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Newport Beach

Volume 4, Issue 74  |  September 13, 2019


Urban Arts OC to hold new class time, fall break art camp

Are you finding it difficult to make it to the Urban Arts OC art class by 3:30 p.m.? Then, they have the solution to keep the creativity flowing this school year.

Urban Arts OC has added a new time slot for children’s afternoon art classes to be held 4-5:30 p.m. on Monday through Wednesday and Friday. They will still offer a class from 3:30-5 p.m., as well. Just choose the day and time best suited to your schedule. Classes include Mixed Media and Advanced Art.

Urban Arts OC girl at easel

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Courtesy of Urban Arts OC

In addition, they are offering a Fall Break Art Camp from September 23 through October 11 (weekdays only). It will be held from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. with instruction focused on painting, ceramics, drawing, crafts, baking and more. Each day, your youngster will create a new craft or project, so they can come to as many camp days as they want. Join the camp for the day or the week. If you need additional childcare after camp, hourly craft time is available. Pack a lunch and the rest will be provided. The camp is geared for ages 4+. You must call to register, as space is limited. Call 949.474.1552. Payment is required prior to camp attendance in order to reserve your child’s space. Drop-ins will not be accepted so as to ensure proper teacher to student ratios. Cancellations made with less than one-week notice will not be refunded.

Urban Arts OC is located at 4250 Scott Drive, Suite L&O, Newport Beach.


Will the global economy survive the U.S.-China trade war?

The state of the Global Economy reaches nearly everyone’s well-being and livelihood in some manner. We are all impacted, whether directly or indirectly, by the health of the integrated global economy and, in turn, each nation’s response further impacts the dynamics of the overall performance and strength of that economy. Recent talk of an upcoming recession has raised serious concerns on the future of the U.S. economy.

The World Affairs Council of Orange County welcomes guest speaker Dr. Gordon Hanson Ph.D., to its dinner and lecture on Wednesday, Sept. 25 at The Pacific Club.

Will the global economy Gordon Hanson

Courtesy of World Affairs Council of Orange County

Gordon Hanson, Ph.D.

Professor Hanson has served as director of the Center on Global Transformation, the Pacific Economic Cooperation chair in International Economic Relations and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is co-editor of the Journal of Economic Perspective. After 20 great years at the University of California, San Diego, Hanson will be joining the faculty of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. A renowned expert on International Trade and Global Economics, he will share his views and predictions on the current and future state of the global economy, the impact of a trade war between the world’s two largest economies – the U.S. and China with imposition of tariffs as a precedent – the impact of the Eurozone Crisis and the general “slow down” in the European economies. Certainly the recent worried talk by many of the economic pundits that we are heading toward a recession merits further discussion and in-depth explanation. No one is better situated to address these concerns than Hanson. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT, and a B.A. from Occidental College.

The evening’s reception begins at 5:30 p.m., followed by the dinner and lecture at 6:15 p.m. To register, visit www.WorldAffairsCouncil.org.

The Pacific Club is located at 4110 MacArthur Blvd., Newport Beach.


Succulent Pumpkin Workshops with Kathleen Nestell at Roger’s Gardens

Get into the spirit of the harvest with Succulent Pumpkin Workshops led by Kathleen Nestell on Tuesdays, Oct. 8 and Oct. 15 from 5-6 p.m. at Roger’s Gardens.

Join Horticulturist and Original Designs Lead Designer Nestell as she guides you on how to create your very own fabulous succulent pumpkin centerpiece that (if properly cared for) will last for months. Just bring your creativity and they will take care of the rest.

Succulent Pumpkin Workshop with Kathleen Nestell pumpkins 9.10

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Courtesy of Roger’s Gardens

The workshop fee is $100 per arrangement, and includes all materials, step-by-step instructions, and details on how to care, handle and artistically prune your masterpiece as the succulents begin to grow.

For an additional fee, supplementary supplies or plant materials are available. Unfortunately, due to material costs, cancellations after September 27 for the October 8 event and October 4 for the October 15 event cannot be refunded. Please bring gloves if desired. Register at the website. 

Roger’s Gardens is located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar. For more information, visit www.rogersgardens.com.

For a calendar of upcoming Home & Garden happenings, visit our Calendars section here.


StyleWeekOC® arrives this week

StyleWeekOC® is right around the corner, September 12-14, as Fashion Island teams up with SIMPLY for fashion and beauty fun.

For the third year, SIMPLY is returning to Orange County for a chic afternoon with three panel discussions and two keynote speakers with highly acclaimed experts and influencers in fashion, beauty and digital marketing.

Listen in on informative panels and shop the latest fall fashions at the in-store parties, and enjoy stylish treats and activities all for three days. 

StyleWeekOC girls

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Photos courtesy of StyleWeekOC®

Schedule of Events:

Thursday, Sept. 12

–VIP Nordstrom Trend Sweepstakes at Nordstrom Fashion Island. Enter to win access into the VIP Nordstrom Trend event. Visit the Fashion Island Instagram page for contest rules. (Invite only.)

–Shopping Party.Stop by C|Dobbs for a shopping party in celebration of StyleWeekOC® and enjoy sips while you shop and 10 percent off your purchase.

Friday, Sept. 13

–Shopping Party at Casablanca Bridal at Crystal Cove Shopping Center from 5-7 p.m. Refreshment, gown shopping advice and inspiration. Book an appointment for a future bridal fitting experience and get 25 percent off your Casablanca gown. (Offer valid on gown only, not on custom changes. Offer is not valid on previous purchases. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Offer is exclusive to Casablanca Flagship Store.)

–Shopping Party at VICI at Corona del Mar Plaza. Stop by VICI from 5-7 p.m. Enjoy rosé, desserts and personal styling sessions with one of their amazing stylists. Spend $150, $250 or $500 to receive a special gift with purchase.* (*Cannot be combined with any other offer or promotion.)

–VIP Dinner Sweepstakes. Round up your friends and enter to win dinner for two at Fashion Island during the StyleWeekOC VIP Influencer Dinner from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Enjoy delicious bites along with top influencers and leave with a goodie bag full of amazing products. This exclusive event is INVITE only, but they’re giving 2 people (and a friend), the chance to join the party. Enter at www.shopfashionisland.com/stylesweeps.

StyleWeekOC guys

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Saturday, Sept. 14

–Live Q&A with First Keynote in the Neiman Marcus – Bloomingdale’s Courtyard in Fashion Island from 1-1:30 p.m. (More details to follow.)

–Fashion Panel in the Neiman Marcus – Bloomingdale’s Courtyard in Fashion Island from 1:40-2:25 p.m. Guest speakers: Gorjana Reidel, jewelry designer known for gorjana; Cassydy Berliner, Infuencer; and Lo VonRumpf, image consultant and fashion correspondent with LVR Style. RSVP here.

–Beauty Panel in the Neiman Marcus – Bloomingdale’s Courtyard in Fashion Island from 2:35-3:20 p.m. Guest influencers: Courtney Kerr, Christine Kon and Olia Majd. RSVP here.

–Fashion Panel in the Neiman Marcus – Bloomingdale’s Courtyard in Fashion Island from 3:30-4:15 p.m. Guest speakers: Becca Tobin, actress, singer and host; Brandy Pham, phanoly founder; Casey “Quigley” Goode, content creator; and Rocky Barnes, model and brand ambassador for AmEx and MAC. RSVP here.

~ Live Q&A with Second Keynote in the Neiman Marcus – Bloomingdale’s Courtyard in Fashion Island from 4:25-5 p.m. (More details to follow.)

–Shopping Parties after the panel discussions. Enjoy shopping parties from 5-7 p.m. at Neiman Marcus, Bloomingdale’s Macy’s, AG, Athleta, Anthropologie & Co. and more.

For additional information, visit www.orangecountyzest.com/styleweekoc.


Passport to Luxury Chef’s Challenge at Roger’s Gardens on September 25

The Inaugural Passport to Luxury Chef’s Challenge  will be held at Roger’s Gardens on Wednesday, Sept. 25 from 6-8 p.m.

Hosted by Modern Luxury Orange County, this event invites culinary masters, luxury brands and event enhancements to showcase signature dishes, products, services and trends.

Passport to Luxury Chef Brittany Valles

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Submitted photo

Guests will gather to experience a guided journey with each stop offering a taste of a different part of the world through bites, signature cocktail or products.

Guests will vote for their favorite dish of the evening, and the winner will be announced at the end of the night.

Newport Beach restaurants participating include A Restaurant Newport Beach, Andrea Ristorante at Pelican Hill Resort, Aqua Lounge, Cannery Food of the Pacific, Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens, Louie’s by the Bay and Oak Grill.

The event benefits Childhelp OC. Tickets are $40 pre-sale and $45 at the door.

All guests must be 21+. Carpooling/Uber or Lyft is highly encouraged as parking will be extremely limited.

Tickets are $40 pre-sale and $5 at the door. To purchase tickets, click here.


KidWorks asks Orange Countians to open hearts, wallets for “Igniting Potential” Giving Day

KidWorks, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit that provides academic, spiritual and leadership programs for underserved children and teens, has again partnered with the Orange County Community Foundation (OCCF) on “Igniting Potential,” an iheartoc collaborative Giving Day to support the youth of Orange County set for Wednesday, Sept. 18.

KidWorks makes an 18-year commitment to support students and their parents by providing academic enrichment, leadership and character development programs to ensure students are prepared to thrive in both college and careers.

KidWorks asks Orange Countians two girls

KidWorks reaches out to underserved youth

Here’s how donations will impact KidWorks students:

–$25 supports a preschooler in KidWorks programs for one week.

–$50 supports a K-12th grade student in KidWorks programs for one week.

–$200 supports a K-12th grade student in KidWorks programs for one month.

–$1,000 supports a preschooler in KidWorks programs for one year.

–$2,500 supports a K-12th grade student in KidWorks programs for one year.

“The students at KidWorks have big dreams,” said KidWorks Executive Director David Benavides. “These dreams require a college education in order to become a reality, so we hope generous donors will support our KidWorks College Success Initiative. Thanks to a generous donor, every donation made to KidWorks on Giving Day will be matched dollar-for-dollar up to $12,500.

Last year, KidWorks led the fundraiser with donations totaling more than $45,000. The 24-hour online effort raised more than $154,843 in total with the participation of more than 535 donors for local nonprofit organizations providing support and resources to children in need.

The OCCF, based in Newport Beach, will power the “Igniting Potential” campaign by providing seed funding to support the marketing assets, campaign resources and collaborative partnerships. “Igniting Potential” is part of a series of collaborative Giving Days that takes place in Orange County as part of a bold initiative from the Foundation to boost the capacity of local nonprofits to meet the community’s needs.

To donate to KidWorks, visit https://ignitingpotential2019.funraise.org/team/kid-works.


Second Chance to hold third annual charity fundraiser

Second Chance Orange County is holding its third annual “More Second Chances Gala” charity fundraiser on Tuesday, Sept. 17 from 5:30-8:30 p.m. in the Newport Beach Civic Center Community Room.

The evening’s festivities include dinner, dessert and drinks along with entertainment. There are 50+ items in the silent auction, including golf and lunch for two at Bel Air Country Club; fine dining restaurant gift cards such as for A Restaurant and Ruth’s Chris Steak House; Sonoma wine tasting tour; three nights at a Carlsbad beach house; hotel stays; three-month membership to Equinox; whale watching tour; theme park and museum admission tickets and assorted gift baskets. Business cocktail attire, please. Guests must be 18 years of age.

Second Chance Deb Johnson

Submitted photo

Deb Johnson, executive director and chairman of the board, Second Chance Orange County

To purchase tickets, $80 per person, visit www.eventbrite.com/e/more-second-chances-gala-tickets-65854531677.

Newport Beach Civic Center Community Room is located at 100 Civic Center Drive, Newport Beach.

Second Chance Orange County helps low-income individuals that are recovering from drug/alcohol addiction and/or experiencing homelessness become productive members of society by providing individualized supportive services: job placement, life & job skills, resume creation, work clothing, mental health therapy and case management. For more information and to make a donation, visit www.secondchanceoc.org.


CERT and Green on Green expos drew crowds

The 11th Annual Disaster Preparedness Expo was held on Saturday, Sept. at the Newport Beach Civic Center Green in conjunction with the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce’s “Green on Green” expo – drawing a crowd of all ages.

CERT and Green on Green Evalie duMars

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Photos courtesy of NBFD

CERT volunteer Evalie DuMars (R) shares information on disaster preparedness during the expo

The City’s Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) was on hand to share information and answer questions. CERT is a nationally recognized, Department of Homeland Security/FEMA training program which teaches residents how to be prepared for unexpected disasters. In addition, there was a petting zoo, family activities, free electronics recycling and document shredding.

CERT and Green on Green Matt, Katie Raymi

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 (L-R) Matt Brisbois, NBFD Life Safety Specialist and CERT Coordinator; Katie Eing, Emergency Services Coordinator and Life Safety Specialist, Raymi Wun

Are you prepared for an unexpected emergency? If not, take one of the Newport Beach Fire Department’s (NBFD’s) fall 2019 Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) programs. This fall, the fire department is offering two CERT programs: a Tuesday through Thursday evening program that starts on September 17 and an all-day Saturday program that starts on September 21. 

CERT and Green on Green NBPD

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Newport Beach Police Department personnel were on hand to provide safety tips and information on crime alerts

For more information on the fall 2019 Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) programs email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or go to www.nbcert.org. Now is the time for Newport Beach residents to get prepared for any unexpected emergency, before it happens.

CERT and Green on Green volunteers

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Matt Brisbois and Raymi Wun flank CERT volunteers


Central Library to celebrate International Literacy Day on September 12

On Thursday, Sept. 12, come celebrate the dedicated tutors, learners and supporters of the Newport/Mesa ProLiteracy program during the annual Literacy Day luncheon event from 10 a.m.-12 p.m. in Central Library’s Friends Meeting Room.

Central Library to celebrate International Literacy Day

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According to Cherall Weiss, Newport/Mesa ProLiteracy’s literacy coordinator, “International Literacy Day was established by the UN in 1966 as a way to remind people about the importance of literacy on human dignity. With 40 million people in the United States who struggle with basic reading, it is still important to remember. Newport/Mesa ProLiteracy uses this day to celebrate our learners and the wonderful accomplishments that they have achieved during the year. We honor an adult learner for outstanding achievement with the Rochelle Hoffman Memorial Award and will be honoring our high school graduates as well. These learners exemplify the ideals of International Literacy Day.”

To RSVP and get more information, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 949.717.3874.

Newport Beach Public Library is located at 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.


Take a walk through the renovated Historic District at Crystal Cove State Park on Sunday

Take a walk through the renovated 12-acre Historic District on Sunday, Sept. 15 from 12-2 p.m. Former lifelong resident Laura Davick will share stories about the colorful past of the Cove including its history, its rescue and the plans for restoring the remaining 17 cottages.

Talk a walk through cottages

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Courtesy of Crystal Cove Conservancy

View the charming renovated cottages and learn about their nostalgic past on the Historic District walk

Park in the Los Trancos parking lot then cross PCH at the signaled intersection and walk across the marked pathways and meet at the bluff top deck of the overnight rental check-in cottage.

For a calendar of upcoming events at Crystal Cove State Park, visit our Calendars section here.


Let’s go sailing with OASIS

If you love the water, check out OASIS Sailing Club, which makes recreational sailing available to its members and guests, while providing instruction in sailing to those members who wish to learn how to handle a sailboat.

Enjoy year-round sailing in OASIS’ beautiful Catalina 34MKII sloops, OASIS-V and OASIS-VI. Both are in excellent condition and ready for all-weather operations.

Let s go sailing OASIS V I

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Courtesy of OASIS Senior Center

Come aboard OASIS VI, one of two sailing vessels available to OASIS members and their guests

Sailing is sometimes tranquil and always enjoyable. More than 150 friendly club members welcome both experienced and new sailors. The Club meets the last Wednesday of every month. There is a $42 monthly dues fees. Sailing is free. Google “Oasis Sailing Club” for the website. Call Membership Chair Rob Reid at 510.329.2741 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for membership details.

