County beach communities for clean air. Her husband contacted local police departments to locate her and encourage her to return home. After spending several weeks unsheltered in Newport Beach, the woman agreed to contact her husband and reunite with her family. 

–A man experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach for two weeks worked with the City’s Homeless Liaison Officer to return to his family in Oregon. 

–Two people in Newport Beach experiencing homelessness were enrolled into City Net services. City Net staff completed Vulnerability Index Intake Assessments for each. The assessments are used to screen clients to determine proper placement in the county’s Continuum of Care system. Some assessment factors include age, health issues and length of time being unsheltered. Following the assessment, one person is awaiting placement into a detox center and the second is entering a domestic violence shelter. Case managers will follow up with the clients to provide housing assessments and prepare documentation for housing. 

–City Net completed two housing assessments for people enrolled in their services. One person is identifying relocation options in Orange County to find affordable housing. 

–City Net assisted two people in the Balboa Pier area to access the Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) service. The EBT system is used in California for the delivery, redemption and reconciliation of issued public assistance benefits, such as CalFresh, CalWORKs, and other food and cash aid benefits. Established in 2004, EBT provides up to $125 a person a month to purchase food. 

–With the assistance of City Net, a man staying in a Project Roomkey motel has returned to a sober living home operated by Project Kinship and re-enrolled into a support program. Project Kinship, established in 2014, provides support and training for people impacted by incarceration, gangs and violence. 

–City Net staff continues to provide support and case management to several people sheltering in motels while they await placement into permanent, supportive housing. 

Throughout the month of October, 22 military veterans and their families have been housed through the county’s Coordinated Entry System. The Coordinated Entry System manages a roster of eligible veterans and works with service providers, such as City Net, to match veterans with housing opportunities. Most of the veterans were placed into the new Placentia Veterans Village, which offers 50 units of permanent, supportive housing. 

Via Lido Soud & Nord Water Main Replacement Begins 

Construction for the Via Lido Soud & Nord Water Main Replacement project is now beginning. The water mains on Lido Isle were installed in the 1930s and are in need of replacement after almost 90 years of service. These water mains serve water to the individual homes as well as provide fire protection for the island. The contractor is currently working on exploratory potholing work to identify existing utilities or possible trench line obstructions. City crews are also busy performing water test shut-downs in anticipation of the water main installation efforts that are scheduled to start November 12. During these water test shut-downs, inland residents can expect to have intermittent interruptions in water service lasting no longer than an hour. We understand many of you are currently working from home and the construction noise, as well as water service disruptions, can make it difficult. Please know that the contractor and city crews are trying very hard to keep these disruptions down to a minimum. Should you have any questions regarding this project, please contact either Alfred Castanon or Mike Sinacori at 949.644.3330. 

Insider’s Guide for the Newport Beach City Council Meeting on November 10, 2020 

Our next City Council meeting is Tuesday, Nov. 10. Items that may be of interest are highlighted below. The entire agenda, and all reports, can be viewed here

The Newport Beach Public Facilities Corporation meeting will begin at 4 p.m. to discuss proposed financing for the new Fire Station No. 2. A Council Study Session, on the status of the City’s General Plan update, will begin at 4:30 p.m. The Council’s Regular Meeting begins at 6 p.m., with the following agenda items of note: 

On the Consent Calendar: 

–An award of contract for phase 2 of the Water Transmission Main Valve project, which replaces large diameter valves that are critical components of our water infrastructure. The $3 million project will replace 22 valves at various locations and is funded in the Water Enterprise Fund through water rates. 

–Consideration of an $880,000 contract award for the Balboa Crossing Improvement Project. The proposed project would improve and upgrade sidewalks, drainage, pavement, landscaping and traffic signals on the Balboa Peninsula at 26th and 28th streets. 

–Approval of an annual Measure M2 expenditure report. The Orange County Transportation Authority oversees distribution of M2 bond funds, approved by voters in 2006. The city received $2.6 million in M2 Funds in FY 2019-20. 

Current Business includes: 

–Potential award of a construction contract and adoption of a financing plan for the new city fire station near Lido Isle. The new Fire Station No. 2, at 28th Street and Newport Boulevard, will replace the current Lido Fire Station No. 2 on 32nd Street, which is nearly 70 years old and does not meet current building codes. The council will consider a $6.3 million construction contract award and a 10-year financing plan not to exceed $10 million. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $9.05 million. 

