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Get out and explore Buck Gully this summer 

Taking a hike in the Buck Gully Reserve, which connects Corona del Mar and Newport Coast, is the perfect opportunity to enjoy the upcoming warmer weather. Explore this 300-acre, natural habitat on foot, with three hikes led by the Irvine Ranch Conservancy staff.

Get out Buck Gully waterfall

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Photos by Emily Spain

The stream is running, making for a memorable late afternoon/early evening hike

–Buck Gully Upper Loop Evening Hikes: Explore the richness of Buck Gully Reserve as you hike during the beautiful early evening hours on Tuesday, Aug. 9 as well as Saturday, Sept. 10 from 3-5:30 p.m. The stream is running, and the rich plant and animal life are enjoying the cool, shady canyon making for an evening hike in a natural oasis amid the suburban surroundings. Walk along San Joaquin Hills Road, which overlooks Buck Gully for the first mile, then drop down into the canyon on the Bobcat Trail, looping back through the upper end of the gully along the Buck Gully Trail. This activity is conducted at a walking pace, approximately 3 miles per hour. The distance is 4 miles; duration, 2.5 hours with moderate difficulty. This hike is open to those 8 years and older. This hike is free, but registration is required. Staging area is the Newport Coast Community Center at 6401 San Joaquin Hills Road. Register at www.letsgooutside.org.

Get out Buck Gully bridge

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Several bridges provide unique vantages and viewing platforms

–Buck Gully Loop Hikes: Come and explore the entire Buck Gully Reserve trail system on Saturday, Aug. 13 as well as Tuesday, Sept. 6 from 8-11:30 a.m. Beginning from the OASIS Senior Center, you’ll hike up through the almost three-mile length of the canyon, then along San Joaquin Hills Road for about a mile, stopping at Canyon Watch Park, where you will take in the panoramic view of the reserve and the Pacific coastline before descending back into the canyon along the Bobcat Trail. This hike is 6 miles; duration, 3.5 hours with high-moderate difficulty and conducted at a walking pace, approximately three miles per hour. It is geared to those 12+ years of age. This hike is free, but registration is required. Meet at the OASIS Senior Center auxiliary lot at 5th and Marguerite in Corona del Mar Register at www.letsgooutside.org.

Get out Buck Gully views

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Enjoy panoramic views as you take in the canyon’s natural beauty

–Bridges of Buck Gully Hikes: Buck Gully is a natural, coastal canyon which opened up to the public in 2012 with the installation of four bridges to allow for safe public access. Discover the bridges on Tuesdays, Aug. 23 and Sept. 20 from 8-11:30 a.m. These bridges facilitate exploration of the Buck Gully Reserve, and also provide unique vantages and viewing platforms from which to pause and observe the abundant life in and around the stream. The guided program starts with a short walk from the OASIS Senior Center to the beginning of the Buck Gully trail, offering a visually dramatic entrance into this special canyon. Open to those 12 years and older. Conducted at a walking pace at approximately 3 miles per hour. Distance is 5 miles; duration is 3.5 hours with moderate difficulty. This hike is free, but registration is required. Meet at the OASIS Senior Center auxiliary lot at 5th and Marguerite in Corona del Mar. Register at www.letsgooutside.org.


Good Morning CdM! to feature Newport Beach water quality report

The Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce will present their Good Morning CdM! monthly meeting on Thursday, Aug. 11 from 8-9:30 a.m. at the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club.

The free meeting will feature Shane Burckle, Newport Beach Watershed & Conservation, City of Newport Beach Public Works Dept., who will discuss the Newport Beach water quality report. Topics covered include drought conditions, guidelines, rebates, and conservancy for residents and business owners.

Good Morning CdM Burckle

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Courtesy of CdM Chamber of Commerce

Shane Burckle

The meeting will also present updates from local legislative office representatives, including Newport Beach City Councilmember Joy Brenner, District 6; Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris, District 74; Congresswoman Michelle Steel, District 48 and Orange County Supervisor Lisa Bartlett, District 5.

The meeting with complimentary coffee/pastry is open to the public and free of charge. There is no RSVP required to attend. 

The Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club is located at 1601 Bayside Drive, Corona del Mar. 

For more information, visit www.CdmChamber.com.


Laguna Playhouse announces XANADU as final show, features Newport Beach resident in cast 

Laguna Playhouse concludes its historic 100th anniversary season with the dazzling and magical musical XANADU, with the book by Douglas Carter Beane, music and lyrics by Jeff Lynne and John Farrar, musical direction by Ricky Pope and directed and choreographed by Paula Hammons Sloan.

According to Executive Producing Director Ellen Richard, “What a euphoric way to close what has been an exceptional 100th anniversary season for the Playhouse with a hilarious book by Douglas Carter Beane and spectacular musical numbers, our subscribers and audiences will close out the summer in a wildly entertaining way!”

Laguna Playhouse Daniels

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Courtesy of Laguna Playhouse

Kristen Daniels plays Kira/Clio 

Slap on your roller skates, pump up the glitter, and get hip to the muses in XANADU, the laugh-out-loud musical stage adaptation of the 1980 film which won the Outer Circle Award for “Best Musical!” XANADU follows Clio, the lovely and precocious Greek muse who decides to don her roller skates and legwarmers to become Kira to help Sonny Malone, a chalk artist with half a brain and a heart of gold, rediscover his own creativity. XANADU is a rare musical with a big heart, an even bigger funny bone, and a tongue stuck firmly in its cheek. The smash-hit score includes “I’m Alive,” “Magic,” “Have You Never Been Mellow” and “Xanadu.”

The Cast of XANADU features Kristen Daniels as Kira/Clio, Dorian Quinn as Sonny, Jonathan Van Dyke as Danny/Zeus, Michelle Bendetti as Calliope/Aphrodite, Judy Mina-Ballard as Melpomene/Medusa and will also feature Daniella Castoria, Erika Harper, A.J. Love, Alec Mittenthal, Patrick Murray and Ellery Smith.

Laguna Playhouse Bendetti

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Courtesy of Laguna Playhouse

Michelle Bendetti, of Newport Beach, plays Calliope/Aphrodite

Bendetti, a Newport Beach resident, is the current president at the Newport Theatre Arts Center (NTAC), former City of Newport Beach Arts Commissioner and a participant and supporter of the local theater scene. After more than two years of working to reopen NTAC after many COVID challenges, it was time to get back on stage. This is her third show at the Laguna Playhouse.

Performances will be Wednesdays through Fridays at 7:30 p.m., Saturdays at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., and Sundays at 1 and 5:30 p.m. There will be added performances on Tuesday, Aug. 9 at 7:30 p.m. and Thursday, Aug. 18 at 2 p.m. There will be no performance on Wednesday, Aug. 17 at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets range from $55-$95 and can be purchased online or by calling 949.497.ARTS (2787). Group discounts are available by calling 949.497.2787 ext. 229. Prices subject to change.

The box office is open Mondays – Saturdays, 12-4 p.m.; Sundays open two hours prior to show time until 15 minutes after the curtain. Open until showtime on all performance days.

XANADU begins previews on Wednesday, Aug. 3; will open on Sunday, Aug. 7 at 5:30 p.m. with performances through Sunday, Aug. 21.

Laguna Playhouse is located at 606 Laguna Canyon Drive, Laguna Beach.

For more information on all shows and programming, visit www.lagunaplayhouse.com.


Thus begins the tale of Orpheus and Eurydice...in Hadestown

Hadestown, the winner of eight 2019 Tony Awards® including Best New Musical and the 2020 Grammy® Award for Best Musical Theater Album, comes to Segerstrom Hall at Segerstrom Center for the Arts, August 9-21.

Hadestown is the most honored show of the 2018-2019 Broadway season. In addition to the show’s eight Tony Awards®, it has been honored with four Drama Desk Awards, six Outer Critics Circle Awards, including Outstanding New Broadway Musical and the Drama League Award for Outstanding Production of a Musical.

Thus begins Hadestown scene 1

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Photo by Kevin Berne

Morgan Siobhan Green and Chibeuze Ihuoma and Company in the North American Tour of “Hadestown”

Beginning on August 9, this Tony Award-winning show brings a timeless myth to life with unforgettable music, poetry and characters that audiences will adore. Hadestown intertwines two mythic tales – that of young dreamers Orpheus and Eurydice, and that of King Hades and his wife Persephone – and invites you on a thrilling journey to the underworld and back. Any way the wind blows, all roads lead back to Hadestown – so don’t forget to grab your ticket today.

The acclaimed new musical is by celebrated singer-songwriter and Tony Award® winner Anaïs Mitchell and developed with innovative director and Tony Award® winner Rachel Chavkin. Hadestown marks the first time in over a decade that a woman has been the solo author of a musical: writing the music, lyrics, and book and is the fourth time in Broadway history a woman has accomplished this creative feat.

Thus begins Hadestown scene 2

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Photo by Kevin Berne

The cast in a scene from “Hadestown” during the North American Tour 

Mitchell’s beguiling melodies and Chavkin’s poetic imagination pit industry against nature, doubt against faith and fear against love. Performed by a vibrant ensemble of actors, dancers and singers, Hadestown delivers a deeply resonant and defiantly hopeful theatrical experience.

Tickets are available online at www.scfta.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa, or by calling 714.556.2787. For inquiries about group ticket discounts for 10 or more, call the Group Services offices at 714.755.0236.

Segerstrom Hall at Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


A look into Newport’s crystal ball

By DUNCAN FORGEY

In 2001, Crystal Cove could have joined a hallowed fraternity of communities that became ghost towns in California. Like Calico in the Mojave Desert and the former gold town of Bodie, the State of California stepped up to save Crystal Cove, named for its see-through waters. Unlike forgotten towns Johannesburg, Keeler and Red Mountain, Crystal Cove is blessed with miles of pristine beach frontage in the never-ending boom that is Orange County. No way was it going to disappear. In fact, in true OC fashion, there was an opportunity to be had.

A look into Newport s Crystal Cove coastline

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Courtesy of Orange County Archives

Crystal Cove coastline

The beach consists of 3.2 miles of flat sand, with a verdant slope approximately 100 yards in depth. The rest of Crystal Cove State Park includes acres of backcountry wilderness, where local kids used to ride horses and bikes.  At the time of the original Crystal Cove’s “death” on July 8, 2001, the community consisted of the beach and its 45 original cottages. The State of California had no solid plans, so rumors spread that the cottages would be torn down and a luxury resort may be built. This sent shudders, shivers and sadness among all who loved the cove.

The 80-year-old shanties, built without housing codes, were rudimentary at best. Locals liked to say they were held together by “magic, dreams and sacrifice.” Any inkling of another grand hotel being built on this sacred location was unacceptable to all concerned, creating anger and activism.

Personal and intimate names like Critterville, HideHo and The Whistle Stop adorned mailboxes shaped like mermaids, crabs and dolphins. Each cottage, painted in bright primary colors, starkly contrasted with the stately homes being built on the hillsides of Newport Coast. Crystal Cove’s sand beaches with granite boulders scattered like marshmallows upon a cake is still home to ghosts of Native Americans, squatters, movie stars, plein air artists, rumrunners and Japanese farmers. These ancient spirits have united with the souls of past family residents making way for today’s Crystal Cove visitors.

In 1837, Rancho San Joaquin was granted to Juan Jose Sepulveda by the King of Spain. In 1864, he sold his cattle ranch for 50 cents an acre to James Irvine, Benjamin Flint and Llewellyn Bixby, to satisfy debts. Irvine bought out his partners, who chose to buy land closer to the pueblo of Los Angeles, allowing the birth of Irvine Ranch.

For Irvine, a man keen to agriculture and ranching, Crystal Cove was useless. It was unfit for any viable commercial purpose of that era. Over decades and generations, this beautiful beach evolved into a recreational destination for family and employees of the ranch. In the early 20th century, a campground opened. Accessible by rutted dirt roads, only the hardiest of beachgoers risked it due to the pounding of the hard springs of contemporary Model T Fords.

With completion of Pacific Coast Highway in the 1920s, Crystal Cove opened up to the public. For a fee, tourists could spend days relaxing at the beach. Permanent tents were erected and became more elaborate with time. Each was given a designated lot. Soon, a residential neighborhood was born.

In 1927, a 287-foot schooner Esther Buhne carrying teak and other building materials to Newport Harbor went aground near Crystal Cove, allowing locals a golden opportunity. Lumber floated up to their beach and was immediately used to build small structures on the lots. Many newly constructed board and batten single-wall cottages and thatched huts sprung up along the bluff.

Each and every one of these homes had a personal history typifying a lifestyle during this golden era of California. From the 1920s on, generation after generation spent as much time as possible living a lifestyle that was somewhere between beach bum and millionaire. Memories etched deeply into the souls of those who can remember these glory days of Crystal Cove.

A look into Newport s Bud Carter

Courtesy of Bud Carter

Bud Carter

One such family was that of A.G. “Bud” Carter. In 2001, walking among the flotsam and jetsam scattered along his beloved beach, he talked about the life he enjoyed. His family purchased the rights to their “home” in 1939 for $750. For 62 years the Carter clan leased this spot. Bud spent his childhood, adolescence, parenting and grand-parenting years in this unique setting. His entire life was shaped by an opportunity to live seaside.

A look into Newport s Crystal Cove 1940s

Courtesy of Orange County Archives

Crystal Cove with its charming cottages, 1940s

There are 45 similar stories with some properties remaining in the same family for five generations. The Davick, McCloskey, Rowland, Payne and Falzetti families are just a few of those who shared in the Cove’s charmed lifestyle. If your family was fortunate enough to have “owned the rights” to one of the original cottages, life was oh so different.

A look into Newport s Crystal Cove 1970s

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Courtesy of Orange County Archives

The rustic beauty of Crystal Cove, 1970s

In 1979, the Irvine Company sold the cove and surrounding lands to the State of California for $32.6 million. The agreement allowed the Irvine Company to develop multiple high-end communities in Newport Coast, in exchange for giving the State this California beach frontage to manage. The state put tenants of the cove on notice that their dream life was coming to an end. July 8, 2001 was an extremely emotional day that life ended for Crystal Cove residents. It was the beginning of a new State Park and destination resort.

Today`s park contains the same beautiful beach, plus multiple “rustic” coastal cottages. In addition, it includes 2,400 acres of backcountry wilderness plus areas offshore for underwater exploration, with one of the most biodiverse marine ecosystems in the world – the kelp forest. The cottages offer approximately 25 different rental choices depending on the size of the group. Enjoying Crystal Cove with its amenities today still allows guests to experience being a beach bum or a millionaire.