OASIS Senior Center is located at 801 Narcissus Ave., Corona del Mar.

For a calendar of upcoming OASIS Senior Center events, visit our Calendars section here.

(Link “visit our Calendars tab here” through to Calendars tab)


Furnishing Hope to hold “The Future is Bright” gala on October 12

Furnishing Hope will host its fundraising gala, “The Future is Bright,” on Saturday, Oct. 12. TruClear Global, the intersection of art and technology, is the presenting sponsor, and has donated their state-of-the-art Experience Center in Newport Beach for the evening. Proceeds from this event help furnish the homes of our military heroes and single parents with children as they transition to independent living.

Guests will enjoy an evening of elegant fun with a live and silent auction, an opportunity drawing, cocktail reception, and sit-down dinner catered by Mark’s Desserts and Catering, while experiencing next level technology at TruClear Global.

To become a sponsor, donate to the silent or live auction, or purchase tickets to the event, visit www.furnishinghope.org or call 949.419.4574.

Furnishing Hope provides home furnishings and supplies to families in crisis as they transition to independent living. Through thoughtful design, they empower families as they regain independence, dignity and stability. It is their vision to stop the cycle of homelessness. Their recipients face unimaginable obstacles as they overcome life’s most difficult situations. Imagine how a mother feels as her children sleep on the floor and have nowhere to sit for a family meal. Community involvement, sponsorship and attending “The Future is Bright” gala will assist Furnishing Hope in providing much needed necessities to the families they serve.

To learn more about Furnishing Hope, visit www.FurnishingHope.org.


Bank of America makes $647,500 investment with Orange County’s nonprofits

Bank of America has provided $647,500 in grants to 30 Orange County nonprofits that will advance economic mobility for individuals and families and put them on a path toward success. The grants focus on workforce development that help people chart a path to better economic futures, as well as basic needs fundamental to building lifelong stability. Bank of America Orange County is located in Newport Beach.

Despite the region’s strong economy, many Orange County households are still struggling financially as a family of four would need to hold more than three full-time, minimum-wage jobs to achieve economic security, according to United Way of Orange County. At the same time, hunger and homelessness continue across the region with nearly 7,000 who are homeless and more than 290,000 people, including one in six children who are at risk of hunger each month, according to Point in Time and Second Harvest Food Bank.

Bank of America makes Shari Battle

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Courtesy of Orange County Community Foundation

Orange County Community Foundation staff with Bank of America representative Shari Battle (far right), senior VP, Orange County market manager, Enterprise Business and Community Engagement

 The local nonprofits receiving funding are connecting youth to first-time jobs, giving young adults alternative pathways to employment, and providing second chances to individuals with barriers to help them rebuild careers and lives. Additionally, funding will help individuals and families in Orange County address basic needs such as access to food and shelter that are fundamental to attain economic stability.

“So many of us are just one life event away from needing to depend on basic needs services such as food banks or shelters, while others remain under-employed lacking the evolving job skills necessary to be part of today’s booming workforce economy,” said Allen Staff, Orange County market president, Bank of America. “But through strategic philanthropic investments into Orange County’s incredible nonprofit network addressing needs such as hunger relief, shelter and career access, Bank of America can deploy its capital to advance more economic opportunities in the region.”

Bank of America boy at computer

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Courtesy of Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Orange Coast

Mastering computer skills advances economic opportunities when our youth mature and go out into the workplace

Solutions for Urban Agriculture (SFUA) is using its grant to establish an above-ground urban regenerative microfarm at the Farm + Food Lab in the Orange County Great Park. This is an economically sustainable, replicable model to create living wage jobs growing produce in microfarms that can be placed anywhere such as vacant lots or in urban food deserts creating affordable nutrition sources for inner-city residents.

“As a nonprofit, SFUA’s mission is to grow nutrient dense food to sustain healthy communities,” said Nathan Gipple, SFUA Senior Director and Farm + Food Lab Director. “This microfarm demonstration at the Farm + Food Lab is an exciting example of the amazing abundance that is possible in a small urban space. It is one of the ways we are working to end hunger in Orange County and beyond.”

Mercy House, a leader in mitigating homelessness will use its grant for programs including street outreach, diversion, homeless prevention, emergency shelters and services, transitional and interim housing, rapid rehousing, permanent supportive housing, affordable housing and residential services.

“We partner with Bank of America through our Continuum of Care programs to be able to provide a variety of housing for those in need,” said Larry Haynes, Mercy House executive director. “With support from their employee volunteers, we help lay a foundation for the individuals and families who struggle to access to permanent housing and continue to grow our impact in the Orange County community.”

Among the Orange County-area organizations receiving grants are the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Orange Coast (whose clubs include the Newport Beach Club) and Newport Beach-based Orange County Community Foundation.


“Tastemakers of Orange County comes to Julianne and George Argyros Plaza

The Orange County Asian and Pacific Islander Community Alliance (OCAPICA) presents its 4th annual «Tastemakers of Orange County” on Thursday, Sept. 12 in the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts.

This culinary event celebrates the Asian and Pacific Islander community, culture and heritage by giving guests the opportunity to taste and indulge in Asian and Pacific Island-inspired cuisines and beverages from distinguished chefs throughout Orange County.

Among the participating chefs are these from Newport: Ivan Calderon, Taco Rosa; Brian Huskey, Tackle Box; Ed Lee, Wahoo’s Fish Taco; Shelly Register, A Market; and Max Schlutz, Sessions Deli.

In addition to the food tastings, guests will have the opportunity to enjoy beverages by Union Wine Co., Gaviña Coffee, 7 Leaves Café, Firestone Walker 805 and Lagunitas Brewing Company.

Festivities will also include entertainment, a silent auction and an opportunity drawing. Tickets are $135 for VIP, which allows early entry at 6 p.m., access to a VIP area and a VIP gift bag; $95 for general admission from 7-9 p.m.

Proceeds benefit OCAPICA to support mental health, health, workforce, youth in education, and civic engagement opportunities for low income families throughout Orange County.

For tickets, visit www.tastemakersofoc.com.

Julianne and George Argyros Plaza at Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


Newport Beach Women’s Democratic Club to hold monthly meeting on September 17

The Newport Beach Women’s Democratic Club (NBWDC) will hold its monthly meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 17 at the OASIS Senior Center, 801 Narcissus Ave., Corona del Mar.

The program features two speakers who will share information about the recent eruptions of gun violence in our communities and more information on possible gun control changes at the national, state and local levels.

Newport Beach Womens Sue Wilder

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Submitted photos

Sue Wilder, president OC Chapter, Brady Campaign

Newport Beach Womens Carole Hacker

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Carole Hacker, legislative lead for OC Chapter, Moms Demand Action

Ample and convenient free parking is available. There is a nominal admission fee. Seating is limited and RSVPs are required. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. for a networking social and light refreshments. The meeting begins at 6 p.m.

Visitwww.NBWDC.org to RSVP and for additional meeting information, or call 949.423.6468.


Guest Column

Grace Leung

An insider’s look at what’s going on in and around City Hall

Grace Leung 9.10

Newport Beach City Manager Grace Leung

Our next City Council meeting is today, September 10. The following are items that may be of interest. As always, this is not a summary of the entire agenda, which can be viewed here.

 Study Session starts at 4 p.m. and includes an update on proposed code amendments related to Third Floor Massing, Beach Cottage Preservation and the RM Zone. In May 2019, the City Council initiated code amendments related to these areas. Staff has developed proposed amendments based on City Council input and conducted a community meeting to review the proposed amendments with the public and design community on August 19, 2019. Comments and feedback received from the meeting and the proposed amendments will be reviewed with City Council at this study session. Following Council direction, staff will present the proposed amendments to the Planning Commission for their review and recommendations, and ultimately return to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for final review and adoption. 

The Regular Session begins at 7 p.m. and the following are items of note: On the consent calendar is the recommendation of the Parks, Beaches, and Recreation (PB&R) Commission with regard to Marine Avenue tree maintenance. At the August 13, 2019 study session, City Council discussed the maintenance of Marine Avenue trees, including staff’s recommendation of the removal and replacement of several trees. Council requested that PB&R review the trees and to report back on the actions taken by the Commission. PB&R reviewed the Marine Avenue trees on September 3, 2019 and provided direction that included the removal and replacement of four special eucalyptus trees, additional testing and review of the results before taking action on six additional trees and the replacement of the three non-eucalyptus trees with eucalyptus trees. All replacement trees will be 24 inch box lemon scented gum eucalyptus trees.    

For public hearing is the Appeal of the Reed Residential Variance for 1113 Kings Road. The Planning Commission approved a variance related to the construction of a new 10,803 square foot, single-family residence and a 1,508 square foot, four-car garage at this address in May 2019. The variance authorized portions of the upper level roof and deck, and portions of an office and covered patio on the main level of the proposed home to exceed the allowed height limit due to the steep topography of the site. The appeal was filed by Stop Polluting Our Newport (SPON).    

Proposed revisions to City Council Policy B-17 – Parks, Facilities and Recreation Program Donations is before Council for approval. B-17 establishes criteria for donations within the City’s public parks and streets system. City Council reviewed the policy in July 2018 and took an action to suspend the policy and directed staff to work with the PB&R Commission to review and make recommendations on revisions back to the City Council. The PB&R Commission conducted a detailed review of the policy, utilizing an ad hoc committee. Following the review, PB&R recommended changes related to the donation and maintenance period, increase to the maintenance fee, standardization of types of benches used throughout the City, disallowance of memorial language, and elimination of plaques for donated trees. Council considered these recommendations on May 14, 2019 and directed the removal of all donation plaques and to offer first right of refusal after the ten-year donation period. Council also directed these changes be reviewed by the PB&R Commission. The commission has approved these changes and now the proposed changes to the policy are back to City Council for final review and approval.

Amendments to the Municipal Code related to Chapter 6.04 – Garbage, Refuse and Cuttings and adding Chapter 6.06 – State Mandated Municipal Solid Waste Diversion Programs are required to be in compliance with state legislation that mandate commercial recycling and the diversion of organic materials from the waste stream by businesses. The revisions to the Municipal Code will require businesses and multifamily complexes of five units or larger to comply with AB 341 and AB 1826 or face penalties. Staff has been working closely with the affected businesses and franchise haulers to educate and gain compliance on the new requirements.       

As a reminder, public comment is welcome at the City Council meeting. The public can comment on any item on the agenda. If you cannot attend the meeting and/or want to communicate with the City Council directly on an item, the following email address gets to all of them: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The Week in Review is also provided this week. It is posted on the City’s website; the latest edition can be found here.

 Thank you for reading. Feedback is appreciated so please don’t hesitate to ask a question or offer a comment. 

Grace K. Leung

City Manager

City of Newport Beach

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

949.644.3001


“Gini” Robins celebration of life planned

Gini Robins

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Courtesy of Robins family

Virginia (Gini) Hutchison Robins peacefully went to be with the Lord on August 8th, surrounded by her immediate family. Virginia (Gini) was born in Covina, September 14, 1929 to Robert Nelson Hutchison and Nellie McAlister Hutchison. She was a 3rd generation Californian. 

Virginia was blessed to travel and attend numerous colleges. She first graduated from Mt. San Antonio Junior College in 1949 where she was a Jobs Daughter and named queen in 1948. She then attended Santa Barbara College, Fresno State, San Francisco State, La Verne College, University of Hawaii, Drake University, University of Colorado/Boulder, UCLA and ultimately graduated with a Bachelor of Education degree from San Jose State College in 1954.   

She taught 3rd grade for a total of nine years at Dos Palos Elementary School, West Covina Elementary School and Newport Elementary School. She then met Bob (Robins) and they married in 1957. 

While raising her family, Virginia was deeply involved in volunteering with the Assistance League of Newport-Mesa while holding various chairs, working in the Thrift Shop, and was a Kids on the Block Puppeteer. She volunteered at Mariners Elementary School, Horace Ensign Jr. High and Newport Harbor High in the 1970s. She also worked part time as a travel agent in the 1980s.   

Virginia was heavily involved in the Camelot Guild of the Segerstrom Center for the Arts, holding various offices, was President of Camelot in 1990-1991, and for a few years she was a docent for the center. There were other numerous organizations that Virginia volunteered at including Founders Plus, the Boys Club, NB Public Library Foundation, OCPAC/Candlelight Encore and Hoag Hospital Circle 1000. 

She was honored by Panhellenic with their Athena Award, the Volunteers of OC, Founders Plus and awarded the Maxine Gibson Award for Community Service. 

Virginia loved being with her family including her six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren at their “monthly” celebrations of birthdays and holidays. 

In her spare time, Virginia enjoyed gardening, sewing, snorkeling, reading and very much loved to travel all over the world with her husband, family and friends. Her favorite destination was always Hawaii. 

She was a member of St. Andrews Presbyterian Church since 1958. 

Virginia was preceded in death by her brother Jimmy Hutchison, her father and mother, and, her husband of 59 years, Theodore “Bob” Robins. She is survived by their three children, Sarah Triano (Frank) of Idaho, Jim Robins (Kim) of Newport Beach and Dave Robins (Laura) of Irvine. Her six grandchildren are Michael and Wesley Robins of Newport Beach, Nicole Boukather (Charlie) of Costa Mesa, Chad Robins of Irvine, Ashley Robins (Dallas) of San Clemente, and Julie Robins of Irvine. Her two great-grandchildren from Nicole are Barron and Emerson. She is also survived by her sister-in-law Mary (Robins) Philpot of Balboa. 

A service will be held at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church in Newport Beach at 11 a.m., Friday, September 13, with a Celebration of Life immediately following at the Santa Ana Country Club. As mentioned above, her favorite vacation was Hawaii, so be sure and wear your favorite Hawaiian shirt/dress to celebrate her life and her 90th birthday, which would have been September 14. A private graveside service will be held separately.

In lieu of flowers, any donations would be welcomed for the following:

Hoag Hospital Foundation/Circle 1000

www.hoaghospitalfoundation.org

330 Placentia Ave #100

Newport Beach, CA 92663 

In memory of Gini Robins

Assistance League of Newport Mesa

2220 Fairview Rd.

Costa Mesa, CA 92627

In memory of Gini Robins

Segerstrom Center of the Arts/Founders Plus

www.scfta.org/donate

600 Town Center Dr. 

Costa Mesa, CA 92626

In memory of Gini Robins


City Manager’s Updates

From the desk of Grace Leung

Special Meeting Held on Addressing Homelessness – On September 4, the City Council held a special meeting to discuss homelessness and whether to initiate negotiations on potential private sites for a homeless shelter in the City. Due to the changing legal landscape, the City needs to have shelter beds available in order to enforce our anti-camping ordinance. To address this need, the City Council has tasked staff with evaluating public and private sites for a shelter facility and pursuing partnerships with neighboring cities. This meeting allowed the City Council to provide direction on three private properties and receive community input. The City Council voted unanimously, 7-0, to remove the site of the former Pine Knot Motel from consideration as a shelter facility due to its location in the Coastal Zone. The City Council also provided direction to initiate negotiations for the property at 4200 Campus Drive and to take no further action on 825 W. 16th Street unless directed to do so by the Council. Any future action on 825 W. 16th Street would require Council direction at a noticed public meeting. In addition, Council directed staff to evaluate the City-owned Municipal Yard on Superior Avenue for a homeless shelter for cost comparison purposes, and continue discussions with neighboring cities for regional partnerships. Moving forward on this Council direction is top priority for staff.

Throughout the evaluation process, the safety and security of residents, staff, and visitors are paramount in driving the planning and implementation of a shelter facility. Any shelter facility under consideration would require a reservation-only intake process, 24/7 on-site security, and a buffer zone of code enforcement responsibilities to ensure safe and orderly access. The reservation process involves partnering with law enforcement, clearing background checks, and processing intake assessments with City Net. City Net is the City’s contracted social service provider. 