–Updating the fair market value per acre to be used in assessing in-lieu park dedication fees. The Newport Beach Municipal Code requires developers that subdivide land parcels for residential housing projects to dedicate land for park space, pay in-lieu fees, or a combination of both. The fee was last updated in 2007. 

–An annual review of the city agreement with Sierra by the Sea, which operates sober living facilities in Newport Beach. Following review of the operations and requirements of the zoning agreement, staff concludes the operator is in compliance with all requirements.


COVID-19: 512 new cases and 3 new deaths reported in OC, 5 new cases in Newport Beach

Sadly, OC Health Care Agency reports that 1,509 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including three new deaths reported today (November 8). There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 62,255 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 512 cases today.

The county reports that there have been 1,289 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of five cases today. This represents a per capita rate of 14.786 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 31 percent of ICU beds and 65 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 201 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 72 are in ICU.

The county estimates 54,847 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 8 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 8 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 8 20 3

Click on photos for larger images

Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 8, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


Petrie-Norris and Dixon remain close in 74th Assembly race with votes left

Saturday, November 7, former Vice President Joe Biden and running mate Kamala Harris were declared winners of the 2020 Presidential Election.

But here in Orange County several races are still too close to call with some 100,000 OC votes still to be counted.

The closest remaining local race is between incumbent Cottie Petrie-Norris and former Newport Beach Mayor and current City Councilwoman Diane Dixon in the 74th Assembly race. Each count since the election has seen a tightening in the overall margin. Petrie-Norris currently leads by just over 3,000 votes. 

Another close battle is between Orange County Supervisor Michelle Steel and incumbent Harley Rouda for the 48th Congressional seat. Rouda led early in the vote count, but less than a day following the election Steel had assumed slight control and has not looked back. Her lead widened to nearly 5,000 votes by Friday’s reporting and 7,000 by Saturday.

Newcomer Dave Min and John Moorlach remain close in the 37th State Senate race. Min leads by nearly 7,000 votes. 

Winners for Newport Beach City Council seats are Brad Avery in District 2, Noah Blom in District 5 and Mayor Will O’Neill in District 7.

Newport-Mesa Unified School District appears to have three new Trustees with Leah Ersoylu claiming the District 1 seat over Vicki Snell, Carol Crane defeating Charles Booker in District 3 and Krista Weigand beating Amy Peters in District 6.

Petrie Norris and Dixon


COVID-19: 3 new deaths reported in OC, 8 new cases in Newport Beach

Sadly, OC Health Care Agency reports that 1,506 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including three new deaths reported today (November 7). There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 61,743 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 322 cases today.

The county reports that there have been 1,284 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of eight cases today. This represents a per capita rate of 14.728 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 31 percent of ICU beds and 64 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 199 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 72 are in ICU.

The county estimates 54,799 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 7 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 7 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 7 20 3

Click on photos for larger images

Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 7, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


COVID-19: 9 new deaths reported in OC, 6 new cases in Newport Beach

Sadly, OC Health Care Agency reports that 1,503 people have died due to COVID-19 in Orange County, including nine new deaths reported today (November 6). There have been 26 deaths of Newport Beach residents to date.

The county reports that there have been 61,421 cumulative cases of COVID-19 countywide to date, an increase of 309 cases today.

The county reports that there have been 1,276 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Newport Beach to date, an increase of six cases today. This represents a per capita rate of 14.636 cases per thousand residents.

The county reports that 38 percent of ICU beds and 64 percent of ventilators are currently available countywide.

The county reports that 177 individuals are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 (includes ICU); 72 are in ICU.

The county estimates 54,645 “recovered cases” according to its data criteria.

For questions about the data presented by the county, call (714) 834-2000 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To view the data dashboard, click here.

Numbers are updated daily by Stu News Newport and reported on our social media pages @StuNewsNewport.

COVID 19 County 11 6 20 1

COVID 19 County 11 6 20 2

COVID 19 County 11 6 20 3

Click on photos for larger images

Courtesy of OC Health Care Agency

Orange County COVID-19 case data as of November 6, as reported by the County; click here to visit page that is updated daily


Top five things to do at ENC in November

Here are the top five things to do at the Environmental Nature Center (ENC) during the month of November to get children and adults exploring the diversity of programs and opportunities that ENC offers.