You see, some things have not changed.

~~~~~~~~

Duncan Forgey, long-time resident, photographer and historian of Newport Beach, makes his home on Kaua’i and is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport. His first novel “Flyin’ Kai: A Pelican’s Tale” is available through his website www.DuncanForgey.com. He would love to hear from you.


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach

Newport Beach A Look Back Balboa Island Ferry

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The Balboa Island Ferry from the Balboa Peninsula side. Date unknown. 

Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free general admission on all days. Two-hour parking is available on Marine Avenue. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Regattas and Races…

Regattas and Races 8.9

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Photo by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

NHYC 

2022 Twilights – August Series

August 4

Finn (3 races, 0 discards)

1 Paul Marshall, n/a, Total 4, Net 4

2 Michael Downing, NHYC, Total 7, Net 7

3 Robert Martin, MBYC, Total 10, Net 10

4 James Lawson, Yacht Club of Evil, Total 11, Net 11

5 Robert Kinney, NHYC, Total 13, Net 13

6 Keith Yonkers, NHYC, Total 18, Net 18

Harbor 20 A (3 races, 0 discards)

1 Thompson/Conzelman, NHYC/BCYC/LIYC, Total 3, Net 3

2 J. Buckingham/Aschieris, NHYC, Total 7, Net 7

3 Menninger/Deermount, NHYC, Total 8, Net 8

4 Thompson/Kraus, NHYC, Total 16, Net 16

5 Bob McDonald, NHYC, Total 16, Net 16

6 Peter Kinney, NHYC, Total 16, Net 16

7 Steve Schupak, BYC, Total 18, Net 18

8 Nick Madigan, NHYC, Total 22, Net 22

9 Scott Ramser, NHYC, Total 22,  Net 22

10 Nick Madigan, NHYC, Total 25, Net 25

11 Ed Kimball, ABYC, Total 25, Net 25

12 Allen/Helias, NHYC, Total 27, Net 27

13 Greg Allan, NHYC, Total 28, Net 28

Harbor 20 B (2 races, 0 discards)

1 Buddy Richley, NHYC, Total 3, Net 3

2 P. Haynes/D. Haynes, BCYC, Total 5, Net 5

3 Drayton/Benter, NHYC, Total 7, Net 7

4 Chan/Logan, NHYC, Total 8, Net 8

5 Thomas Corkett, NHYC, Total 9, Net 9

6 H. Duncan/W. Duncan, NHYC, Total 11, Net 11

7 Russ Detwiler, UCISA, Total 13, Net 13

Harbor 20 C (2 races, 0 discards)

1 Adam Bradley, NHYC, Total 3, Net 3

2 Carlton Seaver, NHYC, Total 3, Net 3

Lehman 12 (3 races, 0 discards)

1 Campbell/D’Eliscu, NHYC, Total 5, Net 5

2 Bruce Ayres, NHYC, Total 9, Net 9

3 Andrew Person, NHYC, Total 9, Net 9

4 Carolyn Smith, NHYC, Total 10, Net 10

5 Brooks Clark, NHYC, Total 12, Net 12

6 Matt Wiley, NHYC, Total 18, Net 18

7 Michael Dahl, NHYC, Total 19, Net 19

BYC 

2022 Beercans – Stout (August) Series

August 4

PHRF 1 – Race #1 (3.3)

1 It’s Ok, Andrews 49.9, Purcell/Rose, BYC

   Elapsed 0:42:26, Corrected 0:45:04

2 Coquille, Farr 40, Wes Selby, BYC

   Elapsed 0:48:25, Corrected 0:48:05

3 Rossa, DK46, Jared Gargano, BYC

   Elapsed 0:55:36, Corrected 0:56:06

PHRF 2 – Race #1 (3.3)

1 Heartbeat 4, J124, Charles Brewer, NHYC

   Elapsed 0:55:11, Corrected 0:53:02

2 Amante, Choate 48, Richley Family, LIYC/NHYC

   Elapsed 0:55:45, Corrected 0:53:46

3 Catorse, FT10, Joshua Burns, NSB

   Elapsed 0:57:16, Corrected 0:54:48

4 Baraka, J120, Janet Mostafa, BYC

   Elapsed 0:58:24, Corrected 0:56:15 

5 Dani Girl, J120, Campbell/Martin, BYC/CRA

   Elapsed 0:59:45, Corrected 0:57:36

PHRF 3 – Race #1 (3.3)

1 XLR8, Bene36.7, Gabriel Nistor, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:57:42, Corrected 0:53:15

2 Crash, Open6.5, Tracey Kenney, BYC

   Elapsed 0:57:21, Corrected 0:53:23

3 Radical Departure, Bene25, Rosene Family, BYC

   Elapsed 1:00:06, Corrected 0:53:50

4 Cha Cha Cha, C&C40, Larry Walker, LIYC/CYCA

   Elapsed 1:04:10, Corrected 0:58:53

5 Gator, Frers38, Daniel Moore, SSC

   Elapsed 1:14:55, Corrected 1:10:38

PHRF 4 – Race #1 (2.6)

1 Horsefeathers, Ericson35, John Fuller, NHYC

   Elapsed 0:55:52, Corrected 0:49:22

2 Campaign II, C&C34, Mark Glackin, BYC

   Elapsed 0:57:05, Corrected 0:50:35

3 Gem, Santana 20, Cooper/Whitaker, BYC

   Elapsed 1:02:41, Corrected 0:53:04

4 Silk, Harbor 25, John Hanscom, SSYC

   Elapsed 1:02:59, Corrected 0:55:34

5 Daydream, Pearson, Rich Fischbeck, BYC

   Elapsed 1:08:16, Corrected 0:59:57

News relating to racing in or around Newport Harbor should be forwarded to Tom Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


The Week in Review

A weekly newsletter from City Manager Grace L. Leung

Grace Leung

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung

Community Members:

This month the city is celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Upper Buck Gully trail renovations, which created an accessible, habitat-friendly hiking and biking trail within a protected canyon. In the past decade, the Buck Gully trail has become one of the city’s most popular recreational destinations, enjoyed by more than 20,000 hikers and cyclists a year. 

The 300-acre Buck Gully reserve is a protected wildlife area owned and operated by the city under an agreement with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the California Department of Fish and Game. The 2012 renovations, which included construction of the 3.32-mile trail system and the installation of four bridges by helicopter, were made possible by a state grant to the city and our non-profit partner, the Irvine Ranch Conservancy.

I’d like to thank the many volunteer conservancy members for their excellent work over the past decade to educate visitors through guiding tours and activities, monitoring the natural resources in the area, removing invasive species, maintaining the infrastructure of the trails and bridges and more. Residents who live in the hills surrounding the canyon have also played an important role in its preservation by choosing native plants, limiting water runoff and reducing fire hazards. 

Buck Gully is open daily from dawn to dusk, and during scheduled programs. To maintain the sensitive wildlife habitats, dogs are not allowed.

I encourage you to visit the Irvine Ranch Conservancy’s website for more information on Buck Gully, including trail maps, docent-led programs, volunteer opportunities and more.

City Manager, Grace K. Leung

Regular Lap Swim Schedule Resumes August 5 at Marian Bergeson Aquatic Center

Beginning August 5, lap swimming at the Marian Bergeson Aquatic Center will return to the standard, year-round schedule of Monday through Friday from 6-9 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Lap swim memberships are sold in bundles of visits or as an annual pass.

Visit www.newportbeachca.gov/aquatics for pricing and the monthly calendar.

New Step-by-Step Guides Available for Virtual Connect Online Permitting Portal

New step-by-step guides for the recently launched City Virtual Connect Online Permitting portal (CiViC) are now available at www.newportbeachca.gov/civic.

The guides will assist users with registering for a CiViC account, reviewing plan check status and written corrections, scheduling a building inspection and understanding how to navigate around the new user dashboard. 

Mayor’s Youth Council Accepting Applications For 2022-23 School Year Through September 5

The Mayor’s Youth Council is now accepting applications for the 2022/23 school year. This educational program gives high school students an in-depth look at careers offered in local government and provides a forum to express opinions, creativity and civic mindedness.

The Mayor’s Youth Council is comprised of three different functions: education, service and outreach. In addition to one-on-one mentoring with city staff, Youth Council members will also be involved in the planning and implementation of community events and engagement with their peers.

High-school aged residents are invited to apply by Monday, Sept. 5. Click here for more information or to apply.

Be Well Mobile Crisis Response Update

The Be Well mobile crisis response team operates in Newport Beach 12 hours a day, seven days a week to respond to mental and behavioral health crises. The mobile unit is staffed with mental health specialists and EMTs, and works closely with the city’s police and fire departments.

This week the Be Well team: 

–Located a person experiencing homelessness who lost contact with his family in Wisconsin. The team took initial steps to reconnect him with family.

–Transported one person to the Be Well sobering station for treatment.

–Transported one person to a crisis stabilization unit for treatment.

–Transported five people to services, shelter intakes and appointments.

Homelessness Update

The City of Newport Beach provides a comprehensive response to address homelessness through a coordinated effort by city staff, contractors, partner agencies and nonprofit groups.

This week, the city’s homeless outreach and response teams:

–Participated in the Newport Beach National Night Out event to provide education and resources to the community.

–Continued to shelter people. Eighteen people who had been experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach are sheltered in the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter.

–Filed reports with the county’s Adult Protective Services for two older adults living in vehicles. This will enroll them in case management.

–Completed housing assessments for four people in the county’s Coordinated Entry System.

–Transported one person to a Social Security appointment.

–Enrolled an older adult into services and completed a housing assessment.

–Completed paperwork with an older veteran awarded an Emergency Housing Voucher program.

–Sheltered a client in a motel while he waits for his new apartment.

To donate to those experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach, visit our Good Giving Program web page.

Click here to view the latest homeless dashboard, which includes key monthly and yearly data on the city’s homeless response. 

This Week’s Events

Thursday, Aug. 11

Fall 2022 Class Registration Opening

Click here

Zoning Administrator Meeting

Zoom – 10 a.m.

City Arts Commission Meeting

Central Library

1000 Avocado Ave. – 5 p.m.

See the Full Schedule

Editor’s Note: City Manager’s Updates was received Friday, Aug. 5 and is subject to editing so the information is current.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

My world travels take me to the VEA Newport Beach and I couldn’t be happier

TJ headshot AugI have to be honest, today isn’t starting out like any other workday. Saturday, I checked myself into the VEA Newport Beach for a little staycation. I got tired of reading Visit Newport Beach columnist and CEO Gary Sherwin’s suggestions of staying local. 

So, I decided to check it out for myself.

My requirements, I was looking for a nice place to relax and enjoy some sunshine and warm weather, perhaps sitting poolside (obviously dressed in a turtleneck and long pants). I was hoping golf would be nearby. I was also hoping for an ocean view. I wanted it to be nice. Shopping and good local restaurants nearby would be a plus.

I started to look.

Airfare to Hawaii’s Kahului was $444; and to Kailua-Kona and Kauai, $446.

That means for two, if I had “a two,” would be almost $1,000.

Then it dawned on me what Gary has been saying, we moved here to live in the greatest part of the country. Our hotel operators continually invest to keep our local products world class. 

Just think what the VEA has done…we also have The Resort at Pelican Hill and the Balboa Bay Resort. And, don’t forget, in the somewhat near future, we’ll also have a new Pendry. Why go anywhere else?

So, here I am today, outside on the veranda area overlooking the beautiful pool, complete with the Edge Pool Bar at the far end, between the pool and seemingly overlooking the second fairway of Newport Beach Country Club. Oh, and off in the distance I not only see the ocean but Catalina hovering at what, “26 miles across the sea, Santa Catalina is a-waitin’ for me.”

Anyway, back to the VEA, it’s simply spectacular.

I’m just saying, next time you’re looking to get away, consider saving on the travel time, saving on the travel costs and come join this land of paradise.

You won’t be disappointed.

• • •

On the campaign trail: Lisa Pearson is formally kicking off her campaign for the Newport-Mesa Unified School Board of Education next Monday, Aug. 15. She comes to us at the recommendation of incumbent Karen Yelsey who is calling it quits after 16 years serving our children.

Oh, and if you know Karen it really was serving! So, when she recommends someone, I don’t take it lightly.

Lisa was an elementary school teacher for 10 years meaning she obviously knows what the inside of a classroom looks and operates like, which I think is important. She was also a district Teacher of the Year. Additionally, she has served as a mentor to new teachers coming into the district.

As a parent, she’s been PTA President at both Lincoln Elementary and Corona del Mar High School; a School Site Council member; on the Harbor Council PTA; she’s been involved in both Newport Harbor and CdM high school principal searches and so much more.

Outside the schools she’s been involved in the National Charity League, Second Harvest Food Bank and volunteered at the Thomas House (family shelter in Garden Grove). Oh, and she’s also raised a family.

Her priorities that she’s running on include “maintaining and advancing the quality of education for every student, continuing distinguished academic programs and career technical programs, support of mental health, providing safe and secure classrooms, all while maintaining financial stability for the district.

I met Lisa and was impressed.

Two other candidates have also announced for District 4 opposite Pearson – Barbara George and Kristen Valle.

I do know that George, who goes by Barbie, is a Newport Arts Commissioner. She’s also heavily involved in the Orange County GOP, particularly in their Hispanic programming. 

Rumors from several people say that Barbie will use the office as a steppingstone to target Will O’Neill’s City Council seat come 2024 when he terms out.

• • •

Last Friday at the OC Fair was the Motorhome Madness demolition derby in their Action Sports Arena. What made this one so different though, aside from the fact that it was a demolition derby in motorhomes, in front of a packed arena, was the fact that it included three police chiefs and three fire chiefs, including our own NBPD Chief Jon Lewis and NBFD Chief Jeff Boyles.

Judging by the driving at the end of the evening, it’s not hard to realize that Chief Lewis spent much of his early career behind the wheel of a patrol car, while Chief Boyles simply hung on to the back of a fire truck.

The six chiefs took off for round one, with three of them eventually being knocked out. Chief Boyles was included in that bunch, seemingly embarrassing an entire department. Okay, maybe not, but you get my drift.

Chief Lewis then continued on fighting for the trophy of all trophies in an attempt to bring it home to Newport Beach, while just falling short to Costa Mesa Fire Chief and Newport Beach resident Dan Stefano

Chief Lewis’ assistant, Jennifer Manzella, said, “I think he was robbed on a technicality.” Of course, she’s probably paid to say that.

Stu News was unable to confirm reports that Chief Lewis attempted to have Chief Stefano arrested on his way home following the event.

And if anyone takes parts of the above seriously, shame on them.

Editor’s Note: Upon publication, we heard from Chief Boyles who informed us he finished fourth overall. As he still affirmed, “Yes, embarrassing my department.” He also pointed out that Costa Mesa Fire Chief Dan Stefano did not in fact win, noting that Tustin Police Chief Stu Greenberg won for the second year in a row.

• • •

The Airport Land Use Commission has once again canceled their next scheduled meeting that was planned for August 18. 

The next meeting will now be scheduled for September 15th at 4 p.m.

• • •

Two fun things coming up at Sherman Library & Gardens this week. First up, Friday, from 10 a.m. to noon or 1-3 p.m., local artist Erna Van Dyk will lead a watercolor class. She’ll teach you how to see and paint color and simple shapes, taking inspiration from a Peacock Orchid.

The classes are open to all levels of painters including the non-painter.

Saturday then is a Parent & Me Art Class, or grandparent & me, or whatever. You’ll again join up with Van Dyk to learn how to create a picture of a Peacock Orchid. 

Working together, the team will use a step-by-step watercolor technique to create their own illustration of a vase and then model magic clay to create the flowers.

Fun, fun, fun. Go to www.thesherman.org.


Man dies just off Lido Isle Sunday after reportedly chasing fallen cell phone into bay

Orange County Sheriffs responded to a call regarding a 32-year-old male who entered the water of the Bay just off Lido Isle and did not re-emerge shortly after 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 7. 

The not-as-yet identified victim reportedly dove into the water to recover a cell phone that had just fallen in, submerged and then disappeared. His body was recovered shortly thereafter as deceased at 5:14 p.m., by Newport Beach Lifeguards, according to an OCSD spokesperson. 

No cause of death has been determined to explain why the victim did not return to the surface. No other details were available.


POPP “Protect Our Planned Parenthood” event held at Sherman Gardens raises $255,000

The POPP “Protect Our Planned Parenthood” sold-out event that took place at Sherman Library & Gardens in Corona del Mar on July 31 raised $255,000 for the Community Action Fund of Planned Parenthood of Orange & San Bernardino counties (CAF), the political arm of the local Planned Parenthood.

POPP Swerdlow

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Photos by Stephen Langlois

(L-R) Event co-chair Cyd Swerdlow and Lauren Wong

In light of the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, attendees were invited to “POPP” into the fight with donations to help elect local officials who will support reproductive and family planning access and defeat anti-abortion initiatives across the country. The event quickly sold out.

POPP Schmider

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(L-R) Pame Schmider, Beth Bidna and Wendy Tenebaum

Attendees wore “summer white,” as they enjoyed an alfresco dinner and a reception. More than 200 supporters heard updates about the state of abortion access both nationwide and in California, which is absorbing an unprecedented amount of patients from out-of-state who are traveling to seek abortion care.

Particular emphasis was placed on the health outcomes of abortion restrictions for all people and particularly for young people of color with low incomes who already have children, as they make up the majority of abortion patients in the U.S.

POPP Tucker

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(L-R) Laney Tucker and Melanie Espeland


Serving up some fun in the sun

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Photo by Stacia Stabler

A little service practice on a sunny summer day in CdM


Summer crowds

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

A bird’s eye view of a busy summer Sunday in Newport


Upcoming events at Balboa Island Museum

Mark your calendar for these upcoming events at the Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach.

NOTE: This event has been canceled.Speaker Event and Book Signing takes place on Thursday, Aug. 11 at 6 p.m. featuring a discussion and book signing of Surfing in Huntington Beach with author Mark Zambrano. 

Summer Art Class takes place on Wednesday, Aug. 10 (Seurat) from 10-11 a.m. Class is led by Eve Nycz, Laguna Beach artist. All ages are welcome. There is a $10 donation and supplies are provided for each project. To register, go here, or call 949.675.3952.

Movie Night at the Museum takes place on Wednesday, Aug. 24 at 6 p.m. Come enjoy the screening of Big Wednesday and refreshments. The movie stars Gary Busey, Jan-Michael Vincent and William Katt as California surfers facing life and the Vietnam War against the backdrop of the love for surfing. There is a $15 donation. For tickets, go here.

All events take place at Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach, 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org.


Tickets are now on sale for the Pacific Wine & Food Classic

Tickets are now on sale for the world-renowned Pacific Wine & Food Classic, returning to the picturesque oceanfront setting of Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort on Saturday, Oct. 1. The exclusive, boutique-style invitational presents an unrivaled culinary experience celebrating the diverse epicurean offerings of Southern California with exquisite wines, decadent cocktails and sumptuous bites from the region’s top chefs.

“We are elated to once again bring a well-deserved spotlight to Orange County’s immensely talented chefs,” said Pamela Waitt, president of OC Restaurant Association and founder of Pacific Wine & Food Classic. “Guests will once again experience VIP treatment as we pair world-class wines from across the Golden State with outstanding local culinary creations.”

Tickets are now on sale Newport Dunes

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Photo by Christian Sosa of Elyx

Pacific Wine & Food Classic returns to Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort on Saturday, Oct. 1

Voted number one on USA Today’s list of 10 Best Food Festivals in the nation, the first-class food and wine event celebrates autumn and one of the most exciting and flourishing food scenes in the U.S. With an illustrious line-up of more than 30 restaurants and food purveyors, the Pacific Wine & Food Classic will highlight many favorites including Cuban and Spanish classic Nuevo Latino cuisine from Habana, fresh-caught seafood from Hook & Anchor, locally sourced and seasonally inspired fare from Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens, authentic Central Mexican street-inspired cuisine from Descanso, award-winning giant paella from Villa Roma and Cambalache, inventive American cuisine from Lido Bottle Works, delicious desserts from Sweet Surrender Specialty Desserts and Pastries and more. The classic is also thrilled to welcome many first-time participants to the event, including The Jetty, Rancho Capistrano Winery, Pacific Hideaway, Trevor’s on the Tracks and The Tea House on Los Rios.

The epicurean experience begins as guests are greeted with a welcome cocktail made with Licor 43. Between bites, discover 100 premium wines from throughout the region, locally brewed craft beer, and a variety of refreshing premium cocktails by Grey Goose, Maker’s Mark, Tres Generaciones and Bacardi.

Bask in the warm California sunshine while enjoying mouth-watering delights including Southern California’s largest charcuterie and crudites tasting experience courtesy of Lover’s Boards and Melissa’s produce. Live music will provide the ultimate soundtrack to an idyllic weekend enjoying great vibes and beautiful coastal California vistas.

The Pacific Wine & Food Classic takes place at Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort located at 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach. Early Bird tickets are $200. All tickets for the 2022 event are VIP and guests must be age 21 and over to attend. Net proceeds for The Pacific Wine & Food Classic proudly benefit the The Golden Rule Charity.

The event will follow all local, state and CDC guidelines. For more information on the Pacific Wine & Food Classic, to view the pricing schedule and to purchase tickets, visit www.pacificwineandfood.com.


Pacific Chorale presents free Choral Festival concert conducted by Artistic Director Robert Istad on August 14

Pacific Chorale, the Grammy-winning resident choir at Segerstrom Center for the Performing Arts, presents a free community Choral Festival concert, conducted by Artistic Director Robert Istad, on Sunday, Aug. 14 at 5 p.m. at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa. The concert offers the opportunity for the public to experience the power of choral music in one of the country’s foremost music venues. The 265-voice Festival Chorus, comprised of singers from across the Southland and beyond, will be joined by soprano Rebecca Hasquet, baritone Jared Daniel Jones, organist Jung-A-Lee and pianist David Clemensen. Pacific Chorale’s Choral Festival is presented in association with Segerstrom Center for the Arts. 

Pacific Chorale choir closeup

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Photo by Stan Sholik Photography

Pacific Chorale to appear at Segerstrom Concert Hall on August 14

The program features three luminous works by National Medal of Arts recipient Morten Lauridsen, hailed as an “American Choral Master” by the National Endowment for the Arts and the most frequently performed American choral composer in modern history. They include Lux Aeterna, composed in 1997, which reveals Lauridsen’s mastery of conveying through music the profound depth of human emotion. Also featured are Two Songs on American Poems – Prayer (On a Poem by Dana Gioia) and “Sure on This Shining Night” from Nocturnes, a setting of James Agee’s poem. According to Lauridsen, “Prayer was written in memory of Michael Jasper Gioia, Dana and Mary Gioia’s infant son, whose brief life was tragically ended by SIDS.” The concert opens with “Hommage à Lauridsen,” an organ prelude improvisation inspired by Lauridsen, composed and performed by Jung-A Lee.

“We are delighted to throw open our doors to the public to showcase the Pacific Chorale Festival Chorus,” said Istad. “It provides a vital opportunity for Pacific Chorale to engage with the broader community in an impactful way to share the power and artistry of the human voice raised in song. We welcome people of all ages to the concert hall, especially those who may not have previously had the opportunity to hear live music in the extraordinary Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall.”

This marks Pacific Chorale’s 14th annual Choral Festival, which returns after a two-year hiatus due to the global pandemic. It features a two-day choral workshop for community-based choirs led by Istad culminating with the performance. The 2022 Festival Chorus comprises 178 community singers hailing from 66 cities in seven states, representing 113 community choruses, church choirs and schools. Of this year’s participants, 117 have sung in multiple festivals and 13 singers have performed in the community-based Festival Chorus each year since its inception. For the performance, the singers will be joined onstage by 72 Pacific Chorale members and 15 alumni.

The concert is free, but tickets are required and available on a first-come, first-served basis at www.pacificchorale.org.

The Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. To reserve tickets and for information, visit www.pacificchorale.org, or call 714.662.2345.


Ten dazzling events for the 2022-23 Dance Series including North American premiere at Segerstrom Hall

Segerstrom Center for the Arts announces its 2022-2023 dance performances, offering a wide range of modern, contemporary and classical dance. The Center will bring 10 dazzling works to Orange County including Center debuts of North America’s most innovative dance companies MOMIX, BODYTRAFFIC, LA Dance Project and Ballet BC and is excited to host the North American premiere of American Ballet Theatre’s Like Water for Chocolate from choreographer Christopher Wheeldon. Plus, welcome back audience favorites with the return of Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan, Farruquito, ABT’s The Nutcracker, Dorrance Dance and Alonzo King LINES Ballet at its 40th anniversary.

Ten dazzling MOMIX

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Photo by Max Pucciariello

MOMIX comes to Segerstrom Center on September 17

“There’s nothing like the feeling of joy and amazement from an exemplary dance performance. With each new season, the Center strives to create a wide selection of classical, contemporary and world dance. Each company highlighted for our 2022-2023 season possesses an extraordinary range of choreography, athleticism and style. Audiences are in for a treat this dance season,” said Judy Morr, executive vice president of Segerstrom Center. 

Ten dazzling Cloud Gate

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Courtesy of sgfta.org

Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan turns ancient aesthetics into a thrilling and modern celebration of motion in “13 Tongues” on October 26

Beginning this fall, the dance series opens with the incredible MOMIX, a company known for mixing unique costumes, music, props and scenography to create a magical performance that is bound to leave audiences on the edge of their seats. In October, “Asia’s leading contemporary dance theater” (The Times) Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan will turn ancient aesthetics into a thrilling and modern celebration of motion. Los Angeles’s BODYTRAFFIC brings their “unfailingly deft and endearing dancers” (Los Angeles Times) to Segerstrom Center for a debut of compelling works that embody the company’s energy, sophistication and sheer joy in dancing. Farruquito’s roots in flamenco dance has taken him all over the world, immersing audiences in his gift as the “greatest Flamenco dancer of this new century.”

Ten dazzling The Nutcracker

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Courtesy of sgfta.org

ABT’s “The Nutcracker” graces the stage for the holiday season on December 9-18

This December, American Ballet Theatre continues its annual holiday engagement of Alexei Ratmansky’s The Nutcracker, returning for the seventh time on the Segerstrom Hall stage. In March 2023, American Ballet Theatre will give the North American Premiere of Like Water for Chocolate at the Center. From the award-winning team of choreographer Christopher Wheeldon and composer Joby Talbot, with costumes by Bob Crowley, this co-production with the Royal Ballet is inspired by Laura Esquivel’s bestselling novel of the same name. Wheeldon and his team have turned “Latin-American magical realism into a fluid, clear and cohesive dance narrative” (Culture Whisper)

Ten dazzling Like Water

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Courtesy of sgfta.org

ABT’s “Like Water for Chocolate” makes its North American premiere on March 29-April 2, 2023

New York-based tap dance company, Dorrance Dance, will take the stage in April 2023, exploring what is most thrilling, brilliant and beautiful about tap dancing with a program called SOUNDSpace.

Ten dazzing LA Dance Project

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Courtesy of sgfta.org

LA Dance Project’s contemporary “Romeo & Juliet Suite” comes to Segerstrom Hall on May 12-14, 2023

In May 2023, LA Dance Project will present its contemporary take on Romeo and Juliet created by artistic director Benjamin Millepied. Other contemporary ballet performances offered in the new season include Center favorite Alonzo King LINES Ballet 40th Anniversary known for their “gripping, urgently beautiful choreography” (San Francisco Chronicle). Also, Vancouver-based Ballet BC brings its diverse style and exemplary works of contemporary ballet that goes beyond the boundaries of the genre. 

Ten dazzling Alonzo King

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Photo by RJ Muna

Alonzo King LINES Ballet celebrates its 40th anniversary at the Center on May 27, 2023, pictured are dancers Robb Beresford and Adji Cissoko 

This season, patrons get to choreograph their own series. The 2022-2023 Dance Series subscriptions are now available. When selecting four to five shows, patrons save 25% and 35% savings for six or more shows. Visit the Center’s website at www.scfta.org for more information. For Group Sales, call 714.755.0236.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Council candidate Grant continues to impress; and group home controversy gaining steam locally

TJ headshot AugWednesday evening, I ventured out to the New Port Theater. I was there to drop in on District 4 City Council candidate Robyn Grant’s fundraiser. With no announced candidate running against Robyn, I saw no potential conflict of interest and allowed me to once again find out why I like her candidacy.

Bottom line, Robyn has so eloquently served the community with an appointment to the Civil Service Board, to being appointed to the Library Board of Trustees and the City Arts Commission, to volunteering for nonprofits including Speak Up Newport, Leadership Tomorrow and Friends of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter.

When she spoke Wednesday, she reiterated her three H’s, as she calls them, referring to homelessness, housing and group homes.

On the homelessness front, she discussed its impact on our community and the “need to provide interim housing and wraparound services to assist people, understanding that it’s not a solution to leave people on the streets.” 

With the housing issue, she discussed the importance of “working to relieve the state housing mandates that potentially create unwanted urban density, so that we maintain the culture and vibrancy of Newport’s villages and communities.”

And as far as group homes, Grant said it’s about “encouraging good operators for these facilities and vigorously enforcing laws to rid our community of poor operators so we maintain safety in our neighborhoods.”

This is not an endorsement…yet…but Robyn is certainly an example of what would be a great addition to our future council.

It’s also interesting in Robyn’s final H, group homes, that there’s a related controversy brewing in town in that arena, completely separate from Robyn.

It seems that some residents have been complaining about an operator in town that has opened multiple homes and given concerning indications by prior actions that there could be issues.

So much so, in fact, that Orange County Board of Supervisor Katrina Foley has sent a letter to the City of Newport Beach demanding some action.

Foley opens her letter saying that she has “received complaints about a potential social rehabilitation facility at (address withheld) Tustin Ave.” She continues by saying her concerns are that “this operator (The Mental Health Collective) has a documented pattern of operating two unlicensed social rehabilitation facilities as 6 and under sober living homes, which seems to violate Newport Beach Municipal Code.”

Here’s where it gets tricky, these kinds of homes, once licensed, fall under protections of state and federal laws. However, what Foley adds is that these two homes, one on Kings Road and the other on Santa Ana Ave., are not yet licensed, meaning that she feels the city could in fact intervene.

A City response has now been made by Newport Beach City Attorney Aaron Harp saying, “In response to the City’s enforcement actions…MHC submitted applications to the State of California Department of Social Service (DSS) to operate properties as Community Care Facilities, a group residential use licensed by the State of California and not the City.”

So, in essence, Harp is saying that DSS’s licensing and regulatory authority now governs the permitting and operation of these residential care facilities and therefore the City has no recourse.

Residents are arguing this fact and continue to work with Supervisor Foley and have additionally engaged Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris and State Senator Dave Min.

One resident, who wishes to maintain anonymity, urges the City to take an aggressive approach like Supervisor Foley did during her time with the Costa Mesa City Council, battling group homes in court and ultimately prevailed.

Now, when you take a second and think back to what Robyn Grant said above, “We need to encourage good operators…and vigorously enforcing laws,” it makes some sense.

This issue seems like it’s only heating up.

• • •

The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce is kicking off the 2022 City Council race with the first scheduled Candidates Forum on Thursday, Aug. 18 at the Newport Beach Public Library. The free admission event will run from 8-9:30 a.m., preceded by a complimentary light breakfast.

Candidates from races that include Districts 1, 3, 4 and 6 have been invited to participate.

Seating for the event will be limited and those with reservations will be seated first. For more info and to make reservations, go to www.newportbeach.com/events/2022-newport-beach-city-council-candidates-forum/.

Lucy Dunn, former CEO of the Orange County Business Council will moderate the panel.

• • •

Two candidates for City Council, Erik Weigand and Grant, have formally qualified for the ballot, according to City Clerk Lelani Brown

The remaining list of Tom Miller, Joe Stapleton, Jim Mosher, Amy Peters, Joy Brenner and Lauren Kleiman are anticipated to complete those efforts in the next few days. The filing period to still enter any of the races closes next Friday, Aug. 12.

Also, multiple candidates mentioned above have been taking short vacation breaks as they prepare for the less than 100 final days of the battle ahead.

• • •

A legendary name in the restaurant business and the patriarch of his family, Salvador Avila, father, grandfather, great-grandfather and founder of Avila’s El Ranchito Restaurants has died at the age of 99.

A man who a number of years ago immigrated to the United States seeking a better life for his family, with an entrepreneur’s spirit and a strong work ethic opened his first restaurant in Huntington Park back in 1966. That empire, shared with his sons, daughters and grandchildren as operators, grew to its current level of 13 restaurants around Southern California.

The family said that “fortunately, his faith in God and the value of family unity solidified the Avila family and ensures that his legacy will continue to be carried on from generation to generation.

He was a wonderful gentleman whom I was fortunate to enjoy a Christmas dinner with a number of years ago.

Sons Sergio and Victor oversee the two Newport Beach El Ranchito operations.

• • •

Speaking of restaurants, Craig Strong is an extraordinary chef. He’s just announced he’s leaving his current kitchen at Larsen at Hotel Laguna and, the rumor is, moving to Big Canyon Country Club.

At Big Canyon that certainly changes the call for just a “hot dog at the turn.” 

Strong, prior to Hotel Laguna, was the chef/owner of Ocean at Main in Laguna Beach, the executive chef at Studio at the Montage Resort, where his efforts earned a Michelin Star, and with The Langham Huntington in Pasadena.

“Craig Strong, whom I consider more a friend than a colleague, has been an integral part of not only the relaunch of the Hotel Laguna’s food and beverage program, but also the Laguna Beach Company’s other culinary outlets,” said Laguna Beach Company founder Mo Honarkar. “Using his incredible talents, and a true passion for Laguna Beach, Craig helped put together an award-winning program and team that will continue his legacy of providing guests an ever-changing menu filled with quality California coastal cuisine. We are grateful for all he has done and look forward to seeing the next chapter of his career. Big Canyon Country Club is lucky to have him.” 

Calls to Big Canyon Country Club for comment went unreturned.


ENC holds Wine Walk fundraiser, exceeds goal

The Environmental Nature Center (ENC) held their 4th Wine Walk fundraiser on July 30. The ENC surpassed their goal of $15,000 and raised more than $17,000, making this the most successful Wine Walk to date. Funds raised will assist the ENC in continuing to provide transformative experiences at the Environmental Nature Center, ENC Nature Preschool and Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary.

ENC holds Wine Walk wine tastings

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Photos courtesy of ENC

Wine tastings were held along the ENC trails

ENC holds Wine Walk attendees

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Attendees enjoyed the Wine Walk amid the picturesque ENC grounds

ENC holds Wine Walk music

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Live pop/jazz music was provided by SideNote Keys/Bass near the ENC’s stream

The ENC collaborated with Hi-Time Wine Cellars to provide guests with a fabulous afternoon of wine tasting. Guests walked through the Center and stopped at wine tasting stations along the trails to taste wines from Dry Creek Vineyards, Jayson Wines, Far Niente, Dreyfus Ashby, Wine Warehouse, Rombauer and more. Wines being poured were available for purchase through Hi-Time Wine Cellars and Hi Time is donating a portion of wine sales generated at the event. Nearly doubling last year’s sales, 172 bottles sold this year.

Small bites were provided by Above All Catering. Live pop/jazz music was provided by SideNote Keys/Bass near the ENC’s stream. Guests ended their walk with Kean Coffee and dessert.

An online auction featuring more than 50 amazing items and experiences raised more than $5,000. Those interested in donating for the ENC’s next online auction, to be held the week before this year’s Fall Faire on October 16, can donate at https://encenter.org/auction-donation-form.

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 W. 16th St., Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.encenter.org.


Families build castles in the sand in annual contest on Balboa Island

On Saturday, July 30, 17 teams showed up in the morning to compete in the annual Balboa Island Family Sandcastle Contest. The Ruby and North Bay Front beach was groomed and plotted out so each team had their designated building area. There were a variety of competitors, including a team of one girl, a couple of sisters, cousins, mom and the kids, as well as several multi-general families (grandparents helping the grandkids).

Familes build early beach crew

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Photos courtesy of Chris Crosson

Chris Crosson (center) and his early beach crew ready the sand for castle building

After two hours, time was called and the judging began. Every team’s efforts produced something special. Team Donuts came with a plan to build the iconic La Sagrada Familia from Barcelona. Team Party Larson thought on a grand scale and built the tallest sandcastle. Team O’Brian Family won first place with their muscular octopus.

Families build La Sagrada Familia

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A member of Team Donuts building a rendition of the iconic La Sagrada Familia in Barcelona

Families build Team Party Larson

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Team Party Larson built the tallest sandcastle

Families build Team O'Brian

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Team O’Brian Family built their muscular octopus in the sand

Families build McManus Kids

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McManus youngsters enjoy their castle in the sand

Families build Team Sequoia

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A young member of Team Sequoia

Families build Team Castle Cousins

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Team Castle Cousins and their sandcastle sculpture

Families build Team Balboa Fun Zone

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Team Balboa Fun Zone with their sand creation

Everyone received a certificate and a Dad’s Donut hippo cookie. The event was sponsored by the Balboa Island Improvement Association and managed by Chris Crosson and his daughter, Stephanie Crosson.


Friends of the Library book sale starts today

The Friends of the Newport Beach Library will host their wonderful book sale today (Friday, Aug. 5) and Saturday, Aug. 6 at Central Library at 1000 Avocado Ave.

The benefits of being a member allow you to shop today from 1-4 p.m., with all books being three for $1. Then tomorrow, from 9 a.m.-2 p.m., everyone is invited and books are $3 a bag, with the bags supplied by the Friends.

Memberships are available at the door: Seniors (age 62+), $10; Students, $10; Individual, $15 and Family, $20.

Friends of the Library Central Library

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Courtesy of NBPL

Central Library 

The Friends of the Library Bookstore generates funds year-round for children’s programs, summer reading materials, furnishings, services, and collections. The Friends Bookstore is located inside the Central Library at 1000 Avocado Avenue, Newport Beach. Donations of used books are always welcome. For more information about the Friends of the Library, visit the website at www.newportbeachlibrary.org.


Hoag welcomes renowned neurosurgeon Adam Kanter, M.D.

Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian has recruited Adam Kanter, M.D., chief of spine surgery and tenured professor of Neurosurgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, to be the chief of the Neurosurgery Division of the Hoag Specialty Clinic, and serve as the associate executive medical director of the Pickup Family Neurosciences Institute.

Dr. Kanter is excited to join Hoag’s renowned team of leading clinicians, innovators, researchers, educators and visionary entrepreneurs.

Hoag welcomes Adam Kanter

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Courtesy of Hoag Hospital

Adam Kanter, M.D.

“What drew me to Hoag was the sincerity and integrity of the people,” said Dr. Kanter, who had been pursued by several academic institutions before choosing to make Hoag his professional home. “Hoag is unique in that everyone – patients, physicians, nurses, therapists, staff from the top on down – are treated as valued members of the Hoag family. The administration endorses physician leadership and inspires those with boots on the ground to make the decisions that affect patients’ lives. It’s a culture of caring and I’m honored to be the newest member of the Hoag family.”

Dr. Kanter initially dreamt of space travel as he performed human motor control research for a NASA-funded laboratory after earning his bachelor’s degree in Neuroscience. The more he learned of the nervous system and its vast interconnections and plasticity, the more interested he became in helping people with brain and spine disorders. He went on to earn a master’s degree in medical sciences from Boston University where his path was sealed and his journey in medicine began. Dr. Kanter earned a medical degree from the University of Vermont in Burlington, Vt. and completed his neurosurgical residency at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va. He completed two fellowship trainings – one in neurosurgery at Auckland Hospital in Auckland, NZ and the other in minimally invasive spine surgery at University of California, San Francisco.

Dr. Kanter comes to Hoag following an illustrious career in academia as a skilled clinician and leader in organized neurosurgery. He is a central figure in multiple spine societies nationally and internationally, including the current chair of the spine section for the American Association and College of Neurological Surgeons and president of the Society for Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery. He is also currently enrolled in the Executive Master of Business Administration Program at UCLA where he hopes to blend his love of medicine with his desire to help guide healthcare reform.

“We are excited to welcome Dr. Kanter to the Hoag family,” said Michael Brant-Zawadzki, M.D., F.A.C.R., the Ron & Sandi Simon Executive Medical Director Endowed Chair of the Pickup Family Neurosciences Institute and Senior Physician Executive at Hoag. “Dr. Kanter’s areas of expertise – minimally invasive spine surgery including lateral-based approaches to the spine (LLIF), complex spine surgery, artificial disc replacement, and spinal cord regeneration is the perfect addition to our powerful team of recognized leaders in neuroscience and spine care. Philanthropic support enables Dr. Kanter to research new developments within the neurosciences and spine arenas, keeping Hoag preeminent in medical knowledge and expertise, particularly around minimally invasive techniques.”

“Hoag’s commitment to innovation – and the community’s celebrated support of medical advances – is another reason that I was drawn to Hoag,” Dr. Kanter said. “The advanced technology and surgical tools available in this institute are truly among the best in the nation. I’m excited to join a talented group of visionary pioneers and continue to bring thoughtful, conscientious, leading-edge spine care to a great community.”

To contact the office of Dr. Adam Kanter and schedule an appointment, call his office at 949.764.6090. It is located at 3900 West Coast Highway, Suite 330, Newport Beach.


Inner tube

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Photo by Stan Sievers (Instagram @stansievers)

Surfer Brighton slides into a sweet summer swell


School Notes

News and notes from our colleges and universities

Tufts University, in Medford, Mass., recently announced their Dean’s List for the Spring 2022 semester. Among Newport Beach students earning Dean’s List honors are Jack Flores, class of 2025; Nic Jacome, class of 2025; Declan Landau, class of 2023 and Nathan Solomon, class of 2024.

Dean’s List honors at Tufts University requires a semester grade point average of 3.4 or greater.

Tufts University, located on campuses in Boston, Medford/Somerville and Grafton, Mass., and in Talloires, France, is recognized among the premier research universities in the United States. Tufts enjoys a global reputation for academic excellence and for the preparation of students as leaders in a wide range of professions.


Take Five: Meet Sgt. Rachel Puckett of the OCSD’s School Mobile Assessment and Resource Team

By AMY SENK

Earlier this year, shortly after the Uvalde, Texas school shooting where 19 students and two teachers were fatally shot, and 17 others were wounded, I attended a Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce event featuring Orange County Sheriff Don Barnes as the guest speaker. It was a fascinating program, but with Uvalde on our minds, I was especially intrigued by his description of his department’s School Mobile Assessment and Resource Team, or SMART, which works with school officials, the District Attorney’s office and other agencies to prevent threats of violence in our schools. That program, he said, has prevented incidents that could have proved tragic – “Columbine-type plans,” he said. I decided to reach out to SMART’s Sgt. Rachel Puckett to find out more. 

Take Five Sgt. Rachel Puckett

Courtesy of OCSD 

Sgt. Rachel Puckett, OCSD

Q: When and why was the School Mobile Assessment Resource Team formed and can you tell me more about it? 

A: The School Mobile Assessment and Resource Team (SMART) was created in July 2001 to serve South Orange County within the Orange County Sheriff’s Department Jurisdiction. SMART was created to respond to incidents related to violence, threats of violence, possession and/or use of weapons, unstable behaviors, suicidal actions, or tendencies that pose a threat to others at K-12 schools. In July 2020, SMART expanded its area of service and now includes the Anaheim Police Department, the Garden Grove Police Department and the Irvine Police Department. The team works in close collaboration with the Orange County Department of Education, the Orange County District Attorney’s Office, Orange County Probation and the Orange County Health Care Agency.

Q: Who are the team members and generally what are their backgrounds?

A: The Team is comprised of two Orange County Sheriff’s Department sergeants – a sergeant that supervises the South Team and a sergeant that supervises the North Team. South SMART has an OCSD Investigator, two OCSD Deputies and an Irvine Police Department Detective. North SMART has an OCSD Deputy, an Anaheim Police Department Detective and a Garden Grove Police Department Detective. The Team members were all selected because of their exceptional skills and experience in working with children. All members have worked previously as School Resource Officers. Additionally, they are all highly trained in Comprehensive School Threat Assessment Guidelines (CSTAG), investigative techniques, crisis intervention and current trends that affect our children. SMART also has a full-time, dedicated mental health clinician assigned to assist children and families when responding to calls for service. As a result of SMART threat assessments, students and families have been able to receive additional resources through the Orange County Health Care Agency. Having a dedicated clinician on SMART gives us another avenue at helping students in crisis or any other mental health issues. 

Q: How many reports do they typically get in a school year and are reports from teachers or administrators, other community members, family? 

A: In 2021, SMART responded to approximately 180 calls for service. It should be noted however, that the majority of schools were closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Our call volume was greatly impacted, as children were mainly at home and participated in online learning. So far in 2022, we have responded to approximately 165 calls for service. SMART is on track to double our calls for service this year, as compared to last year. SMART receives reports of suspicious behaviors, weapons on campus, threats of violence, suicidal ideations, etc., from a multitude of methods and reporting parties. These reports can come from school site personnel on campus, parents or family members, concerned students, community members, just to name a few. We encourage anyone to report suspicious and concerning behaviors to your local law enforcement agency. SMART relies and thrives on collaboration with parents, school employees, the community, students and our stakeholders. We deeply appreciate our partnerships and truly believe that we are stronger when we all work together to keep our children safe. 

Q: Sheriff Barnes told a CdM group recently that the team has actually prevented tragedies. Can you tell me more, generally, about any of those examples?

A: The main goal of SMART is prevention and that can’t always be quantified, but SMART has most certainly prevented tragedies from occurring. SMART has routinely intervened and provided resources to children that are suicidal or who have expressed violent ideations or threats towards others. From threats spoken to other students or school shooting threats made on social media, each incident is investigated. While it would be impossible to say what would have happened or the magnitude of devastation had these threats not been addressed, each situation must be examined and thoroughly assessed to ensure everyone’s safety.

Q: Are there any behaviors or actions that parents, friends, teachers should immediately report, and what should parents say to their kids who are afraid of a school shooting?