In addition to evaluating shelter options, the City Council and staff continue to pursue a multifaceted approach to solve issues resulting from homelessness. City staff is working closely with OCTA and the Irvine Company to address the concerns at the OCTA Transportation Center. This week, OCTA provided authorization for the Newport Beach Police Department to enforce trespassing violations at the Transportation Center when the center is closed at night. Following posting of additional signage, we anticipate enforcement to occur in the coming days. The Homeless Task Force, which includes three Council members and seven members of the community, is working on long-term strategies and a comprehensive community plan for addressing homelessness.

GP Update Steering Committee Meeting – On Thursday, September 12, the General Plan Update Steering Committee (GPUSC) will meet in the Bay Island Room (second floor) of Marina Park beginning at 6 p.m. The entire community is invited and encouraged to attend, as this will be an exciting meeting with much to talk about.

The GPUSC will review the design concepts for branding and messaging of the community engagement and outreach program, as well as the draft outline for the program itself. It will also discuss the community-wide launch event tentatively scheduled for Saturday, October 26, and will review the highly interactive online platform that will serve as an integral tool throughout the program.

The GPUSC will then meet again on September 25 at 6 p.m. in the City Council Chambers to continue the discussion and further refine the items discussed at its September 12 meeting. For additional information, the Committee’s page is found here. You can also check out the General Plan Update webpage at www.newportbeachca.gov/gpupdate.

Coastal Commission September Meeting – The California Coastal Commission will hold their next meeting (September 11-13) in the Council Chambers at City Hall. Each day’s agenda starts at 9 a.m. and the agenda can be viewed at the Coastal Commission website here. The agenda for Wednesday September 11 includes consideration of the City’s request for a Coastal Development Permit (CDP) for Phase 2A of the Big Canyon Coastal Habitat Restoration and Adaptation Project. Coastal staff is recommending approval. Please note that the agenda for Thursday, September 12 includes an item requested by Southern California Edison related to the decommissioning of onshore portions of Units 2 and 3 of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. This item may draw a crowd. On the Friday, September 13 agenda, Coastal staff will be making a presentation on sea level rise vulnerability in the Orange County area. They also will provide information related to the insurance industry about sea level rise considerations. 

Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) Update – On August 22, the California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD) issued their final Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) determination of 1,344,740 total housing units for the six-county Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) region. This number reflects the number of new housing units the region must plan for in the October 2021-October 2029 planning period. This regional determination is significantly higher than projections recommended by SCAG and does not reflect SCAG’s growth forecast, data inputs, or analysis that was previously developed collaboratively with HCD. Therefore, SCAG will file a formal objection to HCD’s determination and recommend an alternative proposed determination of between 821,000 to 924,000 units. Upon receiving the objection, HCD will have 45 days to make a final written determination. 

SCAG is also in the process of determining how to distribute the final HCD regional determination to each of the individual cities in the region, including Newport Beach. Each local jurisdiction is then required to plan for the inclusion of these new housing units in their local Housing Elements of the General Plan.

SCAG is currently seeking public comments on three proposed options for allocating the regional determination through September 13. Following the conclusion of the public comment period, SCAG is expected to adopt a Final Proposed RHNA Allocation Methodology on November 7. Utilizing the three proposed draft allocation options using the current HCD regional determination of 1,344,740 units, Newport Beach is projected to receive a local allocation as follows: Option 1) 3,245 units; Option 2) 5,292 units; or Option 3) 2,336 units.

Small Cell Technology Site Available – Wireless data consumption has grown remarkably in the last few years, outpacing the capacity of current telecommunication infrastructure. Smartphones, tablets, smartwatches; the collective devices we use to live chat with friends and stream video and music, have created an unprecedented wireless data demand. Small cell technology is being deployed around the country as the leading solution to meet soaring data usage and make coverage more reliable. Small cell technology will also help deploy future technologies like 5G, driverless cars, and other concept technology like the Internet of Things. To improve wireless signal strength in the community, the City is working closely with wireless carriers to deploy small cell technology on existing public infrastructure. The City is committed to ensure small cell proposals comply with all State, zoning, building and fire code requirements and that the aesthetic integrity of the City of Newport Beach is preserved. For more information, please visit the City’s Small Cell Technology Frequently Asked Questions page at newportbeachca.gov/smallcell.

Treasury Report – The July 2019 Treasury Report is available on the City’s website at www.newportbeachca.gov/treasury.

As of July, the City’s portfolio totaled just over $277 million, from all sources. Roughly $31 million of this portfolio was highly liquid, meaning it was available for cash flows associated with day-to-day operations and cash funding of major construction expenditures.

The short-term portfolio ($217 million) had a weighted average effective maturity of 1.87 years. The trailing twelve months’ total return was 3.78 percent. This return was close to the benchmark for the same period, the BAML 1-3 Year Treasury index, which returned 3.84 percent. The income yield on the portfolio, a better measure of income derived from the portfolio, was 1.77 percent. 

Water Transmission Main Valve Replacement Project – This year’s Water Transmission project targets deteriorated valves along Eastbluff Drive and San Joaquin Hills Road. Valve replacement work began mid-August for the valves located along Eastbluff Drive and is now complete. The contractor (T.E. Roberts) was able to bring in additional crews to complete this work before the new school year and avoid traffic related issues with school drop-off and pick-up times. Next up are the valves located along San Joaquin Hills Road. The contractor plans to replace these valves in a few weeks once peak water usage decreases.

Another Successful Summer for the Balboa Peninsula Trolley – This past Labor Day weekend marks the close of another successful summer for the Balboa Peninsula Trolley. For beach-going locals and visitors alike, this efficient, convenient and free trolley service ran weekends from 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. all summer long from Memorial Day to Labor Day. Having received great customer feedback, we look forward to continued ridership for the 4th summer of operation commencing in May 2020. 


Flashback Friday is here, we want your mug

Flashback Friday harkens back to yesterday, and we thought it would be fun if our readers submit their “mugs” and others try and guess who is it.

Send in a treasured past photo. It can be of you, your spouse, girlfriend, boyfriend, family member…you get the idea. 

We’re looking for eye-catching representations of your Flashback Friday to post in Stu News on Friday, to end the work week on a high note.

Please send your photos to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with Flashback Friday in the subject line. Let’s make Fridays a day to remember.


Captivating Corona del Mar

Captivating Corona drone

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Photo by Kevin Pellon (Instagram @socalsnapz)

A birds-eye view of our beautiful hometown


A 15-million-year stroll down Mariner’s Mile

By DUNCAN FORGEY

Sitting on an island of sand at a time when global warming is a hot topic, or perched atop a coastal bluff, eyeball to eyeball with a soaring Redtail hawk, or standing on a beach feeling the pounding surf reverberate through your feet – Newport Beach offers a variety of lifestyles.

These options come by no coincidence. Long before hordes of developers, amiable politicians and hyperactive builders got their hands on the city, natural forces, mother nature and God worked hard to sculpt the blueprint for Newport Beach. Sand, stone, rock and water comprise the entirety of the local geology.

Getting it to where it is today has taken a painfully long time. Scientists say millions of years were needed to create this half-water and half-mesa environment. During this period, Newport has been at times wide open lands and at other times water bound.

In an aggressive effort to develop Newport Harbor into one of the finest cities in the world, developers have achieved their goal. Since modern man settled the peninsula and marshes over a century ago, every square inch of Newport Beach has been occupied, altered and developed with a human lifestyle in mind. Gazing east from the peninsula, one sees expansive lines of houses and buildings so complex and densely populated that it baffles even the most ardent supporter of the city. 

A 15 million year aerial harbor

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Photo by Don Logan

An aerial view of Newport Harbor

Looking at all of the growth, it seems implausible that Newport Beach was once the sandy bottom of an ancient sea. As the ocean pushed its way to Nevada millions of years ago, Newport Beach sat under hundreds of feet of saltwater. This soupy brine of silt and siliceous-shelled microfossils rained down onto the ocean floor preparing for a future when the jeweled city would break into the sunlight. Using compaction, these and other floating materials hardened.  Geological folding and uplifting (tectonism) of the earth’s crust created a series of small coastal sea mountains. Proof of this can been found by a “Monterey rock formation” traversing the Back Bay to the Pacific Coast Highway.

Eons before mankind debated the existences of global warming and cooling of the earth, nature did darn well anything she pleased. During the Pleistocene Epoch (some two million years ago), coastal California was subject to dramatic changes in sea levels caused by worldwide climate change. Major ice sheets from the North Pole expanded and contracted pushing shorelines back and forth.  For an unimaginable amount of time, our oceans grew and shrunk. Modern science has documented at least 17 climatically controlled worldwide advances and retreats of sea levels within the past 700,000 years, showing that the earth’s environment is in constant flux. 

When ice caps grew and climate cooled, the oceans contracted. Newport’s shoreline retreated approximately 350 feet below present levels. Under these conditions, 10-20 thousand years ago, the Santa Ana River cut deep channels into the exposed ocean floor hundreds of yards offshore. Along with strong tectonic events and massive flooding, it created the “submarine Newport Canyon” just off today’s Newport Pier. Sand, silt and shells needed to form the peninsula, and islands were moved about and settled waiting for environmental conditions to reverse. About six thousand years ago, roughly corresponding with the arrival of bands of wandering native Americans, sea levels rose close to what they are today. 

The 15 million year fault map

Courtesy of the City of Newport Beach

This map indicates where local active and potentially active faults are located with respect to Newport Beach

Geological events in California continue today. Even though residents live in casual disregard, words like earthquake, tsunamis, liquefaction and erosion are bantered about in cocktail talk. These conversations are circular and get replaced by the more personal discussions about children, cars, income, houses, travel and politics. Nature often gets forgotten when it interferes with mankind’s personal wants.

Present day geological events are taking place courteous of the Newport-Inglewood fault, the San Andres Fault and 30,000 miles of faults that cut across California. Our local tectonic plates build up seismic stress that can eventually lead to a rupture. In addition, faraway places like Mexico, Japan and Alaska provide storms and tsunamis that can affect Southern California.

Newport Coast currently packed with gracious neighborhoods, sits atop marine terraces cut by an ancient sea. The hills were uplifted more than 1,000 feet by a previously unknown fault that is still moving. During the 1994 Northridge earthquake, geologists established a connection between Newport Beach’s summit and a fault line reaching deep into LA. Pelican Hill is probably over a million years old, and covered with ancient beach deposits and near shore fossil beds. This proves that sea level was well above contemporary levels. As the sea retreated, similar terraces were exposed from Newport Heights, through the Back Bay to Laguna Beach and south.

Newport Beach is most directly affected by a north-south fault that terminates in the ocean just offshore. It carries the name Newport-Inglewood fault. Poised along the north end of town the Newport-Inglewood fault is a fair concern due to a history of activity.

A 15 million year 1933 earthquake

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Courtesy of the Balboa Island Museum

The 1933 earthquake on the Newport-Inglewood Fault read 6.4 on the Richter Scale, caused 120 deaths and $40,000,000 in property damages

In 1933, the fault sent waves of crustal energy causing damage in Newport Beach and devastation in Long Beach. Geologists placed the epicenter somewhere offshore between the Newport Pier and the mouth of the Santa Ana River.

Southern California’s historic “oil fields” used to stretch from west Newport, through Huntington Beach, to Signal Hill and ended up near Beverly Hills.  Following this fault line, decades of hydrocarbon accumulation allowed Southern California to become rich in oil long before its beaches became famous for a very unique lifestyle. Huge oil reserves were tapped in west Newport with the Banning Ranch still pumping oil.

Engineers and geologists are also concerned about a liquefaction event in Newport Harbor. If shaken by a sizable earthquake, liquefaction occurs when compacted wet sand breaks loose allowing water to seep to the surface. Most of Newport Beach’s interior neighborhoods are built on compacted dirts or rock, but Newport’s islands and peninsula are not. They sit upon sand and deposits that were either placed naturally or after over a century of dredging. If shaken by an earthquake strong enough, the support will act much like quicksand causing houses to sink and the water to rise.

The 15 million year tsunami map

Courtesy of the City of Newport Beach

Tsunami evacuation map for the City of Newport Beach

Much has been done to prepare for such events. Tsunami signs and warnings are in place to remind people how to get out of town in the event of a tidal wave. Newport Harbor High School’s tower has been rebuilt and earthquake proofed.  New homes and high rises are all being built within current standards regarding earthquake activity. But the area has not been tested since 1933. This leaves residents complacent  about “the big one.” As children, our gang rode bikes down to the ocean front to surf and watch a tidal wave coming in from an Alaska earthquake. Fortunately, we were not punished for our stupidity. Our “monster wave” measured three inches according to the evening news and went unnoticed by just about everyone.

Newport’s scare in 1933 was the only one in recent years to give fair warning that we sit upon the explosive “Ring of Fire.” As far back as 1769, explorer Don Gaspar de Portolá originally named the Santa Ana River, Rio de Jesus de los Tremblores (tremors) due to four violent earthquakes that hit the area. They were so strong that even the local Indians were unnerved by their strength despite being used to such events.

The Newport-Inglewood fault consists of a system of right-lateral strike-slip faults. At 5:54 p.m. on March 10, 1933, the fault shifted. Geologists and engineers could not find any surface ruptures afterward leading them to conclude that the epicenter was under water just off Newport Beach. It read 6.4 on the Richter Scale, caused 120 deaths and more than $50,000,000 in property damages.  Most of the buildings of that era were unreinforced masonry and crumbled easily.  One hundred and twenty schools were damaged, but fortunately children were not in school at the time.