Herb Walk: Learn Native Plant Uses on November 7 from 1-2:30 p.m. Join Herbalist William Broen to learn traditional and modern uses of plants as well as how a plant’s survival tactics affect how they are used by us, how we can tell a lot about plants through our senses, plant folklore and more. Broen’s walks are informative, interactive, accessible, fun and understandable. He is always happy to share his knowledge of botanical medicine with interested people. Broen is a Bioregional Herbalist (one who focuses on local California plants) and he uses a constitutional approach that integrates knowledge and concepts from many world traditions. He has been conducting lectures on medicinal and edible plants of California and the Southwestern United States for 20 years. For more information and to register, go here.

Top five things Broen

Photos courtesy of ENC

Herbalist William Broen leads an informative walk identifying native plants

Nature Camps on November 9-20 at 9-11 a.m., 1-4 p.m. and 3-5 p.m.; and November 23-December 4 at 9-11 a.m., 1-4 p.m. and 3-5 p.m. Join the Before or After School Nature Camp to enhance your child’s education this Fall. ENC Nature Camps provide a learning experience while also giving campers the opportunity to get outside for physical activity and a chance to hang out socially with their peers. Students attending school in person or at home will be provided with critical programming they need to re-engage, re-connect and thrive. After their virtual or in person school day is done – or before it begins – campers spend time at the ENC with friends and mentors for hands-on learning, creative enrichment and expression, a chance to explore without stress. For more information and to register, go here.

Top five things Boy and girl

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Before and After School Nature Camps encourage hands-on learning

Family Holiday Photo Sessions on November 14 at 9 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2:15 p.m. Book an hour in the Center to take your family holiday photos. Bring a photographer or take your own. If bringing a professional photographer, please complete a photo permit, but the fee for this session covers the permit fee.

All Nature Center guidelines must be followed, including staying on the trail. Masks must be worn by all visitors over 2 years old, except for when photos are being taken. Family units of up to 10 people are welcome. No pets. For more information and to register, go here.

Top five things Family

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Take your family holiday photo along an ENC nature trail

Bird Watching Hour at the ENC on November 18 from 7:30-8:30 a.m. ENC has noticed a diversity of bird species on the grounds and they wanted to share. Join them for a quiet hour of bird watching before the kids start arriving for their program at 9 a.m. Registered birders will have an hour to walk the grounds independently (this is not a naturalist-led program). No walk-ins; the ENC is still closed to the public except for those registered for programs. All Nature Center guidelines must be followed, including staying on the trail. Masks must be worn by all visitors. Space is limited to keep numbers small and safe. Please remain physically distanced from others while here. Here is a list of birds sighted at the Center in the past. They can’t wait to hear about what you see. For more information and to register, go here.

Top five things Hummingbird

A hummingbird is among the many birds spotted at ENC

Teachers Night Out at the ENC on November 19 from 4-5 p.m. The Teachers Night Out series brings all kinds of educators together for fun afternoons of learning exciting hands-on ways to teach children about science and nature. Join in person or virtually as you walk through the Center, after hours, to discover some engaging ways you and your students can learn about “Bringing the Outdoors In.” With many districts continuing virtual education through the end of the school year, bringing nature to virtual learners remains a challenge for classroom teachers. Afterwards, you’ll enjoy a light meal together and share some wine by the campfire. Many thanks to Las Palmeras, ENC’s wine sponsor, and Indarra, Modern Indian Cuisine their dinner sponsor, along with Chef Swarm The Pot Pie Guy, the dessert sponsor. For more information and to register, go here.

Top five things Teachers

Teachers gather around the campfire to discover new ways to engage their students

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach. www.encenter.org


Tamara Mellon shoe truck at Fashion Island

It’s a shoe-in! The Tamara Mellon – TM Mobile Store (mobile shoe closet) has pulled up at Fashion Island through November 7. The 24-foot open air truck displays women’s luxury footwear from floor to ceiling in sizes 35-42, affording customers the opportunity to shop their perfect size in an outdoor setting.

Tamara Mellon shoe truck

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Fashion Island

Tamara Mellon TM Mobile Store with a peek inside their shoe closet

Customers who visit the TM Mobile Store are invited to stop by any time during open hours or book an appointment slot to avoid wait times (social distancing will be followed and PPE is provided).

The mobile truck is parked near Macy’s in Pacific Court, 401 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach. Hours are 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

To reserve a 15-minute appointment, visit the website at www.tamaramellon.com/pages/mobilecloset.