A: Please remember to always call 911 or your local emergency number if you or anyone else is in immediate danger or if there is an emergency. Suspicious activity is any observed behavior or statement that could indicate a desire or plan to harm another person. Some of these activities may be innocent or lawful, but it is law enforcement’s responsibility to determine if the behaviors or actions warrant further assessment, investigation, or intervention. When reporting suspicious activity or behaviors to law enforcement, it’s important to describe specifically what you have observed, to include: who or what you saw, when you saw it, where it occurred and why it is suspicious. Families absolutely play a critical role in reaffirming a sense of security for children who are afraid of a school shooting. It’s important to reaffirm safety and emphasize that schools are still very safe. Let your children talk about what they are feeling and support their expressed feelings. Help your child put those feelings into perspective, while keeping explanations developmentally appropriate for your child. It’s also very important to limit a child’s exposure to graphic images, social media, etc. For additional guidance and resources, visit the National Association of School Psychologists at www.nasponline.org/children-and-violence.   

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk is a long-time resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Newport Coastin’

Newport Coastin .png SNN 8.5

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

Pausing for a picture-perfect view at the iconic Newport Coast entrance


Newport Beach is a special place for many reasons, but perhaps more because of the people here that make a difference

By GARY SHERWIN

It’s pretty obvious that Newport Beach has many things going for it.

Whether it is our harbor, beaches, great shopping, dining as well as a variety of excellent hotels and home rentals, we are blessed with many riches. But in the end, what really makes us successful as a place to visit?

I was thinking about this question a lot in the last few weeks especially after attending a convention of my peers where violent crime, divisive social issues and a declining workforce were all top of mind and frankly it was all everyone wanted to talk about.

I was hoping we could all discuss cool new restaurants opening in other cities, but many opted to discuss only murder rates and economic disenfranchisement. For several places, those issues are real.

Fortunately, our little hamlet in a bubble doesn’t have too many of those painful problems. Most of our issues deal with managing our success whether it is development, congestion, or airport noise. There has been talk of rising crime locally, but it still doesn’t come close to big cities.

Gary Sherwin

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Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Gary Sherwin

Even our redevelopment areas such as around the Newport Pier is certainly necessary and important, but in other communities, that part of town would be considered perfectly fine. That’s a testament to our high standards as a city.

But after chewing on this for a while, I’m convinced that our competitive advantage is something else entirely. 

The secret is it’s our community.

If you have lived anywhere else for any length of time, you’ve come to appreciate the uniqueness of how Newport Beach operates. It is a city that is generous in spirit as well as its dollars.

The most obvious example of that is the Christmas Boat Parade and Ring of Lights. In many coastal cities, boat owners throw up a string of lights on their small dingy and call it a day. Here people have been known to spend tens of thousands of dollars to hire professional decorators, or even Disney Imagineers, to create a watery visual masterpiece for the enjoyment of others. Anyone who attends the parade each year can attest to the investment people make just so others can enjoy it, making their holidays a bit brighter.

The homeowners around the harbor do the same by designing amazing holiday lights delighting young and old alike. Combined with the parade itself, we can proudly say we are just about as magical during the holiday season as Disneyland up the road.

But all this comes about because of our residents and their personal investment. I suspect that nearly $1 million is spent annually to decorate boats and homes as well as operational expenses such fuel costs, electricity and boat crews over five nights.

What other city can do that?

That’s a grand example. How about the large turnouts to honor our police and fire departments during their appreciation events? They sell out each year and are packed with residents and local dignitaries. While many cities are dealing with the complex and difficult relationships with their public safety professionals, we celebrate them and let them know how important they are to us.

How about the Friends of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter which has raised nearly $3 million to build a quality new facility for our furry friends? Or the Newport Beach Library Foundation that has contributed nearly $7 million over the last decade to help support programming and infrastructure? If you have ever attended one of the annual Witte Lectures, which brings world-class notable speakers to town, you’ll appreciate how important they are. 

And this doesn’t even include the upcoming new $14 million library lecture hall which is a partnership venture with the city and will be a vital new community meeting space.

There’s more. The Newport Beach Junior Lifeguard Foundation also partnered with the city to build a new building near the pier. They had a fundraising goal of $1.75 million. They raised more than $1.8 million. The Coastal Commission recently signed off on the project and hopefully construction should start soon.

It doesn’t stop there. The Balboa Island Museum is a true local treasure thanks to the devoted work of resident Shirley Pepys and her army of volunteers. Just a few years ago, they were in a small storefront on Marine Avenue and now, thanks to a generous local benefactor, they moved to a much larger space and created a wonderful museum that explores our city’s history. This achievement has not gone unnoticed. This week they were named “Best Museum in the OC” by the LA Times Readers “Best of” survey. Now they are eyeing expansion again thanks to the fundraising generosity of the community.

Hitting closer to home, the Newport Beach tourism industry also has been a financially generous partner, offering free rooms and vacation packages to local charities. Even more significantly, the largest hotels also assess themselves to help promote the marketing of the city, generating $5 million to supplement the city’s funding so our community can effectively compete on the world’s tourism stage. The hotels didn’t have to do this, but they do so our city can attract more visitors from nearby cities at no cost to local government.

On top of all that, you also have tremendous local business investment. Newport Beach’s Eagle Four Partners now owns three luxury hotels and the Newport Beach Country Club and has been investing considerable dollars in all of them. The Pyle family bought the Fun Zone, a treasured piece of our local history and is now upgrading it without damaging its old school reputation.

It goes without saying that the Irvine Company, the city’s largest landowner, is always investing in the city and has a huge charitable arm especially with nearby UC Irvine, its public schools and preservation of open land.

I’m sure there are many other acts of local generosity that I am missing. But add it all up and you have a remarkable commitment to community excellence that revels anything you can find in a much larger metropolis.

In the waning days of summer as we enjoy our beautiful city, take time to not only look at the sea, but at your neighbor next door. That person, as well as many others, is probably the reason our city is as exceptional as it is.

Gary Sherwin is President & CEO of Visit Newport Beach and Newport Beach & Company.


You Must Remember This: Bud Browne, surfing filmmaker

By NANCY GARDNER

As a city, we’ve never embraced surfing the way we’ve embraced boating, and it’s a shame because Newport, particularly Corona del Mar, is such a part of the sport’s history. I was reminded of this the other day when I was looking for something in one of my father’s old college yearbooks. By chance, the 1933 edition of El Rodeo opened to Swimming and Water Polo. I gave a quick glance, and one phrase caught my attention: Bud Browne, captain of the swim team.  THE Bud Browne? A quick review of his bio, and yes, he swam for SC.

Not everyone will recognize the name, not even every surfer, but Bud Browne, who lived in Costa Mesa a good part of his life, was a pioneer in surf films. He was one of the first to edit footage into a coherent narrative, and while none of his films was as transformative as The Endless Summer, by Bruce Brown (no e) they were highly appreciated by aficionados, particularly as he did so much of his filming in the water. That seems ordinary enough today, but it was not at all the norm when he was doing it and even today not just anybody can manage the task.

It’s one thing to take stills, but a film sequence? You have to be a really strong swimmer to hold the camera steady for the duration. What made it more challenging for Browne was the lack of appropriate equipment. When he started filming in the early 1950s, there weren’t wetsuits. In those days you got up at five on a winter morning and drove to Trestles where both the water and air were in the 50s, and you went out in nothing more than a bathing suit and goose bumps.   When filming, Browne often spent four or five hours in the water which is an invitation to hypothermia in California, so to counter the chill he glued together pieces of rubber, creating his own wet suit. Also, in that period you couldn’t just bop over to Samy’s for an affordable waterproof camera. The waterproof cameras that existed were solid and boxy which presented a hazard. Browne was filming in surf and occasionally got sucked into waves. He didn’t want a hard, sharp object smacking him in the head, so he developed a bag-like rubber container that perfectly met his needs. With these innovations and his outstanding water skills, he was able to get shots no one else was getting – surfers in the tube, for example, commonplace today but unique then.

Browne first got the surfing bug in 1932 when he saw some surfers out at the Corona del Mar breakwater, the same spot that attracted Duke Kahanamoku.   Already an avid swimmer and skin diver, Browne quickly added surfing to his repertoire. After graduating from SC, he taught school, served in WWI and then returned to teaching, but the siren of the waves was too strong. He went back to SC, to the film school, to get the technical training he needed and from there he helped create a genre. His first film, Hawaiian Surfing Movie, shot in 1953, is credited as the first commercial surf movie, and his later film, Surfing Down Under, was the first international surf film. While often difficult, filming was in many ways the easiest part of the endeavor. A huge challenge after creating a movie was how to show it. There was no distribution system for what he was doing, so he went from town to town, renting an auditorium if available, setting up a tent if not, putting up flyers and gradually building up a market for his product.  One of the secrets of Browne’s success was that in his films it wasn’t just one big wave after another. He showed surfers doing things besides surfing, establishing their personalities and he added humor. He had Hevs McClellan narrate at least one of his films, and anybody who ever heard McClellan announce a surf contest can attest to his wit.

Over the years, in addition to his own films he helped with the photography on Big Wednesday and collaborated with MacGillivray-Freeman films and he also shot locally. In the late ‘50s, you’d often find him filming at the Wedge on a big day. Browne lived modestly in an apartment over a garage, never gaining the financial success of some of his successors, but he had the respect, even veneration, of several generations of surfers who recognized how much he contributed to the success of their sport. Browne is another of our under-appreciated local ties to the world of surfing. 

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, long-time resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Regattas and Races…

Regattas and Races 

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Photo by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

BYC 

2022 Twilight Series - August

August 3

Harbor 20A Fleet (3 races, 0 discards)

1 G. Thorne/K. Thorne, BYC, Total 7, Net 7

2 Jim Sears, BYC, Total 8, Net 8

3 Kincaid/Devlin, BCYC, Total 9, Net 9

4 Ed Kimball, ALYC, Total 12, Net 12

5 N. Madigan/M. Madigan, NHYC, Total 12, Net 12

6 Matt Campbell, BYC, Total 15, Net 15

Harbor 20C Fleet (3 races, 0 discards)

1 Allen/Brooks, BYC, Total 3, Net 3

2 David LaMontagne, BYC, Total 6, Net 6

3 Christy Wyatt, BYC, Total 9, Net 9

Thistle Fleet (2 races)

1 Larzelere/McDaniel, BYC, Total 2

2 Chuck Simmons, BYC, Total 4

3 R. Maxwell/M. Maxwell, BYC, Total 8

ILCA Fleet (2 races)

1 Rob Vandervort, BYC, Total 4

2 Alan Andrews, BYC, Total 4

3 Michael Arrigo, NHYC, Total, 4

4 Rich Luttrell, BYC, Total 9

5 Paloma Amigo, BYC/NHYC, Total 10

8 Chris Daher, BYC, Total 11

9 Isa Amigo, BYC/NHYC, Total 14

Lido 14 A Fleet (2 races)

1 McRae/Gorski, ABYC, Total 2

2 Long/Biram, BYC, Total 4

Lido 14 B Fleet (2 races)

1 Waniek/Moulds, BYC, Total 2

2 Long/Swan, BYC, Total 4

Adult Sabot A Fleet (2 races)

1 Molly Lynch, BYC, Total 2

2 Susan Jennings, BYC/NHYC, Total 5

3 Dana Fischbeck, NHYC, Total 6

4 Kerri Luttrell, BYC, Total 7

5 Susan D. Jennings, BYC, Total 11

6 Dennis Allison, BYC, Total 11

7 Bob Reilly BYC, Total 14

Adult Sabot B Fleet (2 races)

1 Carol Harmon, BYC, Total 2

2 Debbie Meany, BYC, Total 4

3 Stacy Ware, SSC, Total 6

BCYC 

2022 Taco Tuesday Series

August 2

PHRF A (4.3 miles)

1 Legacy, Bruce Cooper, BCYC 

   Elapsed 0:58:28, Corrected 0:51:39

2 Amante, Richley Family, LIYC 

   Elapsed 0:56:43, Corrected 0:52:59

3 Table 9, Tyler Wolk, BYC 

   Elapsed 0:59:59, Corrected 0:55:11

PHRF B (3.2 miles)

1 Horsefeathers, John Fuller, NHYC 

   Elapsed 0:52:48, Corrected 0:43:47

2 Miss Informed, Jeff Tighe, BYC

   Elapsed 0:53:41, Corrected 0:44:56

3 Rhythm, Roger Gooding, SBYRC

   Elapsed 0:51:05, Corrected 0:45:03

4 Shadow, Steve Fink, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:54:12, Corrected 0:47:32

5 Lickity Split, Andrew Whittingham, WSAOC

   Elapsed 0:54:57, Corrected 0:47:55

 6 Healer, Larry Kliger, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:56:20, Corrected 0:50:02

PHRF C (2.6 miles)

1 Ventus, Team BCYC, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:44:34, Corrected 0:35:33

2 Celia, Jim O’Conner, ALYC

   Elapsed 0:51:16, Corrected 0:41:52

3 Halcyon 3, Bob Kafka, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:52:29, Corrected 0:42:57

4 Mystery, Dene Stratton, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:54:28, Corrected 0:43:17

5 Bella Rose, Rose Henigman, ALYC

   Elapsed 0:53:41, Corrected 0:44:09

H20A Division (3 races)

1 Shana’s Secret, Thompson/Conzelman, BCYC, Total 4

2 Summer Dream, Cheadle/Schupak, BYC, Total 5

H20B Division (3 races)

1 Spirit, D. Haynes/P. Haynes, BCYC, Total 5

2 Whatever, Hurliman/Fischbacher, SBYC, Total 6

3 Comfort Too, Buddy Richley, LIYC, Total 7

4 Ruth & Ada, Dan Rossen, BCYC, Total 12

H20C Division (3 races)

1 Dragon Lady, Sangster/Kimball, LIYC, Total 3

2 Flexi Flyer, n/a, n/a, Total 3

ALYC 

2022 ALYC Sundowner Series

Monday, August 1

H20B Division (12 races, 2 discards)

1 Ping, Anne Wiese, Total 15

2 Jubilee, Patrick Kincaid, Total 21

3 Spirit, Debra Haynes, Total 25 

4 Emoji, Andrew Tosh, Total 34

5 Summer Dream, Tucker Cheadle, Total 36

H20C Division (12 races, 2 discards)

1 Whim, Hubie Laugharn, Total 12

2 FREEDOM, Ralph Simmonds, Total 21

3 Shazam, Stephen Alfano, Total 24 

4 Spiritus, Roger Grable, Total 25

5 Chloe, Roy Delis, Total 30

6 Dragon Lady, Kathy Sangster, Total 33

7Tiki, Devon Kelly, Total 34

J22 Division (12 races, 1 discard)

1 Jack, Chris Hill, Total 18T

2 Red Stripe, Bill Cohen, Total 18T

3 Iconoclast, Min Choi, Total 26 

4 Jenda, Robert Bents, Total 29

5 Off in the Ocean, Glen Dromgoole, Total 32

6 OCC #6, William Miller, Total 37

7 Marina 5, Derek Matheson, Total 39

PHRF A Division (12 races, 1 discard)

1 XLR8, Gabriel Nistor, Total 14.5

2 Kaisen, David Camerini, Total 29.5

3 Violetta, Jane Hartley, Total 30

4 Stella Maris, Theodore Barry, Total 32

5 #29, Michael Darr, Total 33 

6 Healer, Larry Kliger, Total 41

7 Starfire, Dan O’Sullivan, Total 42

PHRF B Division (12 races, 1 discard)

1 Buena Vista, Berkeley Green, Total 18

2 Holokai, Ross McElfresh, Total 19 

3 Hobo Flats, Louis Chappelear, Total 29

4 Painted Lady, Matthew Foreman, Total 30

5 Stanley’s Cup, Stanley Tutton, Total 32

6 Hayden’s Havoc, Michael Hayden, Total 34

PHRF C Division (12 races, 1 discard)

1 Carioca, Bob Wine, Total 11.5

2 CELIA, Jim O’Connor, Total 20

3 Mystery, Any Club Member, Total 31.5 

4 Mystery II, Club Member Any, Total 37

5 FAIRWIND, Skipper Tim Bercovitz, Total 47

6 No Ka Oi, Lori Romano, Total 48

News relating to racing in or around Newport Harbor should be forwarded to Tom Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Moulin Rouge! The Musical returns to Segerstrom Center

Producers Carmen Pavlovic, Bill Damaschke and Gerry Ryan have announced the Costa Mesa premiere of the Tony Award-winning Best Musical Moulin Rouge! The Musical at Segerstrom Center for the Arts’ Segerstrom Hall for a limited three-week engagement from November 9-27. 

The cast is led by previously announced Courtney Reed as Satine and Conor Ryan as Christian, as well as Austin Durant as Harold Zidler, André Ward as Toulouse-Lautrec, David Harris as The Duke of Monroth, Gabe Martínez as Santiago and Libby Lloyd as Nini. Yvette Gonzalez-Nacer is the Satine Alternate. The cast includes Nicci Claspell, Harper Miles, Andrés Quintero, Adrienne Balducci, Andrew Brewer, Jack Cahill-Lemme, Sam J. Cahn, Darius Crenshaw, Alexander Gil Cruz, Alexa De Barr, Tamrin Goldberg, Alexis Hasbrouck, Jordan Fife Hunt, Justin Keats, Tyler John Logan, Tanisha Moore, Brayden Newby, Kent Overshown, Amy Quanbeck, Ayden Pratt, Adéa Michelle Sessoms, Jenn Stafford, Denzel Tsopnang, Travis Ward-Osborne, Sharrod Williams, Jennifer Wolfe and Ricardo A. Zayas. 

Moulin Rouge The Musical

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Photo by Matthew Murphy

The cast of the original Broadway production of “Moulin Rouge! The Musical” 

According to Tony Award-winning Director Alex Timbers, “I’m thrilled and honored to welcome an extraordinary and vibrant group of actors to Moulin Rouge! The Musical as we begin our rehearsal process this week. After years of anticipation, we are all so excited to finally be taking this show on the road to audiences throughout North America.”

Moulin Rouge! The Musical is the winner of 10 2021 Tony Awards including Best Musical, two Drama League Awards including Outstanding Production of a Musical, five Drama Desk Awards and 10 Outer Critics Circle Award Honor citations including New Broadway Musical. 

Tickets are now available online at www.scfta.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa, or by calling 714.556.2787. For inquiries about group ticket discounts for 10 or more, call the Group Services offices at 714.755.0236. For more information, visit www.moulinrougemusical.com/us-tour/home/.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.scfta.org.


Decorative Arts Society announces 2022-23 Speaker Series

Decorative Arts Society (DARTS), a Newport Beach-based philanthropic organization dedicated to arts appreciation and supporting local non-profits that primarily benefit women, families and children in need, has announced its 2022-23 Speaker Series.

Featuring a line-up of renowned interior designers and authors, the annual Speaker Series returns this fall on Tuesday, Oct. 11 at 9:15 a.m. at Regal Edwards Big Newport. Attendance is free for DARTS members and $75 for non-members.

“We’re excited for this season’s Speaker Series, where we’ll bring the community a respected array of experts in art and interior design,” said DARTS president Madeline Hayward. “These inspiring speakers are nationally and even internationally known for their style, design, and the books they’ve authored, so we look forward to hearing their stories and insights.”

Membership fees for DARTS help fund their grant program, which has provided more than $3.6 million to women, family and children’s charities in Orange County since its inception more than 25 years ago. DARTS recently announced donations of $275,000 in grants to Orange County non-profits.

DARTS 2022-23 Speaker Series:

Decorative Arts Society Philip Mitchell

Photos courtesy of DARTS

Philip Mitchell

Tuesday, Oct. 11 – Philip Mitchell has made a name for himself as a modern maximalist master. Renowned for his passion and energy, Mitchell’s approach to design is contemporary with a distinctive, casually elegant, layered style. His almost encyclopedic knowledge of design, architecture, art, textiles and historical reference, becomes an unforgettable journey for clients all over the world as they collaborate on projects of any scale.

Mitchell has been honored twice as one of the Top 100 Designers of the World by Andrew Martin Awards and is continuously named one of the Top 25 Designers by House & Home Magazine. His passion for restoration has been recognized with numerous historic preservation awards and he has been invited twice to participate in the Kips Bay Decorator Show House. Mitchell’s work has been widely celebrated in magazines, newspapers, books and online, including Veranda, Architectural Digest, House Beautiful, The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and others. He established his design firm in 2002, which now has locations in New York City, Toronto, and on the east coast of Canada.

Decorative Arts Society Suzanne Tucker

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Suzanne Tucker

Tuesday, Nov. 8 – Suzanne Tucker is recognized as one of the country’s leading interior designers. Tucker is known for her personal approach, enduring style, attention to detail, and passion for architecture and decorative arts. She believes that by surrounding ourselves with the authenticity of thoughtful design and timeless architecture, we can enrich and enhance the quality of our lives.

Architectural Digest has honored Tucker repeatedly on the AD100 list of top designers and she is included in the Elle Décor A-list and the Luxe Gold List. Having worked under the legendary Michael Taylor and often referenced as his protégée, she and her husband/partner Timothy F. Marks, founded Tucker & Marks in 1986. Suzanne Tucker Home was launched in 2010 with her textile, tabletop and home furnishings line. She has published two books with the third, Suzanne Tucker – Extraordinary Interiors, being published this fall. Tucker has been given multiple awards over the years, and in 2020, she was honored with a Doctorate of Humane Letters from the Academy of Art University. Tucker is one of the four founding directors of the Northern California Chapter of the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art and is currently director emeritus, having served on the board for 14 years.

Decorative Arts Society Lisa Fine

Lisa Fine

Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2023 – Lisa Fine is a former contributing editor at Elle Décor and House Beautiful and is an internationally established textile designer specializing in hand-printed linens. Fine produces a range of both exotic and traditional designs, influenced by her extensive travels and a particular passion for India and Eastern culture. Her coveted designs are used by many of the world’s leading interior designers. She has launched three Indian-inspired collections: her namesake textiles line; Irving & Fine, a fashion label in collaboration with Carolina Irving and Langham & Fine Rugs, a limited edition of dhurries she designed with Richard Keith Langham.

 Fine is also the author of Near & Far, which showcases her homes in New York, Dallas and Paris, as well as many other designers and style icons. As long as she can remember, she has had a passion for color, pattern, old-world ambience and exotic elements that kindle the romance of faraway lands. “I love pretty, layered rooms that draw you in and make you want to stay,” Fine said. “As a little girl in Hattiesburg, MS, my favorite activity was going on house tours. I’m not a decorator, but I’ve always been obsessed with decorating my own homes.” Professional training would have been beside the point. Fine has an innate flair for pulling off everything she does with that je ne sais quoi that can’t be taught.

Decorative Arts Society Frances Schultz

Frances Schultz

Tuesday, March 14, 2023 – Frances Schultz is a writer and artist who pivoted during the pandemic to become a certified Martha Beck Wayfinder life coach and master coach. Ever the enthusiast of decoration and design, food and entertaining, travel and style, Schultz hosts workshops and retreats in creativity and personal development at her home in California and around the world. Her mission is to bring light to the world and to guide others to do the same in whatever way that brings meaning, purpose and joy.

Schultz is the author of several books, including The Bee Cottage Story – How I Made a Muddle of Things and Decorated My Way Back to Happiness, and California Cooking and Southern Style. She is also the West Coast contributing editor for Flower magazine and a contributor to Veranda magazine. Schultz has written also for House Beautiful, The Wall Street Journal, Town & Country and others. She was the on-air host of the award-winning cable television show Southern Living Presents for six years and was named to the 2019 Salonnierre 100 top party hosts in the country. She serves on multiple boards, including the Horticultural Society of New York and divides her time between the coasts.

Decorative Arts Society Aldous Bertram

Aldous Bertram

Tuesday, April 11, 2023 – Aldous Bertram is an artist, illustrator, author and interior designer based in Charleston, SC. His interiors have been featured in House Beautiful and other design publications. He received his Ph.D. from Cambridge University, specializing in the historical influence of China on English garden design and architecture.

As an art historian and artist, Bertram has long been captivated by chinoiserie, a term for Western art and design inspired by a largely invented vision of China. Marco Polo’s sensational account of his visit to the exotic East in the 13th century sparked a fascination with China that reached a fever pitch in the 18th century and continues to this day. Bertram’s book, Dragons & Pagodas: A Celebration of Chinoiserie, is a nod to his appreciation of this style of design.

For more information on the Decorative Arts Society and membership opportunities, visit www.decorativeartssociety.net and follow the organization on Instagram or Facebook at @decorativeartssociety.


National Night Out scheduled for tonight, August 2, at Bonita Canyon Sports Park

The Newport Beach Police Department (NBPD) invites you to join in celebrating National Night Out in conjunction with a Community Safety Fair scheduled for tonight (Tuesday, Aug. 2) from 4-7 p.m. at Bonita Canyon Sports Park.

There will be displays from CSI, SWAT, K-9 and Motor Vehicle Officers, Animal Control, Dispatch and C.E.R.T., in addition to kids’ activities and games.

National Night Out police car

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Courtesy of NBPD

McGruff “The Crime Fighting Dog” will be in attendance. There will be photo opportunities and free food, so don’t forget to bring your camera and your appetite. 

Bring your family and friends to spend the evening with the NBPD as together we, “Give Crime & Drugs A Going Away Party!” The event is suitable for all ages.

Bonita Canyon Sports Park is located at 1990 Ford Road, Newport Beach. The park is located east of MacArthur Boulevard between Bonita Canyon Drive and Ford Road.

For more information, visit www.nbpd.org, or call the Crime Prevention Unit at 949.644.3699.


New Zealand’s Stevenson beats newly crowned world champ Petersen to win the GovCup

New Zealand’s Jordan Stevenson won the 55th Governor’s Cup International Youth Match Racing Championship, his first, after last appearing at the Cup in 2019. 

New Zealand's Stevenson 3 guys holding trophy

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Photo by Mary Longpre

The Kiwis, led by Jordan Stevenson, capture the 55th Governor’s Cup 

The finals were head-to-head between two competitors, with the first team capturing three races (points) winning the championship.

Stevenson, in a battle with World Youth Match Racing Champion and defending GovCup champion Jeffrey Pettersen, won the first two races to take a commanding lead. However, Petersen, along with his team of Max Brennan and Scott Mais, fresh off winning the World Youth MR championship, was not one to easily quit.

In the series’ third race, with Stevenson appearing in control, a protest flag was filed by Petersen against a questionable move made by the race committee, and the race was subsequently thrown out, leaving Stevenson still one win short.

After a restart, Stevenson again jumped out to a lead and appeared to be on his way to victory when he suddenly engaged in what race announcers assumed was kelp that considerably slowed his boat, allowing Petersen to overtake him to win. 

After the race, Stevenson discovered what his team described as, “40 kilos of kelp on the keel.” The match was now 2-1.

This set up what was to be the final race and the start kept the umpires busy. Petersen at first incurred a penalty before the start, but in shepherding Stevenson down the line before the starting gun, Stevenson made a critical mistake and was over the line when the gun went off. As he returned to the line with no rights against Petersen, he committed a double penalty for an intentional foul, which meant he had to do his penalty turn immediately. 

New Zealand's Stevenson two sailboats

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Photo by Mary Longpre

Stevenson and Petersen boats battle to take mark first

This erased the penalty for Petersen but left Stevenson with one penalty turn to complete. However, his boat speed and tactics were again sufficient to eke out a lead. As both boats approached the finish, and Petersen charging, the large spectator fleet waiting at the line had to wait for the Race Committee to raise a yellow flag, indicating that the New Zealand team had won by 2-3 feet, giving Stevenson the Cup. 

One other race was run, the best to two petit final stage between the other two semifinalists, Marius Westerlind, of Sweden and Jack Egan, of the U.S. 

With the score tied 1-1, Egan looked to take the race and place third in the final standings. But like the Stevenson/Petersen race above, the race was abandoned and set-up for a re-start. 

In the next race, Egan sailed well and achieved a “podium finish” in the Cup.


Newport Beach: The Kitty Hawk/Woodstock of Hang Gliding

By BILL LOBDELL, podcaster

Bill Lobdell, former Daily Pilot editor and Los Angeles Times journalist, has a podcast called “Newport Beach in the Rearview Mirror,” which looks at historical events and people – famous and forgotten – that shaped Newport Beach. You can listen and subscribe to all episodes of his podcast at http://newportbeach-podcast.com. You can also follow “Newport Beach in the Rearview Mirror” on Instagram (@newport_in_the_rearview_mirror). 

Lobdell’s latest podcast is headlined Newport Beach: The Kitty Hawk/Woodstock of Hang Gliding. Here’s a preview.

On a sunny spring day in 1971, a rag-tag group of adventurers from as far away as San Francisco dragged their homemade hang gliders 600 feet up a Newport Beach hill, turned their rickety flying (a generous adjective there) contraptions around to face the gentle ocean breeze and tried to fly.

The Birdmen, as they called themselves, didn’t soar like latter-day Icaruses, threatening to get too close to the sun. In fact, they didn’t get far off the ground that day – maybe 30 feet for the best of them. But they still made history. It marked the first time the nascent hang-gliding community came together to fly. The day was part Kitty Hawk and part Woodstock, and it marked the beginning of the modern sport of hang gliding.

The get-together was called the Lilienthal Meet because it was held on the 123rd birthday of Otto Lilienthal, a 19th century German aviation pioneer credited with being the first person to truly fly a glider. Not-so-fun fact about Lilienthal: In 1896, at the age of 48, his glider stalled and plunged to Earth, breaking his neck. He died the next day. 

Newport Beach The Kitty Hawk Colver

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Courtesy of Frank Colver

High schooler Matt Colver, pushed by his friends, tried to fly on what’s now Spyglass Hill

The meet, which was officially and modestly called the Great Universal Hang Gliding Championships, was expected to attract maybe five hang gliders – that’s how small the sport was at the time. But more than 15 pilots showed up, along with a fun-loving crowd of 300, surprising both organizers and the participants, who until then had felt quite alone in their pursuit of engineless flight. Now, amazingly, they were surrounded by kindred souls.

Event organizers said they picked the launching spot – now known as Spyglass Hill – because it was devoid of fences, had no posted trespassing signs and was blessed with ocean breezes. It was the property of the Pacific View Mortuary & Memorial Park, and the owner soon became aware of this nutty and dangerous event happening on his land without permission. But, apparently not worried about liability (simpler times), he let the flying continue. The hang gliders joked that they were allowed to stay because the cemetery owner thought he might get more business.

And the Pacific View cemetery probably should have gotten additional residents that day. The hang gliders were incredibly primitive, either made by hand or built from a kit. The self-taught builders were engineers, college students studying aerodynamics, tinkerers, and, in one case, a group of sixth graders supervised by their summer schoolteacher.

Materials included bamboo, pieces of wood, and, no kidding, repurposed plastic painter tarps. The popular “Hang Loose” model resembled something the Wright Brothers would fly, with two flimsy wings on each side of the pilot, whose legs dangled uselessly below. The design of most of the gliders hadn’t changed much since Lilienthal’s time, and Spyglass Hill simply wasn’t steep enough to put much space between the pilot’s feet and Mother Earth.

Some didn’t make it off the ground. Others hopped in the air for a few seconds, like a chicken trying to fly. The best of them climbed maybe 30 feet in the air and covered 600 feet. The longest flight lasted 17 seconds. If that doesn’t sound like much, the Wright Brothers’ first flight lasted just 12 seconds and went only 180 feet.

It was fortunate that these gliders stayed close to the ground. Even at low altitudes, the uncontrollable aircraft had spectacular crashes. Flimsy gliders snapped in half while in flight. Others cartwheeled across the hillside. Some nosedived into the ground. And the lower wing of one poor pilot’s gilder got caught by an updraft, pushing up the aircraft upward until it stalled and plunged to the hillside from about 15 feet.

For all its historic importance, the Lilienthal Meet would have been lost to history if it weren’t for the presence of journalists from the Los Angeles Times and National Geographic magazine. The Times ran a front page, above-the-fold story and photo the next day headlined, “Time Turns Back as Birdmen Take to Southland Sky.”

National Geographic, which had an international circulation of more than 12 million at the time, ran an eight-page spread about the meet. The media coverage captured the imagination of dreamers around the world who wanted to fly, too, and sparked the modern, international sport of hang gliding.

You still can find reminders of the Lilienthal Meet in two spots in Newport. One is a historical marker near the basketball court in San Miguel Park at the base of Spyglass Hill. The other is a memorial bench at the Pacific View Mortuary & Memorial Park.

The inscription on the cemetery bench reads: “On this hill, May 23, 1971, with a gathering of enthusiasts for personal human flight, began the worldwide sport of hang gliding. May the lift be good and may the joyful spirit of that magical day soar forever.”

Editor’s Note: Stay tuned for connecting to Bill Lobdell’s future podcasts in Stu News.


Smart home technology can enhance your next vacation

By Suzanne Schlundt

As exciting as it is to take a vacation, planning for one can feel all-consuming. When you arrive at your destination, you want to be able to focus on one thing: relaxation. There is nothing that can distract from a good time on vacation like worrying about what could be going wrong at home.

Thankfully, the rapidly evolving smart home technology of today provides efficient, affordable and sustainable solutions that come in handy for those times when you can’t race home to make sure you locked the door or check on the family pet.

This summer, whether you’re heading out of town on vacation to someplace exotic or hanging closer to home on a staycation, smart home technology can streamline the preparation for your getaway and infuse peace of mind while you’re “out of office” at your destination.

Smart Home Technology home

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Cox Communications

Smart home monitoring devices accessed remotely provide peace of mind

Smart home monitoring devices like Smart Door Lock, HD cameras and door and window sensors are all accessible remotely, so you can stay in “vacation mode” for the entire duration of your trip. If you suddenly question whether you locked the front door, you can remedy it from your beach towel with the touch of a button.

Smart energy and lighting devices like Smart Plug and Smart LED Light Bulbs, easily control devices like lamps and small appliances, or set up rules to automate when your devices turn on or off. This is a great way to conserve home energy when you’re not home to use it.

With Cox, our Homelife app makes it easy to control all your Homelife devices and services. You can set your alarm system, view camera feeds and control all your connected devices from virtually anywhere. Cox customers can also upgrade to Homelife Security for 24/7 professional monitoring of fires, floods and carbon monoxide. Now that’s peace of mind.

To showcase how smart technology enables and enhances how we live, work, and interact within our community and our world, Cox recently introduced “Smart Stories.” With Smart Stories, Cox tells the stories of real-life ways Cox customers can use smart technology in their day-to-day lives to get things done more quickly and efficiently – all without extensive tech backgrounds or experience.

The Cox Smart Stories series is one of several initiatives to spread awareness about smart technology options available to Cox customers as we enter into the next chapter of smart living.

Tapping into the latest in smart home technology can take you from a good vacation to a great vacation when you’re not worried about what might be going wrong at home. Bring on the sunscreen and poolside service! Learn more about Cox Homelife at www.cox.com/homelife.

Suzanne Schlundt is the vice president, marketing - west region for Cox Communications.

This is paid content by Cox Communications. Cox provides residents in the Newport Beach area with digital cable television, telecommunications and Home Automation services. Cox also provides scholarships to local high school students in its service area through its Cox Cares Foundation. For more information, visit www.cox.com.


The Week in Review

A weekly newsletter from City Manager Grace L. Leung

Grace Leung

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung

Community Members:

Congratulations to the Friends of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter (FONBAS) for the latest milestone in a public-private partnership that will bring a new, permanent animal shelter to the City of Newport Beach.

Last week FONBAS joined members of the City Council and city staff for a “topping off” celebration at the shelter building site, marking the placement of the highest beam in construction of the new facility.

FONBAS members have raised nearly $3 million in recent years to purchase the Riverside Drive parcel and to fund design and construction of the shelter. Once construction is completed, the shelter will be donated to the city and managed by our staff. The permanent shelter will replace a temporary, leased shelter and will help improve the health and welfare of the animals in our care.

We can now look forward to the next milestone for the shelter, a ribbon-cutting expected in the fall. Thank you to FONBAS and to the many community donors who contributed so far to make this public-private partnership a success.

For more information on the shelter project, visit https://fonbas.org.

City Manager, Grace K. Leung

Mayor’s Youth Council Now Accepting Applications for 2022-23 School Year

Mayor’s Youth Council is now accepting applications for the 2022/23 school year. This educational program gives high school students an in-depth look at careers offered in local government and provides a forum to express opinions, creativity and civic mindedness.

Mayor’s Youth Council is comprised of three different functions: education, service and outreach. In addition to one-on-one mentoring with city staff, Youth Council members will also be involved in the planning and implementation of community events and engagement with their peers. High school-aged residents are invited to apply by Monday, Sept. 5. Click here for more information or to apply.

Asphalt Shortage Temporarily Postpones Jamboree Road Construction

Paving operations for the Jamboree Road pavement rehabilitation and reclaimed water project have been postponed due to a shortage in asphalt concrete materials.

The paving work was originally scheduled to be completed by August 11. Because of a lack of available materials, the city’s contractor, All-American Asphalt, has rescheduled this work for October. In the meantime, the contractor will continue on improvements to the medians on Jamboree Road between San Joaquin Hills Road and Back Bay Drive. The median improvements include expanding the reclaimed water irrigation system and installing new landscaping.

Working hours are Monday through Friday from 7 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Intermittent lane closures will be required to facilitate the median irrigation and landscaping work. Thank you for your continued patience throughout construction.

June Treasury Report Now Available Online

The June 2022 Treasury Report is available on the city’s website at www.newportbeachca.gov/treasury.

As of June, the city’s investment portfolio totaled $377.6 million when measured at amortized cost. The current market value of the city’s portfolio of $368.7 million incorporates price fluctuations due to the changing interest rate environment that is typically irrelevant since the city typically holds its securities to maturity and receives the full principal value at that time.

The city’s liquidity portfolio is sized to meet the city’s cash flow needs over the next 12 months. Approximately $57.5 million or 15% of the portfolio was invested in liquid investments available for day-to-day operating expenses and the costs associated with ongoing construction projects.

An additional $28.9 million or 8% of the overall portfolio was invested in a portfolio of securities with targeted short-term maturities, which earns a higher yield than the city’s more liquid investments. 

Be Well Mobile Crisis Response Update

The Be Well mobile crisis response team operates in Newport Beach 12 hours a day, seven days a week to respond to mental and behavioral health crises. The mobile unit is staffed with mental health specialists and EMTs, and works closely with the city’s police and fire departments.

This week the Be Well team: 

–Collaborated with the county’s Adult Protective Services and Veterans’ Administration teams to shelter a newly evicted older adult.

–Transported one person to a psychiatric facility for treatment.

–Transported one person to a crisis stabilization unit for treatment.

–Reunified one person with his roommates.

–Transported one person to an emergency room for treatment.

–Transported six people to services, shelter intakes and appointments.

Homelessness Update

The City of Newport Beach provides a comprehensive response to address homelessness through a coordinated effort by city staff, contractors, partner agencies and nonprofit groups.

This week, the city’s homeless outreach and response teams:

–Sheltered a newly homeless couple and helped one partner prepare for a job interview. Donations from the Good Giving program were used to purchase proper attire and sundry items for the job interview.    

–Continue to shelter people. Eighteen people who had been experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach are now sheltered in the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter.

–Helped three people enroll in services and complete housing assessments for the county’s Coordinated Entry System.

–Transported one person to a Social Security appointment.

–Enrolled an older adult into services and completed a housing assessment.

–Enrolled an older veteran into the Emergency Housing Voucher program.

To donate to those experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach, visit our Good Giving Program web page.

Click here to view the latest homeless dashboard, which includes key monthly and yearly data on the city’s homeless response. 

This Week’s Events

Tuesday, August 2

Zoning Administrator Meeting

Zoom – 10 a.m.

Parks Beaches & Recreation Commission Meeting

City Council Chambers

100 Civic Center Drive – 5 p.m.

See the Full Schedule

Editor’s Note: City Manager’s Updates was received Friday, July 29 and is subject to editing so the information is current.


Regattas and Races…

Regattas and Races.jpg 8.2

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Photo by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

NHYC 

2022 Twilights – July Series

July 28

Finn (9 races, 2 discards)

1 Phil Ramming, NHYC, Total 16, Net 10

2 Robert Kinney, NHYC, Total 25, Net 13

3 Robert Martin, MBYC, Total 32, Net 21

4 David Wood, NHYC, Total 37, Net 25

5 Sail #21, NHYC, Total 36, Net 26

6 Keith Yonkers, NHYC, Total 38, Net 26

7 Brad Dwan, NHYC, Total 45, Net 30

8 Sail #147, NHYC, Total 47, Net 33

Harbor 20 A (11 races, 3 discards)

1 Thompson/Conzelman, NHYC/BCYC/LIYC, Total 49, Net 22

2 Bose/Elliot, BCYC, Total 45, Net 25

3 Menninger/Deermount, NHYC, Total 51, Net 26

4 K. Weiss/A. Weiss, NHYC, Total 66, Net 30

5 Nick Madigan, NHYC, Total 69, Net 39

6 J. Buckingham/Aschieris, NHYC, Total 65, Net 39

7 Camerini/Detwiler, UCISA, Total 79, Net 48

8 Thompson/Kraus, NHYC, Total 85, Net 52

9 Yates/Kincaid, NHYC, Total 94, Net 57

10 Cheadle/Schupak, BYC, Total 99, Net 61

11 E. Kimball/A. Costello Kimball, ABYC, Total 97, Net 61

12 Scott Ramser, NHYC, Total 102,  Net 63

13 Tyler Macdonald, NHYC, Total 109,  Net 70

14 Sail #420, NHYC, Total 111,  Net 72

15 Noring/Foy, SBYC, Total 112,  Net 75

16 Gary Thorne, BYC, Total 115, Net 78

Harbor 20 B (11 races, 3 discards)

1 Drayton/Benter, NHYC, Total 30, Net 16

2 R. Rader/B. Rader, NHYC, Total 37, Net 17

3 P. Haynes/D. Haynes, BCYC, Total 37, Net 19

4 Buddy Richley, NHYC, Total 59, Net 32

5 Chan/Logan, NHYC, Total 57, Net 33

6 Watanabe/Sutherland, UCISA, Total 63, Net 40

7 Thomas Corkett, NHYC, Total 64, Net 43

8 Dick Somers, NHYC, Total 72, Net 45

9 Matt McKinlay, NHYC, Total 72, Net 45

10 K. Whitney/J. Whitney, NHYC, Total 83, Net 54

11 Patrick Kincaid, BCYC, Total 89, Net 58

Harbor 20 C (11 races, 3 discards)

1 S. Sellinger/E. Sellinger, NHYC, Total 26, Net 11

2 Adam Bradley, NHYC, Total 23, Net 14

3 Ric Magrath, Scuttlebutt SC, Total 36, Net 19

4 Prescott Cook, NHYC, Total 41, Net 25

5 Sail #37, n/a, Total 41, Net 26

6 John Horton, NHYC, Total 46, Net 28

7 Bill Brooks, n/a, Total 49, Net 31

8 Sail #389, n/a, Total 46, Net 31

9 Sc. Ketchum/Sa. Ketchum, NHYC, Total 51, Net 33

Lehman 12 (12 races, 3 discards)

1 J. LaDow/Dahl, NHYC, Total 49, Net 29

2 Smith/H. Beek, NHYC, Total 69, Net 35

3 Jack Donatele, NHYC, Total 71, Net 35

4 Michael Ramming, NHYC, Total 60, Net 36

5 Campbell/D’Eliscu, NHYC, Total 68, Net 37

6 Alex Curtiss, NHYC, Total 87, Net 41

7 Sail #47, n/a, Total 79, Net 41

8 Killian/Newman, NHYC, Total 82, Net 48

9 Ayres 3/DeYoung, NHYC, Total 97, Net 57

10 Scott Mais, NHYC, Total 96, Net 62

11 Brooks Clark, NHYC, Total 100, Net 62

12 Michael Dahl, NHYC, Total 100, Net 64

13 Tyler MacDonald, NHYC, Total 103, Net 65

14 Chuck Beek, NHYC, Total 107, Net 67

15 Andrew Person, NHYC, Total 115, Net 69

16 Reid Wiley, NHYC, Total 113, Net 73

17 Jeff Aschieris, NHYC, Total 123, Net 77

18 Sail #USA212, NHYC, Total 129, Net 83

19 Pete Stemler, NHYC, Total 123, Net 84

20 Mik. Sentovich/Nik. Sentovich/ NHYC, Total 130, Net 84

BYC 

2022 Beercans – Pilsner (July) Series

July 28

PHRF 1 – Race #4 (4.5)

1 It’s Ok, Andrews 49.9, Purcell/Rose, BYC

   Elapsed 0:51:25, Corrected 0:55:01

2 Rossa, DK46, Jared Gargano, BYC

   Elapsed 1:04:33, Corrected 1:05:14

3 Coquille, Farr 40, Wes Selby, BYC

   Elapsed DNF

PHRF 2 – Race #4 (4.5)

1 Amante, Choate 48, Richley Family, LIYC/NHYC

   Elapsed 1:05:32, Corrected 1:02:50

2 Dani Girl, J120, Campbell/Martin, BYC/CRA

   Elapsed 1:10:39, Corrected 1:07:44

3 Baraka, J120, Janet Mostafa, BYC

   Elapsed 1:12:22, Corrected 1:09:27 

PHRF 3 – Race #4 (4.5)

1 XLR8, Bene36.7, Gabriel Nistor, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:13:29, Corrected 1:07:25

2 ChaChaCha, C&C40, Larry Walker, LIYC/CYCA

   Elapsed 1:15:28, Corrected 1:08:16

3 Violetta, Davidson, Jane Hartley, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:15:47, Corrected 1:08:35

4 Man O War, J29, James Malm, NHYC

   Elapsed 1:17:44, Corrected 1:09:25

5 Gator, Frers38, Daniel Moore, SSC

   Elapsed 1:26:07, Corrected 1:20:16

6 Cal 40, Cal 40, Vince Valdes, NHYC

   Elapsed DNF

PHRF 4 – Race #4 (3.8)

1 Campaign II, C&C34, Mark Glackin, BYC

   Elapsed 1:12:55, Corrected 1:03:25

2 Horsefeathers, Ericson35, John Fuller, NHYC

   Elapsed 1:14:39, Corrected 1:05:09

3 Silk, Harbor 25, John Hanscom, SSYC

   Elapsed 1:20:18, Corrected 1:09:28

4 Daydream, Pearson, Rich Fischbeck, BYC

   Elapsed 1:23:11, Corrected 1:11:01

5 Tui, Ericson32, Brian Boyle, SSYC

   Elapsed 1:20:48, Corrected 1:11:18

6 Gem, Santana 20, Cooper/Whitaker, BYC

   Elapsed 1:29:44, Corrected 1:15:40

7 Delightful, Hunter33, Alan Schneider, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:43:57, Corrected 1:33:41

News relating to racing in or around Newport Harbor should be forwarded to Tom Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


New book explores transformation of Irvine Ranch 

A new book, Transforming the Irvine Ranch: Joan Irvine, William Pereira, Ray Watson and THE BIG PLAN, has been released that chronicles the transformation of the Irvine Ranch. 

Covering a critical three decades in the California ranch’s 146-year history, elements of corporate intrigue, family disputes, planning theory and execution and the extraordinary stories of personal achievement highlight the book.

At the heart of the story is Joan Irvine Smith, granddaughter of James Irvine II. An intelligent, beautiful young woman, she inherited 20% of the ranch at age 14, then spent the next 30 years of her life trying to gain control of it. She played a key role in the decision to locate UC Irvine on the ranch and lobbying for passage of the Tax Reform Act of 1969.

New book explores

Courtesy of Michael Stockstill

“Transforming the Irvine Ranch: Joan Irvine, William Pereira, Ray Watson and THE BIG PLAN” chronicles three decades of the ranch’s 146-year history

William Pereira towers over the landscape in the role of planning “philosopher/king.” Charismatic and shrewd, he translated his architectural dreams and designs into structure and form at the new university and community.

Ray Watson, who grew up in a boarding house in Oakland, and by sheer intelligence and hard work, rose from young planner to president of the Irvine Company during a 17-year career there. He led a group of planners and managers in creating local landmarks such as Newport Center, Eastbluff, University Park and Woodbridge.

The lives of these three people intersected in the early 1960s as the University of California set out to build new campuses in Southern California. The hard-fought decision to build UC Irvine on 1,000 acres of land donated by the Irvine Company became the “foundation for the planning and development of what would become the most successful new town (Irvine) in the United States.”

Because James Irvine II willed the majority of his stock in the Irvine Company to a private foundation, its leaders had ultimate control of the ranch until passage of the Tax Reform Act of 1969. That law forced them to sell shares in the company in a public bidding war that attracted national attention. The book ends in 1977 when a group led by retail magnate Alfred Taubman made the winning bid of $337.44 million.

The book is authored by Pike Oliver and Michael Stockstill. Both worked at the Irvine Company in the 1980s and spent two years researching and writing the 308-page book. Details about the book can be found on the book website, www.thebigplanbook.com. The book is available on Amazon in paperback, hardback and Kindle. It is also available from the publisher, Routledge, on its website.


Capturing iconic Newport Beach and beyond: Family at the Trailhead

Capturing iconic Newport Beach and beyond Family at the Trailhead

Click on photo for a larger image

Artwork by Don Krotee

This landscape is fictitious as to location and, in the foreground, the family is suited up for a day hike. The middle ground and background are “supporting cast.” The road in the center distance is illuminated and travels away from the viewer. The remainder of the entourage, planting and fence provide a sense of scale for the abstracted figures. The work was an alla prima, or “all at once” direct watercolor, with a lot of “wet into wet brush marks and, by its nature, is greatly abstracted. The painting was also a part of painting 30 pieces, mostly 11 x 15 paintings, in 30 days – a group challenge of more than 1,600 artists on Facebook.