On Balboa Island, the pharmacy on the corner of Marine Avenue shook radically, resulting in its entire inventory being dumped onto the floor. Chimneys cracked and fell in several areas of Newport, but overall it survived quite well compared to further north. Unlike 27 years later when that stupid gang of boys rode toward an incoming tsunami, old-time Newporters were cognizant of the dangers of a tidal wave and fled to higher ground. 

~~~~~~~~

Duncan Forgey, a lifelong resident of Newport Beach, now makes his home in Hawaii. He is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Quiet and calm mornings 

Quiet and sunrise

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Photo by Jason Berry (Instagram @its_jason_berry)

Soaking in an end-of-summer peaceful morning at the beach


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Never-forgetting, Newport Beach Fire and American Legion remember 9-11

Fair Game Tom NewTomorrow is September 11th. It’s a day we’re all committed to never forgetting. In that fashion, the Newport Beach Fire Department will begin Wednesday 9-11 as they’ve customarily done since that day of devastation occurred. 

The NBFD will gather at the City Hall flag pole in advance of the first plane hitting the first building (8:46 a.m.). A radio broadcast from the Orange County Fire Association will then play. All in attendance will solemnly remember.

The public is invited to join in.

Later, the Sons of the American Legion-Post 291 will host a remembrance event “honoring our country and all the brave men and women who dealt with this devastating event.”

It will take place in the NB Veteran’s Memorial Park, 207-211 15th St., next to the American Legion on the Peninsula, from 3-7 p.m.

Our Mayor Diane Dixon is scheduled to be on hand, as are other dignitaries and first responders.

Guests should bring their own blanket and beach chairs. 

Numerous food trucks will be on hand, as will a Tom Petty cover band to provide some entertainment.

• • •

My friend Richard Dunn has just finished writing a book that should bring a buzz throughout Newport Beach. The title of the book is 14 Weeks: The Most Improbable High School Football Season in History.

It’s a story of the Newport Harbor High School football team’s 1994 run to an undefeated season and the CIF Championship.

The 194-page paperback is available at Amazon or you can get it through Kindle.

It’s an inspirational read about a team that was undersized and overmatched, yet prevailed at every turn.

Richie is the former longtime sports editor of the Daily Pilot and a regular contributor to the Orange County Register.

Speaking of Dunn, another aspect of his life was the loss of his young son Julian, who died in 2013 just months short of his 10th birthday after a five-year battle with brain cancer.

Going on now in the month of September is a drive to support the Julian Lego Corner through the CHOC Children’s Foundation. Sgt. Pepperoni Pizza Store, in Newport Beach, is making a donation to CHOC in Julian’s name for every pizza sold. They also have a drop box where the community can donate boxes of Lego kits.

Sgt. Pepperoni’s is trying “to make a difference in the loving memory of Julian Dunn.”

Julian’s Lego Corner was inspired by Julian’s love for Legos. It provides new Lego kits for hospital patients, especially those receiving care in the oncology unit and children with other serious conditions.

• • •

Stewart Hagestad of Big Canyon Country Club is one of the top amateur golfers in the world. This past weekend he joined the U.S. Walker Cup team at Royal Liverpool in Hoylake, England, to take on a team from Great Britain and Ireland.

The U.S. has been dominant over the years building a record of 37-9-1. But, come Sunday, they were trailing and needed a boost.

Hagestad was one of the Americans that came through big-time. He beat his opponent, Harry Hall, 5 and 3, to lead the Sunday comeback. The U.S. won 15 1/2 to 10 1/2, for their first win on foreign soil in 12 years.

• • •

You might have missed it, but Bianca Andreescu played and won the Oracle Challenger Series tennis tournament in Newport Beach last January. 

Well, this past weekend she was on an even bigger stage. Yup, that was her center court on TV. The 19-year-old Canadian beat Serena Williams, 6-3, 7-5, to win the U.S. Open in New York.

That’s quite a rise for a woman who was ranked 152 worldwide just nine months ago.

• • •

Don’t forget, this Sunday the 2019 Concerts on the Green continues with Flashback Heart Attack on the Civic Green from 6-7:30 p.m. Admission and parking are free. However, remember that people come out early, block off their seating space, and then return later. So, if you want a good seat, you’ll have to do the same.

A couple of food trucks will be on hand to enjoy, Chef TLC’s Sidewalk Café and Scooter’s Italian Ice. Picnics are also always welcomed. 

Come out and enjoy one of the best 80s cover bands.


Sherman Library & Gardens now accepting nominations for 2020 garden tour

Sherman Library & Gardens is in the planning stages for the 2020 Newport Beach Garden Tour. The annual tour will showcase gardens in the Newport Beach area. The Garden Tour committee of dedicated volunteers is seeking recommendations for private, residential gardens in this area.

Sherman Library & Garden flowering plants

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Courtesy of Sherman Library & Gardens

The Newport Beach Garden Tour showcases six residential gardens each year. Selected home garden owners will allow members of the community to wander through their yard from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. on Saturday, May 9, 2020. Homeowners do not need to be home for the tour, as Sherman Library & Gardens provides staff at each location. 

The Tour, in its 24th year, is Sherman Library & Garden’s largest fundraiser of the year and is an event for the avid and amateur gardener alike. 

“The best gardens are not always the biggest or most expensive, so don’t be shy. Nominate yourself, your friend, your neighbor, or that garden that always catches your eye,” said Scott LaFleur, Gardens Director. 

To nominate a garden, provide the physical street address, along with the owner’s name, contact information and a photo or two if possible to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.or by calling 949.673.2261, ext. 300.


Taste of Twilight at ENC on September 25

The Environmental Nature Center (ENC) will be hosting its annual Taste of Twilight. This dinner event, for ENC members and their families, will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 25 at 5:30 p.m.

Taste of Twilight lanterns

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Guests will enjoy hands-on nature activities along the trails, a complimentary dinner, and live music by the Shadybrook Band. The evening will end with s’mores and storytelling around a campfire.

The Taste of Twilight is a member’s only event – if you’re not a member, you can become one now at www.encenter.org. Pre-registration is required at https://encenter.org/blog/events/taste-of-twilight-3/.

For any questions, call 949.645.8489 or visit the website.


Sherman Library & Gardens’ Lunch & Lecture Series explores the world of fungi

On select Fridays of every month Sherman Gardens, in partnership with Cafe Jardin, features a horticulture speaker combined with a delicious lunch...the perfect way to end the week.

On Friday, Sept. 13, from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., the Lunch & Lecture Series: Getting Friendly with Fungi explores the fascinating kingdom Fungi with amateur mycologist Joanne Schwartz. She will describe methods for locating and identifying wild mushrooms in Southern California and beyond, as well as understanding their place in nature – oaks, pines, orchids, and more are dependent on fungal associations.

Sherman Library & Garden Joanne Schwartz

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Sherman Library & Gardens

Discover the world of fungi with amateur mycologist, Joanne Schwartz 

Attendees will hear tales of fungal folklore and consider eating and growing them. Schwartz will bring her collection of mushroom hunting gear and ID resources...and mushrooms too, if they are fruiting locally.

Schwartz’s recent collecting has focused in the Channel Islands, where she is leading a fungal DNA barcode sequencing project. She and her husband are also seen collecting and identifying fungi in the Redwoods and southern Sierra, as well as Wyoming, Colorado, Utah and throughout Orange County. Her presentation will feature finds from these locations and others.

Cost: Friends Lunch & Lecture - $35; Non-Member Lunch & Lecture - $45; Friends Lecture Only - Free (RSVPs are appreciated); Non-Member Lecture Only - $10. Lunch will be served during the lecture. 

For more information, including reservations, visit www.slgardens.org/lunch-and-lecture-series.

Sherman Library & Gardens is located at 2647 East Coast Highway, Corona del Mar.


Segerstrom Center’s 2019-2020 season kicks off with Vijay Iyer Trio

Segerstrom Center for the Arts presents MacArthur “Genius” Fellow and renowned composer-pianist Vijay Iyer on Saturday, Oct. 5 at 7 and 9 p.m. in Samueli Theater.

Described as “one of the great living jazz pianists” (NPR), Iyer makes his Center debut opening the 2019-2020 Jazz Season at the helm of his lauded trio which includes Stephan Crump, double bass and Jeremy Dutton, drums. The ensemble brings their innovative and intoxicating style to Orange County for two performances. 

Vijay Iyer Trio

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Courtesy of scfta.org

Composer-pianist Vijay Iyer

Single tickets start at $39. Tickets are available for purchase online at www.scfta.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa, or by calling 714.556.2787. For inquiries about group ticket savings of 10 or more, call the Group Services office at 714.755.0236.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


Roll up your sleeves on Coastal Clean Up Day, September 21

The Annual Upper Newport Bay Cleanup Day is a shining example of partnership in action. On Saturday, Sept. 21 from 9 a.m.-12 p.m., more than 1,000 people will venture out into the marsh from the land and the water to remove more than 12,000 lbs. of trash and recyclables. Individuals, families and groups are all welcome. 

Come join approximately 800 volunteers to help remove trash from the uplands and marsh areas of our bay and do some native plant restoration. Volunteers meet at the Peter and Mary Muth Interpretive Center. Shuttle service is provided to other areas of the bay (along Back Bay Drive, Bayview, etc.).

Roll up your sleeves volunteers

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Photos courtesy of Newport Bay Conservancy

Volunteers getting ready to head out to clean up our bay last year

What to wear/bring: Everyone should wear old clothes and close-toed shoes, because you will get dirty. Feel free to bring your own gloves and/or bucket if you have them to help pick up trash. It also helps for the land-based cleanup if you have tall/rubber boots or water shoes so you can get into the mud and reach those hard to get pieces that may be not as accessible when wearing regular sneakers. Please bring a reusable/refillable water bottle to help reduce plastic use. Be sure to bring your completed waiver to the event; minors need a guardian’s signature (those 6 years of age and up can participate). Click here to register for this free event.

Roll up your sleeves collecting trash

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Collecting trash along Back Bay Drive at last year’s Coastal Clean Up

Upper Newport Bay wants to remind you to order your Rain Barrel. Rain Barrel Intl. will be on hand to distribute rain barrels. Only $30 after rebate (Metropolitan Water District gives a $35 rebate for up to 2 barrels per household). Click here to order yours today.

For a full list of all Coastal Clean Up Day sites in Orange County and more information, visit Orange County Coastkeeper’s website.

Peter and Mary Muth Interpretive Center is located at 2301 University Drive, Newport Beach.


Orange County Community Foundation to host second annual “Igniting Potential” Giving Day

The Orange County Community Foundation (OCCF) will host “Igniting Potential,” a Giving Day to support the youth of Orange County. Now in its second year, “Igniting Potential” is the latest in a series of Collaborative Giving Days launched by OCCF to boost the capacity of local nonprofits.

Together, the aligned nonprofits aim to raise $125,000 for their shared vision. OCCF will power the campaign with seed funding for the marketing assets, campaign resources and collaborative partnerships.

“At OCCF, we believe collaboration is a powerful change-making tool,” said Shelley Hoss, president, OCCF. “We look forward to empowering our local nonprofits for a second year to collectively maximize their impact and enrich the lives of youth throughout our county.”

Orange County Community Foundation kids

Click on photo for a larger image

Submitted photo

“Igniting Potential,” will raise critical funds for nine nonprofits, including KidWorks, Orange County Boy Scouts of America, The Youth Center, Boys Hope Girls Hope of Southern California, MOMS Orange County, Assistance League of Irvine, Parentis Foundation, Us Too Gymnastics and Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County.

OCCF first challenged Orange County residents to “give where their heart lives” during the inaugural iheartoc Giving Day in 2015, raising more than $1.8 million through gifts to 347 participating nonprofits in just 30 hours. OCCF nearly doubled those results in 2016 during the second annual iheartoc Giving Day, receiving contributions totaling $3.2 million for 418 participating nonprofits. In 2017, OCCF re-envisioned iheartoc as an expanded opportunity for nonprofits to connect with one another in support of their shared missions. The seven Giving Days held throughout 2018 raised a total of $1.4 million for local organizations.

To give online, visit www.ignitingpotential2019.funraise.org. For more information, visit www.oc-cf.org/iheartoc.


Kids throughout NMUSD are back at school

Students throughout the Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) celebrated the first day of school on Tuesday, Sept. 3.

From the looks of these photos taken at some of our Newport Beach schools, kids were excited to be back on campus, sharing the beginning of a new academic year with all of their friends.

Kids throughout NMUSD Mariners

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Photos courtesy of NMUSD

Two “Marlins” at Mariners Elementary School

Kids throughout NMUSD Newport Heights

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These young ladies welcome classmates back to Newport Heights Elementary School

Kids through NMUSD Harbor View

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Youngsters at Harbor View Elementary School “rule” the jungle gym

Kids throughout NMUSD CdMHS

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Teen gals are all smiles at Corona del Mar High School

Kids throughout NMUSD Sea Kings

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Some proud coeds aka “Sea Kings” at Corona del Mar High School


Lido Theater temporarily closed for a refresh

One of Southern California’s oldest and most unique movie theaters, the iconic Lido Theater in Newport Beach is temporarily closing for interior upgrades and will reopen in Spring 2020. The Lido Theater, which marked its 80th anniversary last year, closed at the end of business on Monday, Sept. 2.

A single screen auditorium that has kept an air of Old Hollywood glamour, the Lido Theater will be refreshed while maintaining the integrity of the original theater. Improvements will include state-of-the-art-sound and projection, new paint, carpet and seating, as well as modern touches such as air conditioning and heating.

“The Lido Theater is an iconic art deco movie theater that we are committed to maintaining and improving,” said Paul Bernard, vice president of the western region for Fritz Duda Company, which owns the theater. “We are proud that the theater remains a cornerstone of Via Lido Plaza and the greater Lido community.”

Lido Theater marquee

Photo by Bob Hodson Photography

The iconic Lido Theater is temporarily closed for an interior refresh

Bernard added that the annual Bill Medley concert to benefit Lupus research and education, held in honor of Linda and Bobby Hatfield, is slated to return in May 2020. Next year will be the 10th year that Medley has done the concert to honor his late musical partner in the Righteous Brothers, Hatfield and his wife Linda, who lost her battle with Lupus in 2010.

In addition to its art deco architectural details, the Lido Theater features vintage movie poster cases, the original box office, and a magnificent red velvet waterfall curtain on an elevated stage. The theater also has some of its original Catalina tilework, revered at the time for its colorful hand painted beauty, and rarely seen in Southern California today. Harkening back to the golden age of Hollywood, the Lido Theater also has a balcony, which is not seen in modern theaters.

The Newport Beach landmark opened in 1938 with the Oscar-winning movie Jezebel, starring Bette Davis and Henry Fonda. A resident of nearby Corona del Mar, Davis is said to have traveled by the site daily while the theater was under construction, and requested a sitting parlor in the ladies’ room, which was built and remains today.

The Lido Theater is located in Via Lido Plaza at 3459 Via Lido, off Newport Boulevard, on the Balboa Peninsula in Newport Beach.


Let’s Get Outside...go hike Buck Gully Loop

Come and explore the entire Buck Gully Reserve trail system on Saturday, Oct. 12 from 8-11:30 a.m. Beginning at the OASIS Senior Center, participants will hike up through the almost three-mile length of the canyon, then along San Joaquin Hills Road for about a mile, stopping at Canyon Watch Park, where the group will take in the panoramic view of the reserve and the Pacific coastline before descending back into the canyon along the Bobcat Trail.

Let's Get Outside panoramic views, E. Spain

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Photo by Emily Spain

The Buck Gully Loop Hike offers panoramic views

Led by an Irvine Ranch Conservancy volunteer, this hike is 6 miles; the duration is 3.5 hours with high-moderate difficulty, conducted at a walking pace (approximately three miles per hour). It is geared to those 12 years and older.

This hike is free, but registration is required. Meet at the OASIS Senior Center auxiliary lot at 5th and Marguerite in Corona del Mar. Bring water, a light trail snack, sturdy closed-toe shoes and supplies to keep you safe during the journey. Sunscreen and a hat are highly recommended. Register at www.letsgooutside.org.

For a calendar of upcoming events at Let’s Get Outside, visit our Calendars section here.


Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens introduces Coffee Cart and Cocktails for a Cause

Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens has launched two new beverage programs you can feel good about enjoying all year round in the restaurant’s garden setting. Introducing the Farmhouse Coffee Cart, now serving freshly brewed cups from Riverside-based, small batch roasters Arcade Coffee Roasters and Cocktails for a Cause, which donates 50 percent of weekend proceeds from the ever-changing featured cocktail to local charities.

Located at the Farmhouse entrance, the new Coffee Cart offers high quality, specialty coffee drinks for both dining at the restaurant or take-out. Enjoy a gourmet cup of iced or hot coffee by the Farmhouse fountain or take it with you to wander throughout Roger’s Gardens.

Farmhouse at Roger s Gardens coffee cart

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Submitted photos

Farmhouse Coffee Cart serves freshly brewed cups from small batch roasters Arcade Coffee Roasters