~~~~~~~~

Artist Don Krotee is a 36-year resident of Newport Beach, a member of the 2000 General Plan Advisory Committee, a Corona del Mar Residents Association member, the founder of the Newport Heights Improvement Association and a board member of SPON. He lives in Corona del Mar, is an architect, sailor and fine artist who has been drawing and painting from an early age. He provides Stu News color prints of his original drawings and paintings from Newport Beach, Calif. and around the world. Follow @donkrotee.art for more art by artist Don Krotee.


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach

The Wave towing a dinghy.jpg

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A photograph negative of “The Wave” towing a dinghy in front of Collin’s Castle. The dinghy was built by Hal according to the envelope. The photograph was taken in 1922.

Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free general admission on all days. Two-hour parking is available on Marine Avenue. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


School Notes

News and notes from our colleges and universities

Rhys Sullivan, of Newport Beach, has been named to the Champlain College President’s List for the Spring 2022 semester. Students were awarded honors based on their academic achievement. Sullivan is currently enrolled in the Computer Science and Innovation major and the honor includes achieving a 4.0 grade point average during the spring semester.

Founded in 1878, Champlain College is a small, not-for-profit, private college in Burlington, VT, with additional campuses in Montreal, Canada and Dublin, Ireland.


Winding down the summer, a little sooner than I’m used to

By AMY SENK

I hope you’re enjoying the summer because the countdown is on. We’re on the brink of back-to-school everything. Football and pumpkin spice are around the corner.

My kids grew up on long Newport Beach summers filled with sandy beaches and Fun Zone games and ferry trips to junior guards and visits to the fair when there were elephant rides and you could entertain a preschooler for hours for under a hundred bucks.

I remember those days, stretched out endlessly in front of us, and being a little shook when I’d see commercials for back-to-school sales when my family were only on Week One of summer break. We had until the day after Labor Day, thank you very much, and over that sad weekend, I would listen to “Boys of Summer” on repeat.

Now my children are young adults, and things are different, including the start date of school. For the third year, Newport-Mesa students will start in August (August 22 this year) after years of discussion about whether to move to a collegiate calendar.

The change makes a lot of sense, especially for high schoolers taking Advanced Placement classes that have a national test day. That means kids in areas of the country that start the classes in August have several weeks’ advantage over local kids who start in September, which means summer homework and a lot of cramming.

I didn’t think about those concerns when my kids were little, when I loved having them in school during most of gloomy June and having all of August to play. Parents who hate the idea of an August start date in kindergarten might grow to appreciate it by junior year.

It does rush summer to a close, though. 

• • •

Meanwhile, the July meeting of the Corona del Mar Residents Association was routine – an interesting guest speaker, Laird Hayes, who was the police department’s 2021 Volunteer of the Year, updates from City Council representatives and police, along with a chance to catch up with friends and neighbors.

Winding down Laird Hayes

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Photo by Amy Senk

Laird Hayes at the CdM Residents Association meeting

CdMRA President Debbie Stevens and her latest unsuccessful bid for a Planning Commission appointment came up a couple of times – never as official business but in little comments here and there. One member mentioned that the City Council had passed on Stevens at their June 28 meeting, voting 4-3 to appoint Tristan Harris instead.

“I was so upset,” Stevens responded jokingly, adding that she’d lost count of how many times she’d applied. Later during the meeting, while Hayes was talking about his volunteer work in Newport Beach, he mentioned being termed out of the Parks, Beaches and Recreation Commission and was trying to decide what to do next.

“There’s always the Planning Commission,” Stevens told him. “Maybe you’ll have better luck.”

Everyone laughed, and I suppose it’s one of those situations where you laugh or you cry. I doubt it’s actually funny to any of the people making jokes and I hope Stevens doesn’t give up. She would be a great Planning Commissioner. According to her application, Stevens is a 29-year resident of Newport Beach with a long history of public service, having served on the Housing Element Update Advisory Committee, the General Plan Update Steering Committee and Environmental Quality Affairs Committee.

One last thought. Several times this summer during walks along East Coast Highway, I’ve noticed how dirty the sidewalks are. This made me miss the Corona del Mar Business Improvement District, which disbanded last year. Previously, the group would hold monthly meetings and discuss things like holiday decorations, marketing strategies, parking solutions and dirty sidewalks. If sidewalks were gross, I’d let them know at one of those 7:30 a.m. get-togethers. 

I emailed Linda Leonhard, the CdM Chamber of Commerce president who used to attend all CdM B.I.D. meetings, and asked her how the process worked then and now.

“You are correct that when people complained to our office, I would bring it to the meetings and city staff would address it,” Leonhard said. “Unless they are informed of problem areas, I don’t think it’s much on the radar for cleaning.” She asked me to let her know of problem areas so she could forward the information to city staff.

I asked the city spokesman how things work with no B.I.D., and he forwarded me a response from public works that said there is no regularly scheduled sidewalk pressure wash cleaning for CdM. Furniture, including trash cans and benches, from Avocado to Poppy are pressure washed monthly.

Winding down dirty sidewalk

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Photo by Amy Senk

A dirty sidewalk on the 3100 block of East Coast Highway in Corona del Mar

“The city also added a Porter Service on Tuesdays and Thursdays to litter pick-up the PCH Business District and wipe down trash cans, benches, etc.,” the email said. “The only scheduled locations that get pressure washed monthly are the temporary (pandemic related) allowed outdoor dining areas,” including near Summer House and Golden Spoon.

There are certainly other areas in town that need a good scrub. The 3100 block of East Coast Highway is one. And all this makes me wonder if perhaps the city should pressure wash the sidewalks maybe twice a year, maybe after the summer crowds and after the Christmas Walk. Maybe anything beyond that, the merchants should pay for, particularly if they sell drippy ice cream and other things that might soil the pavement. The sidewalks outside the White Dress bridal shop, for example, look great.

I do miss the B.I.D., where we could have a lively discussion about all the mundane things that affect our quality of life, particularly when I play the icky game of “what caused that stain” during my walks through town.

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 20+ years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association. She and her husband have two children attending college at the University of Missouri and Duke University. She is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

The Counting Crows, Australian Battered Potatoes and a goldfish! You had to be there

Fair Game Tom Johnson headshotI went to the Orange County Fair last week. The plan was to enjoy the Counting Crows in concert at the Pacific Amphitheatre. But before I get to that, I have to tell you about a somewhat violent reaction I had that night.

My daughter, who now is in her late 30s, years ago like many kids do, got a job at the Fair. It was actually nice to see her want to make some extra money at the time. 

Unfortunately, she was too young to drive, so I made the commitment to deliver and pick up my daughter and her friend every day…every day!

Here was the problem. They got assigned to the Australian Battered Potatoes stand, a Fair favorite. Every night when I arrived to pick them up, the smell from a day’s work with fried potatoes and whatever else they used, wafted throughout the interior of my relatively new car.

It hung there like it owned it. And every night that smell was again reinforced. I can’t even remember, but it seems like this went on for three or four weeks.

It reminded me of an old Seinfeld episode when Jerry couldn’t get a certain smell out of his car after the valet returned the car to him at a restaurant.

Anyway, weeks after the Fair ended the smell finally seemed to subside making the vehicle actually comfortable again.

Fast forward to last Wednesday, I’m walking along, minding my own business and then it hit me! Yup, the smell of Australian Battered Potatoes filled my nostrils. I wanted to run, I wanted to hide, but I didn’t. 

To be honest, the smell did take me back to those childhood times so many years ago, which in its own way was good.

Back to the concert – Counting Crows was awesome! So many good songs being thoroughly enjoyed by so many people.

But the lead up to the concert was even better. I met my three grandchildren (ages 5, 3 and 2) while they enjoyed rides in the kids’ section of the fairgrounds, running from one to the next as fast as their little feet could carry them, with mom, dad, grandma and Auntie Ashley in tow.

Oh, and did I mention they also had the new family pet accompanying them? That’s right, a goldfish, won earlier that evening by dad with a lucky ping pong ball. Boy, were they excited! (Actually, he didn’t win, but the guy at the booth felt sorry for him, with three kids and all and didn’t want him walking away empty handed.)

Fair Game granddaughter with fish

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Photo by Victoria Dell

Kate Dell, 5, is excited after “winning” a new fish, while her brother Curty, 3, and Dad look on

The fish did make it home alive, but I have to be honest, I had the under on its lifespan lasting more than two days. I’m not trying to be mean here, just realistic with the truth.

Upon arriving home, and probably even before, they named the fish. There was Goper, Squishy (heaven knows why), Ava, and more. I think at last check it was up to 15 different names.

But, remember above when I gave the little fish hardly a chance at survival? Well, I was almost right. The little guy went to fishy heaven down the toilet when he was found floating a couple of days later on the surface.

So, what are a mom, dad and grandma to do to calmly discuss death with their three young children? They did what anyone would do – they headed to the pet store and purchased a replacement Goper, Squishy, Ava, or whatever.

The kids don’t have a clue because guess what, both fish were gold and that’s good enough for them. So, now I’m taking the over/under on how many goldfish it will take to make it through the end of the year? I’ve marked down 15, and dad has opened an account at the pet store. We’ll see.

• • •

The newest entry into the Newport Beach City Council race is Amy Peters. She’ll oppose previously announced Jim Mosher and Planning Commissioner Erik Weigand.

Peters has been active over the years, particularly with the Newport-Mesa Unified School District as her kids advanced through. She previously ran and lost in an attempt for a board of trustee seat.

The race will be for the District 3 seat to be vacated by the termed-out “Duffy” Duffield.

Speculation is that Mosher will now gracefully back out of his previous announcement as a candidate. His beliefs are that all candidates should have opposition, so with Peters joining in, that would seem to fill that concern.

• • •

Speaking of fish, Sunday was the Newport Pier 2 Pier Swim. That’s when a bunch of crazy people, in much better shape than me, swim from the Balboa Pier to the Newport Pier.

Fair Game Swimmers in caps

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Courtesy of Newport Beach Fire Dept.

Participants listen to final instructions before embarking on the 2022 Newport Pier 2 Pier race

News headline #1, nobody was eaten by a shark. 

Headline #2, 38-year-old Ryan Bullock, from Redondo Beach, won the event, followed by Paul Reynolds, 30, of Costa Mesa, in second and Yann De Fabrique, 49, of San Clemente, third.

Bullock completed the swim in 37:03, almost a full minute ahead.

The women were also well represented with 33-year-old Kathleen Hohwald of Santa Monica, finishing fourth overall and as the top female in 39:40.

The top finisher from Newport Beach was Jamie Fowler, 63, who finished 17th in a time of 43:48.

At the end of the day, 118 participants completed the two-mile swim.

Better them than me.

• • •

The Friends of the Newport Beach Library will host their wonderful book sale this Friday and Saturday, Aug. 5 & 6 at Central Library at 1000 Avocado Ave.

First off, the benefits of being a member allow you to shop Friday, 1-4 p.m., with all books being three for $1. Then Saturday, from 9 a.m.-2 p.m., everyone is invited and books are $3 a bag (bags supplied by the Friends).

Enjoy some summer reading!

• • •

The Balboa Island Improvement Association has released their plans for their summer concerts planned for Friday evenings at 6 p.m. at the Park on Agate

August 5 - Matt Koener 

August 12 - The Nomads 

August 19 - George Fryer 

August 26 - British Invasion 

September 2 - Kenny Hale (Neil Diamond tribute

September 9 - Anthony Castagna 

Bring the family, relax and enjoy great music in a beautiful setting with some old friends and some great new talent. 

• • •

This could be fun, OCMA, the Orange County Museum of Art, is having a job fair this Saturday, Aug. 6 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. They’re actively seeking full- and part-time employees for positions in education, food & beverage, retail, security and visitor services.

Candidates are encouraged to bring resumes and visit www.ocma.art/jobs for details. Questions and more info can be directed to Vickie Byrd at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

They’ll be free admission and parking at OCMA, 1661 W. Sunflower Ave., in Santa Ana.


Ferrying in another day

Ferrying in another day.png SNN 8.2

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

Looking down on the activity around the Fun Zone


Shake, shake, shake

Shake shake shake.png SNN 8.2

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

There’s nothing better on a hot day than a visit to the Shake Shack


Pets of the Week Dog and Cat print

Stu News Newport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

Meet the shelter’s newest available – Bell and Betsy. They arrived at about 8 weeks of age. They are now just shy of 10 weeks in age and these sisters are totally friendly and love to snuggle. They obviously would be stoked if they were adopted into a loving home together so that they have a playmate but, most important, is that each of them is brought into a loving family unit that values them as lifelong family members. If you are interested in meeting a beautiful orange tabby and/or her sister, a Tabico (brown tabby and calico mix), you are invited to contact the shelter to schedule your meet and greet.

Pets of the Week Bell Pets of the Week Betsy

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Photos courtesy of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter

Meet (L-R) Bell and Betsy

They will schedule your meet and greet as conveniently as possible. In addition, they have a great new professional photographer that is donating her time to help the shelter get the best out of their pet guests. They invite you to visit Andrea Domjan’s IG page at @andrea_domjan_photography to see all of her fabulous photography that she shares with the world. 

The shelter does require completed application forms for their animals, so simply print one up from their non-profit’s webpage at www.FONBAS.org. After it is completed, you can email it to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and upon review, they’ll call you to schedule an appointment. If you have any questions, call 949.718.3454.

Newport Beach Animal Shelter adoption fees:

–Adult Dogs - $150

–Puppies - $225

–Adult Cats - $90

–Kittens - $110

–Rabbits - $45

Also, consider becoming a member of an incredible nonprofit that supports the city’s efforts with providing wonderful opportunities to stray, injured, ill and owner-surrendered domestic pets.


Pacific Chorale presents free Choral Festival concert conducted by Artistic Director Robert Istad

Pacific Chorale, the Grammy-winning resident choir at Segerstrom Center for the Performing Arts, presents a free community Choral Festival concert, conducted by Artistic Director Robert Istad, on Sunday, Aug. 14 at 5 p.m. at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa. The concert offers the opportunity for the public to experience the power of choral music in one of the country’s foremost music venues. The 265-voice Festival Chorus, comprised of singers from across the Southland and beyond, will be joined by soprano Rebecca Hasquet, baritone Jared Daniel Jones, organist Jung-A-Lee and pianist David Clemensen. Pacific Chorale’s Choral Festival is presented in association with Segerstrom Center for the Arts. 

Pacific Chorale presents choir

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Photo by Molly Pontin

Pacific Chorale 

The program features three luminous works by National Medal of Arts recipient Morten Lauridsen, hailed as an “American Choral Master” by the National Endowment for the Arts and the most frequently performed American choral composer in modern history. They include Lux Aeterna, composed in 1997, which reveals Lauridsen’s mastery of conveying through music the profound depth of human emotion. Also featured are Two Songs on American Poems – Prayer (On a Poem by Dana Gioia) and “Sure on This Shining Night” from Nocturnes, a setting of James Agee’s poem. According to Lauridsen, “Prayer was written in memory of Michael Jasper Gioia, Dana and Mary Gioia’s infant son, whose brief life was tragically ended by SIDS.” The concert opens with “Hommage à Lauridsen,” an organ prelude improvisation inspired by Lauridsen, composed and performed by Jung-A Lee.

“We are delighted to throw open our doors to the public to showcase the Pacific Chorale Festival Chorus,” said Istad. “It provides a vital opportunity for Pacific Chorale to engage with the broader community in an impactful way to share the power and artistry of the human voice raised in song. We welcome people of all ages to the concert hall, especially those who may not have previously had the opportunity to hear live music in the extraordinary Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall.”

This marks Pacific Chorale’s 14th annual Choral Festival, which returns after a two-year hiatus due to the global pandemic. It features a two-day choral workshop for community-based choirs led by Istad culminating with the performance. The 2022 Festival Chorus comprises 178 community singers hailing from 66 cities in seven states, representing 113 community choruses, church choirs and schools. Of this year’s participants, 117 have sung in multiple festivals and 13 singers have performed in the community-based Festival Chorus each year since its inception. For the performance, the singers will be joined onstage by 72 Pacific Chorale members and 15 alumni.

The concert is free, but tickets are required and available on a first come first served basis at www.pacificchorale.org.

The Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. To reserve tickets and for information, visit www.pacificchorale.org, or call 714.662.2345.


Star-studded world class field set to sail in this week’s BYC 55th Governor’s Cup

The 2022 Youth Match Racing World Champion and runner-up lead an impressive field for this week’s 55th Governor’s Cup, hosted by the Balboa Yacht Club (BYC). The overall field will be made up of 12 skippers from five countries.

At the top of the heap is Jeffrey Petersen (USA), the 2021 GovCup champion from host BYC, who, as of last week, is also the youth match racing World Champion. 

“I’ve always preferred to be the ‘underdog’ going into a regatta. I guess that will be more difficult this year,” said Petersen. 

Star studded world class boats

Photo by Tom Walker

Newly crowned world champion Jeffrey Petersen, shown here in last year’s action, returns home to lead the U.S. efforts

Last year’s 10th place Governor’s Cup finisher, Marius Westerlind, of Sweden, has obviously learned a lot over the past year as he finished second to Petersen in the Youth Match Racing Worlds completed Saturday in Pornichet, France. 

Westerlind is a three-time Swedish Youth Match Race Champion. At last year’s GovCup, observers noted that, while his starts were generally good, Westerlind and his team struggled with boat speed in the Governor’s Cup 22 sloops that BYC provides to each team. Given his performance in France, that is unlikely to be a problem this year. 

Petersen and Westerlind will face plenty of competition in this year’s fleet. One of the toughest would appear to be Jordan Stevenson, of New Zealand, who is the highest-ranked match racer in World Sailing’s “Open” (non-age limited) rankings at number 12 and will make a return to the GovCup after a three-year absence. 

Given COVID travel restrictions, his graduation from a university and a new job, Stevenson hasn’t been able to compete much since 2019. However, in that year, he arguably deserved an even higher ranking after winning two of the three most important youth match race regattas in the Southern Hemisphere and the U.S. Grand Slam series, a four-event series in the Midwest and Northeast against five-time U.S. Match Racing Champion, Dave Perry and former Governor’s Cup winner, Nick Egnot-Johnson (NZL). 

Stevenson will be joined by his countryman, Robbie McCutcheon, who won the New Zealand Youth Trials for the World Championship in France. While he had a disappointing result at the Worlds, he has proven his abilities by winning the New Zealand’s Centreport Youth International Regatta, the Auckland Match Race Championship and was third in the New Zealand Match Race Championship, which is not age limited.

Teams from Australia return in force, with two teams from New South Wales and one from Western Australia. 

For decades the Cruising Yacht Club of Australia (CYCA) in Sydney has sent teams to the Governor’s Cup and has won numerous times – including Harry Price’s two wins in 2015 and 2018. 

This year the club has three well-qualified skippers. GovCup veteran Finn Tapper will crew for his younger brother Cole and Will Sargent will steer for a different CYCA team. The three sailed in the Worlds with Finn steering. 

Marcello Torre will lead a team from another club with a rich GovCup history – the Royal Freshwater Bay Yacht Club, from Perth, Western Australia. The “Royal Freshie” has produced such winners as Sam Gilmour (2013 and 2014) who, with his father and brothers, represent perhaps the most decorated match racing family in the world. 

The British also return to the GovCup after a COVID-related absence. Two-time United Kingdom Youth Match Racing Champion Robbie King will lead his team in their first Governor’s Cup. He didn’t have to go far to get to the BYC as he is currently a Ph.D. student at California Institute of Technology (CalTech) in Pasadena. Like many of his competitors, King is also a champion team racer.

The U.S. contingent brings in a great deal of experience to the event led by the return of Morgan Pinckney of Newport Harbor Yacht Club to the Cup who, at 17, will again be the youngest competitor. Pinckney was third last year, and in June won the U.S. Youth Match Racing Championship for the Rose Cup. 

Star studded Kavle sail

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Photo by Mary Longpre

Last year’s semifinalist Porter Kavle and San Diego Yacht Club’s Jack Egan will also represent the U.S. contingent

U.S. Intercollegiate 2021 Champion and Governor’s Cup veteran Jack Egan, of San Diego Yacht Club, will sail in his second GovCup, as will 2021 GovCup semifinalist Porter Kavle, from Eastport Yacht Club in Annapolis, Maryland. Both will try to move up the leaderboard this year. Ansgar Jordan, of Coronado Yacht Club in San Diego, will return for his second GovCup after an impressive intercollegiate career at Tufts University, from where he just graduated. 

BYC’s GovCup TV Team will provide extensive live coverage on both the BYC YouTube channel as well as the Governor’s Cup Facebook page, Wednesday through Saturday with pre-race morning shows, including the daily 9 a.m. briefing from race officials and selected crew interviews. Live racing coverage airs Friday and Saturday at 11:30 a.m., along with a Friday evening a press conference featuring the four semi-finalists at 6:30 p.m.

The final press conference and awards ceremony will also be covered live at 4:45 p.m. on Saturday.

For more information, visit www.govcupracing.com.


Upcoming events at Balboa Island Museum

Mark your calendar for these upcoming events at the Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach.

Summer Art Classes take place Wednesdays, July 27 (O’Keefe); Aug. 3 (Raphael); Aug. 10 (Seurat) from 10-11 a.m. All ages are welcome. There is a $10 donation and supplies are provided for each project. To register, go here, or call 949.675.3952.

Speaker Event and Book Signing takes place on Thursday, Aug. 11 at 6 p.m. featuring a discussion and book signing of Surfing in Huntington Beach with author Mark Zambrano. Tickets are $20 and can be purchased here.

All events take place at Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach, 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org.


ENC’s Wine Walk online auction is now live

Join the Environmental Nature Center (ENC) and Hi-Time Wine Cellars for their 2022 Wine Walk on Saturday, July 30 from 4-6 p.m. Enjoy a fabulous afternoon of wine tasting, while helping to raise funds for environmental education in our community.

The ENC’s Wine Walk online auction is live now and continues through Saturday, July 30 at 6:30 p.m. Bid on a number of excellent items. To view the online auction and bid, go here.

To donate a silent auction item, go here, or if you have questions, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

There are only a few tickets left for the Wine Walk. Enjoy a fabulous afternoon of wine tasting, while helping to raise funds for environmental education in our community. Walk through the Center and stop at wine tasting stations along the trails to taste wines from several Wineries. Remember to wear trail appropriate shoes.

ENC's Wine Walk tastings

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Courtesy of ENC

Sample varietals at tasting stations along the ENC trails

Walk through the ENC and stop at wine tasting stations along the trails to taste wines from several wineries. Remember to wear trail appropriate shoes.

Wines being poured include varietals from:

–Dry Creek Vineyards

–Jayson Wines

–Far Niente

–Dreyfus Ashby

–Wine Warehouse Assort

Small bites will be provided. Live music will be performed by SideNote Keys/Bass near the top of the stream. Pause to enjoy their summery pop/jazz tunes. End your walk with Kean Coffee and dessert.

 Wines being poured will be available for purchase through Hi-Time Wine Cellars with pickup at Hi-Time at a later date.

One hundred percent of ticket sales will support environmental education at the ENC.

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.encenter.org.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Sunday marks the return of the Newport Beach Pier to Pier Swim…still time to enter

TomJohnsonFairGame2022Get the Speedo out, this Sunday is the Newport Beach Pier to Pier Swim. It’s a two-mile advanced open water swim for experienced swimmers, from the Balboa to Newport Pier. The event returns under the guidance of the Newport Beach Ocean Lifeguard Association

Check-in is at 9 a.m. at the Balboa Pier and the race starts at 10 a.m. Then, if you’re like me, you’ll have two full hours to think about sharks…just kidding. It’ll make you swim faster!

The swim is $60 if you pre-register at www.newportoceanswims.com/ or $80 on race day and you must be a member of U.S. Masters Swimming at www.usms.org.

There are 15 divisions for both men and women ranging from 18 years old to the Super Veterans division which starts at 75.

The first 300 registered swimmers will receive a shirt and division winners will receive medals.

Safety will be provided by the Newport Beach Fire Department-Lifeguard Division.

All proceeds will go to the Newport Beach Ocean Lifeguard Association, a non-profit organization that provides scholarships and equipment for lifeguards.

We mentioned 15 divisions above, a 16th division actually meets at the Dory Deli for lattes while everyone else swims. Count me in for that group!

• • •

Who’s in and who’s out? Well, so far nobody has exited the local election scene but a few of the races do have newly announced candidates.

Perhaps the biggest surprise was the addition of the name Jim Mosher to the District 3 City Council race. Mosher, an outspoken gadfly at virtually every public meeting around town for an extended period of time, announced his candidacy opposite Erik Weigand, for the seat formally held by Duffy Duffield, who is termed out.

Reports are that Mosher won’t run a formal campaign, instead throwing his name in after saying that “nobody should run unopposed.”

Elsewhere, with the recent addition of Lauren Kleiman opposite incumbent Joy Brenner in District 6, each race has multiple candidates (District 1Joe Stapleton vs. Tom Miller), with the exception of District 4 with only Robyn Grant.

In the Newport-Mesa School Board races, things have gotten considerably more crowded. In Trustee Area 4, previously held by retiring-incumbent Karen Yelsey, there’s Lisa Pearson, Yelsey’s hand-picked choice as her successor, and Barbara George as the formally announced candidates, with a third to be rumored waiting in the wings; Trustee Board Chair Michelle Barto remains unopposed at this point in Area 5; and Trustee Area 7 has three candidates, that include incumbent Ashley Anderson, along with challengers Vicky Rodriguez and Kristen Seaburn.

There’s still time in the filing period and rumors and accusations circulating.

The Orange County GOP did hand out their endorsements earlier this week, selecting Stapleton, Weigand, Grant and Kleiman in the council races; and Barto and George in the school board races.

As mentioned above, a number of allegations have been charged by opposing candidate groups in the last week. Stu News continues to investigate each and will present a complete report in Tuesday’s issue. The accusations include several incidents citing “lying” and one that suggests a candidate received an endorsement following a late political party registration change.

It’s a battle out there and not for the weak!

We’ll be meeting and/or talking with each of the candidates concerning the charges, as well as providing more in-depth candidate write-ups next week.

• • •

The GovCup competition is fast and furious out of the Balboa Yacht Club with participants coming from around the world to go after the coveted championship. As we approach the championship rounds today and tomorrow, two racers have already qualified for the semi-finals, while five other teams remain in contention for the other two.

Local star Jeffrey Peterson (USA) out of the host BYC, defending GovCup champion, and now the recently crowned Youth Match Racing World Champion, has qualified to advance to today’s semifinals. 

No surprise there.

He’s joined by co-favorite Jordan Stevenson (New Zealand), who was undefeated in yesterday’s round-robin of races and is in sole possession of second place, one point behind Peterson.

Those with hopes remaining include Jack Egan (USA), Marius Westerlind (Sweden) who enter today tied at third, followed by Will Sargent (Australia) in fourth, with local Morgan Pinckney (USA) out of the Newport Harbor Yacht Club and the competition’s youngest participant tied with Great Britain’s Robbie King.

Racing continues this morning wrapping up the round-robin, then moving to the semis this afternoon, followed by the finals on Saturday.

The semifinals are the first-to-win three races, as is Saturday’s finals. 

• • •

The City of Hope unveiled their Orange County Lennar Foundation Cancer Center in Irvine to the media for a peek behind the curtain on Wednesday (July 27). The very impressive tour of the 190,000 sq. ft. center for research and treatment was led by a group of noted City of Hope leaders and physicians.

Some of the highlights included: 

–Their very advanced “interventional radiology suites that are designed to provide leading-edge technology to speed advanced cancer treatments to patients.”

–A full-service salon with oncology-trained cosmetologists, 67 high tech and touch exam/treatment rooms, 53 infusion bays and rooms, a pioneering clinical research unit, an onsite retail pharmacy and more. 

It was quite impressive and included specific Feng Shui designs to mentally assist in healing.

• • •

OpenTable recently selected the 100 Best Restaurants for Outdoor Dining nationally. Two locals made the list. Any guesses?

First up, the Beachcomber Café in Crystal Cove; second is The Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens.

Go here for a complete list.


Take Five: Meet Celia Endsley, Sherman Library & Gardens’ Volunteer of the Year

By AMY SENK

Earlier this summer, some friends who work at the Sherman Library & Gardens informed me that a new Volunteer of the Year had been named. Celia Endsley, they said, was a tireless worker who oversees Sherman’s summer garden party’s raffle and silent auction, raising lots of money for the organization, and she also is involved with Los Compadres, a group of history buffs who support Sherman Library and meet monthly at the Gardens to listen to a different speaker on history. I reached out to Endsley to learn more.

Take Five Celia Endsley

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Courtesy of Sherman Library & Gardens

Celia Endsley

Q: Congratulations on being named Sherman Library & Gardens Volunteer of the Year. Do you remember your first visit there and what are your early memories and connections?

A: I had been driving by the Gardens since I was able to drive but had never been inside until one of my friends got married there in the early ‘80s. I remember thinking how beautiful and magical it was, but somehow equated that to the wedding event and not the actual gardens. It was probably four or five years later, when I was renting a place on Heliotrope, that I visited just to see the Gardens. It was just magical and beautiful. After that I made a point of visiting “the area’s best kept secret” as often as possible. The Gardens were and are always changing. There is always something new to see, explore and discover.

Q: When did you first become a volunteer, and how did your work at SL&G change and grow over the years? 

A: A few years back, at a Saturday dinner with a group of friends, two recently retired teachers started talking about a lecture they had just attended at Sherman that morning. I was so interested that they continued to tell me about the lecture topics and what they had learned every month. I found out that they were volunteers at Sherman Library and Gardens – I never even knew about the Library part – and one of their chosen volunteer duties was to provide coffee and breakfast snacks for “Los Compadres de Los Libros,” a group of historians, writers and scholars, all men at the time, who would meet the second Saturday morning of each month. There is a long history to the group, who has been meeting since the ‘50s. I really wanted to attend the lectures, but at the time it was only open to Los Compadres members and, of course, the volunteers who served them and then were able to sit in the back and listen. I told my friends I wanted to volunteer once I retired. Well, skip ahead a couple more years to June 2018. Within a week of my retirement, I got an email from the Sherman Library & Gardens Volunteer Association saying my friends had signed me up for the next recruitment class which started in July. I tried to put it off so I could enjoy some time without responsibilities for a bit, but that was not to happen. I was hooked, though, by the friendly and fun people I met right off the bat and was able to attend the next Los Compadres meeting as a volunteer. The topic of that first meeting was barbed wire. I was so disappointed. Could anything be less interesting? Boy was I wrong! Not only did the story of barbed wire come with a wealth of history about the Old West, but the samples of wire they brought and discussed were incredibly intricate and beautiful. I loved it.

Q: Who was your favorite Los Compadres speaker?

A: I really can’t pick a favorite topic because each time, even when I can’t imagine I would care in the least, I am surprised. Los Compadres never disappoints – even when there is no speaker scheduled and the members just share some stories or books they wish to highlight. That, by the way, is how “The Friends (Comrades) of the Books” got their name.

Q: I understand you are a retired NMUSD teacher. Can you tell me more about that?

A: I’m guessing I got recruited by our new education director because of my teaching experience. I taught elementary school in Irvine for 17 years, mostly in sixth grade, before taking a job with the Orange County Department of Education, where I completed 15 more years before retiring. My job at OCDE was working with families that were homeschooling their K-8th grade children. It was super rewarding because I worked with entire families and formed close bonds with many of them. I had families that traveled and lived all over the world, and one that homeschooled while they sailed around the world. Other students were actors, entrepreneurs and world-class athletes. And some that just didn’t quite fit the mold at their traditional neighborhood schools. Every situation was different and designing programs that would work for them was always fun. It was also great because we taught actual classes on our campuses for those who wanted to attend, and you got to create your own courses and teach what you loved. Not at all what I thought of homeschooling before I started. After my normal school hours, I supervised the online classes for our middle schoolers who chose that route, so I guess I would have had an easy breezy transition had I still been teaching when the pandemic hit. Super glad I retired when I did though, otherwise I would still be driving by and wondering about all the amazing things that go on within the gates of my new adopted home at Sherman Library & Gardens.

Q: What is your favorite part of the Gardens?

A: Even though I joined for the library, the history part, and don’t have much knowledge or a background in horticulture, I am learning a ton about the Garden and plants part and loving it. I have been working recently with our education team by helping with field trips for school groups and also reading books to preschoolers at the Friday mornings “Little Seedlings Story Time.” At this time of year, I am always super busy getting ready for the raffle and silent auction part of our annual volunteer fundraiser – The Newport Beach Garden Tour and Summer Garden Party. The event takes place Saturday, Aug. 27. For tickets and information, visit www.thesherman.org.

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk is a long-time resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


REALTORS® care about the community

Another successful Red Cross Blood Donation Drive is in the books thanks to the support of the Newport Beach Association of REALTOR® and Affiliate members.

They were able to collect 25 pints of blood at the July 25 drive which will be used to save up to 75 local hospital patients’ lives. Blood is essential to help patients survive surgeries, cancer treatment, chronic illness and traumatic injuries.

NBAOR is thankful to all of the donors and hopes to see you at their next Blood Donation Drive.

REALTORS Dopheide

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Photos courtesy of NBAOR

Geoffrey Dopheide

REALTORS Sutherland

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Caroline Sutherland

REALTORS Wong and Doyle

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(L-R) Jennifer Wong and Peyton Doyle

REALTORS Dishon

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Nicole Dishon

REALTORS Criss

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Austin Criss

For more information on the Newport Beach Association of REALTORS®, visit www.nbaor.com.


On the Harbor: Hank Thayer, Baxter & Cicero sailmakers

By LEN BOSE

For my last column, I picked up the phone and called an old friend of mine Hank Thayer from Baxter & Cicero sailmakers regarding remote control sailing and his time with Swede Johnson at the sail loft. As the phone was ringing the idea came to me that I should be interviewing Thayer regarding the history of Baxter & Cicero.

I first met Thayer in the late ‘80s. He would come into Reubens restaurant for lunch from time to time with some of the people that worked with him and sat at the bar where I was the daytime bartender. Of course, we always talked about sailing, and at that time he was the helmsman for John Arens Frers 50 Tomahawk, the biggest, baddest boat on the harbor.

In 1937, Bud Gardiner and Bill Baxter opened up Gardiner & Baxter Sails – the idea was to start a sailmaking facility on the West Coast. Just at the end of WWII, Saint Cicero joined the loft. Cicero was an active Star sailor who also crewed on the schooner Goodwill and other local big boats. Shortly after Cicero joined the team, Gardiner split away with the name of the loft changing to Baxter & Cicero, which is still the name today some 85 years later. I believe it is the longest continuously operated sailmaking/canvas company in the U.S. Baxter passed away in the 1950s leaving the business to Cicero who then passed the baton over to Hank Thayer in the late 1970s.

On the Harbor ficker trophies

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Courtesy of Baxter & Cicero

Bill Ficker trophies from winning the Star Worlds with Baxter & Cicero sails in 1958

From the beginning back in 1937, the loft focused on our local fleets of Stars, Rhodes 33, Lehmans and Snipes. It gained international attention with Bill Ficker in 1958, when Ficker won the Star Worlds with Baxter & Cicero sails followed up by Don Elder winning the Star Worlds in 1964. Baxter was also an active Star sailor at Newport Harbor Yacht Club, where they still hold the Baxter Bowl annually. Notable is that Dave Ullman got his start at Baxter & Cicero making Snipe and Lido 14 sails. Henry Sprague was also one of the local sailors who would work at the loft. “Most of best harbor sailors would work at the loft during the summer months. There was sailboat designer Carl Schumacher, who worked at the loft along with other sailmakers that started their own lofts – John Staff, Kevin Conley and Cal Preston,” Thayer said.

Baxter & Cicero has a long history dating back to the 1940s for their canvas work from boat & sail covers, embroidery, soft luggage and outdoor covers for the home – always known for quality work with Warren Blinn getting his start at the loft along with J Miller. In the 1980s, Thayer gave me a Baxter & Cicero canvas duffel bag, which today I still pull out of the closet to impress when I arrive on the boats that “remember” when these bags were built.

Over the years Baxter and Cicero have moved around, first starting their loft off of 31st Street in Newport Beach, then up to Costa Mesa in the 1980s off of Farad Street, then up to 20th Street and Newport Boulevard. For the last 15 years they have been located at 1760 Monrovia St. You can also view their website at www.baxterandcicero.com.

There is a lot of history when you walk through their doors. For me it’s like walking into an old-style sailing club where your go for advice on the race course or find out which materials work best for the tasks at hand. The personal service and attention along with being greeted by your first name, along with a “well done” from the local weekend race results give me that at-home feeling when calling. 

• • •

Breaking News! For years I have been searching for ways to properly dispose of all my expired marine flares. Harbormaster Paul Blank was notified of a press release from the California Boating and Waterways. On Saturday, Aug. 27 from 7 a.m.-1 p.m., head to Dana Point Harbor, 34555 Casitas Place, Dana Point. Bring your unwanted or expired marine flares and smoke signals. Accepted: Hand-held flares aerial flares smoke signals. Not accepted: Electronic flares, military flares, or any other hazardous waste such as paint, oil, e-waste, or batteries. Participants will receive free boater kit and flare discount coupons, courtesy of the California State Parks and California Coastal Commission.

Sea ya.

~~~~~~~~

Len Bose is a yachting enthusiast, yacht broker and harbor columnist for Stu News Newport.


Morning glory

Morning glory

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Photo by Tina Treglia (Instagram @ttregs)

Summer sunrise at The Wedge


As travel continues to present challenges, a staycation may be just what the doctor ordered

By GARY SHERWIN

While it not exactly the Summer of Love, things are looking pretty good right now in the Newport Beach tourism world. 

The Los Angeles Rams have arrived for their third year of preseason training at VEA Newport Beach, filling up half of the new hotel and bringing a large contingent of national media which you would expect for a team that just won the Super Bowl.

Average daily rates at our hotels are averaging a very healthy $416.93 a night as of last week and occupancy is at 70.5% which is pretty good considering the new Pendry, formerly the Fashion Island Hotel, is not yet open. And this occupancy figure doesn’t include short term rentals which have become even more popular during the pandemic and have dramatically increased their nightly rates as well.

It’s also worth noting that those healthy average daily rates are among the highest in the nation and those more expensive hotel rooms also generate more transient occupancy tax for the city.

Gary Sherwin

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Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Gary Sherwin

As to the rest of the country, that dream of “revenge travel” to long delayed vacation spots this summer, well, that dream is more of a nightmare.

Last week I was in Toronto for an industry conference and its airport has been an international ground zero for the chaos going on with the industry. When I arrived at 9:30 p.m., the flight attendant made the unusual announcement that unless we had a connecting flight, everyone had to remain on the plane due to “airport passenger capacity issues.” We sat there at our gate for about 20 minutes before they released us.

Once we walked to customs, it was clear that they lacked enough employees to process the passengers even though most people used check in kiosks.

When it was time to come home, I was warned that you needed to be at the airport no less than three hours before departure due to the same problem. In Canada, you go through U.S. Customs and Immigration at your point of departure which meant that there weren’t enough U.S. Federal employees to process in-bound passengers. The line was enormous but luckily, I had Global Entry, which is the international equivalent of TSA Pre-Check, and permits you to use a kiosk and then go on your way. That saved me about 45 minutes.

Many people at my conference of travel industry professionals reported cancelled flights, delays and a lack of customer service to assist you. While I was there, Canada also started random COVID screenings for U.S. passengers which was done off site. That meant you had to arrive even earlier for your flight since you were hustled off to another area for your test before returning to the airport. They also started random screens for arriving passengers as well.

Oddly, these weren’t the quick COVID tests. These test results took 48 hours which meant if you were departing and turned out to be positive, you were likely already back home by the time the results came in. Canadian officials said they were doing this to see how much of the new COVID variant BA.5 was in the country.

But the problems in Canada are not isolated ones. Since June, nearly 26,000 flights, comprising 2.2% of all flights, have been cancelled and 260,000 flights, or 22%, have been delayed according to a flight tracking company.

American Airlines alone, which has a big presence at John Wayne Airport, has cancelled 1,175 flights during the next two months to “build a buffer” into its schedule.

So, who’s to blame? Some have pointed fingers at pilots or air traffic controllers. However, many in the industry are saying greedy airline executives are the culprits who wanted to cash in on the expected travel rush but organizationally weren’t prepared for the demand.

Couple that with new inexperienced staff and COVID outbreaks and you have an epic mess.

“A major contributor is that demand has been coming back so quickly and airlines are jumping to try and meet it and overpromising and putting in too much capacity,” said Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants.

To say passengers have had it is an understatement. The number of complaints about airline service jumped 237% in May with 4,344 complaints compared to 1,289 complaints in May 2019. J.D. Power, which measures guest satisfaction said that airlines have dropped more than 20 points on a 1,000-scale compared to a year earlier.

And, if you are flying, you get to enjoy the privilege of paying even more for this bad service. Ticket prices have soared 33% over the last year with the average ticket at $605.

No one is exempt from this flying mess. Even Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, whose job it is to oversee the industry, ironically had his flight to New York cancelled after meeting with airline executives to discuss this very problem.

My advice is to staycation this year if you don’t have any plans. If your goal is to relax and recharge, you probably won’t find it if you need to fly. Besides, I’ve always said, people pay big bucks to visit Newport Beach and we get the privilege of enjoying it for free every day.

That’s a deal if I ever saw one.

Gary Sherwin is President & CEO of Visit Newport Beach and Newport Beach & Company.


Enjoying the pier

Enjoying the pier SNN 7.29

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

Picture perfect in paradise


Regattas and Races…

Regattas and Races.jpg 7.29

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Photo by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

BCYC 

2022 Taco Tuesday Series

July 26

PHRF A (4.5 miles)

1 Destroyer, Jim Baily Family, NHYC 

   Elapsed 0:48:50, Corrected 0:44:38

2 Legacy, Bruce Cooper, BCYC 

   Elapsed 0:52:11, Corrected 0:45:03

3 Problem Child, Dan Rossen, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:52:12, Corrected 0:46:03

4 Heartbeat, Charles Brewer, NHYC 

   Elapsed 0:51:17, Corrected 0:47:18

5 Amante, Richley Family, LIYC 

   Elapsed 0:51:21, Corrected 0:47:27

6 Table 9, Tyler Wolk, BYC 

   Elapsed 0:52:47, Corrected 0:47:45

PHRF B (3.3 miles)

1 Horsefeathers, John Fuller, NHYC 

   Elapsed 0:41:57, Corrected 0:32:39

2 Amante, Chas Beek, NHYC

   Elapsed 0:42:33, Corrected 0:33:55

3 Lickity Split, Andrew Whittingham, WSAOC

   Elapsed 0:41:14, Corrected 0:33:58

 4 Rhythm, Roger Gooding, SBYRC

   Elapsed 0:40:24, Corrected 0:34:11

5 Violetta, Jane Hartley, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:41:49, Corrected 0:35:46

6 Healer, Larry Kliger, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:44:13, Corrected 0:37:44

7 Sea Scout, Derek Taylor, Sea Base

   Elapsed 0:45:26, Corrected 0:39:13

PHRF C (2.6 miles)

1 Ventus, Team BCYC, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:40:33, Corrected 0:31:32

2 Halcyon 3, Bob Kafka, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:43:11, Corrected 0:33:39

3 Celia, Jim O’Conner, ALYC

   Elapsed 0:43:32, Corrected 0:34:08

4 Mystery, Dene Stratton, BCYC

   Elapsed 0:47:37, Corrected 0:36:26

H20A Division (2 races)

1 Shana’s Secret, Thompson/Conzelman, BCYC, Total 2

2 Only Child, L. Bose/J. Bose, BCYC, Total 4

3 Jubilee, Yates/Kincaid, NHYC, Total 6

H20B Division (2 races)

1 Whatever, Hurliman/Fischbacher, SBYC, Total 2

2 Spirit, D. Haynes/P. Haynes, BCYC, Total 4

3 Mili’apa, Watanabe/Sutherland, UCISA, Total 7

H20C Division (2 races)

1 Ruthless, Team BCYC, BCYC, Total 3

2 Dragon Lady, Sangster/Kimball, LIYC, Total 4

3 Kalani II, Ibbetson/Thornton, SYA, Total 5

ALYC 

2022 ALYC Sundowner Series

Monday, July 25

H20B Division (11 races, 2 discards)

1 Ping, Anne Wiese, Total 14

2 Jubilee, Patrick Kincaid, Total 19 

3 Spirit, Debra Haynes, Total 22 

4 Emoji, Andrew Tosh, Total 31

5 Summer Dream, Tucker Cheadle, Total 33

PHRF A Division (11 races, 1 discard)

1 XLR8, Gabriel Nistor, Total 13.5

2 Kaisen, David Camerini, Total 26.5

3 Violetta, Jane Hartley, Total 27

4 Stella Maris, Theodore Barry, Total 29

5 #29, Michael Darr, Total 31 

6 Healer, Larry Kliger, Total 38

7 Starfire, Dan O’Sullivan, Total 39

PHRF B Division (11 races, 1 discard)

1 Buena Vista, Berkeley Green, Total 16

2 Holokai, Ross McElfresh, Total 18 

3 Hobo Flats, Louis Chappelear, Total 27

4 Painted Lady, Matthew Foreman, Total 28

5 Stanley’s Cup, Stanley Tutton, Total 30

6 Hayden’s Havoc, Michael Hayden, Total 32

PHRF C Division (11 races, 1 discard)

1 Carioca, Bob Wine, Total 9.5

2 CELIA, Jim O’Connor, Total 18

3 Mystery, Any Club Member, Total 30.5 

4 Mystery II, Club Member Any, Total 33

5 FAIRWIND, Skipper Tim Bercovitz, Total 42

6 No Ka Oi, Lori Romano, Total 45

News relating to racing in or around Newport Harbor should be forwarded to Tom Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Wine Walk coming to ENC

Join the Environmental Nature Center (ENC) and Hi-Time Wine Cellars for their 2022 Wine Walk on Saturday, July 30. Enjoy a fabulous afternoon of wine tasting, while helping to raise funds for environmental education in our community.

Wine Walk tastings

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Submitted photo

Sample varietals as you visit the tasting stations along the ENC trails

Walk through the ENC and stop at wine tasting stations along the trails to taste wines from several wineries. Remember to wear trail appropriate shoes.

Wines being poured include varietals from:

–Dry Creek Vineyards

–Jayson Wines

–Far Niente

–Dreyfus Ashby

–Wine Warehouse Assort

Small bites will be provided. Live music will be performed by SideNote Keys/Bass near the top of the stream. Pause to enjoy their summery pop/jazz tunes. End your walk with Kean Coffee and dessert.

 Wines being poured will be available for purchase through Hi-Time Wine Cellars with pickup at Hi-Time at a later date.

 The fabulous online auction from July 25-30 will feature a number of excellent items. To bid, go here. To donate to their online auction, go here

One hundred percent of ticket sales will support environmental education at the ENC.

Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.encenter.org.


Newport Beach Association of REALTORS® Charity Pickleball Tournament to benefit Childhelp 

The inaugural Newport Beach Association of REALTORS® (NBAOR) Charity Pickleball Tournament will be held on Wednesday, Aug. 3 at The Tennis and Pickleball Club at Newport Beach benefiting Childhelp. This internationally respected nonprofit is the largest organization dedicated to helping victims of abuse, neglect and at-risk youth.

Childhelp focuses their efforts on advocacy, intervention, treatment, prevention, family resilience and community outreach.

This year’s event is chaired by Hope Carr, WFG Title. Sponsors of the event include Candy Babcock, First American Natural Hazard Disclosures; Lina King and Roberta Curlender, myNHD; Ryan Kleis, Reverse Mortgage Educators; Rosie Poole, First American Home Warranty and Caroline Sutherland, U.S. Bank.

NBAOR is looking forward to this sold-out event benefiting such an important cause. With game play, a BBQ mixer and more, it is sure to be a great success.

The Tennis and Pickleball Club at Newport Beach is located at 11 Clubhouse Drive, Newport Beach.

For more information on the Newport Beach Association of REALTORS®, visit www.nbaor.com.


Upcoming events at Balboa Island Museum

Mark your calendar for these upcoming events at the Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach.

Sunday Supper at the Museum takes place Sunday, July 24 at 5 p.m. with a BBQ and community-style seating along with Bingo. Tickets are $30 for dinner and wine and available for purchase here or at the Museum Store.

Summer Art Classes take place Wednesdays, July 27 (O’Keefe); Aug. 3 (Raphael); Aug. 10 (Seurat) from 10-11 a.m. All ages are welcome. There is a $10 donation and supplies are provided for each project. To register, go here, or call 949.675.3952.

Speaker Event and Book Signing takes place on Thursday, Aug. 11 at 6 p.m. featuring a discussion and book signing of Surfing in Huntington Beach with author Mark Zambrano. Tickets are $20 and can be purchased here.

All events take place at Balboa Island Museum Newport Bech, 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org.


Miracles for Kids hosted third “Surf & Paddle” summer camp on July 22

All children and families deserve to believe in miracles. On Friday, July 22, Miracles for Kids (MFK) concluded their 11th year of “Surf & Paddle” Summer Camps, giving critically ill children and their loved ones a sunny summertime miracle: A worry-free day of surf, sand and sun where fun is the only thing on their agenda.

While most of the year is spent in doctors’ offices or hospital rooms, MFK’s annual “Surf & Paddle” events provide an opportunity to enjoy a day of normalcy. Collaborating with Boardriders and Waves of Impact, numerous local businesses joined in a community building experience, bringing more than 100 families closer through joy-filled beach play days.

Miracles for Kid hosted third surf 1

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Photos courtesy of Miracles for Kids

Miracles for Kids hosted third surf 2

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“Every act of kindness makes an immeasurable impact on the world,” shared MFK Co-Founder/CEO Autumn Strier. “Our ‘Surf & Paddle’ camps are a powerful reminder of why we do this work. It’s incredible to witness the pure joy of ear-to-ear smiles on the faces of every kid, parent, and volunteer.”

Miracles for Kids families were invited to attend two surf-focused day camps and one stand-up paddle/kayak day camp throughout the month of July in Newport Beach. Each camp was offered free of charge, including a catered lunch by Bracken’s Kitchen, fresh juices from Perricone Farms, plus transportation to/from the event.

Miracles for Kids hosted surf 3

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Miracles for Kids hosted third surf kids

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All children received complimentary rash guards, sunglasses, beach towels and fun beach essentials from the Boardriders Foundation. In addition to surf or paddle/kayak instruction from Waves of Impact volunteers, critically ill children, their siblings and parents enjoyed beach volleyball, boogie boarding, sandcastle building, giant water inflatables slides, beach yoga with Yoga Six Newport Beach, and more. 

Miracles for Kids empowers people to “be the miracle” for families struggling with the battle against a child’s life-threatening illness. Leveraging the power of community, the California-based non-profit provides for essential needs such as housing and bills, in addition to fun, family-friendly opportunities for critically ill children and their siblings to experience joyful play. For more information, visit https://miraclesforkids.org.


The Week in Review

A weekly newsletter from City Manager Grace L. Leung

Grace Leung

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung

Community Members:

July is National Parks and Recreation Month, and there is no better way to celebrate than by enjoying one or more of your Newport Beach parks, beaches and recreational facilities.

With 65 parks throughout the city, there are plenty of opportunities to explore the outdoors by visiting one of our parks. Click here for a comprehensive directory of all city parks and recreational facilities.

Did you know you can rent a kayak or stand-up paddle board at Marina Park, or take boating and sailing classes? Visit the Marina Park boating office to rent equipment, or call 949.270.8160.

It’s a great time to take a relaxing hike or bike ride along a city trail. Visit the Arroyo trail for a short half-mile walk (one-way), or the more challenging 3.41-mile Buck Gully trail. Visit this page for a directory of all city walking and biking trails.

Browse through the Newport Navigator to find a new activity. The city offers more than 400 camps and classes, with activities for every age group. And for older adults, the OASIS Senior Center offers a wide variety of programs and activities.

Thank you to our residents for your continued support of the city’s recreational programs (a record 4,133 participants joined the first six weeks of 2022 summer camps) and to the Recreation and Senior Services staff for your dedicated service to our community.

City Manager, Grace K. Leung

City Launches New Virtual Permit Portal

The city has launched a new online platform called Newport Beach City Virtual Connect, or CiViC, to provide the public with an easy and convenient portal to acquire, pay, check project status and schedule inspections for basic (over-the-counter) permits.

The system replaces a 30-year-old permitting application with the intent to set the stage for the future of online services. Permits currently available on the online platform include residential mechanical, plumbing, re-roof, windows/door change out and electrical permits that do not require plans.

Other services enable residents and contractors to apply for planning entitlement applications, residential building reports and recreation special event permits. The next phase of the CiViC platform implementation will facilitate full electronic building plan review eliminating the need to submit paper plans at the Permit Center. We are excited about the future services and ease of use the platform will provide to our community. The CiViC site can be accessed at www.newportbeachca.gov/civic.

CR&R Now Billing for Additional Trash, Recycling Carts

Beginning in mid-July, some Newport Beach residents began receiving the first quarterly bill from CR&R, the city’s waste contractor, for additional trash and recycling carts above those allocated under the expanded recycling program.

The expended recycling program was implemented in January to help meet state mandates related to the recycling of organic waste. As part of the expanded program, residential households are allocated a set amount of solid waste collection in a combination of black trash carts, blue recycling carts and green organics carts at no charge.

As of July 1, additional fees are being charged for extra carts, at the rate of $6.09 a month for black trash carts, $3.41 a month for blue recycling carts and $4.11 a month for a green organics recycling cart. The first quarterly bills were mailed July 11.

If you would like to return extra carts, or request extra carts, contact CR&R Customer Service at 949.667.4158 or email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. You can manage all your waste and recycling services through an online account at https://oss.crrinc.com.

Tickets on Sale for Country Rock Band at July 29 OASIS Concert

The OASIS Senior Center will be holding an outdoor “Concert In The Courtyard” on Friday, July 29 at 5:30 p.m. SugarLips, a local country rock band, will be performing. Bring your own picnic lunch and low-slung beach chair. Tickets are $10 each.

To purchase tickets, call 949.644.3244 or visit the OASIS administration office. For future OASIS events, please visit our website.

Afterschool Programming Registration Opens July 28 at 8 a.m.

The new school year is right around the corner, which means it’s time to start thinking about afterschool activities. The city staff-run program, Active Kids, offers afterschool programming at three locations: Community Youth Center, Mariners Vincent Jorgenson Community Room and Newport Elementary School.

Due to its popularity, registration opens earlier than other fall classes – Thursday, July 28 at 8 a.m. Space is limited and historically, this program fills up within minutes on the first day of registration. To assist and prepare for this highly anticipated morning, be sure to visit our page on registration tips and wait listing

Registration for all other Fall programs will open on Thursday, Aug. 11. Click here for more information on Recreation & Senior Services programs.

Annual Memberships Available to 50+ at OASIS Fitness Center

The OASIS Senior Center features a state-of-the-art fitness center designed to meet the health and wellness needs of older adults.

The fitness center is open seven days a week and offers a full line of strength and cardiovascular machines, free weights, resistance bands and yoga mats.

Annual membership is available to individuals 50 years and older at the rates of $137 for Newport Beach residents and $192 for non-residents. Membership sign-up and orientation is by appointment only and can be made by calling 949.718.1818. For more information, visit the Fitness Center Website.

Be Well Mobile Crisis Response Update

The Be Well mobile crisis response team operates in Newport Beach 12 hours a day, seven days a week to respond to mental and behavioral health crises. The mobile unit is staffed with mental health specialists and EMTs, and works closely with the city’s police and fire departments.

This week the Be Well team: 

–Transported one person to the Be Well sobering station for treatment.

–Transported three people to the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter.

–Transported one person to an emergency room for treatment.

–Transported 10 people to services, shelter intakes and appointments.

Homelessness Update

The City of Newport Beach provides a comprehensive response to address homelessness through a coordinated effort by city staff, contractors, partner agencies and nonprofit groups.

This week, the city’s homeless outreach and response teams:

–Enrolled a woman fleeing domestic violence into a transitional home, which provides counseling and mental health services.

–Completed assessments with three people experiencing homelessness to determine disabling conditions.

–Enrolled a couple into services and completed a housing assessment.

–Continue to shelter people. Eighteen people who had been experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach are now sheltered in the Costa Mesa Bridge Shelter.

To donate to those experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach, visit our Good Giving Program web page.

Click here to view the latest homeless dashboard, which includes key monthly and yearly data on the city’s homeless response. 

On the Agenda: City Council Meeting for July 26, 2022

Our next City Council meeting is Tuesday, July 26. Items of interest are highlighted below. The entire agenda and reports can be viewed here

A study session will begin at 4 p.m. Agenda Items include:

–Design changes for residential properties located in the VE Zone, a West Newport flood zone. In March 2019, new Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)flood insurance rate maps took effect throughout Newport Beach. The FEMA maps include the designation of a special flood hazard area (VE Zone) that includes 166 beachfront properties in West Newport between 24th Street and 48th Street. Staff will provide an update to the City Council on potential amendments that will address development standards in the VE Zone.

The regular session begins at 5:30 p.m. Agenda items include:

–Approval of a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers related to the Newport Harbor dredging project. The Army Corps is planning to dredge the federal navigation channels in Newport Harbor this fall, and has the necessary federal funding contributions for the project. The city will fund 50% of the costs, up to $10 million, which is included in the current Capital Improvement Program budget. The MOA will formalize the city’s financial commitment to the dredging project.

–A resolution to collect certain sewer and recycling fees through property tax rolls. Approximately 5,300 accounts are sewer and/or recycling only customers
that do not receive a City of Newport Beach utility bill. To reduce delinquency rates, staff is recommending that these customers be charged through the property tax billing process as an add-on charge similar to a school bond debt service charge or an annual assessment district levy.

This Week’s Events

Tuesday, July 26

City Council Meeting

City Council Chambers

100 Civic Center Drive – 4 p.m.

Thursday, July 28

Zoning Administrator Hearing Meeting

Zoom – 10 a.m.

See the Full Schedule

Editor’s Note: City Manager’s Updates was received Friday, July 22 and is subject to editing so the information is current.


Council agenda includes sewer fee collection, dredging project details, sale of surplus property

By SARA HALL

City Council has a variety of interesting items on the agenda tonight. 

At tonight’s meeting (Tuesday, July 26), council will consider: A resolution collection of certain sewer and recycling fees and charges through the property tax roll; an agreement with the federal government for city contributed funds for the Lower Bay Dredging project; declaring a portion of city-owned Balboa Peninsula property as exempt surplus land and selling it to the county for $467,629.56; and a policy change meant to discourage the appointment of persons to boards and commissions who work or are related to other members of the same board or commission. 

During the evening’s public hearing, council will consider a resolution collection of certain sewer and recycling fees and charges through the property tax roll.

The city provides services including water, sewer and recycling to residents and businesses that are billed via the city’s utility billing process. There are certain areas in Newport Beach where one or more of these services are provided by other surrounding cities or special districts. 

The city also provides services to a limited number of customers that are located outside of, but immediately adjacent to, the city boundary. 

According to the staff report, there are approximately 5,300 accounts that are sewer and/or recycling only customers that do not receive a City of Newport Beach utility bill. State code allows local agencies to collect certain annual fees and charges, including for sewer and recycling services, through the property tax roll. 

“Enrolling these types of charges on the property tax roll is a common practice in California local agencies, particularly in instances where a customer is not receiving electric and/or water service from the billing agency,” the report reads. 

Because these customers do not receive a utility service from the city that can be disconnected for nonpayment, the delinquency rate can be significantly decreased through utilizing the property tax billing process. Such charges are billed as part of the normal property tax billing process as an add-on charge similar to a school bond debt service charge or an annual assessment district levy.

“While it is difficult to quantify the savings that will result from this effort, considerable staff time is expended on collection efforts related to these bills,” the staff report explains. 

Council agenda includes sewer fee trash truck

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Sara Hall

A CR&R truck picks up trash bins in a Newport Beach neighborhood in early 2021

The frequency of issues has increased significantly since Newport Coast property owners began to be assessed the recycling fee last year.

“Because the bills are small and infrequent, and because the bills are sent to the property address when the property owner(s) may reside elsewhere as their primary residence, collection rates have been significantly lower than for customers who are also billed for other city services. Transitioning these fees and charges to the property tax bill will also reduce the burden on these customers by eliminating an additional bill that must be paid on a semi-annual or bi-monthly basis,” the report reads. 

Tonight, council will hear and consider all objections and protests. If they don’t hear from a majority of the separate parcels, council may adopt the report based upon a supermajority vote. 

If adopted, the report must be submitted to the Orange County assessor’s office no later than August 10 in order for the sewer and recycling fees for Fiscal Year 2022-23 to be placed on the tax rolls.

Council agenda includes sewer fee harbor CAD rendering

Click on photo for a larger image

Rendering courtesy of the City of Newport Beach

View simulation of the CAD construction from the public beach at 10th Street, looking northeast

Earlier in the meeting, on the consent calendar, council will consider a memorandum of agreement with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for city contributed funds for the Lower Bay Dredging project

According to the staff report, USACE is planning to dredge the federal navigation channels in Newport Harbor this fall and has secured the necessary funding to complete the dredging project, assuming the City of Newport Beach also funds 50% (up to $10 million, already included in the city’s adopted Capital Improvement Program budget) of the anticipated costs as it has committed. The MOA is to memorialize the city’s contribution.

Also, because a portion of the dredging is over Orange County tidelands, the county will contribute funds to the city, which will pass those funds on to USACE. In the near future and likely after bids are received, a county/city MOA will be presented to the council for consideration.

The city has been working aggressively with the federal government for several years to undertake a much-needed channel dredging project within the Lower Harbor to reestablish navigation depths as well as to improve overall tidal flushing and water quality.

The federal channels extend from the entrance channel to the turning basin (adjacent to the Newport Boulevard Bridge), and from the east anchorage between Bay Island and Lido Isle to the Marina Park area.

Staff explain in the report that Newport Beach has previously contributed funds to assist with the federal dredging effort because the dollar amounts historically allocated by the federal government are insufficient to properly maintain the channels to their necessary authorized depths.

Recent sediment studies determined that most of the material was suitable for disposal at either a federally managed open ocean disposal site (LA-3) or within the nearshore disposal zone along the city’s ocean beaches. 

However, some bottom material within the federal channels is unsuitable for open ocean disposal even though the material passed toxicity tests. After reviewing various disposal solutions, staff decided the most feasible and cost-effective option to dispose of this bottom sediment material is to construct a Confined Aquatic Disposal (CAD) site within the harbor.

A CAD is constructed underwater by digging a large hole and placing the non-open ocean quality sediment inside. A cap of suitable material is then placed on top, creating a physical barrier between any contaminants and the overlying water column and benthic organisms.

To fit 156,900 cubic yards – approximately 106,900 from the federal channel and an additional 50,000 to accommodate other material elsewhere in the harbor to assist waterfront residents and businesses – the hole would need to be dug about 47 feet below the existing harbor floor. The clean, final cap sediment layer will be about three feet thick. The final elevation of the CAD will be at or below the depths necessary for navigation within the harbor.

Council agenda includes sewer fee trash truck

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Stacia Stabler

Council will consider declaring an undeveloped portion of the city-owned Marina Park property as surplus land

Also on the consent calendar for tonight, council will consider declaring a portion of city-owned property at 1516 Balboa Boulevard West as “exempt surplus land.”

If approved, the action will also sell the property to the Orange County Sanitation District for a price of $467,629.56.

The City of Newport Beach owns the property currently developed as part of the Marina Park Community Center and operates as a parking lot. According to the staff report on the surplus land item, a small portion of the lot was left undeveloped in anticipation of selling it to the Orange County Sanitation District to use with its adjacent pump station property. 

After construction of Marina Park was completed in 2015, approximately 1,042 square feet along the eastern edge of the property was left vacant and undeveloped. City officials planned for the area to be sold to OC Sanitation, the adjacent property owner, to improve access and circulation around the existing pump station, which serves Newport Beach exclusively. 

“Since the property benefits OC San’s access and circulation, it has no significant value to anyone else,” the staff report explains. “Therefore, the value of the property was established based on a 2012 appraisal report adjusted for CPI.”

Later in the meeting during current business, council will consider amending the City Council policy related to the process for appointment to a board or commission. 

The resolution proposes to amend the policy to discourage the appointment of persons who, in their professional capacity, supervise or are supervised by another member of the same board or commission, or are a member of the same family as another member of the same board or commission.

On July 12, a majority of councilmembers asked staff to bring back a proposal designed to help ensure diversity of opinions and to avoid the appearance of a conflict.

The council agenda is available online here. The closed session starts at 4 p.m., followed by the study session. The regular meeting begins at 5:30 p.m. 

The meeting can be watched live on the local NBTV channel (Spectrum 3 or Cox 852) or on the city’s website here.

Members of the public may speak in person in council chambers (there is not a remote or online option to participate).

Questions and comments can be submitted in writing for City Council consideration by sending them to the city clerk at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To give the council adequate time to review comments, written comments needed to be submitted by 5 p.m. on July 25. The agenda packet can be viewed here

Material received after the deadline (July 25 by 5 p.m.) and prior to 2 p.m. today (the day of the meeting) will be provided to the council in hard copy and will be available to the public at tonight’s meeting.