“We partnered with Arcade Coffee Roasters because of our shared philosophy of specialized craft and quality,” said Rich Mead, owner and executive chef of Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens. “At Farmhouse, we value supporting farmers and using only the freshest seasonal ingredients.”

Just like Chef Mead nurtures relationships with local farmers to gather the highest quality of responsibly sourced ingredients for his seasonal menus, Arcade Coffee Roasters works directly with farmers all over the world to seasonally source the highest quality of coffee beans. Arcade Coffee Roasters provides Farmhouse with seasonal, exclusive blends that are roasted to specifications providing the highest level of freshness.

Farmhouse at Roger s Gardens cocktail

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Cocktails for a Cause features a highlighted cocktail, donating 50 percent of weekend proceeds to a local charity

Steps away from the Coffee Cart is the Farmhouse bar, introducing the new Cocktails for a Cause initiative. Each Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Farmhouse will donate 50 percent of the proceeds from the highlighted cocktail to a local charity. Designed as a drink to showcase the talent and creativity of Farmhouse’s cocktail specialists, led by Anthony Laborin, head of Cocktail R&D, these cocktails are fun, seasonally inspired sips that reflect what Farmhouse does best. The local charity benefited will change weekly along with the featured cocktail. Guests can learn which charities are highlighted and details of the weekend’s Cocktail for a Cause by following Farmhouse on social media or signing up for the restaurant’s newsletter.

“We have decided to use these cocktails as a way to pay it forward to as many as we can,” Mead said. “We are happy and lucky to be able to do this, and we hope guests come enjoy a cocktail in the garden with us to support a great cause.”

The Farmhouse bar is open daily from 11:30 a.m. until closing and the Coffee Cart is open from 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Farmhouse is open for lunch from 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m., serves a mid-day menu from 2-5 p.m. and dinner from 5 p.m. until closing.

Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens is located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar. For more information about Farmhouse or to make a reservation, visitwww.FarmhouseRG.com or call 949.640.1415.


Protect Our Planned Parenthood party raises $216,000 on behalf of reproductive health

More than 225 guests came out on August 9 to help Planned Parenthood of Orange and San Bernardino counties raise more than $216,000 to further its reproductive healthcare mission at its summer fundraising event, “POPP: Protect Our Planned Parenthood.” The event was spearheaded by co-chairs Afsaneh Alisobhani and Teddie Ray with assistance from a 50-member committee of Orange County leaders dedicated to the cause of Planned Parenthood and the healthcare of the entire community. About half the committee members and many of the event’s sponsors reside in Newport Beach.

Protect Our Planned Parenthood Teddie Ray and Michael Bryan

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Photos by Corey Sandler, OC Event Photo

Event co-chair Teddie Ray and artist Michael Bryan

Held at an elegant, modern outdoor setting near the Irvine Spectrum, guests ate, drank and danced under the stars. They heard the private reproductive healthcare story of a fellow Newport Beach guest who is a medical doctor and a foster and adoptive mother. At the 19th week of a long-awaited pregnancy, her obstetrician gave her devastating news: the fetus had a chromosome disorder that affected her heart. There was no chance of a live birth, and her life was at risk. She turned to Planned Parenthood for the termination procedure required to protect her life because no local hospital would perform it. 

 “Her story could be any of our stories,” co-chair Teddie Ray told the crowd. “It’s a reminder of how important Planned Parenthood’s work is to maintaining a full range of medical services in our region.”

Protect Our Planned Parenthood Walkie and Janet Ray

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Event supporters Walkie and Janet Ray 

Newport Beach residents who participated by serving on the committee or sponsoring the event included co-chair Afsaneh Alisobhani, Janet and Walkie Ray, Wendy and Larry Tenebaum, co-chair and Newport Beach native Teddie Ray, Karen and Bruce Clark, Jill Johnson Tucker and Larry Tucker, Ann and Eric Smyth, Jennifer VanBergh, Ann Marie and Gordon McNeill, Lourdes and Ted Nark, Beth and Howard Bidna, Cyd and Steve Swerdlow, Sheryl and Robert Anderson and Natalie Palomino.

Protect Our Planned Parenthood Jillian and Aaron Rosen

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Party attendees Jillian and Aaron Rosen

A portion of the funds raised at POPP is earmarked for education. One key element of education is de-stigmatizing birth control and STD prevention, starting with the condom. Co-chair Ray commented, “A condom should be viewed not as a reason for embarrassment but instead like a toothbrush or a tampon – part of smart, everyday self-care.” Indeed, research shows that condoms are effective and easy to use. They help prevent both pregnancy and STDs.

The event’s proceeds will directly benefit more than 100,000 patients who receive healthcare at the nine centers located in Orange and Sam Bernardino counties. Preventive care services comprise 93 percent of the healthcare its clinics offer, including lifesaving cancer screenings, breast health exams, annual well-woman check-ups, STD prevention and treatment, family planning and sexual health education. Services are provided regardless of a patient’s personal circumstances or ability to pay.

For more information, visit www.healthwomentrust.org.


“Newport Beach: Then and Now” exhibit at Central Library gallery

The Newport Beach City Arts Commission presents “Newport Beach: Then and Now,” a special photographic exhibition curated by Paul Wormser, director of Sherman Library & Gardens, on display at the Newport Beach Central Library gallery from September 9 through November 1.

Newport Beach Then and Now nostalgic photo

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Courtesy of NBPL

A nostalgic photo among the “Newport Beach: Then and Now” collection

The photographs are part of Sherman Library’s significant collection of historical local photography. The Library’s collections document the development of the region through books, archival collections, photographs, maps, aerial photographs and newspapers.

Newport Beach Central Library is located at 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.


Take Five: Meet Cherall Weiss, Literacy Coordinator

By AMY SENK

Each year, Newport Beach celebrates Literacy Day with a party that honors its learners and celebrates their native cultures with a potluck feast, speeches, awards and more at an event held at the Central Library. (This year’s event will take place September 12.) But literacy in Newport Beach is a year-round concern, and since 1986, Newport/Mesa ProLiteracy has offered free tutoring to adults who live or work in the Newport Beach area. I caught up with Newport/Mesa ProLiteracy’s Literacy Coordinator Cherall Weiss to find out more.

Take Five Cherall Weiss

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Courtesy of Cherall Weiss

Cherall Weiss

Q: Newport/Mesa ProLiteracy began in 1986 and offers free tutoring, one-on-one and in small classes. Can you share more information about the history and organization of the program?

A: The program started in the home of Carol Hazelwood, a local woman with a good heart and passion for literacy. Carol struggled to keep the program alive, but in 1988 she heard about a literacy grant from the state and applied for it with the support of the Newport Beach library director. After winning the grant, the program was relaunched and gradually gained traction. From this shaky beginning, we have continued to grow and currently work with around 200 learners each year.

Q: How many learners have come through the program over the years, and can you tell me about a specific learner’s story that was inspirational to you?

A: We don’t have early records, so the total numbers of people that have come through the program are hard to calculate. As mentioned before, for the past five years or so, we have been seeing approximately 200 people per year. There are always learners that stand out. Some because their stories are heartbreaking, and we are able to watch their improvement – baby steps for most people but leaps for them; others because of the amazing things they accomplish while in the program. For one man, who came to us with no reading ability at all, it was a huge success just to order from a menu. We have seen immigrants who were physicians in their home country working as home care aides in the U.S., and with help from their tutor they were able to pass the tests to become certified here as well. Then, of course, there are the dozens of learners who have become citizens because their tutors taught them about the U.S. and helped them through the test process. Recently, we started a high school diploma program called Career Online High School. We offer scholarships to adults in the community who demonstrate the ability to commit to the online learning process. We have had seven graduates – all of whom are women between 30 and 50 years old, each with a story. Last year’s valedictorian had to leave school when she became pregnant with her now 17-year-old son. Her goal was to get her high school diploma before her son did. She beat him by a semester.

Q: Literacy Day is September 8 – can you tell me more about that event?

A: International Literacy Day was established by the UN in 1966 as a way to remind people about the importance of literacy on human dignity. With 40 million people in the United States who struggle with basic reading, it is still important to remember. Newport/Mesa ProLiteracy uses this day to celebrate our learners and the wonderful accomplishments that they have achieved during the year. We honor an adult learner for outstanding achievement with the Rochelle Hoffman Memorial Award and will be honoring our high school graduates as well. These learners exemplify the ideals of International Literacy Day.

Q: What are some of the most common misconceptions about literacy in general, and in the Newport/Mesa community specifically?

A: One of the biggest misconceptions is that people that have low literacy skills are lazy and dumb. Of course, this is a stereotype, but often people who struggle with literacy have devised brilliant skills to compensate for their disability. That takes brains and brawn. The other misconception is that there is no literacy problem in our area. We know that to be a fallacy, as estimates indicate that in Newport/Mesa alone there are about 23,000 people who, if tested, would fall into the “struggling” category. For instance, we recently accepted a recently retired man into the program who had seen some success in his career. He lives locally, had recently retired and found himself with time on his hands for the first time in his life. With the encouragement of his wife and daughter he came to see us. Originally assessed at a third-grade reading level, his wife stopped by the other day to say he is actually enjoying practicing reading and has started to pick up his Bible. There are many reasons for low literacy skills in this area. Some of our learners had undiagnosed learning disabilities as children, many slipped through the cracks at school. For others, English is not their first language and they need to acquire more proficiency to achieve greater success in their lives – at home, at work and in the community.

Q: Are you looking for tutors, and what skills should someone have to get involved, and what should they do?

A: Yes, we are always looking for tutors as there is usually a waiting list of learners hoping to be matched. There are no special skills necessary to be a tutor other than good reading and writing ability and, of course, patience. Prior teaching experience is absolutely not necessary and, in fact, many of our best tutors come from outside the academic world. Prospective tutors complete six hours of training, are given a mentor and have the opportunity to attend “continuing education” workshops throughout the year. 

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk is a long-time resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Assemblymember Petrie-Norris earns support of the California Association of Highway Patrolmen

The California Association of Highway Patrolmen (CAHP) endorses Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris’ re-election bid for California’s 74th District.

In announcing their endorsement, Rick LaBeske, president of the California Association of Highway Patrolmen, stated:

“Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris knows that our law enforcement officers face unique threats and challenges on a daily basis. Cottie is committed to supporting our officers by ensuring we have the tools and training to do our jobs, and we trust her to fight for policies that keep Californians safe. We strongly support Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris.”

Assemblymember Petrie Norris Cottie headshot

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Submitted photo

California 74th District Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris

The CAHP represents more than 14,500 uniformed Highway Patrol officers across California. Formed in 1920, the CAHP prides itself on protecting the legal rights of its member officers, as well as supporting their families in times of need through charitable funds and scholarships.

Petrie-Norris was elected to represent California’s 74th Assembly District in 2018. Over the course of her first year in office, she has introduced more than a dozen bills, including important legislation to combat sea-level rise, improve services for veterans, expand access to birth control and save small business owners money. As part of the 2019-2020 State Budget, Petrie-Norris secured $4.5 million to help the Orange County Fire Authority’s Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance project to protect Southern California from wildfires and $2.9 million to end Veteran homelessness in Orange County.

She serves as chair of the Assembly’s Accountability and Administrative Review Committee and as chair of the Select Committee on Student Debt. She also serves on the Assembly’s committees for Appropriations, Judiciary, Revenue and Taxation and Veterans Affairs.

After working her way through Yale University, where she double majored in economics and English, Petrie-Norris had a successful 20-year career in finance and technology. She helped to build businesses and led teams at Fortune 500 corporations, small companies and start-ups.

Petrie-Norris lives in Laguna Beach with her husband, Colin, their two sons, Dylan and Hayden, and their rescue dog, Flounder.


Flashback Friday: Answer

If you guessed Tim Hetherton, Newport Beach Library Services Director, then you are correct!

Send in a treasured past photo!

You can submit yourself, wife, girlfriend, boyfriend or family member. We’ll even surprise them if you want. 

We’re looking for eye-catching representations of your Flashback Friday.

Please send them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with Flashback Friday in the subject line. Let’s make Fridays a day to remember.


Flashback Friday

Ready in the outfield...

Flashback Friday 9.6.19

Here is our Flashback Friday...harkening back to yesterday...and we hope you can guess who it is.

Clue: In 1972, this bookworm liked to play some ball, too.

Good luck guessing this one. The answer appears today at the bottom of Stu News.

Send in a treasured past photo!

You can submit yourself, wife, girlfriend, boyfriend or family member. We’ll even surprise them if you want. 

We’re looking for eye-catching representations of your Flashback Friday.

Please send them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with Flashback Friday in the subject line. Let’s make Fridays a day to remember.


Hoag becomes first in country to use AI-powered PET scans to improve patient care

Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian’s Imaging Department is blending unprecedented, innovative technology with patient care with the addition of SubtlePET™, new artificial intelligence AI-powered imaging technology that cuts positron emission tomography (PET) scan time for patients by more than 60 percent. Hoag is the first hospital in the country to adopt this groundbreaking software for patient use.

This is the first AI-powered software cleared by the FDA for medical imaging enhancement. The technology produces the same high-quality images seen in traditional 18-minute PET scans, while reducing patient time in the scanner to just 4.5 minutes – significantly improving patient comfort and reducing appointment length.

Hoag becomes first in country Hoag exterior

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Submitted photo

“By utilizing AI-powered imaging technology, we have been able to dramatically increase PET scan efficiency and provide a superior patient experience,” said Michael Brant-Zawadzki, M.D., F.A.C.R., senior physician executive and the Ron & Sandi Simon Executive Medical Director Endowed Chair of the Pickup Family Neurosciences Institute at Hoag. “The technology allows us to scan a patient four times faster than normal, yet maintain equal image quality, not otherwise impacting workflow.”

Hoag’s adoption of the new imaging technology enables completion of more exams in a day compared to conventional PET imaging, boosting hospital productivity and enabling more patients to be scanned comfortably per day on existing scanners.

Early adoption of game-changing technology is built into the fabric of Hoag. The hospital was one of five research partners, and the only in Southern California, to participate in a clinical trial designed to test the validity of the SubtlePET software and its impact on patients and standard of care. Hoag’s participation and partnership was paramount in the technology’s pursuit of FDA clearance, which was awarded in November 2018.

The SubtlePET imaging software is currently being used at Hoag’s Advanced Technology Pavilion in Newport Beach, with expansion to additional locations planned in the future. 


You Must Remember This: My Dad, Chief Justice of Samoa

By NANCY GARDNER

After my father retired from the appellate court, he signed on for a term as Chief Justice of American Samoa. I recently came across some letters he wrote from there.

The first wrinkle of my parents’ Samoan life started with housing. Before they left Newport Beach, they were provided with all sorts of information on the residence of the Chief Justice to help them plan what to take. Letters flew back and forth, phone calls. They had every detail they could want. There was only one small problem. When they got to Samoa, they found the house didn’t exist.  At some point in the months preceding their arrival – and during all the exchanges of information – it had been razed. Pago Pago being a small place (one stop sign), it seemed like someone might have noticed the missing residence, but somehow it had escaped everyone’s attention. So, while the government scrambled to find another house, they spent their first four months at the Rainmaker Hotel. I have been to the Rainmaker Hotel. Pelican Hill it ain’t, and as my parents waited for the government to resolve things, my father wrote of the experience.