~~~~~~~~

Sara Hall covers City Hall and is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Regattas and Races…

Regattas and Races 7.26

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

NHYC 

2022 Baxter Bowl

July 23-24

Finn (6 races, 1 discard)

1 Chris Raab, NHYC, Total 9, Net 6

2 Robert Kinney, NHYC, Total 22, Net 17

3 Lee Hope, SDYC, Total 23, Net 17

4 Paul Marshall, NNYC, Total 28, Net 21

5 Phil Ramming, NHYC, Total 33, Net 22

6 Brady Kennedy, NHYC, Total 33, Net 26

7 Robert Martin, MBYC, Total 40, Net 29

8 Mike Kennedy, BYC, Total 42, Net 34

9 Keith Yonkers, NHYC, Total 49, Net 40

10 Brad Dwan, NHYC, Total 66, Net 55

Finn (6 races, 1 discard)

1 Lidecis/Smith, BCYC, Total 15, Net 9

2 Madigan/Wood, NHYC, Total 22, Net 14

3 Dodson/Pritchard, ABYC/CYC, Total 24, Net 16

4 J. Buckingham/C. Buckingham, NHYC, Total 24, Net 19

5 Trotter/Rudderham, SWYC, Total 27, Net 20

6 Watt/Siemers, CYC Seattle, Total 40, Net 29

7 Chu. Beek/Israel, ISCYRA, Total 41, Net 30

8 Mason/Wright, NHYC, Total 46, Net 37

9 Chas. Beek/Bradley, NHYC, Total 50, Net 39

10 Richley/Brown, NHYC/BCYC, Total 53, Net 42

11 Gould/Sieck, St.FYC, Total 54, Net 43

12 Batchelor/Brown, NHYC, Total 72, Net 60

NHYC 

2022 Twilights – July Series

July 21

Finn (6 races, 1 discard)

1 Phil Ramming, NHYC, Total 11, Net 8

2 Robert Martin, MBYC, Total 17, Net 11

3 Robert Kinney, NHYC, Total 21, Net 14

4 Sail #21, NHYC, Total 21, Net 17

5 David Wood, NHYC, Total 26, Net 18

6 Keith Yonkers, NHYC, Total 28, Net 21

7 Brad Dwan, NHYC, Total 30, Net 22

8 Sail #147, NHYC, Total 32, Net 24

Harbor 20 A (8 races, 2 discards)

1 Bose/Elliot, BCYC, Total 31, Net 17

2 Menninger/Deermount, NHYC, Total 35, Net 19

3 K. Weiss/A. Weiss, NHYC, Total 44, Net 20

4 Thompson/Conzelman, NHYC/BCYC/LIYC, Total 42, Net 24

5 J. Buckingham/Aschieris, NHYC, Total 31, Net 22

6 Camerini/Detwiler, UCISA, Total 44, Net 27

7 Nick Madigan, NHYC, Total 50, Net 30

8 Cheadle/Schupak, BYC, Total 48, Net 30

9 Yates/Kincaid, NHYC, Total 62, Net 37

10 E. Kimball/A. Costello Kimball, ABYC, Total 64, Net 40

11 Thompson/Kraus, NHYC, Total 66, Net 44

12 Noring/Foy, SBYC, Total 75,  Net 52

13 Gary Thorne, BYC, Total 78, Net 54

Harbor 20 B (8 races, 2 discards)

1 P. Haynes/D. Haynes, BCYC, Total 19, Net 11

2 R. Rader/B. Rader, NHYC, Total 31, Net 16

3 Drayton/Benter, NHYC, Total 27, Net 17

4 Buddy Richley, NHYC, Total 41, Net 23

5 Chan/Logan, NHYC, Total 45, Net 28

6 Thomas Corkett, NHYC, Total 46, Net 31

7 Dick Somers, NHYC, Total 54, Net 36

8 Matt McKinlay, NHYC, Total 54, Net 36

9 Watanabe/Sutherland, UCISA, Total 52, Net 36

10 K. Whitney/J. Whitney, NHYC, Total 65, Net 45

Harbor 20 C (8 races, 2 discards)

1 Adam Bradley, NHYC, Total 17, Net 10

4 S. Sellinger/E. Sellinger, NHYC, Total 23, Net 13

2 Ric Magrath, Scuttlebutt SC, Total 27, Net 15

3 Prescott Cook, NHYC, Total 32, Net 21

5 Sail #37, n/a, Total 32, Net 22

5 John Horton, NHYC, Total 37, Net 25

7 Sail #389, n/a, Total 37, Net 27

6 Bill Brooks, n/a, Total 40, Net 28

7 Sc. Ketchum/Sa. Ketchum, NHYC, Total 42, Net 30

Lehman 12 (6 races, 1 discard)

1 Campbell/D’Eliscu, NHYC, Total 20, Net 14

2 J. LaDow/Dahl, NHYC, Total 24, Net 16

3 Sail #353, NHYC, Total 32, Net 18

4 Killian/Newman, NHYC, Total 34, Net 22

5 Michael Ramming, NHYC, Total 39, Net 28

6 Sail #47, n/a, Total 46, Net 33

7 Scott Mais, NHYC, Total 48, Net 36

8 Smith/H. Beek, NHYC, Total 52, Net 39

9 Alex Curtiss, NHYC, Total 58, Net 42

10 Tyler MacDonald, NHYC, Total 55, Net 42

11 Ayres 3/DeYoung, NHYC, Total 58, Net 43

12 Michael Dahl, NHYC, Total 60, Net 46

13 Brooks Clark, NHYC, Total 60, Net 47

14 Reid Wiley, NHYC, Total 68, Net 54

15 Jeff Aschieris, NHYC, Total 75, Net 59

16 Chuck Beek, NHYC, Total 73, Net 59

17 Pete Stemler, NHYC, Total 75, Net 62

12 Mik. Sentovich/Nik. Sentovich/ NHYC, Total 82, Net 66

BYC 

2022 Beercans – Pilsner (July) Series

July 21

PHRF 1 – Race #3 (4.5)

1 It’s Ok, Andrews 49.9, Purcell/Rose, BYC

   Elapsed 0:39:17, Corrected 0:42:53

2 Coquille, Farr 40, Wes Selby, BYC

   Elapsed 0:46:12, Corrected 0:45:45

PHRF 2 – Race #3 (4.5)

1 Amante, Choate 48, Richley Family, LIYC/NHYC

   Elapsed 0:50:47, Corrected 0:47:25

2 Dani Girl, J120, Campbell/Martin, BYC/CRA

   Elapsed 1:00:40, Corrected 0:57:45

3 Baraka, J120, Janet Mostafa, BYC

   Elapsed 1:02:26, Corrected 0:59:31 

4 L30 #29, L30, Charles Ullman, BYC

   Elapsed 1:07:15, Corrected 1:04:20 

PHRF 3 – Race #3 (4.5)

1 Man O War, J29, James Malm, NHYC

   Elapsed 1:02:52, Corrected 0:54:33

2 ChaChaCha, C&C40, Larry Walker, LIYC/CYCA

   Elapsed 1:03:36, Corrected 0:56:24

3 Radical Departure, Bene25, Rosene Family, BYC

   Elapsed 1:07:02, Corrected 0:58:29

4 XLR8, Bene36.7, Gabriel Nistor, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:05:26, Corrected 0:59:22

5 Violetta, Davidson, Jane Hartley, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:08:39, Corrected 1:01:27

6 Cal 40, Cal 40, Vince Valdes, NHYC

   Elapsed 1:11:31, Corrected 1:02:58

7 Gator, Frers38, Daniel Moore, SSC

   Elapsed 1:09:12, Corrected 1:03:21

PHRF 4 – Race #3 (3.8)

1 Horsefeathers, Ericson35, John Fuller, NHYC

   Elapsed 0:59:29, Corrected 0:49:59

2 Tui, Ericson32, Brian Boyle, SSYC

   Elapsed 1:06:17, Corrected 0:56:47

3 Silk, Harbor 25, John Hanscom, SSYC

   Elapsed 1:10:15, Corrected 0:59:25

4 Delightful, Hunter33, Alan Schneider, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:26:43, Corrected 1:16:27

News relating to racing in or around Newport Harbor should be forwarded to Tom Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach

Newport Beach A Look Back two men, one boy, a woman 7.26.2022

Click on photo for a larger image

A photo of what appears to be two men, one boy and a woman lying on blankets on Balboa Island enjoying the sun in 1911. The woman is holding an umbrella to shield herself from the sun. In the background is the Balboa Pavilion, a couple of houses and a house on the Balboa Peninsula.

Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free general admission on all days. Two-hour parking is available on Marine Avenue. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Lido House hotel expansion plans approved by city commission

By SARA HALL

Plans for a 15,103-square-foot expansion for Lido House hotel on the Balboa Peninsula were unanimously approved last week.

The Planning Commission voted 7-0 on Thursday (July 21) in favor of the permits, amendments, reviews and reports required for the project located at 3300 Newport Blvd. and 475 32nd Street. A coastal development permit amendment is also required from the California Coastal Commission since it was the original review authority for the hotel.

The applicant believes the added area and additional cottages will enhance the experience and are anticipated to make the hotel more successful. 

It’s been four years since Lido House hotel opened its doors, things are going well and there are just a few changes they’d like to make, said R.D. Olson Development President and CEO Bob Olson. 

“We’ve been through quite a journey here,” he said. “Lot of things we’ve learned over the years.”

The additional floor area at the 130-room Lido House hotel would allow the construction of five new cottages, increased storage space, enlarged pre-function/breakout meeting rooms, a new greenhouse seating room, expansion of three existing hotel rooms, and an enclosed area on the rooftop terrace. Also included is demolition of the former fire station no. 2 building (relocated to 2807 Newport Blvd.) to create additional public and private parking spaces.

Plans also include demolishing the former fire station and replacing it with 28 private valet parking spaces and 14 public parking spaces. The project also proposes to realign the 32nd Street driveway and reconfigue onsite parking, as well as install a new barrier fence and gates along 32nd Street and Newport Boulevard frontages.

Lido House Hotel rendering highlights

Click on photo for a larger image

Rendering by WATG/Courtesy R.D. Olson Development

A birds-eye view of the proposed project looking northwest at the southeastern elevation

“Most of the additions are occurring on the ground level, limiting the amount of bulk that you’ll see from the street,” said Principal Planner Ben Zdeba. 

The expansion includes a ground-level request for adding 8,351 square feet for five cottages (three-story structures), 1,466 square feet of storage space, 3,481 square feet of walkway/breakout rooms and 600 square feet for a greenhouse room. 

On the other three levels, the application includes a 273-square-foot suite conversion on each level. The fourth level also includes a 386-square-foot rooftop enclosure.

The five new cottages will mirror the existing cottages, Zdeba noted. 

The idea for the additional cottages has been two years in the planning, Olson noted, and they’ve been looking at where the rooms should be located. 

“The demand for the cottages has been very positive,” he said. 

A lot of families stay at the cottages and the fence is for a sense of security, particularly for small children, he explained. The gates would be locked to the general public but opened by key card access.

Commissioner Mark Rosene clarified that the gates along Newport Boulevard will be open, so people will be able to grab a coffee and sit at the tables outside. He recently visited during the middle of the week and they were full, he noted. 

“People obviously use it,” Rosene said. 

Olson emphasized that it’s a public area. People often come with their dogs, neighbors, and visiting friends and family to sit and enjoy the space, he said.

“We welcome everyone, but we do want to be able to have an event,” he said, explaining the reason behind the need for the movable gates.

Lido House Hotel current hotel

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy R.D. Olson Development

Lido House hotel 

Overall, the project maintains the Lido House hotel architectural style, the parking layout was reviewed by the city traffic engineer, it retains the two landmark Ficus trees, and the large setback area remains and is enhanced, Zdeba explained.

To accommodate the project, the Land Use Element of the General Plan, Local Coastal Program (including both the Coastal Land Use Plan and Implementation Plan), and zoning code would all be amended to increase the maximum gross floor area allowed on the site from 103,470 square feet to 118,573 square feet.

City Council executed a long-term ground lease and approved the hotel project in 2014. About a year later, the CCC approved the project. 

In 2016, hotel officials received approval for an expansion of the development limit to 103,470 square feet. It was an increase of 4,745 square feet from the previous limit. The additional floor area was for enlarging the lobby, spa, a few guest rooms, hotel management offices, retail space, restaurant space and back of house areas.

Lido House hotel opened in April 2018.

Lido House Hotel character imagery

Click on photo for a larger image

Renderings by WATG/Courtesy R.D. Olson Development

Renderings and character imagery of the new greenhouse proposed as part of the Lido House hotel expansion project

During last week’s discussion, some commissioners questioned the location (in relation to the setback), access and usage of the greenhouse. 

“My first impression of the outdoor greenhouse, it just felt a little bit odd to me,” Rosene said.

The greenhouse idea comes from Tavern on the Green in New York, Olson explained. 

They built a similar structure, although “not as beautiful as this,” Olson said, just outside of Mayor’s Table, the on-site restaurant at Lido House hotel. The awning structure has retractable walls and roof and has been received really well, Olson noted. 

The greenhouse would be open to the public for use with the hotel, Olson said. The idea is that it would be used for small groups, like wedding or baby showers, he explained. It would be serviced from Mayor’s Table.

The images provided in the presentation have a “very strong feel” to them, Rosene noted, but the images of the exterior felt “temporary.” It could be the color or the way the images were set up, he noted, but the style didn’t match the interior character imagery.

They selected a warm white, but there are various shades they could use to tone it down, said project architect Greg Villegas of WATG. 

The hotel is modeled after Olson’s Balboa Island home and he has a similar greenhouse structure (but smaller) in his own yard. The imagery included in the staff report isn’t perfect, but the structure at his home better conveys the design the team is aiming for, Olson noted.

“I just needed some help understanding how it was going to feel because it felt alone in that space,” Rosene said. 

That’s also why they added the stone fireplace, Villegas said. The idea is to naturally fit in between the two trees, he added. They didn’t want to create a solid structure, which will look more like a tool shed, he noted. 

“Essentially what you have is a little jewel box, it’s a unique condition on the site, it literally sits on the existing deck,” Villegas said. “I think this was the best approach to create that flavor for the hotel.”

Villegas confirmed that the greenhouse will not reduce the open space. It’s essentially sitting on the existing wood deck, he noted. 

The greenhouse will be maintained and regularly cleaned, Olson confirmed, answering a commissioner question. 

“It just takes one bird to ruin a really good day,” he joked. 

Some of the commissioners also asked about the location and coverings for the trash enclosures. 

The original trellis is considered a roof, Villegas said, and it will simply be rotated to sit up against the building. It’s essentially the same enclosure, he noted. 

The existing trash enclosure on the northeastern side will remain, Zdeba noted. The trash enclosure currently on the western side of the property will be relocated to be integrated into the break room component. There is no trash enclosure proposed on the eastern side by the parking.

Lido House Hotel expansion plans parking and cottages

Click on photo for a larger image

Rendering by WATG/Courtesy R.D. Olson Development

Rendering of the parking expansion and cottages

Commissioner Tristan Harris noted that the project results in the loss of a few parking spaces and questioned if it’s been an issue in the summer or during a big event.

The valet team is pretty creative, Olson said.

“They’re putting cars everywhere, (but) we’re not parking on the street,” he confirmed. 

There was an initial concern about street parking conflicts from the neighboring Finley tract when the hotel was first approved, Olson recalled, but they’ve had “zero complaints.”

“They’re our best customers in the lounge and at Mayor’s Table,” he joked. 

They would hear if there was a parking issue, he added. 

City council is expected to hear the item on September 13. Later this year the relevant LCP amendments will head to the Coastal Commission. 

~~~~~~~~

Sara Hall covers City Hall and is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Fun is seeing who, or what, comes to visit off our coast

TOM MARCHJessica Roame is the Education Manager for Davey’s Locker & Newport Landing Whale Watching out of Newport Beach. We hear from Jessica when something unique happens out on one of the whale watching tour vessels.

She’s shared rare whale sightings, dolphin stampedes, a recent close-up of a giant Blue Whale and her calf mugging for the whale watching passengers and offered an occasional Orca sighting.

So, I always get excited when one of Jessica’s emails finds my inbox as it did the other day. What did she have this time? Well, she shared several local sightings of “boobies.”

It’s not what you think and might be a good time to get your head out of the gutter. We’re talking birds here, as in a Nazca booby, a masked booby and a red-footed booby. But even more importantly, Jessica told us was a RARE sighting of a Laysan albatross.

First let’s discuss the Laysan albatross. She informed me that this sea bird has one of the largest wings spans of any living bird, stretching up to 3.5 meters, or 11 1/2 ft. This incredible length allows the Laysan to “ride the ocean winds, traveling great distances without so much as a flap,” according to Roame.

The Laysan albatross usually “forages for food across the northern Pacific Ocean, but tends to go northwest to Japan and Alaska,” she added. That’s what makes this sighting in the OC so special.

Fair Game Layson Albatross

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Kayla Smith

Courtesy of Davey’s Locker Whale Watching

The Laysan albatross can be seen cruising on its massive wingspan

Back to the boobies…on the same trip the Laysan was seen, they also saw a masked booby, which usually is seen somewhere down around Mexico. The Nazca and red-footed were also seen on recent outings. Red-footeds are usually also seen down in Mexico and in the Southern Hemisphere, while the Nazca is usually seen off Mexico and the northern parts of South America.

Thanks again to Jessica and Davey’s Locker Whale Watching for letting us know what’s interesting in the waters just off our coast. 

If you haven’t ventured out, you should.

Fair Game masked booby

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Angela Syswerda

Courtesy of Davey’s Locker Whale Watching

Denoted by the black facial covering is the masked booby

• • •

I’m excited. This Thursday, our Stu News operation will “work” out at the Sawdust Festival in Laguna Beach. I say work in quotes because, although we want to get some work done, it also gives us the opportunity to connect out and about in the community.

We want to do the same thing here in Newport Beach. It could be a corner booth in a restaurant, the library, OASIS, any place that has people that we can potentially interact with.

What the plan would be is to announce the planned location in the preceding Stu News Newport issue as to where and when we plan to be somewhere. Heck, we could be at the Fun Zone or watching pickleball. There aren’t any places we won’t consider unless it’s the jail in the basement at the Newport Beach Police station.

In fact, I would add that a little creativity to some local cool spots might also bring some ink leading up to the event and definitely afterwards.

So, put your thinking caps on. We’ll invite our staff and readers to join us in these ventures out.

I’m looking forward to hearing some ideas. And if Don Bren wants us to work out of his penthouse office in Newport Center, the answer is, “we’d love to.”

• • •

The Friends of the Newport Beach Library have another Super Book Sale, benefiting the Library, scheduled for Friday and Saturday, Aug. 5 & 6.

Members will get the first peek at the books on Friday, Aug. 5, from 1-4 p.m. and can purchase them 3 for $1. Then Saturday, Aug. 6, everyone is welcome! From 9 a.m.-2 p.m., books will go for $3 a bag.

I know what you’re thinking but, no, they supply the bags. The bookstore is located at Central Library, 1000 Avocado Ave.

• • •

Have you been following the progress at the Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA), as construction continues to progress at Segerstrom Center for the Arts? It will truly be a community and regional jewel and definitely worth the wait. 

Fair Game OCMA

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Morphosis

Rendering of OCMA’s Terrace

Construction began in September 2019, when OCMA broke ground. Since then, a lot has happened. The finished building will be 53,000 sq. ft., with 25,000 sq. ft. of dedicated exhibition space. And, there is just so much more built into the overall design by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne.

The countdown is on and the excitement builds…11 weeks to go until the grand opening planned for October 8!

• • •

A second candidate has announced her intentions to run for the Newport-Mesa Unified School District Trustee Area 4 (Corona del Mar High School area) seat. Barbie George, a wife and mother of five, a Newport Beach Arts Commissioner, has announced via social media sites her intentions to run against the previously announced Lisa Pearson.


Summer swell

Summer swell wave.jpg SNN 7.26

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Photo by Jason Berry (Instagram @its_jason_berry)

Huge surf was a sight to see in Newport Beach


Watching at the Wedge

Watching at the Wedge

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

Big surf brought out lots of spectators


Council agenda includes sewer fee collection, dredging project details, sale of surplus property

By SARA HALL

City Council has a variety of interesting items on the agenda next week. 

At the Tuesday (July 26) meeting, council will consider: A resolution collection of certain sewer and recycling fees and charges through the property tax roll; an agreement with the federal government for city contributed funds for the Lower Bay Dredging project; declaring a portion of city-owned Balboa Peninsula property as exempt surplus land and selling it to the county for $467,629.56; and a policy change meant to discourage the appointment of persons to boards and commissions who work or are related to other members of the same board or commission. 

During the evening’s public hearing, council will consider a resolution collection of certain sewer and recycling fees and charges through the property tax roll.

The city provides services including water, sewer and recycling to residents and businesses that are billed via the city’s utility billing process. There are certain areas in Newport Beach where one or more of these services are provided by other surrounding cities or special districts. 

The city also provides services to a limited number of customers that are located outside of, but immediately adjacent to, the city boundary. 

According to the staff report, there are approximately 5,300 accounts that are sewer and/or recycling only customers that do not receive a City of Newport Beach utility bill. State code allows local agencies to collect certain annual fees and charges, including for sewer and recycling services, through the property tax roll. 

“Enrolling these types of charges on the property tax roll is a common practice in California local agencies, particularly in instances where a customer is not receiving electric and/or water service from the billing agency,” the report reads. 

Because these customers do not receive a utility service from the city that can be disconnected for nonpayment, the delinquency rate can be significantly decreased through utilizing the property tax billing process. Such charges are billed as part of the normal property tax billing process as an add-on charge similar to a school bond debt service charge or an annual assessment district levy.

“While it is difficult to quantify the savings that will result from this effort, considerable staff time is expended on collection efforts related to these bills,” the staff report explains. 

Council agenda includes sewer fee trash truck

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Sara Hall

A CR&R truck picks up trash bins in a Newport Beach neighborhood in early 2021

The frequency of issues has increased significantly since Newport Coast property owners began to be assessed the recycling fee last year.

“Because the bills are small and infrequent, and because the bills are sent to the property address when the property owner(s) may reside elsewhere as their primary residence, collection rates have been significantly lower than for customers who are also billed for other city services. Transitioning these fees and charges to the property tax bill will also reduce the burden on these customers by eliminating an additional bill that must be paid on a semi-annual or bi-monthly basis,” the report reads. 

On Tuesday, council will hear and consider all objections and protests. If they don’t hear from a majority of the separate parcels, council may adopt the report based upon a supermajority vote. 

If adopted, the report must be submitted to the Orange County assessor’s office no later than August 10 in order for the sewer and recycling fees for Fiscal Year 2022-23 to be placed on the tax rolls.

Council agenda includes sewer fee harbor CAD rendering

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Rendering courtesy of the City of Newport Beach

View simulation of the CAD construction from the public beach at 10th Street, looking northeast

Earlier in the meeting, on the consent calendar, council will consider a memorandum of agreement with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for city contributed funds for the Lower Bay Dredging project

According to the staff report, USACE is planning to dredge the federal navigation channels in Newport Harbor this fall and has secured the necessary funding to complete the dredging project, assuming the City of Newport Beach also funds 50% (up to $10 million, already included in the city’s adopted Capital Improvement Program budget) of the anticipated costs as it has committed. The MOA is to memorialize the city’s contribution.

Also, because a portion of the dredging is over Orange County tidelands, the county will contribute funds to the city, which will pass those funds on to USACE. In the near future and likely after bids are received, a county/city MOA will be presented to the council for consideration.

The city has been working aggressively with the federal government for several years to undertake a much-needed channel dredging project within the Lower Harbor to reestablish navigation depths as well as to improve overall tidal flushing and water quality.

The federal channels extend from the entrance channel to the turning basin (adjacent to the Newport Boulevard Bridge), and from the east anchorage between Bay Island and Lido Isle to the Marina Park area.

Staff explain in the report that Newport Beach has previously contributed funds to assist with the federal dredging effort because the dollar amounts historically allocated by the federal government are insufficient to properly maintain the channels to their necessary authorized depths.

Recent sediment studies determined that most of the material was suitable for disposal at either a federally managed open ocean disposal site (LA-3) or within the nearshore disposal zone along the city’s ocean beaches.

However, some bottom material within the federal channels is unsuitable for open ocean disposal even though the material passed toxicity tests. After reviewing various disposal solutions, staff decided the most feasible and cost-effective option to dispose of this bottom sediment material is to construct a Confined Aquatic Disposal (CAD) site within the harbor.

A CAD is constructed underwater by digging a large hole and placing the non-open ocean quality sediment inside. A cap of suitable material is then placed on top, creating a physical barrier between any contaminants and the overlying water column and benthic organisms.

To fit 156,900 cubic yards – approximately 106,900 from the federal channel and an additional 50,000 to accommodate other material elsewhere in the harbor to assist waterfront residents and businesses – the hole would need to be dug about 47 feet below the existing harbor floor. The clean, final cap sediment layer will be about three feet thick. The final elevation of the CAD will be at or below the depths necessary for navigation within the harbor.

Council agenda includes sewer fee Marina Park

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Stacia Stabler

Council will consider declaring an undeveloped portion of the city-owned Marina Park property as surplus land

Also on the consent calendar for Tuesday, council will consider declaring a portion of city-owned property at 1516 Balboa Boulevard West as “exempt surplus land.”

If approved, the action will also sell the property to the Orange County Sanitation District for a price of $467,629.56.

The City of Newport Beach owns the property currently developed as part of the Marina Park Community Center and operates as a parking lot. According to the staff report on the surplus land item, a small portion of the lot was left undeveloped in anticipation of selling it to the Orange County Sanitation District to use with its adjacent pump station property. 

After construction of Marina Park was completed in 2015, approximately 1,042 square feet along the eastern edge of the property was left vacant and undeveloped. City officials planned for the area to be sold to OC Sanitation, the adjacent property owner, to improve access and circulation around the existing pump station, which serves Newport Beach exclusively. 

“Since the property benefits OC San’s access and circulation, it has no significant value to anyone else,” the staff report explains. “Therefore, the value of the property was established based on a 2012 appraisal report adjusted for CPI.”

Later in the meeting during current business, council will consider amending the City Council policy related to the process for appointment to a board or commission. 

The resolution proposes to amend the policy to discourage the appointment of persons who, in their professional capacity, supervise or are supervised by another member of the same board or commission, or are a member of the same family as another member of the same board or commission.

On July 12, a majority of councilmembers asked staff to bring back a proposal designed to help ensure diversity of opinions and to avoid the appearance of a conflict.

The council agenda is available online here. The closed session starts at 4 p.m., followed by the study session. The regular meeting begins at 5:30 p.m. 

The meeting can be watched live on the local NBTV channel (Spectrum 3 or Cox 852) or on the city’s website here.

Members of the public may speak in person in council chambers (there is not a remote or online option to participate).

Questions and comments can be submitted in writing for City Council consideration by sending them to the city clerk at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. To give the council adequate time to review comments, submit any written comments by 5 p.m. on July 25 (the day before the City Council meeting). Correspondence received by this deadline will be uploaded to the agenda packet by July 25 at 5:30 p.m. and can be viewed here

Material received after the deadline and prior to 2 p.m. on July 26 (the day of the meeting) will be provided to the council in hard copy and will be available to the public at the meeting.

~~~~~~~~

Sara Hall covers City Hall and is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Sandcastle treasures

Sandcastle treasures castle.jpg SNN 7.22

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Photo by Chris Crosson (Instagram @sandcastlekit)

Sandcastle master Chris Crosson shares another treasure


Hoag Digestive Health Institute welcomes Dr. Elizabeth Raskin

Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian has recruited innovative colorectal surgeon Elizabeth R. Raskin, M.D., as surgical director for the Margolis Family Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Program within Hoag’s Digestive Health Institute. Dr. Raskin comes to Hoag from University of California, Davis Medical Center, where she served as Chief of the Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery and Director of Robotic Surgical Education.

With nearly 20 years of experience in state-of-the-art technologies and surgical techniques, Dr. Raskin’s patient-centric approach provides cutting-edge, comprehensive, compassionate care to improve surgical outcomes and speed recovery. Her expertise includes laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgical techniques to treat complex colon, rectal and anal conditions, and she is often asked to lecture, teach and train surgeons of all levels on robotics.

“Dr. Raskin is a perfect fit for Hoag in that, in her own words, she challenges doctors to ‘use their experience, instinct and imagination to reach beyond traditional boundaries to pave the way for better healthcare today and tomorrow,’” said Robert T. Braithwaite, president and CEO of Hoag. “She embodies Hoag’s ethos of innovation, and we are proud to welcome her to our growing Digestive Health Institute.”

Hoag Digestive Health Raskin

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Hoag Hospital

Elizabeth R. Raskin, M.D.

Skilled in minimally invasive surgery, Dr. Raskin views robotic surgery and developing technologies as means to improve patient treatment options and outcomes. She is impressed by Hoag’s commitment to robotic surgery: Hoag has been designated as a Center of Excellence in Robotic Surgery (COERS) from the Surgical Review Corporation.

“Hoag is known for putting patients first and for supporting technologies and treatments that advance the standard of care,” she said. “I’m excited to be joining Hoag’s Digestive Health Institute and collaborating with Dr. Caroline Hwang, among other distinguished colleagues, to bring world-class IBD care to Orange County and our region.”

Though a sought-after expert, Dr. Raskin considers herself a “perpetual student.” Her intellectual curiosity extends beyond surgery to include energy medicine and functional healing as an adjunct to surgical care. Her publications include research about IBD, complex diverticular disease and ostomy creation and care. She has written and contributed to many peer-reviewed publications and textbooks and has presented multiple national and international lectures on a wide array of colorectal topics.

“Dr. Raskin shares our belief that moving the needle in leading-edge, evidenced-based techniques and innovations can improve lives,” said IBD Program Director Caroline Hwang, M.D. “We are excited to work with her to further advance our digestive health treatments and services for the communities we serve.

Additional information about Hoag’s Margolis Family IBD Program can be found at www.hoag.org/IBD.


Crystal Cove victim identified

Last issue a victim was reported deceased on the sand of Crystal Cove on Sunday, July 17, after being removed from the surf.

 Numerous attempts by lifeguards and, subsequently, Newport Beach Fire Paramedics were implemented to save the victim’s life to no avail.

The victim has been identified as Charles Maldonado, 45, of Upland. Sheriff’s authorities say the cause of death has yet to be determined and released.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Two new faces join the dance party for November

TOM MARCHTwo new candidates jumped into the mix this week for local elected offices that I’m excited to tell you about. The first, as I reported earlier this week, was Lauren Kleiman who’s making it official by running against incumbent Joy Brenner for the City Council District 6 race. Kleiman, if the name sounds familiar, is the Chair of Newport Beach’s Planning Commission

We met yesterday at the Wild Strawberry Café to catch up.

She’s an experienced land use attorney, who has additionally led the Newport Beach Foundation to new levels. Her biggest issues/concerns center around public safety, homelessness and housing impacts/issues facing the community that are unfortunately being dictated out of Sacramento.

The other newly announced candidate is Lisa Pearson. Lisa was introduced to me through Newport-Mesa Unified School District Area 4 Trustee Karen Yelsey, as her potential hand-selected replacement.

Yelsey has served our District with class and distinction over the years, so if she says, “Pearson,” she must be good.

I’m looking forward to meeting Lisa next week.

For any candidate in any office, it’s not always easy to throw one’s hat into the ring, especially when doing so leads to public debate and potentially to judgement and/or ridicule. So, I commend both candidates for doing so.

Speaking of candidates, here are some of our other previously announced in action:

Fair Game Robyn Grant

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Robyn Grant

Robyn Grant working the campaign trail and knocking on doors seeking the District 4 position

Fair Game Tom Miller

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Tom Miller

Tom Miller, running for District 1, points to what he hopes is his new home come November

Fair Game Erik Weigand

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Erik Weigand

Erik Weigand, seeking the District 3 seat, gathers the necessary signatures to enter the race with the help of neighbors and friends

Fair Game Joe Stapleton

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Joe Stapleton

District 1 candidate Joe Stapleton signs off on documents to officially launch his campaign during a visit to the City Clerk’s office

• • •

The Summer Garden Party is coming to Sherman Library & Gardens on August 27, from 4-7 p.m. Oh, and you’re invited. It’ll be quite an evening with live music, food from 608 Dahlia and a special summer art exhibit Inspired by Nature by mosaicist Irina Charny. There will also be other artists in the Gardens who will be painting and selling their original artwork.

Here’s the plan, wear your favorite garden party (think Ricky Nelson) hat ensemble and enter the garden party hat contest upon arrival.

There will also be a Bouquet Bar, silent auction and raffle.

Tickets are $60 for members and $80 for non-members, which also includes access to this year’s spectacular Newport Beach Virtual Garden Tour. For more info and to purchase your tickets, go to www.thesherman.org/.

Most importantly, remember Sherman Library & Gardens is a non-profit cultural center and proceeds from this event go to support their children’s education programs.

• • •

Recently CR&R announced that “some Newport Beach residents will receive a bill from CR&R, the City’s waste contractor, for additional trash and recycling carts above those allocated under the expanded recycling program.” 

That’s all well and good, but here’s my question and concern. I’m still hearing from numerous residents, particularly those in and around Corona del Mar, complaining that their carts are not being picked up as scheduled. And despite too many complaint calls to remember CR&R still doesn’t complete what they’re paid to do. 

So, here’s my question, will CR&R eventually charge more when they finally begin completing the job they’re currently being paid for?

Asking for a friend.

B-t-w, if you would like to return any of those extra carts, or even request more carts, please contact CR&R Customer Service at 949.667.4158 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

• • •

How ‘bout some boot scootin’ line dancing? Segerstrom Center for the Arts has announced the return of Tuesday Night Dance on the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza. That’s right, outside, on the Plaza! 

This year, it’s line dancing August 2, 9, 16, 23 & 30 from 6:30-7:30 p.m. with guest teacher Dev Edwards.

The program is designed for all ages and abilities, with no dance experience needed.

Dev will teach a new series of line dances from her extensive repertoire as a performer, choreographer, and teacher of line dance. She’s performed alongside many country music legends.

For reservations and tickets, visit www.SCFTA.org, or the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa by calling 714.556.2787.

• • •

Get out those buckets and shovels…call your friends and begin planning a team for the 60th Annual Newport Beach Sandcastle Contest planned for Sunday, Oct. 2 at Big Corona State Beach.

This year’s theme will be California Dreamin’. And you have time!

This annual contest is hosted by the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce and their Commodores Club. As it’s done for 60 years, it’s one of those annual events that makes our city the special place it is. 

If you’re never done it…think about giving it a try. To find out more, go to www.newportbeach.com/events/60th-annual-sandcastle-contest.

• • •

Orange County Environmental Justice will hold their summer fundraiser at the Peter and Mary Muth Interpretive Center on Friday, July 29, from 6-9 p.m.

The fundraiser will include music, food and an art auction sourced from local artists. Proceeds will benefit grassroots environmental and educational programs.

Formed in 2016, OCEJ is a 501(c)4 multi-cultural, multi-ethnic environmental justice organization. Their mission is to fight for environmental justice by mobilizing and empowering marginalized community members. ​

For more information, go to www.ocej.org.


You Must Remember This: thank you Dr. Spock (the pediatrician, not the Vulcan)

By NANCY GARDNER

Like most of us, to get my first driver’s license, I had to take a several week driving course, in my case through Harbor High, taught by a seemingly unflappable man. Although I have forgotten his name, I still remember his calming voice as the tires swerved while I was scaling what at the time seemed a very steep and perilous dirt road, actually a minor incline, but that’s why we take driver training – to handle such moments. Having completed that first challenge, I got my learner’s permit and spent several months in the car with my not-so-unflappable father (“Brake! Brake!”), then took and passed the written test and driving test, my observer beyond unflappable and was at last presented with my license and the authority to drive on my own. Independence! I crowed in triumph.  Independence, my folks sighed in relief at no longer having to ferry me everywhere. Now all we had to do was fight over who got the car, a fight which I invariably lost, but still, a decent portion of the time I had wheels and the license to prove my expertise – in striking contrast to another life experience.

Having a child is a step most people would say is at least as serious as driving a car, and what preparation did I have when this particular event occurred for me? Absolutely none. Unlike most of my friends, I had never baby sat which would have been some preparation, but it went beyond that. I had never even held a baby, and yet there I was in the hospital having delivered this child for which I was now responsible. I comforted myself with the thought that if dealing with a child was any sort of a challenge, society would have instituted requirements as it did with driver’s licenses. Since it didn’t – well, being a mother was undoubtedly all about instincts which would automatically kick in. Comes the first feeding, the nurse brings in the baby and the bottle and departs. I prop said  baby against my knees and offer the bottle. The nurse comes back in, takes one horrified look at my method and quickly has the baby snugged in the crook of my arm. So much for instinct. Throughout my three-day stay, I gave so many other indications of lack of expertise that I’m surprised they let me take the baby home.  Fortunately, once I got there I had a helper. No, not someone who came to the house for a couple of weeks to get me settled in. I had Dr. Spock.

For the younger crowd, the name Spock evokes Leonard Nimoy and subsequent interpreters of the character in the Star Trek anthology. For an older group, Spock is the man who helped us raise our children. I received his book Baby and Childcare at a baby shower and it was a lifesaver. Health, behavior – whatever the issue, there was Dr. Spock with both advice and diagnoses. it was probably why my daughter survived. Without my Spock Bible, how else was I to know that this rash of my daughter’s was not a life-threatening syndrome but rosacea and not just the diagnosis but what to do about it?

Fast forward some decades, and we’re in Inglewood, visiting an old friend who had lost her husband a few years before. She has a gentleman friend and who is he? Dr. Spock’s son. Was Dr. Spock the coolest dad ever, or was he Daddy Dearest? It was such a tempting question, but I figured the fellow had been dealing with that inquiry most of his adult life, so I let it be, and even if Dr. Spock didn’t always live up to his own advice I would give him a break for all the help he gave me and so many others.

Dr. Spock says…was a ubiquitous phrase among young mothers of that period, and yet today if you say the name Spock, most of the world will not picture a benevolent, advice-dispensing doctor, but a part-Vulcan with pointy ears. Sic transit and all that. 

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, long-time resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Regattas and Races…

Regattas and Races

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

BYC 

2022 Twilight Series - July

July 20

Harbor 20A Fleet (10 races, 3 discards)

1 G. Thorne/K. Thorne, BYC, Total 13, Net 7

2 Ed Kimball, ALYC, Total 29, Net 17

3 Kincaid/Devlin, BCYC, Total 31, Net 18

4 Sears/Linden, BYC, Total 39, Net 24

5 Newman/Wolk, BYC, Total, 46, Net 25

Harbor 20C Fleet (10 races, 3 discards)

1 Kimme/Carlson, BYC, Total 13, Net 9

2 Allen/Brooks, BYC, Total 16, Net 13

3 Grable/Verona, BYC, Total 22, Net 18

4 B. Whitton/S. Whitton, BYC, Total 19, Net 15

5 Duncan/Hunger/Bloomberg, BYC, Total 56, Net 38

Thistle Fleet (6 races)

1 Chuck Simmons, BYC, Total 9

2 Larzelere/McDaniel, BYC, Total 14

3 R. Maxwell/M. Maxwell, BYC, Total 17

ILCA Fleet (6 races)

1 Alan Andrews, BYC, Total 12

2 Rob Vandervort, BYC, Total 22

3 Martin Bonsager, BYC, Total 25

4 Gator Cook, BYC, Total 32

5 Rich Luttrell, BYC, Total 32

6 Brett Hemphill, BYC, Total 40

7 Michael Arrigo, NHYC, Total, 45

8 Chris Daher, BYC, Total 46

9 Isa Amigo, BYC/NHYC, Total 57

Lido 14 A Fleet (2 races)

1 Papadopouos/Ogier, WSA, Total 2

Lido 14 B Fleet (6 races)

1 Long/Swan, BYC, Total 8

2 Boudreaux/Aldaco, BYC, Total 14

Adult Sabot A Fleet (6 races)

1 Larry Coon, MBYC, Total 23

2 Susan Jennings, BYC/NHYC, Total 26

3 Dennis Allison, BYC, Total 27

4 Linda Ungerland, BYC, Total 31

5 Dana Fischbeck, NHYC, Total 34

6 Erika Foy, SSC, Total 35

7 Mike Bartell, BYC, Total 52

8 Molly Lynch, BYC, Total 52

9 Bob Reilly BYC, Total 54

10 Karen Stockman, BYC, Total 56

11 Susan D. Jennings, BYC, Total 61

Adult Sabot B Fleet (6 races)

1 Stacy Ware, SSC, Total 8

2 Teresa Power, BYC, Total 26

Junior Sabot Fleet (6 races)

1 Victoria Swan, BYC, Total 12

2 Jack Swartzbaugh, BYC, Total 27

3 Isabella Swan, BYC, Total 31

4 Heidi Swartzbaugh, BYC, Total 31

5 Kai Woods, BYC, Total 41

6 Lin Zhou, BYC, Total 45

7 Austin Lee, BYC, Total 47

BCYC 

2022 Taco Tuesday Series

July 19

PHRF A (4.3 miles)

1 Destroyer, Jim Baily Family, NHYC 

   Elapsed 1:05:57, Corrected 1:01:56

2 Table 9, Tyler Wolk, BYC 

   Elapsed 1:16:08, Corrected 1:11:20

3 Legacy, Bruce Cooper, BCYC 

   Elapsed 1:18:09, Corrected 1:11:21

4 Heartbeat, Charles Brewer, NHYC 

   Elapsed 1:16:21, Corrected 1:12:33

5 Amante, Richley Family, LIYC 

   Elapsed 1:16:52, Corrected 1:13:08

6 XLR8, Gabriel Nistor, BCYC 

   Elapsed 1:22:34, Corrected 1:15:45

PHRF B (3 miles)

1 Violetta, Jane Hartley, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:02:14, Corrected 0:56:44

2 Sea Scout, Derek Taylor, Sea Base

   Elapsed 1:02:59, Corrected 0:57:20

3 Horsefeathers, John Fuller, NHYC 

   Elapsed 1:07:02, Corrected 0:58:35

4 Lickity Split, Andrew Whittingham, WSAOC

   Elapsed 1:09:22, Corrected 1:02:46

5 Healer, Larry Kliger, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:10:25, Corrected 1:04:31

PHRF C (2.6 miles)

1 Halcyon 3, Bob Kafka, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:02:59, Corrected 0:53:27

2 Ventus, Team BCYC, BCYC

   Elapsed 1:03:12, Corrected 0:54:11

3 Celia, Jim O’Conner, ALYC

   Elapsed 1:12:00, Corrected 1:02:36

4 Bella Rose, Rose Henigman, ALYC

   Elapsed 1:19:52, Corrected 1:10:20

H20A Division (1 race)

1 Only Child, L. Bose/J. Bose, BCYC

2 Summer Dream, Cheadle/Schupak, BYC

3 Aquafit, Camerini/Kamei, UCISA

4 Jubilee, Yates/Kincaid, NHYC

5 Dragon Lady, Sangster/Kimball, LIYC

H20B Division (1 race)

1 Whatever, Hurliman/Fischbacher, SBYC

2 Spirit, D. Haynes/P. Haynes, BCYC

H20C Division (1 race)

1 Kalani II, Ibbetson/Thornton, SYA

2 Dragon Lady, Sangster/Kimball, LIYC

3 Ruthless, Team BCYC, BCYC

ALYC 

2022 ALYC Sundowner Series

Monday, July 18

H20B Division (10 races, 1 discard)

1 Ping, Anne Wiese, Total 13

2 Jubilee, Patrick Kincaid, Total 17 

3 Spirit, Debra Haynes, Total 19 

4 Emoji, Andrew Tosh, Total 28

5 Summer Dream, Tucker Cheadle, Total 30

H20C Division (10 races, 1 discard)

1 Whim, Hubie Laugharn, Total 10

2 FREEDOM, Ralph Simmonds, Total 19

3 Shazam, Stephen Alfano, Total 22 

4 Spiritus, Roger Grable, Total 23

5 Chloe, Roy Delis, Total 28

6 Dragon Lady, Kathy Sangster, Total 32T

7 Tiki, Devon Kelly, Total 32T

J22 Division (10 races, 1 discard)

1 Jack, Chris Hill, Total 13

2 Red Stripe, Bill Cohen, Total 16

3 Iconoclast, Min Choi, Total 25T 

4 Jenda, Robert Bents, Total 25T

5 Off in the Ocean, Glen Dromgoole, Total 29

6 OCC #6, William Miller, Total 32

7 Marina 5, Derek Matheson, Total 34

PHRF A Division (10 races, 1 discard)

1 XLR8, Gabriel Nistor, Total 12.5

2 Kaisen, David Camerini, Total 22.5

3 Violetta, Jane Hartley, Total 25

4 Stella Maris, Theodore Barry, Total 26

5 #29, Michael Darr, Total 27 

6 Healer, Larry Kliger, Total 34

7 Starfire, Dan O’Sullivan, Total 35

PHRF B Division (10 races, 1 discard)

1 Buena Vista, Berkeley Green, Total 13

2 Holokai, Ross McElfresh, Total 17 

3 Painted Lady, Matthew Foreman, Total 25T

4 Hobo Flats, Louis Chappelear, Total 25T

5 Stanley’s Cup, Stanley Tutton, Total 27

6 Hayden’s Havoc, Michael Hayden, Total 29

PHRF C Division (10 races, 1 discard)

1 Carioca, Bob Wine, Total 8.5

2 CELIA, Jim O’Connor, Total 16

3 Mystery, Any Club Member, Total 26.5 

4 Mystery II, Club Member Any, Total 30

5 FAIRWIND, Skipper Tim Bercovitz, Total 36

6 No Ka Oi, Lori Romano, Total 40

News relating to racing in or around Newport Harbor should be forwarded to Tom Johnson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Take Five: Meet Madeline Hayward, president of the Decorative Arts Society

By AMY SENK

Earlier this month, I was reading Stu News and saw an item about the Newport Beach-based Decorative Arts Society (DARTS) and how the group had given 13 Orange County non-profit organizations a total of $275,000 in grants for the 2022-2023 year. An additional gift of $60,000 from an anonymous DARTS donor has been given to two vetted non-profits, the article said, adding that since its inception 27 years ago, the organization has given $3.6 million to local non-profit organizations. I was impressed by the generosity but didn’t know much about DARTS, and when I began researching, I discovered that a longtime friend, Madeline Hayward, is now the organization’s president. I reached out to her to find out more.

Take Five Madeline Hayward

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Courtesy of Madeline Hayward

Madeline Hayward

Q: What is Decorative Arts Society and how did you become involved with it?

A: Decorative Arts Society was founded more than 27 years ago by a small group of dedicated women headed up by a local Orange County philanthropist, Mary Anna Jeppe. The organization has grown exponentially over the years. Our membership is curious, interested and oftentimes passionate about the world of decorative arts. I’m often asked what “decorative arts” means. It could be interior design, landscape architecture, formal architecture, apparel, design, antiquities, etc. In addition to fueling our members’ curiosity of the decorative arts, the goal was to give back to our own Orange County community. It has grown over the years both in the scope of our speaker offerings and what we have given back. We offer an impressive speaker series consisting of five lectures a year. Our 2022/2023 Series begins in October. World-renowned experts in their fields speak to our group for about an hour and a half each lecture. We offer our Patron membership level the unique opportunity to attend a wine reception the night before the lecture at a local, beautiful home in honor of the speaker. There, they can personally meet the speaker, mingle with friends and enjoy the host’s home. Or one can join just the lecture series. I personally got involved when a dear friend asked me to join, knowing that I love homes and love everything interior design. At the time, I had little knowledge of the back-end philanthropic portion of the group. I certainly love going to a beautiful reception the night before, enjoy the lectures and hearing from such interesting speakers. I always walk away with new knowledge and newfound appreciation of their field. It doesn’t necessarily have to be a topic that I was interested in in advance or a style of architecture or decor that I personally have in my own home, but I always leave with such appreciation. I learn a thing or two about history, past trends evolving into current trends, geographical history, cultural history and more.

Q: Can you tell me more about the chartable aspect of the organization?

A: This is an area that I personally am so proud of. More than 80 percent of our membership dues goes toward funding grants to an average of 10-13 small to midsize non-profits in support of women, family and children in Orange County each year. Our grant vetting and giving process is stringent and analytical. We vet the nonprofits for their financial stability, operating budgets, management and board stability. We are also dedicated to ensuring that our grant will make a distinct difference to them and our community. We have seen such an uptick in homelessness, domestic violence, basic needs, and educational needs and feel proud that we can support such amazing organizations and their missions. Our grant-giving arm has blossomed from one grant recipient back in 1995 to five to eight, and now 13 this year with total funding thus far exceeding $3 million. This year we gave $275,000 in grants and an additional $60,000 in a special project funded by an anonymous donor to two of our vetted non-profits. We like to say our group has passion with a purpose. Our members have a passion for all things decorative arts – we love to learn, we love to explore and at the same time we have a purpose – and that is giving back to our own community.

Q: How does someone become a member and do you have to be a designer?

A: We welcome everyone. Anyone that has the smallest to the largest interest in home décor design and all things decorative arts is so welcome. You certainly do not have to be a designer, although I always say that the design groups in this area would certainly benefit from coming to our lectures. We would love to have a lot of the new designers even sign up for the lecture series. I continually see some interesting historical classic and contemporary designs inching their way back into our current design trends. You always walk away from a lecture with a new idea or new way of thinking about a home or a beautiful garden.

Q: Do members tend to have the same design sense?

A: We have such a wide varied group of speakers. There’s something for everyone. We are proud to have welcomed such esteemed speakers as Charlotte Moss, Tim Corrigan, Margot Shaw, Bobby McAlpine and our local gem, Barclay Butera. We recently had Miguel Flores Vianna, esteemed photographer for Architectural Digest who flew in from London to speak to our membership. 

Q: What do you wish people knew about the organization?

A: This organization is such an amazing group of men and women that share a common passion of all things beautiful as it pertains to the decorative arts. We are so proud of the caliber of speakers that we have had throughout the years and this upcoming season, but the charitable backend of the organization makes it such a complete package. We welcome anyone who wants to join our group, if even just for the lecture series or to become a Patron and take advantage of all the other additional opportunities.

Editor’s note: For more information, visit the Decorative Arts Society website at www.decorativeartssociety.net.

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Amy Senk is a long-time resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Old Glory Boat Parade winners announced

Congratulations to the winners in this year’s Old Glory Boat Parade, themed “America the Beautiful,” which took place on Monday, July 4th – proudly celebrating our nation’s freedoms on Newport Harbor. The parade was presented by the American Legion Yacht Club (ALYC).

The winners were announced during the awards dinner on Sunday, July 17 at the American Legion Post 291 in Newport Beach. All the winners received trophies.

Old Glory Boat Parade My Way

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Photos courtesy of American Legion Yacht Club

“My Way” owned by Les and Marilyn Davidson won the Sweepstakes award

Old Glory Boat Parade GROUPER

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“GROUPER” owned by Randy Ressell went home with the Commodore’s Trophy

Old Glory Boat Parade Second Star

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“Second Star” owned by Robert Shaw took Best Theme Award

Old Glory Boat Parade Kathryn Marie

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“Kathryn Marie” owned by Roger Behrens won for Best Decorations

Old Glory Boat Parade Manalea

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Judge’s Discretion award went to Mike and Janelle Starkweather’s “Manalea”

Old Glory Boat Parade Ocean Girl

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Best Animation went to Ray Elledge’s “Ocean Girl”

Old Glory Boat Parade Mystery

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“Mystery” owned by Dan Paracchini won for Best Costumes

Old Glory Boat Parade Rondavous

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Best Spirit award was garnered by Rolf Rolnicki’s “Rondavous”

Old Glory Boat Parade Fairwind

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“Fairwind,” with Skipper Tim Bercovitz won Best Wooden Classic

Old Glory Boat Parade Im A Da Best

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“Im A Da Best,” piloted by Alexandra Chebil won Best Electric

Old Glory Boat Parade TT

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Best Dinghy award went to “T/T Tomasndrus Too!” owned by Tom Mallard

Old Glory Boat Parade Shootist

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Best Power was awarded to “Shootist” owned by Jim Buchanan

Old Glory Boat Parade OASIS V

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“OASIS V” skippered by Hank Littrell won for Best Sail

Not pictured is Shaine Krosby’s Hobie, which won for Manual (Hand Powered) Most Creative.


Festival of OC Chefs benefiting KidWorks was a sell-out event

The Second Annual Festival of OC Chefs, benefiting KidWorks, was held Sunday, July 17 at Newport Beach Country Club (NBCC). The popular food festival, which featured 34 chefs, drew 400 guests to mingle and sample the scrumptious fare. Renowned wineries, such as Duckhorn, Crown Point, Schramsberg, Three Sticks and Chateau Montelena, were also a part of the mix. Guests were later seated on the lawn to sample desserts and be introduced to the chefs by emcee DawnMarie Kotsonis.

The Newport Beach chefs and restaurants participating included Graeme Blair, host chef for Newport Beach Country Club; Jacob Davis, Balboa Bay Club; Victor Soto, Cannery Restaurant; Andy Huynh, Nobu; Kyung Carroll, Pelican Hill Resort and Yvon Goetz, The Winery.