His reaction will warm the hearts of small government adherents: “This has been my first direct contact with the Federal Government. When I worked for the city, I thought it was inefficient. When I worked for the county, I thought it was a disgrace. When I worked for the state, I thought it was a calamity, but working for the federal government makes all of them look like paragons of governmental efficiency.” The housing situation was eventually resolved with a charming house replete with a group (pod? bevy? gang?) of geckos, one of whom, according to my father, fell in love with my mother and would cling to the wall above her cooing amorously.

Another hurdle they faced was the language barrier. Although the Samoans all spoke English, the grasp of some of the finer details was elusive, as related in another of my father’s letters: “We get our news via Samoan radio with some startling results. Did you know that Joan of Arc was burned for hearsay, that Princess Kelly died of a massive cerebral hemorrhoid, or that David Kennedy died in his hotel suit? Another lady was convicted of murdering her 12-year-old invalid daughter – with the accent on ‘valid’.”

Samoa letter for 9.6

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Courtesy of Nancy Gardner

High Court of American Samoa naming Robert Garner as Chief Justice

Still, if the Samoans occasionally stumbled over English pronunciation, that was nothing compared to what he did with Samoan. “For me, Samoan is very difficult, with enormously long words and lots of vowels, each one of which must be pronounced. For example, a candidate for a Matai Title in a case I am trying has the name Leaosaasuego Asuega Moananu which is pronounced Lay-ou-sa-a-sue-enga Ah sue enga Mo ah na nu. Try that one a few times for size. When I call the calendar of cases in court, all the litigants sit there with puzzled looks on their faces as I mangle their names.”

Then there was the newspaper coverage: “The local paper just came out with a flattering piece about me which concludes that I should have the ‘respect and protection of all law abiding citizens.’ It then proceeds with a blueprint of how to get rid of me. It would be unfortunate, the piece says, if ‘his quarters were to be set on fire, his automobile tires to be slashed or his family to receive threatening telephone calls.’” My father’s gallant response: “Big deal! With this much rain you couldn’t set this water-logged house on fire with a blow torch, it’s Katie’s car, not mine, and she answers the phone, so any death threat would be addressed to her.”

None of it ever came close to occurring. In actuality, the welcome from the Samoans couldn’t have been warmer. They were quickly embraced within the local culture, as indicated by his description of one of the many parties they were always attending: “High Talking Chief Olo had a surprise birthday party for me – a four pig affair. In addition to the pigs, we had lobster, fish, ham, lamb, prime rib of beef, plus tables full of Samoan delicacies like raw fish, octopus, green bananas cooked in coconut milk. Lots of drinking, singing, and dancing – Samoan style.” And it wasn’t just social events. “We are members of the exclusive Pago Pago Yacht Club (14 Hobies) which together with our membership in the world-famous Lava Lava Country Club definitely puts us in the jet set. Of course the Lava Lava Country Club is only a nine-hole cow pasture, but it has live cows. When your ball lands in a cow plop, you can lift it out without penalty. The only problem is that there are no ball or finger washers.”

All of this made them quite content, but the thing that really sold my father on Samoa was the medical system. He was a self-proclaimed hypochondriac, always quick to go to the doctor, always being restrained by my practical mother, but even she couldn’t complain about the cost of care there. As he reported,   “The government has just announced that they are going to charge $2.00 a call for outpatient visits to the hospital and going to raise the room charges from $5.00 to $7.50 a day.”

After three years of prices like that, when they returned here, it must have been quite a shock when they got their first medical bill and found $7.50 barely covered the cost of an aspirin.

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, long-time resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Grants available for arts planning or projects

The Newport Beach City Arts Commission invites organizations offering cultural arts programs for Newport Beach residents and visitors to apply for 2019/2020 Newport Beach Cultural Arts Grants. 

The sum of $40,000 is provided this year for specific cultural or artistic planning or projects as approved by the City Council. The deadline for applications is Tuesday, Sept. 27.

Grants will be awarded to qualified organizations with strong projects that enhance arts education and community programs for the citizens of Newport Beach. Successful applicants must propose projects/programs for funding that directly benefit children, youth, adults and seniors living in Newport Beach, as well as schools within the City’s geographic boundaries. Applicants must also be able to document need, quantifiable success, a realistic budget and an implementation plan. 

Grant applications are available online on the City’s website at www.newportbeachca.gov/culturalarts, and must be completed according to the instructions. Applications can be emailed and/or dropped off at the Cultural Arts Office by 4 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 27. 

The address for delivery is Cultural Arts Services, Newport Beach Public Library, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach, Calif. 92660. Applications, or requests for additional information, should be sent to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Waves of change

Waves of sunrise

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Photo by Jason Berry (Instagram @its_jason_berry)

Mornings at the beach just got a whole lot quieter…as some would call it now, the “locals’ summer”


Sweet September sunsets 

Sweet September sky

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Photo by Michelle Mar (Instagram @itsmichellemar)

A cotton candy sky delighted locals this week in Newport Beach


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Dog Beach is becoming a no-no for dog lovers and trees will soon begin to fall on Balboa Island

Fair Game Tom NewDog Beach, located at the north end of the Peninsula between Newport Beach and Huntington Beach, is under fire for dog lovers. Orange County Sheriff’s Department deputies are now making regular appearances at the site with the threat of citations for those attempting to bring their canine friends onto the land.

Although the area isn’t officially permitted for dog use, the Orange County Board of Supervisors were very close a few years back to approving that use before environmentalists reared their heads.

Environmentalists argue that there is sensitive habitat on the beach property that includes two rare bird species – the western snowy plover and the least tern.

For now, it appears dogs will have to run loose elsewhere.

• • •

The final tally following Tuesday’s Parks, Beaches & Recreation Commission meeting is the immediate (this month) removal of four eucalyptus trees on Balboa Island’s Marine Ave. Both sides of the tree removal argument agreed that these trees need to go.

Next, it was decided that six other trees of concern would be given additional time and effort to strengthen them. If they don’t show signs of improvement, they could be removed come the first of the year.

Any removed trees and those already existing empty tree wells will be replaced by young eucalyptuses of a specimen more suited for that area.

Special Tree Replacement flier on tree for 9.3 meeting

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Photo by Lana Johnson

• • •

The City Council met Wednesday to discuss potential temporary homeless sites in a special meeting. They were looking at three sites and other potential considerations.

One site previously mentioned, the former Pine Knot Motel, on East Coast Highway, was taken off the consideration list.

The two others remain: the Avis rental car lot at 4200 Campus Drive, and the spot at 825 W. 16th St. on the border with Costa Mesa.

Council also added the City’s maintenance yard at 592 Superior Ave. and remain open to discussing partnerships with neighboring cities.

Opposition appears to be lining up against all of the above sites for a variety of reasons, but all relating basically back to Not in My Backyard.

Negotiations with property owners will begin as the Council tries to zero in on a plan.

No matter what, it’s not going to be fun or an easy decision.

• • •

If you’re not a regular reader of our Police Files feature, you might miss this. Forty-six-year-old Thomas Ladd McGregor, of Mission Viejo, is suspected of attempting this week to light the homeless encampment, next to the bus station at Avocado Avenue and San Joaquin Hills Road, on fire.

He was charged with arson of an inhabited structure and on a parole violation. He was slapped with a quarter-of-a-million-dollars bail.

• • •

Okay, imagine my surprise when I found out yesterday that I’m one of four people nominated for Best Local Radio Personality by OC Weekly in their Best of 2019 poll. As you may or may not know, I do a Sunday local talk show at 11 a.m. with Lynn Selich called Stu News Sunday.

To make the list, OC Weekly readers voted for their favorites during a five-week nomination period spreading over July and August.

Now, voting for a winner lasts from now through September 26.

On the ballot, my listing falls under the Arts & Entertainment category. To be fair, the other three included in the category are Emo on KOCI, Poorman and, my counterpart, Lynn Selich.

Should you want to cast your opinion, go to https://ocweekly.com/best-of-2019/.

As they’ve said for years in Chicago politics, “Vote Early and Often.”

• • •

Get your red, white and blue on for this Sunday, September 8. The Hail to the Heroes concert celebrating U.S. veterans and first responders takes place in the Pacific Amphitheatre at the O.C. Fair & Event Center at 7:30 p.m.

The concert will feature country music icon Lee Greenwood (“God Bless the USA”) in front of the Pacific Symphony. It will be an evening of “music, celebration and remembrance, to honor those who are serving, salute those who defended America’s ideals and remember those who never returned.”

Tickets are free for active-duty military, veterans and first responders. Those wishing to buy tickets to help support the event can do so here.

• • •

Finally, tomorrow, Saturday, September 7, is the Newport Beach Chamber’s Green on the Green event at the Civic Center on the green. The event runs 11 a.m.-2 p.m. and will also offer a disaster preparedness component. 

There will be information booths, a petting zoo, electronic recycling opportunities and more.

It’s all free.


Write Your Life Stories at OASIS 

Have you ever wanted to write about your life, but wondered how to get started, how to keep going and whether it is even worth it in the first place? In

Writing Your Life Stories – Introduction, you will learn how to turn the crazy, sad and wonderful stuff of your life into stories that have order, clarity and meaning.

With opportunities for giving and receiving feedback, you will learn how to prepare your stories for the benefit of future generations, possibly your greatest legacy.

Write Your Life Stories writer with pen

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The class takes place on Tuesdays from October 1 through November 11 from 10 a.m.-12 p.m., in Room 5. The instructor is Berteil Mahoney.

No writing experience is necessary. The group is limited to 15 participants. For those new to the class, a $15 materials fee is payable to the instructor. Cost: $140/8.

For a calendar of upcoming OASIS Senior Center events, visit our Calendars section here.


Top concerts, demolition derbies among the sold-out shows for 2019 OC Fair

The 2019 OC Fair offered a unique mix of entertainment options at Pacific Amphitheatre, The Hangar and Action Sports Arena, and the shows were a hit with fairgoers.

More than 200,000 people enjoyed concerts and attractions in these venues as part of the 2019 OC Fair, which ran from July 12 through August 11. For concerts at Pacific Amphitheatre and The Hangar, the number of tickets sold was up seven percent and 13 percent, respectively.

“The numbers are great, but for me it’s more about the dancing and the happy faces,” said Dan Gaines, OC Fair Entertainment Director. “I rarely watch the shows, but I could watch the people enjoying themselves all night. I’m glad so many people came and had a good time this year.”

Top concerts Styx

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Photos, courtesy of OC Fair & Event Center

Styx, who appeared July 14, was among the headliners at Pacific Amphitheatre

The Toyota Summer Concert Series at Pacific Amphitheatre hosted 31 shows, including three pre-Fair shows and five post-Fair performances. There were 12 sold-out shows including Rebelution with Collie Buddz and Iya Terra (both nights), Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo with Melissa Etheridge, Styx, Brothers Osborne with Chase Bryant, Chicago, Dwight Yoakam with Midland, The B-52s with Dead Man’s Party, The Fab Four, “Weird Al” Yankovic, America with Poco and Firefall and Jackson Browne.

New to the Pacific Amphitheatre this year was the Viva El Mariachi show, which grew from a smaller, but popular performance previously held at The Hangar.

Since the Pacific Amphitheatre was reopened in 2003, sell-out crowds have regularly been attracted to this intimate 8,200 seat venue, one of the most consistently successful destinations – in one of the more desirable concert markets – in the world. The Pacific Amphitheatre venue has been honored in the industry for everything from ticket sales to acoustics to its lobby design.

Top concerts Los Lobos

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Los Lobos took the stage at The Hangar 

In The Hangar, Grammy-winning artists plus quality tribute bands brought fans to the venue, where there were 11 sold-out shows in 2019: Brew Hee Haw featuring Dead Man’s Party, Brew Hee Haw featuring Fast Times (both performances), Los Lobos, The English Beat, Queen Nation, Rumours, Sweet & Tender Hooligans, Which One’s Pink?, Elton – The Early Years and Zeppelin Live. New to The Hangar this year was the Brew Hee Haw event featuring more than 100 craft beers, which was previously located in the Club OC area.

Top concerts Demolition Derby

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Crowds filled the Action Sports Arena for the Demolition Derby

At Action Sports Arena, there were motors buzzing, vehicles flying and death-defying stunts being performed either in vehicles or on bulls and horses. In all, there were 10 sold-out events, including all five monster truck shows and all five demolition derbies.

OC Fair & Event Center in Costa Mesa is home to the annual OC Fair and Imaginology. Year-round attractions include Centennial Farm, Table of Dignity, Heroes Hall and Pacific Amphitheatre. Throughout the year, events ranging from recreation shows to cultural festivals are held at the Fairgrounds.

For more information, visit www.ocfair.com.


Roger’s Gardens wins design awards

The 61st Annual California Landscape Contractors Association (CLCA), Orange County Chapter recently awarded Roger’s Gardens Landscape the following awards:

–Landscape Beautification Award Winner

–Landscape Beautification Outstanding Achievement

–Robert Wade Memorial Presidents Award

Roger s Gardens wins landscape awards pool  Roger s Gardens wins landscape awards outdoor patio

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Photos courtesy of Roger’s Gardens

Award-winning landscape designs by Roger’s Gardens

Roger’s Gardens is located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar. For more information, visit www.rogersgardens.com.


Pacific Symphony presents “Tchaikovsky Spectacular,” complete with brilliant fireworks

Experience the Pacific Symphony’s performance of Tchaikovsky’s thrilling 1812 overture, complete with live cannons and brilliant fireworks on Saturday, Sept. 7 at 8 p.m.

Pacific Symphony Presents Tchaikovsky Carl St.Clair

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Photos courtesy of Pacific Symphony

Carl St.Clair will conduct Tchaikovsky’s thrilling “1812” overture

Attendees will enjoy this famous romantic composer’s greatest hits including his memorable Violin Concerto, performed by the first prizewinner of the 2010 Montréal International Musical Competition, Benjamin Beilman.

With a variety of vendor options onsite to serve up delicious selections from a gourmet menu for pre-concert dining, your evening of great music in the great outdoors is sure to be memorable. Dine on the Plaza Pacifica pre-concert or in the seats during the performance. Gates open at 6 p.m. for picnicking.

Pacific Symphony Presents Tchaikovsky Fireworks

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Enjoy fireworks and live cannons while listening to incredible music

For more information or to purchase tickets call 714.755.5799 or visit the Pacific Symphony online at www.PacificSymphony.org.

The show takes place at the Pacific Amphitheatre at the OC Fair & Event Center, 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa.


Five Crowns and SideDoor name new bartender

Peter Thom has been named Lead Bartender of the Five Crowns and SideDoor restaurants in Corona del Mar. Thom joins the Five Crowns and SideDoor team carrying an array of bartending experience, including his most recent role as bartender and beer manager at Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens, where he designed the entire beer program. As a certified cicerone, beer lover and cocktail enthusiast, Thom is thrilled to have found the perfect blend of fine dining and craft gastropub at Five Crowns and Side Door.

“We are delighted to welcome Peter Thom to our growing team of talented staff,” said Ryan Wilson, chief marketing & strategy officer for Lawry’s Restaurants Inc. “As SideDoor nears its 10th anniversary in January 2020, Peter will certainly be a valuable asset as we continue to develop our bar program to be enjoyed by generations to come.”

Five Crowns and SideDoor name new bartender

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Bartender Peter Thom

When it comes to serving his guests, Thom truly enjoys the social aspect of bartending and the opportunity it provides to creatively satisfy each unique taste. While his beverage of choice is a bright and refreshing gin cocktail, his favorite drink to make is a creative spin on the classic Old Fashioned. When it comes to garnishes, he never misses an opportunity to utilize fresh herbs and fruits picked from the restaurants’ culinary garden, Hazel Street Farm.

Thom has already been hard at work behind the Five Crowns and SideDoor bar developing a new menu of seasonal sips including Smoke on the Horizon with Dulce Vida reposado, Siembra mezcal and fresh lemon, and will soon introduce a number of decadent barrel-aged cocktails.

“’m grateful to the Lawry’s family for welcoming me to the Five Crowns and SideDoor team,” Thom said. “It’s important to me to never stop learning, and to be a part of an organization with a proven commitment to developing their staff to in turn provide a better experience for their guests. It’s the creative environment that I’ve been looking for.”

Five Crowns and SideDoor are located at 3801 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar.


Christ Church by the Sea welcomes new pastor

Christ Church by the Sea proudly welcomes a new pastor to their congregation, Rev. Paul Capetz.

Rev. Capetz is a native of Southern California, having been raised in the Glendora United Methodist Church. He is a graduate of UCLA, Yale Divinity School and the University of Chicago Divinity School. He has worked as a parish minister, young director, college chaplain and hospital chaplain, as well as a seminary and college professor. After three decades of living elsewhere (Connecticut, Illinois, Virginia, Minnesota and Texas), Capetz is happy to return to his home in California and serve as a minister in the California-Pacific Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church.