Festival of OC Chefs Cannery

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Photos by Reza Allahbakhshi

(L-R) Cannery Seafood of the Pacific’s Vinnie Miranda, NBCC Chef de Cuisine Gio Bolivar, Cannery Chef Victor Soto and Host Chef for NBCC Graeme Blair

Festival of OC Chefs Olhats

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(L-R) Chef Pascal Olhats of Pascal Catering and Baja Shellfish with Chef Kyung Carroll, Pelican Hill Resort 

Festival of OC Chefs Davis

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Balboa Bay Club Chef Jacob Davis holding his Poke Cup and Peach Sangria

Kidworks’ incoming board chair and event co-chair Cory Alder shared the Kidworks’ story. Involved with the charity for 16 years, he lauded the nonprofit’s academic support, character and leadership development programs that empowers students in Orange County’s underserved neighborhoods from pre-K through their college years. Despite the pandemic challenges, he said the non-profit is addressing mental health challenges, making plans to expand into additional satellite campuses and adding programs to include Friday nights and Saturdays. “Despite all the challenges, this is the eighth year in a row we have 100% high school graduations and 100% college graduations,” Alder said.

Fun was had as guests joined the Heads or Tails Game, with one guest left standing to claim the $500 prize. Luis Lopez was the winner of the 50-bottle premium wine tree raffle, generously donated by Mona Lee Nesseth and valued at $2,500. He generously donated it back to KidWorks, and it was auctioned for $5,500 to benefit the charity.

Festival of OC Chefs Alder

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(L-R) Event Co-Chairs Cory and Lisa Alder, Tracy and Kevin Murphy along with Kyle and David Team

The event co-chairs included Lisa and Cory Alder, Tracy and Kevin Murphy and Kyle and David Team, with committee members Joey Booth, Karin and Jeff Garell, Linda Maggard, Leticia and Pat Merrell, Camille and Tim Strader Jr., Chase Watson, and Sue and Nick Willett. Also attending were outgoing Board Chair Adrian Montero and KidWorks’ CEO David Benevides. KM Productions was thanked for producing the event. 

Festival of OC Chefs Pickup

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(L-R) Representing Sponsor Eagle Four Partners were Todd and Natalie Pickup with Devon and Kevin Martin

Following a generous Fund-A-Need portion, which helped boost proceeds to $820,000, the band, Flashback Heart Attack, took the heartfelt evening home.

The KidWorks’ mission is to restore at-risk neighborhoods one life at a time. Since 1993, KidWorks has grown into a vibrant community development non-profit that serves central Santa Ana students and families through a fully licensed preschool, after-school programs, tutoring, mentoring, and adult services in the areas of health, parenting classes and support.

For additional information, visit www.KidWorksoc.org.


Atria Newport Beach adds to its leadership team

Atria Senior Living recently announced new additions to the Atria Newport Beach leadership team as the community anticipates the fall opening of its new North Building offering memory care services. 

Brian Keys joins Atria Newport Beach as senior executive director and Kyle Coleman joins as life guidance® director. 

Prior to the senior living industry, Keys spent two decades in hospitality, working for Hilton and Remington Hotels at luxury properties, including the Renaissance Newport Beach and Beverly Hills Marriott. Most recently, he served as executive director at an Atria property in Costa Mesa. Keys will lead all community operations, including resident services, resident experiences, staff management and the Quality Enhancement Program at Atria Newport Beach. 

Atria Newport Beach Brian Keys

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Courtesy of Atria Newport Beach

Brian Keys has been named senior executive director of Atria Newport Beach

“Hospitality and quality service is at my core and at the center of our staff,” Keys said. “I am proud to join a company who invests in its staff and leaders who put others first, because our priority is the older adults who call Atria home.” 

As life guidance® director, Coleman will lead memory care services in the secure neighborhood designed specifically for residents living with dementia, Alzheimer’s disease or other memory impairments. He brings 14 years of senior living experience. 

“I have a strong drive to support older adults in living vibrant, full lives and to help their families through the aging journey,” Coleman said. “It’s exciting to join such a talented, accomplished team, because I already feel at home.” 

“Both Brian and Kyle are seasoned leaders who embody Atria’s values of top-quality service,” said Sarah Laloyan, Atria senior vice president of operations. “We are excited to build on our commitment to create vibrant communities where older adults can thrive in Orange County and across California.”

Atria operates 38 communities throughout California, including five in Orange County. Atria’s communities offer full-service restaurants, indoor and outdoor amenities and 24/7 access to on-site care staff should residents’ needs change. 

Atria Newport Beach is minutes away from the Newport Marina, Balboa Island, Sunset Ridge Park and across from the Hoag Hospital campus. The community offers independent, assisted and memory care, as well as a selection of studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom floor plans. The newly renovated North building is expected to open this fall.


Miracles for Kids hosted “Surf & Paddle” summer camp day on July 13

While families across America are gearing up for summertime travel adventures, parents of critically ill children continue to face the ongoing struggles and stresses of managing everyday care needs.

Miracles for Kids has brought the fun to these youngsters with their 11th annual “Surf & Paddle” Summer Camp, in collaboration with Boardriders and Waves of Impact.

Miracles for Kids hosted their second summer surf camp of the season on July 13 at the beachfront of the Newport Aquatic Center in Newport Beach. It was a fun-filled stand up paddle/kayak day.

Three surf camp dates were planned for this summer – two of which have been magical days when time stands still, worries are left at the door and every huge smile is a testament to the joy of the moment. The next camp, “Surf Day” takes place Friday, July 22 at Newport Beach Pier.

Miracles for Kids 1

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Photos courtesy of Miracles for Kids

Miracles for Kids 2

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Miracles for Kids 3

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Miracles for Kids 4

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Miracles for Kids 5

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For more information about Miracles for Kids, visit www.miraclesforkids.org.


Subaru makes donation to Hoag

On Wednesday, July 20, in partnership with The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS), two local Subaru retailers donated 160 plush blankets and 25 arts & crafts kits to Hoag Family Cancer Institute patients in Newport Beach and Irvine.

Subaru makes donation group

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Courtesy of Hoag Hospital

McKenna Subaru in Huntington Beach and Subaru Zone Office in Costa Mesa made these generous contributions as part of the Subaru Loves to Care program. This program has allowed Subaru retailers across the U.S. to donate more than 230,000 blankets and 31,000 arts and crafts kits, along with care, hope and information about cancer support available through the LLS. 

For more information about the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS), visit www.lls/org

For more information about the Subaru Loves to Care program, go here.


Grammy winner Eric Marienthal performance to benefit High Hopes

The 23rd Annual Eric Marienthal and Friends Concert benefiting High Hopes Head Injury Program, a non-profit organization dedicated to helping individuals recover from traumatic brain injuries, is holding its largest fundraiser on Sunday, July 17 at the Hyatt Regency Newport Beach. 

“For 23 years, Eric Marienthal and Friends Concert has played an integral role in raising funds needed for High Hopes Brain Injury Program,” said Mark Desmond, drector/instructor and developer of High Hopes Brain Injury Program. “We are so thankful to the Hyatt Regency to be in this beautiful place and we couldn’t be more grateful.”

The Tulsa Rib Company will be hosting the VIP guests to enjoy a dining experience along with a hosted bar and entertainment by the Ron Kobayashi Trio with special guest artist, singer and songwriter, Mary Desmond. 

After the VIP dinner, guests and concertgoers will be led to the Hyatt’s outdoor amphitheater. Sirius XM Radio host Talaya Trigueros will serve as master of ceremonies along with Desmond. 

During the concert, a generous spread of cheeses, fruits, veggies and light bites of finger foods such as tacos, nachos, Empanadas, desserts and coffee will be available throughout the evening.

Grammy winner Marienthal

Submitted photo

Eric Marienthal

Along with the music, there will be a silent and live auction. Highlights of the live auction include a Sunday brunch for eight at Spaghettini’s; from MVP of Super Bowl 2018 Nick Foles, a signed Eagles Jersey and football in a case, a signed copy of his book, Believe It and a signed “Philly Special Play!”; luxurious jewelry and tickets to the Andrea Bocelli concert at the Honda Center; four tickets for each Broadway show at Segerstrom Center for the Arts and a handmade, one-of-a-kind acoustic guitar as a classic, restored vintage radio.

Tickets are $150 for VIP and $75 for General Admission and are available at www.HighHopes.ws, or by calling 949.733.0044. The VIP Party starts at 3:45 p.m. with the general admission starting at 5 p.m. The music will begin at 6 p.m.

Sponsorship opportunities are still available. 

Established in 1975, High Hopes Brain Injury Program is a one-of-a-kind non-profit charitable organization dedicated to rehabilitating and retraining those devastated by brain injuries. The program at High Hopes is unique as its physical programs include conditioning classes, therapeutic swimming, nautilus weight training, physical therapy, and rehabilitation activities for cognitive and social challenges. Other services include vocational art classes, pre-vocational training, music classes, community activities, independent living classes, occupational therapy and speech therapy. High Hopes’ goal is to provide the best possible program to those with brain injuries and get results far above expectations. High Hopes is celebrating 47 years of witnessing miracles in the life of these deserving 

 For more information, visit High Hopes at www.HighHopes.ws and www.HighHopesBrainInjury.org. Follow them on Highhopesheadinjuryprogram, Twitter @highhopes100 and Instagram at highhopesheadinjury.

Hyatt Regency Newport Beach is located at 1107 Jamboree Road, Newport Beach.


Join the Newport Beach Chamber on the water for their upcoming luncheon on July 20

The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce (NBCC) is holding their networking luncheon on Wednesday, July 20 at the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club from 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. 

Come enjoy a delicious lunch with picturesque harbor views while making connections with other business professionals. You’ll spend the entire meeting with everyone else in the room and leave with contacts for your business success.

Join the Newport yacht club

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Courtesy of the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce

The NBCC networking luncheon is on the water at the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club

Advanced reservations are required, so go here to reserve your seat. Space is limited. Cost (which includes lunch): Chamber members, $40; Potential members, $50.

The Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club is located at 1601 Bayside Drive, Corona del Mar. Free parking.

For more information on the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce, visit www.newportbeach.com. Call 949.729.4400.


Summer Concerts on the Green keeps the music coming

The City of Newport Beach Arts Commission once again is presenting monthly Summer Concerts on the Green, which kicked off on May 29 with Mark Wood and the Parrot Head Band followed on June 12 by Catch a Wave.

Make Sunday evenings special beginning at 6 p.m. and head over to the Civic Center Green. Bring blankets, low-slung beach chairs and a picnic dinner, or purchase food from onsite food trucks. No alcohol is allowed.

The upcoming music line up:

–Sunday, July 17: Billy Nation (a Billy Joel tribute band)

–Sunday, Aug. 21: Young Guns

–Sunday, Sept. 18: Britain’s Finest: The Complete Beatles Experience (a tribute to The Beatles)

Summer Concerts Billy Nation

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Photos courtesy of City of Newport Beach Cultural Arts

Bill Nation, a Billy Joel tribute band, takes the stage on July 17

Summer Concerts Young Guns

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Young Guns hits the Civic Center Green on August 21

Summer Concerts Britain s Finest

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Britain’s Finest: The Complete Beatles Experience, a tribute to the Fab Four, takes the stage to finish the concert series on September 18

Free admission and parking.

Civic Center Green is located at 100 Civic Center Drive, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.newportbeachca.gov/culturalarts.


Balboa Island speaker event featuring Johnny Sampson, well attended

The Balboa Island Museum hosted a Speaker Event on Thursday, July 14 at 6 p.m. with Catalina Museum for Art & History Deputy Director and Chief Curator Johnny Sampson. Sampson discussed the 100-year history of Catalina Island and the historic landmarks therein.

Balboa Island Sampson and 2 guys

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Photos courtesy of PMMC

(L-R) Jerry Bigelow, Johnny Sampson and Jim Mooney

The camp lasts from August 8-12, Monday through Friday 9-11:30a.m. $229 per person.

Balboa Island Sampson speaking

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Guests listening in on Johnny Sampson’s presentation

For more information, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org.


Obituary

Kathy Marlowe Thompson, 1950s “Hollywood Blonde” passes

December 31, 1934 – July 2, 2022

OBITUARY Kathy Marlowe

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Submitted photo

Kathy Marlowe Thompson

The 1950s era blonde film “Goddess” Kathy Marlowe, once labeled the “It Girl” as the most recognized and photographed advertising model of the time, passed away July 2. She was 87. Breaking into acting with a role in 1958 cast in an “adults only” low-budget, now classic-cult film titled Girl With An Itch, Marlowe went on to roles in Bombers B-52 for Warner Brothers, The Helen Morgan Story, Death In Small Doses, The Phoenix City Story and Queen of Outer Space, among others. On the small screen, the 5’6” actress with the classic 37-24-36 figure, Marlowe was a regular foil with George Burns on The Burns and Allen Show, playing the sexy fiancé of Burn’s son Ronnie on the program, one of television’s most popular episodic shows of TV’s early decade. Also appearing with Dean Martin and many other stars on television, Marlowe took her place in the lineup of “’50s blondes” including Marilyn Monroe, Jayne Mansfield, Mamie Van Doren and others in the Hollywood history books. 

Marlowe was born Kathleen Maslowski to parents Thomas & Julia Maslowski on December 31, 1934, in Minneapolis, MN. She was stunning at a young age, and the allure of Hollywood in the late 1940s post WWII drew her to California at age 15 since she was able to live with an older sister with a residence in Van Nuys. The high school kid with big dreams had a very practical side. The child of Polish immigrants, Maslowski knew the value of a buck. She enrolled in high school and also went to work as a bookkeeper while taking modeling courses. She also found her way into the big studios in the San Fernando Valley getting work as an extra on movie lots.

Graduating high school in Van Nuys, Maslowski became Marlowe. By this time, she was also teaching modeling and getting noticed as an ideal figure model perfectly representing the 1950s style of the sexy young American blonde girl next door. Over the next five years, Marlowe would be featured in thousands of ad layouts and would be named countless times as “Miss” this and that. It was serious public relations business of the day. Among her credits, far too many to mention all, are “Miss Long White Potato,” “Miss Traveling Saleslady,” “Miss Chinchilla,” “Miss Green Stamps” and “Miss Lawn Seed.”

She also appeared at any and every opening ceremony from department stores to highways to ship launchings. Marlowe was a worker. She was a practical mid-western Polish girl who took nothing for granted and accepted every job she could handle.

With the dawning of the early 1960s, the era of the blonde was fading. Acting roles and modeling roles diminished. In 1962 at a chance meeting in a Burbank bar, Marlowe met a former Navy sailor Jerry Thompson who operated fishing boats in Newport Beach. The actress and the fishing boat captain married and lived an idyllic life on the Newport bayfront for the next 60 years and would have been celebrating the occasion of their 60th anniversary on April 6, 2022.

Predeceased by husband Gerald (Jerry) Thompson in 2018, Kathy Marlowe Thompson is survived by three children: son Gerald Livingston Thompson Jr. (Betty), daughter April Ann Thompson-Egbert, grandsons Spencer Gerald Egbert and Pierce Steven Egbert and son Todd William Thompson (April Jennifer Grice-Thompson), and grandchildren Ava Lee Grace Thompson, Tayden Courage Thompson and Josiah Endure Thompson.

A black-tie Hollywood themed celebration of life will be held in Newport Beach at the Balboa Bay Resort, Newport Beach. Please contact April Egbert at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. In lieu of flowers, donations in Kathy Marlowe Thompson’s name may be made to Share Our Selves, Costa Mesa an Orange County-based non-profit serving the working poor families in the community (www.shareourselves.org), or FONBAS, Friends of Newport Beach Animal Shelter (www.fonbas.org).


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach

Newport Beach A Look Back B&W Collins Island 7.19.2022

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A black and white photo of Collins Island taken in June 1963

Balboa Island Museum Newport Beach and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free general admission on all days. Two-hour parking is available on Marine Avenue. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboaislandmuseum.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


OCMA hosts Utopian black-tie fashion event, a memorable gathering

On June 28, OCMA (Orange County Museum of Art) and Opening Gala Sponsor South Coast Plaza hosted a Utopian Black-Tie Fashion Event in anticipation of the sold-out gala taking place on Saturday, Oct. 1.

The fashions were showcased in OCMA’s temporary home in South Coast Plaza Village where South Coast Plaza stylists Kim Apodaca and Jackie Rose presented their favorite fall gala looks inspired by the upcoming gala’s Utopia theme.

OCMA s Utopian Cline group

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Photos by Reza Allah-Bakhshi/Capture Imaging

Courtesy of OCMA

(L-R) Barbara Cline, Amy Vieth, Pam Gilmour and Sandy Perlmutter at the OCMA Opening Gala

OCMA s Utopian Segerstrom 4 ladies

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(L-R) Lisa Merage, Jennifer Segerstrom, Isabel Janavs, Michelle Merage

OCMA s Utopian Jacobson and Zuckerman

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(L-R) Oleana Jacobson with OCMA CEO and Director Heidi Zuckerman

OCMA s Utopian Apodaca and Rose

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(L-R) South Coast Plaza stylists Kim Apodaca and Jackie Rose

The opening gala will honor artist Sanford Biggers and give a preview of the museum’s new 53,000-square-foot Morphosis-designed building which will officially open to the public on Saturday, Oct. 8.

OCMA’s opening gala on October 1 will be chaired by Jennifer Segerstrom and co-chaired by Lisa Merage.


The missing coral trees and other CdM observations

By AMY SENK

Sometimes I’ll take a walk around town and notice changes. This fills me with an ambivalent sense of feeling observant while simultaneously feeling terribly unobservant. Why am I just noticing these things? Why didn’t I see them sooner?

A recent example came during a walk I’ve taken several times a week from my rental house to my old neighborhood, Shore Cliffs, which has city-owned and maintained coral trees lining the entrances at Seaward and Morning Canyon roads. During the holidays, they are decorated with white lights, the rest of the year, they give Shore Cliffs a signature look. They are landmarks of sorts – turn right at the street with the giant coral trees, I’ve told visitors.

Last week on my walk, I noticed that one side of Seaward looked bare compared to the old days, and sure enough, a city spokesperson confirmed that two trees had been removed after city arborists made an “emergency determination.”

Good that I was not imagining things. Bad that the trees were removed in April and May of 2021. It took me 15 months of regular walks to notice this major change.

Back in the day when I published Corona del Mar Today, I wrote frequently about these coral trees, starting in 2009 when a truck damaged one and neighbors fought hard to save it. In the end, the tree, which was planted in 1948, had to be removed and a new coral tree replaced it.

The missing coral trees Shore Cliffs

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Photo by Amy Senk

Coral trees near Shore Cliffs

Over the next few years, I diligently reported trees that were diseased or damaged and removed and replaced. In 2012, I wrote a fun feature about one of the trees that was removed from the block where former Mayor Nancy Gardner once lived. Apparently a couple of local men had a few at their yacht club and decided that their club’s new Catalina location needed some trees, so they drove to Shore Cliffs, gathered trim cuttings off the coral trees, placed them in tubs of water and took them by yacht to the island.

City Public Information Manager John Pope said that typically, city staff would work with homeowners’ associations for suitable replacement trees, but “due to the narrower parkway, utility conflicts and potential intersection clearance issues in this area, Coral tree replacements are inappropriate.”

I will be paying more attention to see what replacement trees are planted, if they are ever planted.

I was talking to a member of the Shore Cliffs HOA, and another topic arose: the grassy areas at the entrance could be doomed by new California water regulations that prohibit watering “decorative, non-functional turf grass,” which is turf grass that is solely ornamental and not regularly used for human recreational purposes or for civic or community events.

Pope said that the City Council declared the Level 2 water restrictions in late June, and letters were sent to business owners and about 90 HOAs explaining the new restrictions.

“The new state regulation requires your business to stop using potable water to irrigate non-functional turf areas on your property,” the letter states. “You may also choose to replace the non-functional turf grass with another type of landscaping or artificial turf. Doing so will bring your property into compliance with this mandate and help meet the water use reduction goal. We understand it may take some time to fully comply and plan for the landscaping replacement. In the meantime, we recommend you drastically reduce your water to these areas.”

The city has stopped the use of potable water on all city-owned, non-functional turf areas, the letter said, while some non-functional turf grass is irrigated with recycled water.

The letter also described exemptions, like if some or all of the grass is for “human recreational purposes” or if it is used for civic or community events. I wonder if Newport Beach communities will begin installing mini-soccer fields to create exemptions that let them keep their lawns.

• • •

Another unrelated observation was made by a friend, who noticed that a sign by Corona del Mar’s Grounded Coffee at 3636 E. Coast Highway had been removed. The sign, a banner type sign placed in front of the shop, said F*CK TRAFFIC/GET COFFEE and caused some grumbling on the Nextdoor site.

The missing coral trees Grounded Coffee

Photo by Amy Senk

Grounded Coffee at 3636 E. Coast Highway

City staff apparently demanded that the sign be removed, and my friend and a few coffee shop employees assumed that the language was the reason.

I asked Pope if it was indeed the vulgarity, or rather the sign type, because I know not every banner or flag type sign is permitted under city code.

“The city received two complaints about the sign at the coffee shop,” he said. “Code enforcement spoke with the owner and explained that the sign type was prohibited based on the sign type, not the language. The owner stated she understood and removed the sign immediately. Code enforcement provided her contact information for the Planning Department if she wanted to install an approved sign type in the future.”

The owner was out of town and unavailable to respond to my questions. However, the shop is selling stickers with the same logo for 75 cents apiece.

The missing coral trees Grounded Coffee stickers

Photo by Amy Senk

Grounded Coffee stickers

A final observation was the addition of new green sharrows painted on Coast Highway on the Laguna-bound side of the road, from Carnation through Poppy avenues. No word on if the markings, which remind motorists to share the roads with bicyclists, will be added to the other side of the road.

The missing coral trees sharrows

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Photo by Amy Senk

The new green sharrows in CdM from Carnation to Poppy avenues on the west side of Coast Highway

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Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 20+ years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association. She and her husband have two children. Her son recently graduated with a Master of Arts from the School of Journalism from her alma mater and her daughter is attending Duke University. She is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


SOCALPAPA returned to Upper Newport Bay for plein air art festival

SOCALPAPA artists returned to the Upper Newport Bay for their Fine Arts Juried Event and Display Sale from July 9-17. This year the festival was a longer celebration and a showcase that included the juried plein air art competition featuring the Back Bay and OC Parks. The weekend show included 30 artists with more than 300 paintings of other painting locations and still lifes. A portion of the sale proceeds benefits the Newport Bay Conservancy. This festival of fine art is a collaborative event organized by SOCALPAPA in conjunction with the Newport Bay Conservancy (NBC) and Orange County Parks.

SOCALPAPA returned Pete and Randy

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Photos courtesy of Newport Bay Conservancy

(L-R) Quick Draw Competition Honorable Mention Pete Roberts with Judge Randy Higbee 

The festival started with a Quick Draw Competition that was open to anyone who registered to complete a painting in only 90 minutes. Thirty artists set up along the many trails of the Upper Newport Bay Nature Preserve surrounding the Muth Center, were provided with inspiration of the natural outdoors. The framed paintings were available for viewing in the main lobby of the Muth. Randy Higbee selected the winning submissions which proved to be done in a variety of styles. First Place went to Lisa Skelly, Second Place was awarded to Marie Stone and Third Place was garnered by Gilberto Delgado. Three SOCALPAPA Honorable Mentions went to Pete Roberts, Sue Miano and Monica Edwards.

SOCALPAPA returned Sue Miano

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Sue Miano with her Honorable Mention artwork in the Quick Draw Competition

SOCALPAPA artists submitted more than 60 original paintings for jury review and awards. Talented Laguna Beach artist Jeff Sewell was the judge for this year’s competition. He is a distinguished Signature Member of the Laguna Plein Air Painters Association, Artist Member of the California Art Club and a Signature Member of the American Society of Marine Artists. He also demonstrated on July 14 and produced an incredible painting in less than two hours. 

SOCALPAPA returned Evening Harbor

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Steve Kell’s “Evening Harbor” received the OC Parks award

Derreck Angstar presented the OC Parks award to Steve Kell for his Evening Harbor. Sherry Marger awarded the Frank and Fran Robinson prize to Kevin Davidson for his Mid Back Bay painting.

SOCALPAPA returned Elisa Arancibia

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Elisa Arancibia received the Artist’s Choice award

The Artist’s Choice award went to Elisa Arancibia; People’s Choice was awarded to Peter Schuller; First Prize, Kevin Davidson for Morning Awakening; Second Prize, Fernando Perez for Irvine Ranch Historic Park and Third Prize, Kathleen Williams for Resurgence. Honorable Mentions were awarded to Pete Roberts for Just the Two of Us; Steve Kell for Mellow Day; Diane Pendergast for Morning Light and Eileen McCullogh for Morning Hikers.

The juried artwork was on display in the Theater Room of the Muth Center from July 9-15. Painting demonstrations in the amphitheater by many of the talented artists participating in the show took place July 10-14. This past weekend (July 16-17) was the official show and sale.

Free painting classes for youngsters ages 7-12 were offered on Friday, July 15 and Sunday, July 17, with SOCALPAPA artists as the art instructors. They provided the children with an unforgettable fine art experience. All materials were supplied and participants were able to take home a completed painting at the end of each class.

SOCALPAPA returned Rick Morales

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SOCALPAPA plein air painter Rick Morales in Upper Newport Bay

SOCALPAPA’s nearly 150-member association dedicates itself to painting outdoors from life. For more information about SOCALPAPA, visit the association’s website at www.socalpapa.com.

SOCALPAPA returned Bay

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Upper Newport Bay provided the perfect outdoor setting for the plein air art show and sale

Peter and Mary Muth Interpretive Center is located at 2401 University Drive, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.newportbay.org.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Topping out ceremony at new animal shelter offers feel-good celebration, oh, and raises another $100,000

TOM MARCHIf you want to know how to get the people out, think kids, or perhaps, better yet, pets. Yesterday was the “Topping Out Ceremony” for the city’s new animal shelter. The ceremony is where everyone present has the opportunity to sign a board to be enclosed in the construction which will become a permanent, albeit hidden, part of the shelter’s history.

The dignitary turnout was impressive and included the Hon. Diane Dixon, Hon. Joy Brenner, Chief of Police Jon Lewis, Fire Chief Jeff Boyles, Animal Control Supervisor Valerie Schomburg, Recreation & Senior Services Director Sean Levin, Newport Beach Chamber CEO Steve Rosansky, Friends of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter Board of Directors President Jon Langford, plus board members Tom Fischbacher, Sharon Esterley, Robyn Grant and Sandy Meadows.

Yesterday’s ceremony also included the installation of an American Flag and the City of Newport Beach Flag to the construction site.

Why do it? Well, to some an event like this is inspiring, hence on-site donations in excess of $100,000 were realized. That brings the project within about $200,000 of the initial goal of $3,000,000 which covers the purchase of the property, the design and construction.

It’s going to be an important part of Newport Beach moving forward simply because the new shelter will include a single-story, 1,600-sq.-ft. building with 750 sq. ft. for a kennel to house dogs, cats and other animals, plus parking, a front yard greeting area and a secure rear area to exercise the animals housed there.

Fair Game Dixon and Brenner

Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

(L-R) Councilmembers Joy Brenner and Diane Dixon join in the Topping Out Ceremony for new animal shelter

Completion is expected this Fall, at which time FONBAS will donate the finished project to the City of Newport Beach.

They could still use donations and/or new members to FONBAS (Friends of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter). Go to www.FONBAS.org. Remember, for a gift of $5,000 or more, there will be a dedication wall recognizing those individuals.

• • •

Did you feel it? A 3.6 magnitude earthquake struck 14 miles southwest off our coast early Sunday morning (July 17) at 3:41 a.m. According to the United States Geological Survey, the earthquake occurred at a “depth of 10 kilometers” or about 6.2 miles.

No damage or injuries were reported.

• • •

I know, you’re probably sitting at home and saying to yourself, I wish I could run for City Council. If the answer is yes, call your doctor! 

But, if you really want to, here’s the latest. Districts 1, 3, 4 and 6 will have/or could have races for November 8.

Only District 6 has a councilperson (Joy Brenner) running for reelection. The other three districts all have termed out candidates.

The nomination period is currently open effective yesterday through August 12. Candidates must get at least 20 and no more than 30 registered voters from the district on a Nomination Petition. They also must fill out a Conflict-of-Interest Disclosure Statement and a Campaign Finance Disclosure Statement.

If you have questions of Council District boundaries, you may visit www.newportbeachca.gov/government/city-council/find-your-council-district.

• • •

Would it surprise you if I told you that Tom Miller and Joe Stapleton in District 1, Erik Weigand in District 3 and Robyn Grant in District 4 pulled nomination papers yesterday, the first day potential City Council candidates could do so for the November election? I didn’t think so.

Incumbent Joy Brenner has also announced her reelection in District 6.

Outside of that, the hottest rumor concerning other potential candidates circulate around Planning Commission Chair Lauren Kleiman, who is rumored to be considering a run opposing Brenner. 

More to come.

• • •

You’re going to need a camera for this one. The California Coastal Commission is hosting the California Ocean & Coastal Amateur Photography Contest. The contest opens August 1 and closes September 19.

Viewers will then vote for several weeks, with winners announced at the end of October.

It’s free to enter for amateur photographers, which is defined as someone who earns less than 50% of their income from photography.

The subjects for the contest entries are (1) The scenic coast and the Pacific Ocean off California (2) People and the California coast (3) California ocean and coastal wildlife.

There are some very fun prize packages. To see those, contest rules and other information, go to https://mycoastalphoto.com.

• • •

Multiple construction projects are underway at some of our local schools. Each has to go through three phases, including planning, design and construction. Each must additionally get approvals for budget and design from the Newport-Mesa Unified School District’s Board of Education and the Division of State Architects (DSA).

Here’s where they’re taking place:

Newport Harbor High School is modernizing the existing courtyard in the home arts building area. It includes improving accessibility, which means restroom modifications, hardscape, drainage, landscaping, kiln replacements (adding three new kilns) and includes a new kiln roof canopy.

These changes should be completed by late 2022.

Another project is for the pool area. It’s currently awaiting design and DSA approval. The project includes a remodel of the aquatics complex, including the installation of a shade structure, the replacement of bleachers, new lighting and the relocation of the scoreboard.

An additional phase is in the preliminary stages and includes new pool plaster and deck repairs, a remodel of locker rooms, restrooms, showers and coaches’ offices.

Construction is anticipated to begin next summer and the goal will be to limit pool closure timing so as to minimize impacts on aquatics programs.

Corona del Mar Middle/High School is considering improvements to functionality and accessibility to their field areas. No dates for further plans have yet to be determined.

At Ensign Intermediate, plans are in the design stage for improving the outdoor student gathering area. It includes landscaping, surrounded by brick and concrete seating walls in the center of campus. 

Construction is planned to begin in Spring 2023.

At both CdMHS/MS and Ensign there are projects to expand sidewalks and improve landscaping between the perimeter fencing and adjacent streets. The design and budget for both have been approved, but the construction bids received in Spring 2022 were rejected. They’re currently being reevaluated to determine how to proceed.

There is a Facility Project Webpage with additional information and updates.


Man dies at Crystal Cove after being pulled from the surf

According to a reliable source, a man was pulled from the surf by State Lifeguards in the Crystal Cove area on Sunday, July 17, around 1 p.m. The lifeguards initiated CPR on the sand prior to the arrival of the Newport Beach Fire Department Paramedics.

Upon their arrival, paramedics continued CPR unsuccessfully, with the patient eventually pronounced deceased by the Hoag base hospital. This occurs in the field after a significant amount of time has passed and multiple doses of medication and CPR efforts show no progress toward the return of cardiac activity.

The victim’s identity or cause of death has yet to be released by the Orange County Coroner.


Looking down at CdM

Looking down at CdM SNN 7.19

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

A drone captures this unique corner of CdM


Morning has broken

Morning has broken SNN 7.19

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Photo by Jason Berry (its_jason_berry)

The early sun breaking through


Flight of Newport Beach is in the books and the winners are…

The 86th annual Flight of Newport took to the waters of Newport Harbor on Sunday (July 17). The race, with more than 100 sailors, was represented in three classes: Harbor 20s, ILCA and RS Tera. 

The day’s activities started near the Newport Pavilion in cloudy conditions, with light to medium wind, and progressed into wind that became shifty and irregular, with lots of puffs. By the end of the competition, the wind had filled in and the sun was out for a perfect conclusion to a fun-filled race.

Flight of Newport Buddy Richley

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Photos by Bronny Daniels | Joysailing.com

Buddy Richley finished first in the ILCA fleet

Winners were awarded following the competition at the Balboa Yacht Club. First to finish in the ILCA fleet was Buddy Richley, who had previously finished second three times over the years. He was awarded a new ILCA sail donated by West Coast Sailing.