Christ Church Paul Capetz

Courtesy of Christ Church by the Sea

Rev. Paul Capetz, Pastor

The oldest congregation in Newport Beach, Christ Church by the Sea was founded in the 1880s, and has been at their present spot since about 1930. 

The church welcomes all to worship with them on Sundays at 10 a.m.

Christ Church by the Sea is located at 1400 W. Balboa Blvd., Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.christbytheseanb.org.


The Red Queen, Mad Hatter and Catepillar invite you down the spooky rabbit hole

Combine Alice in Wonderland and Halloween and what do you get? “Malice in Wonderland,” a unique boutique is now open at Roger’s Gardens during regular store hours.

Follow the White Rabbit down the rabbit hole to experience Wonderland, a labyrinth full of strange and impossible décor to fill your home for Halloween.

The Red Queen Red Queen

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The Red Queen is expecting you at “Malice in Wonderland”

Enter the Red Queen’s domain, but be cautious of her wrath, or she will threaten to cut off your head with just a snap. Find yourself exploring the Mad Hatter’s workshop, full of treasures, surprises and frights. Celebrate a very merry un-birthday by pulling up a chair for a cup of tea at the Mad Hatter’s Tea Party as the clock strikes midnight.

The Red Queen Caterpillar

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This Hookah Smoking Caterpillar welcomes you beneath the rabbit hole

Visit Roger’s Gardens where “Wonderland” has gone mad and is completely reimagined.

Roger’s Gardens is located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar. For more information, visit www.rogersgardens.com.


Evening on the Bay to celebrate UNB’s 50 years

On Sunday, Sept. 8 from 4-7 p.m., the Newport Beach Historical Society (NBHS) presents “Evening on the Bay” to celebrate the 50th anniversary and history of Upper Newport Bay (UNB).

Enjoy spectacular views, a sunset dinner reception and a culinary journey through nature overlooking the picturesque Upper Newport Bay featuring local cuisine stations from favorite Newport Beach restaurants.

Following dinner, a special program will be presented by speaker Cassandra Radcliff-Mendoza, author of the new book, Saving Upper Newport Bay.

Evening on the Bay Radcliff Mendoza

Photos courtesy of Newport Bay Conservancy

Author Cassandra Radcliff-Mendoza is the featured speaker

Saving Upper Newport Bay book synopsis: During Orange County’s population boom in the early 1960s, the Robinson family moved to Newport Beach. A short walk from their home was Upper Newport Bay, where they and their neighbors could play on North Star Beach, water ski on the bay’s calm water, or dig in the shallow mudflats for fresh clams for dinner. But land developers and local government officials had a different use for the open space in mind – build a private harbor much like the bustling lower Newport Bay and Balboa Island. In 1963, 14-year-old Jay Robinson rode his bike down to North Star Beach and found a newly erected “private property” sign. His parents, Frank and Frances Robinson, would soon find themselves embroiled in one of the most important ecological battles in California, with friends, neighbors, newspapers, the government and the courts all taking sides. This is the story of two ordinary people’s life-changing journey, which ultimately impacted the history and ecology of southern California.

Radcliff-Mendoza, a writer and editor from Orange County, began volunteering at UNB in 2014 after visiting the park for birdwatching. Her passions include habitat restoration, local history and travel.

Evening on the Bay Upper Newport Bay

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A picturesque view of Upper Newport Bay

All proceeds from the event will go to support the Society’s ongoing historical preservation programs. This event is limited, so sign up early for this one-of-a-kind experience. The Society is offering a special discounted $30 ticket price for current members. Non-Members are also encouraged to attend, and as an added bonus, the $50 general admission ticket will include an annual membership to the NBHS. Kids 12 & under are $10. Mail your check payable to: The Newport Beach Historical Society, P.O. Box 8814, Newport Beach, Calif. 92658. For sponsorship opportunities, call 949.675.0501. For tickets, visit https://nbhs.eventbrite.com

For a calendar of upcoming Upper Newport Bay events, visit our Calendars section here.


Chat and snack with a ranger complete with s’mores at Crystal Cove

State parks, campgrounds and s’mores are a summertime tradition. Come down to the Berns Amphitheater at Crystal Cove State Park on Friday, Sept. 6 and Saturday, Sept. 21 from 7-8 p.m. to Chat and Snack with a Ranger and learn about some of the nocturnal animals that live in the park.

Chat and snack with a ranger

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Bring your s’mores fixings and they’ll have the fire pit lit. For this family night to share together, meet at the Berns Amphitheater (PCH inland at stoplight School-State Park, follow signs towards the campground.) Enjoy the $5 sunset rate.

For a calendar of upcoming events at Crystal Cove State Park, visit our Calendars section here.


Canstruction Design Build Contest returns to John Wayne Airport, open for public viewing

For the 12th year, Canstruction Orange County is engineering its unique design/build competition where the “bricks” are canned food, which are then donated to the Orange County Food Bank. Nine design build teams will construct structures made of food (starting August 29). Completed structures will remain standing and open to public viewing through September 29. The teams are drawn from prominent architecture, engineering and construction firms throughout Southern California.

Occurring in conjunction with the Festival of Children at South Coast Plaza, and also hosted by John Wayne Airport and ARTIC in Anaheim, Canstruction Orange County is the most creative food drive in the South Coast. Constructions can be viewed at each of these three sites.

Canstruction Design Build unicorn structure

Courtesy of Canstruction

Canstruction Orange County Design Build unicorn structure created by Fluor on display this year at John Wayne Airport 

Canstruction Orange County is presented by Fluor Corporation, who will once again be creating their “can creation.”

“Fluor is proud to once again sponsor Canstruction Orange County and support the many employees who volunteer their time and talents to make this event a success,” said DeeDee Rosenthal, community relations manager for Fluor.Our involvement, along with the other companies participating, has helped provide 730,306 cans of food over the past 11 years to the Orange County Food Bank providing 467,593 meals for individuals, families and seniors in need.”

The CanstuctionOC Build Teams include: Webb Foodservice Design, Gensler & WL Butler, Disneyland Resort | Design and Engineering, HNTB, LPA, Terracon & WD Partners, WATG / RD Olson, SVA Architects and Fluor.

The completed structures will be judged in several categories.

This annual event raises much needed food and money for the Orange County Food Bank, and provides public knowledge while raising awareness about hunger in Orange County, thanks to the efforts that Canstruction teams make to counter hunger in Orange County.


Calling all gardeners: Come join the OC Organic Gardening Club

Whether you have a green thumb or would like to find out more about organic gardening, come join the Orange County Organic Gardening Club on Tuesday, Sept. 10. Each club member will receive materials to start a flat of vegetable seedlings at home right after the meeting. Containers, soil and seeds are provided.

On Tuesday, Oct. 8, bring your seedlings back for the Bonanza seedling exchange and go home with a wide selection of vegetables and herbs for your fall garden.

Calling all organic gardeners seedlings

Only paid-up members can participate. Annual dues are only $30. The club meets on the second Tuesday each month from September through June with speakers and many other benefits. Meet at 7 p.m. in the Silo Building at Centennial Farm in the Orange County Fairgrounds. Enter the main gate at 88 Fair Drive and look for the red silo.

For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or contact Francene Kaplan at 949.722.3536.

Centennial Farm at the Orange County Fairgrounds is located at 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa.


Begonia Show coming to Sherman Library & Gardens

On Saturday, Sept. 21 from 10:30 a.m.- 4 p.m., come enjoy the Begonia Show, presented by the Southern California Begonia Society at Sherman Library & Gardens.

Begonias 2

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You’re invited to attend a spectacular judged show and sale. The show offers a rare opportunity to explore the many varieties of gorgeous locally grown begonias. A large selection of beautiful begonias will be available for purchase. The begonias will be unique species not typically available for sale in local nurseries. There is a $5 admission to the Gardens.   

The event will be held at Sherman Library & Gardens, 2647 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. For more information, visit www.slgardens.org.

For a calendar of upcoming Home & Garden happenings, visit our Calendars section here.


Support Friends of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter by becoming a founding member

If you take a moment to receive a heartwarming message that will brighten your day, go to the Friends of Newport Beach Animal Shelter (FONBAS) website – www.fonbas.org – and click on the section called videos under news. Especially look for the Henry and Maggie stories. 

Henry is the Golden Retriever found on the beach with a 40-pound tumor and Maggie needed a cart so she could walk and run again. Both were treated and have loving new homes, because of the tender loving care of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter under the management of Valerie Schomburg. They are also success stories because of donations from the community that have helped pay for medical help and the cart.

Support Friends of the Newport Brach Animal Shelter Maggie

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Courtesy of FONBAS/Newport Beach Animal Shelter

Maggie was lovingly adopted into a forever home

These and hundreds of other stories are what have drawn many people in the community to form FONBAS. Although the Shelter is very capably operated in a leased space by the Newport Beach Police Department Animal Control Division, the goal of the “Friends” is to raise community awareness and support for a permanent shelter with optimal facilities for the care of animals while they await a loving home or reunite with their owner.

If you would like to expand on the heartwarming feeling, then become a Founding Member of the Friends of Newport Beach Animal Shelter. Join the Furry Friends Family. You are also welcome to drop by the Shelter at 20302 Riverside Dr., Newport Beach. It is open six days a week from 11 a.m.-4 p.m.  The Shelter is closed on Monday. Valerie Schomburg can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call 949.718.3453. 


Jewish athletes win medals, forge friendships

By AMY SENK

During a spring and summer where Orange County high schoolers have made headlines for Nazi songs, salutes and symbols, a group of local Jewish teens joined others from around the world for the annual JCC Maccabi Games, which celebrates athleticism, artistry and Jewish pride.

“For me, I had four Jewish friends before Maccabi,” said Davey Singer, a 16-year-old who played flag football and basketball in this year’s games. “Now it’s crazy how many Jewish friends I have. It’s a great experience for Jewish teens to have.”

Rowan Schneider, 15, of Corona del Mar, agreed. “It’s an opportunity to be with so many other Jewish friends.”

Jewish athletes youth with medals

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Maccabi OC Jewish athletes share their medals

Both boys said they would describe the event as a sort of Jewish youth Olympics by day and a fun social scene by night. The games are hosted in different cities each year; Orange County’s JCC hosted in 2018, and this year’s games were in Atlanta and Detroit. About 3,000 teens participate each summer from throughout the United States, Mexico, Great Britain and Israel, and this year, Orange County sent about 87 teens, including 22 from Newport Beach.

Traditionally, the games begin with an Opening Ceremony that includes not only expected touches – a torch lighting and parade of athletes – but mindful and important Jewish ones – the Israeli national anthem and a tribute to the 11 Israeli athletes and coaches killed in the 1972 Munich Olympics.

Throughout the week (this year’s games were held August 4-9), participants danced or played sports including basketball, swimming, flag football and soccer. In the evenings, social events included dance parties, dinners and trading delegation “swag” – an OC pin for a Philadelphia jacket or a Mexican hat. This summer, Orange County participants brought home 91 medals, according to Raychel Setless, the OC Maccabi coordinator. 

Maccabi games are among the more meaningful experiences for Jewish teens that they have growing up, athletes generally agree.

“There’s nothing quite like this,” Setless said. “Even for kids who aren’t from religious families. You truly connect with every person inside that stadium.”

Jewish athletes youth competing

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Athletes competing at the JCC Maccabi Games

Maccabi also includes community service projects, and of course, medals. This year, the OC delegation’s 91 medals included 18 golds and 28 Midot medals, which award the participants who exemplify the spirit of the Maccobi midot, or values – respect, joy, pride, big heart and Jewish peoplehood.

Samantha Kaufman, a tennis player from Newport Beach, said Maccabi was the highlight of her summer.

“It’s truly amazing to be a part of something larger than myself that incorporates not only Judaism, but community, helping others in need, sports, arts, competition, Rachmanus (sportsmanship), festivities and togetherness,” she said. “My favorite part of Maccabi was being able to reconnect with the people who I met last year in the games. Additionally, I love being able to explore my Jewish heritage and tradition while forming long lasting bonds with my teammates, delegation and Jews from around the world.”

• • •

Meanwhile, closer to home…Plans for a proposed city traffic affairs committee or commission appear to have been tabled, according to City Councilwoman Joy Brenner, who first pitched the idea for the new committee at the July 9 City Council meeting.

Jewish athletes traffic

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Photo by Amy Senk

Bumper to bumper traffic in the middle of Corona del Mar

Her original concept was to form a committee or commission with community members and possibly a school district liaison, and to have that group hold public forums to hear about traffic complaints and suggestions. But after more consideration, Brenner said that launching a brand-new committee would take too much staff time. Instead, she said she is working on plans to make traffic a bigger part of the Planning Commission’s work, including by selecting future commissioners who have innovative ways at solving traffic issues.

“If we infuse that into the Planning Commission, I’m fine with that,” she said.

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 20 years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association and the Corona del Mar High School PTA. She and her husband have two children.


Giving Day for OC Boys & Girls Club raises more than $280,000 in 24 hours

On August 21, 15 local Boys and Girls Clubs partnered with the Orange County Community Foundation (OCCF) to host the second annual Greatness Amplified, a Giving Day for Boys and Girls Clubs in Orange County. The 24-hour effort raised more than $280,000 with participation from 377 donors.

OCCF launched this series of Collaborative Giving Days in 2017 to build the capacity of local nonprofits through collective fundraising around shared missions. OCCF powered the Greatness Amplified campaign with seed funding to support the marketing assets, campaign resources and collaborative partnerships.

“We are thrilled with the success of Greatness Amplified and thank each donor who opened their hearts and supported our local Boys and Girls Clubs,” said Shelley Hoss, president, OCCF. “This is a testament to the strength of our community and shared desire to ensure a bright future for the youth of Orange County.”

Giving Day for OC Boys & Girls Club two kids

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Submitted photo

The 15 organizations that participated in Greatness Amplified included Boys and Girls Clubs in Anaheim, Brea-Placentia-Yorba Linda, Buena Park, Capistrano Valley, Central Orange Coast, Cypress, Fullerton, Garden Grove, Huntington Valley, Laguna Beach, La Habra, South Coast Area, Stanton, Tustin and Westminster.

OCCF first challenged Orange County residents to “give where their heart lives” during the inaugural iheartoc Giving Day in 2015, raising more than $1.8 million through gifts to 347 participating nonprofits in just 30 hours. OCCF nearly doubled those results in 2016 during the second annual iheartoc Giving Day, receiving contributions totaling $3.2 million for 418 participating nonprofits. In 2017, OCCF re-envisioned iheartoc as an expanded opportunity for nonprofits to connect with one another in support of their shared missions. The seven Giving Days held throughout 2018 raised a total of $1.4 million for local organizations.

Additional collaborative Giving Days will be announced throughout the year. For more information, visit www.oc-cf.org/iheartoc.


MacArthur Boulevard and University Drive face paving issues this week

A contractor working for the City of Newport Beach will begin paving work on MacArthur Boulevard between the 73 Freeway and Ford Road, and University Drive between Jamboree Road and the 73 Freeway, on Tuesday, Sept. 3. It will take approximately four weeks to complete the paving.

The improvements include cold milling and overlaying asphalt pavement, traffic signing and striping, utility adjustments and other incidental items as required.

MacArthur Blvd. and University Dr. face paving issues this week

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Courtesy of City of Newport Beach

Map showing where paving work will be done, some requiring ramp closures

The construction work on MacArthur Boulevard and University Drive will necessitate intermittent ramp closures on State Route 73. Caltrans only permits ramp closures between 9 p.m. and 5 a.m., Sunday through Friday.

To help minimize traffic impacts, construction on MacArthur Boulevard, Bison Avenue (east of MacArthur Boulevard), and University Drive (east of the Bonita Creek Bridge) will be performed at night. The remaining portion of University Drive will be completed between 7 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

For more information, call 949.644.3331.


Flashback Heart Attack takes the stage on September 15 on the Civic Center Green

On Sunday, Sept. 15, the City of Newport Beach continues its annual Concerts on the Green summer series featuring an array of performers for the community’s entertainment. Enjoy Flashback Heart Attack, repeat winners of the best live band/best rock band/best tribute awards in Orange County, who will bring the authentic 80s cover band experience to the Newport Beach Civic Center.

Flashback Heart Attack band on stage

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Courtesy of NBPL

Flashback Heart Attack

This local Orange County band that has made it big, nationally and internationally, will lend some fire to the end of summer with a playlist that includes all the great 80s hits.

The concert takes place from 6-7:30 p.m. on the Civic Center Green lawn, located at 100 Civic Center Dr., Newport Beach.

Visitors are encouraged to bring their beach chairs and blankets for an evening of fun. Picnics are welcome (alcohol is prohibited), and gourmet food trucks Chef TLC’s Sidewalk Cafe and Scooter’s Italian Ice will be on site.

Admission and parking (on a first-come, first serve basis) are free.

The concert is presented by the City of Newport Beach Arts Commission.


Council to hold meeting Wednesday to discuss locations for temporary homeless shelter

The Newport Beach City Council will convene a special meeting tomorrow, Wednesday, Sept. 4, at 4 p.m., to discuss the initiation of negotiations with three property owners for a temporary homeless shelter to be located in Newport Beach. 

The City Council will hear public comments and then recess to a Closed Session to consider three properties.

“This is an important step toward providing a short-term solution to addressing the issue of homelessness in our community,” said Mayor Pro Tem Will O’Neill, who chairs the City’s Homeless Task Force. “As discussed at our recent Task Force meeting, immediate action is needed and providing temporary shelter beds complies with Ninth Circuit direction while we continue our work on longer-term housing solutions.” 

Council to hold meeting Thursday to discuss locations

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Courtesy of City of NB

Map shows three possible locations for the temporary Newport Beach homeless shelter to be discussed at the special City Council meeting

In addition to the private properties identified for discussion, City-owned properties and regional solutions such as sharing a facility with a neighboring city, remain on the list of possible shelter locations. 

Homelessness is a nationwide crisis that has generated a significant amount of public interest and scrutiny. It came to the forefront locally in 2018 when the federal judge overseeing Orange County’s homeless issues blocked cities from enforcing anti-camping laws if they do not have adequate shelter beds or other housing for homeless persons. As a result, many communities without shelter beds are now seeing homeless encampments in public parks, transit stations, beaches and on other public properties. 

Prior to going into Closed Session, the public will have an opportunity to comment on the potential negotiations as well as other issues of interest. As the City continues to take actions to develop or obtain shelter beds, public input will be solicited throughout the process. 

While enforcement of laws is a critical and an important part of addressing homelessness, it is one piece of the larger strategy to find long-term solutions to this complex issue. The Homeless Task Force is working to identify the specific needs of the homeless in Newport Beach, develop long-term housing options, and provide resources and tools for residents and businesses, as well as for people experiencing homelessness. 

“This is a complex and challenging issue for everyone involved, but it needs to be solved and we’re committing a significant amount of City resources toward short- and long-term solutions,” said Mayor Diane Dixon. 

The meetings will be held in the Council Chambers at 100 Civic Center Dr.


Caring Companions At Home owner to be honored at Alzheimer’s OC luncheon

The 13th annual Alzheimer’s Orange County Visionary Women Caregivers Luncheon to be held on Thursday, Sept. 12 will honor Diane Mondini, owner of Caring Companions At Home, with the Lifetime Caregiver Award.

Caring Companions Diane Mondini

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Submitted photos

Caring Companions At Home owner Diane Mondini to be honored at upcoming Alzheimer’s Orange County luncheon

Mondini opened Caring Companions At Home more than 20 years ago, because she wanted to provide a higher level of in-home care for seniors. At that time, there were only a handful of in-home care companies in Orange County. As business grew, she expanded to serve all of Southern California. Mondini has been in the senior industry for 35 plus years and actively supports UCI Mind, Alzheimer’s Orange County and CHOC Follies.

Caring Companions At Home is based in Newport Beach.

Caring Companions Eva LaRue

Special guest and luncheon speaker, actress Eva LaRue

The special guest and featured speaker is actress Eva LaRue, who is best known for her roles as Dr. Maria Santos on All My Children and Det. Natalia Boa Vista on CSI: Miami.

The shopping boutique opens at 10 a.m.; the program and lunch begin at 11:30 a.m. To purchase tickets, visit www.alzoc.org/vwluncheon.

The luncheon will be held at Rancho Las Lomas, located at 19191 Lawrence Canyon in Silverado.


City Manager’s Updates

From the desk of Grace Leung

Many members of the community have expressed their concerns regarding people experiencing homelessness in Newport Beach. This is the highest priority for the City Council, me and the staff. In addressing the issue, we are operating in a challenging legal environment with multiple agencies involved, making any actions and solutions a complex endeavor. Please be assured we are working as fast we can to work through these challenges and implement solutions. 

I wanted to take this opportunity to update you on what we are doing and share some of the challenges we have. 

What’s Happened to Date:

OCTA staff informed the City that they are concerned about individuals remaining at the OCTA Transit Center at 1550 Avocado Avenue (Transit Center) between the hours of 11:15 p.m. and 5 a.m., when the Transit Center is closed. Specifically, OCTA has experienced various negative secondary effects associated with individuals who remain on the Property after its posted hours. These effects include storage of trash and debris, public urination and defecation, and active interference with OCTA’s personnel and/or contractors who are attempting to perform maintenance at the Property. Given the problems it is experiencing at the Transit Center, the OCTA is submitting a letter to the City, which will authorize the City to act as the OCTA’s agent and enforce no trespassing laws at the Transit Center, and posting additional signage. Once we have the authorization letter and the signage is posted, we will begin enforcement.

–The OCTA informed us this week that it is going to move forward with a beautification project, which will require the closure of the area between the Transit Center and San Joaquin Hills Road. OCTA informed us that they are working with the Irvine Company on the improvement. I do not have a date from them yet on this, but we are hopeful that the site will be closed in the near future to accommodate the project.

–Working with several neighboring cities to determine if there is a regional approach that can benefit everyone.

–Evaluating potential sites within the City to set up a temporary shelter.

–Brought in a public communication firm we have on contract to update our website with resources for residents and businesses, discuss what we are doing and to get regular communications out to the public. We are working to get updates on the website next week.

–Temporarily reassigned an employee as our full-time homeless coordinator to manage all of the work that is occurring internally.

What’s Happening This Week:

The City Council will hold a Special City Council meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 4 at 4 p.m. in the City Council Chambers to discuss initiation of negotiations on three possible locations for a homeless shelter. This is the first step in evaluating the City’s options as we consider private properties, City properties and regional solutions to obtain temporary shelter beds in the short term. There will be opportunities for the public to speak before the closed session. Following City Council direction, extensive community input will be solicited throughout the process and before any final decisions are made.

Public Safety Response – Our Police and Fire Departments are on the front lines of working with the homeless population. The Police Department makes multiple stops each day at the OCTA bus station and will cite and/or arrest for illegal activity. From January to July of this year, the Police have responded 258 times and made 24 arrests on or near the OCTA property. During 2019, the Fire Department has responded 20 times to assist people experiencing homelessness.

Homeless Engagement Working to Move Individuals Off the Street – During the week of August 19-23, the City, Orange County Behavioral Health, OCTA, Orange County Sheriff Department and City Net (our social services provider) did intensive outreach at the Transit Center to determine how we could assist the people experiencing homelessness. During that week we made contact with 33 individuals. This is one of the many steps we need to take to get individuals to exit the street. It is a slow but effective process as we move toward housing.

Newport Beach Efforts – Last Several Months:

Newport is not unique in having homeless in our community. To give you some perspective, in January of 2019, the City participated in the County’s 2019 Point in Time Count and counted 6,860 homeless persons and 64 unsheltered here in Newport Beach.

The City has taken a number of steps to address this very complex issue. We work with each homeless individual on a case-by-case basis to see if we can get them the services they may be eligible for, including moving them into housing. Most don’t accept outreach right away. Oftentimes, folks are resistant to seeing case workers or our police officer assigned to work with the homeless (one officer is assigned to this subject matter full-time).

Multiple visits can be required before we can gain someone’s trust to even have them start talking with us to work on their solutions. That is why in addition to our full-time officer, who is assisted by a caseworker from the County’s Healthcare Agency, the City has contracted with City Net to provide homeless outreach services. City Net also deploys staff to assist with street outreach and case management services. Street outreach seeks to connect unsheltered homeless neighbors with emergency shelter, housing, or critical services, healthcare and providing urgent, non-facility-based care.

To best coordinate all of the City’s efforts, in the spring of 2019, the Newport Beach City Council formed a Homeless Task Force. The Task Force is comprised of three Council Members and seven community members who are working to develop a plan to reduce or eliminate homelessness. The planning process includes developing strategies to integrate all services needed; creating a list of community partners willing to assist with addressing the issues; reviewing and considering temporary housing solutions; and developing metrics to monitor the reduction of homeless. 

To be informed of the Task Force meetings, please sign up here: I would encourage you to get involved. Our next meeting is Tuesday, Sept. 17 at 4 p.m. in the City Council Chambers. 

Background – Below are some of the State and Federal laws the City must follow when dealing with individuals experiencing homelessness.

State and Federal Laws – State and federal laws determine how we work with homeless individuals. Cities and counties are obligated to follow the state and federal laws that clearly define what we can and cannot do when addressing the impacts of homelessness. Generally, case law precludes a city from enforcing its anti-camping laws if there are not places for the homeless person to go.

In September 2018, the United States Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in its Martin v. City of Boise that the Eighth Amendment precluded the enforcement of laws prohibiting sleeping outside against homeless individuals with no access to an alternative shelter. Specifically, the Ninth Circuit held that as long as there is no option for sleeping indoors, the government cannot criminalize indigent, homeless people from sleeping outdoors, on public property.

As a result, local human rights groups asked the federal judge overseeing Orange County’s homeless issues to directly block cities from enforcing anti-camping laws when that city does not have adequate shelter beds or other housing for persons as an alternative sleeping location. Newport Beach has no such facilities, though it does have one, 12-bed home operated by a local nonprofit. That home is at capacity.

It is important to note that the anti-camping laws apply to public property, not private property including the OCTA Transit Center. Private property owners can enforce trespassing violations on their property.

I know this issue is of deep concern to many in the community. I will continue to update you on a regular basis as we work thorough this issue.


Living in a purple paradise 

Living in view

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Photo by Michelle Mar (Instagram @msmichellemar)

It was another splendid Labor Day weekend in Newport Beach, with lots of pretty sights to see


Pretty in purple on Lido Isle

Pretty in sunrise

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Photo by Clark Reeder (Instagram @crca.photo) 

Another jaw-dropping sunrise in paradise over the holiday weekend


Good Morning CdM features NB Fire Chief

Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce presents Good Morning Corona del Mar on Thursday, Sept. 12 from 7:30-9 a.m. Come meet newly appointed Newport Beach Fire Chief Jeff Boyles, and learn first-hand about the department’s operations, fire safety and preparedness for natural disasters.

Good Morning CdM Jon and Jeff

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Submitted photo

Newport Beach Fire Chief Jeff Boyles (right), pictured here with Newport Beach Police Chief Jon Lewis, will speak at Good Morning CdM on September 12

There will also be updates from these representatives: Newport Beach Councilmember Joy Brenner, Congressman Harley Rouda, Senator John Moorlach, Assembly member Cottie Petrie-Norris and Orange County Supervisor Michelle Steel, along with information on the toll roads. 

Bring a friend or colleague. No RSVP is necessary, and the event is free of charge with complimentary refreshments.

Good Morning Corona del Mar, a monthly discussion group, takes place at the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club, 1601 Bayside Drive, Corona del Mar. 

For more information, visit www.CdMChamber.com.


Flashback Friday is here, we want your mug

Flashback Friday harkens back to yesterday, and we thought it would be fun if our readers submit their “mugs” and others try and guess who is it.

Send in a treasured past photo. It can be of you, your spouse, girlfriend, boyfriend, family member…you get the idea. 

We’re looking for eye-catching representations of your Flashback Friday to post in Stu News on Friday, to end the work week on a high note.

Please send your photos to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with Flashback Friday in the subject line. Let’s make Fridays a day to remember.


Carnival & Taste to light up Balboa Island’s Marine Avenue with food, music, fun on September 15

The Balboa Island Carnival & Taste of the Island will take place on Sunday, Sept. 15, from 1-5 p.m. The event is a perfect way to spend an afternoon with family and friends.

Highlighting the day will be cuisine from Island restaurants at food stations, carnival rides, arcade games, a dunk tank, pie-eating contest, DJ music & entertainment, a fashion walk, face painting, bungee jump, a climbing wall and opportunity prizes. The entire 200 block of Marine Avenue will be cordoned off.

Carnival and Taste street scene

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Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Balboa Island Carnival & Taste of the Island creates a lively street scene on Marine Avenue

Sponsored by the Balboa Island Improvement Association and Balboa Island Merchants Association, the carnival takes place in the 200 block of Marine Ave., Balboa Island.


Meet our new fire chief at WAKE UP! Newport on Thursday

On Thursday, Sept. 5, meet our new Newport Beach Fire Chief Jeff Boyles at WAKE UP! Newport. Presented by the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce, come learn about our new fire chief and his plans for the department, and enhancing life safety services for the community of Newport Beach.

Meet our new fire chief Jeff Boyles

Newport Beach Fire Chief Jeff Boyles

Chief Boyles started with the Newport Beach Fire Department in February 2000. During the past 19 years, Boyles has served as a firefighter, paramedic, captain, arson investigator, urban search and rescue team member, battalion chief, department training chief, assistant chief and now as fire chief. He has served as the Newport Beach Fire Association’s vice present and president, president of the O.C. Training Officers, O.C. area director to Cal Chief’s and co-chair of the O.C. EMS Committee. He is a board member with the Chamber of Commerce Leadership Tomorrow program and the Speak Up Newport Board of Directors. Boyles also serves on the city’s Marines 1/1 Foundation.

Schedule: 7:15 a.m., complimentary continental breakfast; 7:45-8:30 a.m., program. The event is free to the public, but the Chamber asks that you make reservations so that they can plan for food and seating. Walkups are welcome on a space available basis. This is a free opportunity to meet one on one with legislative and government officials, and stay updated on current local, state and federal issues. 

For more information, contact Pam Smith at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 949.729.4411.

WAKE UP! Newport takes place in the Central Library’s Friends Room, 100 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Bayfront home sells for record price of $35M, while Council looks for homeless relief

Fair Game Tom NewA five-bedroom bayfront home that stretched across three lots has sold for a Newport Harbor record high $35+ million, edging out a similarly priced home previously sold by actor Nicholas Cage back in 2008.

The three-story, 14,000-square-foot Balboa Peninsula home was capable of housing eight Duffy boats in a huge U-shaped dock, a theater, sauna, swimming pool, stone fireplace, 1,100-gallon aquarium and private beach.

The home was listed by Coldwell Banker’s Tim Smith. Tara Foster Shapiro of Pacific Sotheby’s International Realty represented the buyers.

• • •

Three potential sites have been identified as possible locations for a temporary Newport Beach homeless shelter. 

The first site is located near John Wayne Airport and currently houses an Avis rental car lot at 4200 Campus Drive.

Site number two is at 6302 W. Coast Highway in what used to be the Pine Knot Motel. A fire destroyed the property back in April 2018 and it sits fenced in.

The third site is at 825 W. 16th St. near the border of Costa Mesa in western Newport Beach. 

The City Council will meet Wednesday to discuss each of the potential sites behind closed doors in a special meeting at 4 p.m. 

Several groups have already expressed concern, including the Newport Heights/Cliffhaven Community Association and citizens from neighboring Costa Mesa.

The issue has heated up in recent months with the development of a small homeless encampment near City Hall, next to the bus station turnaround.

As of this time, Newport Beach does not offer homeless housing and as such is limited on enforcement opportunities within the community.

• • •

Corona del Mar High School senior Ethan Garbers threw for four more touchdown passes this past weekend in the Sea Kings 42-14 win over St. Francis High School, giving him 12 on the year after two games. The win moved CdM to 2-0.

The host Lancers, from Mountain View in Northern California, were playing their first game of the season.

Garbers’ line was 26 of 40 for 330 yards and two INTs.

Keeping it in the family, Ethan’s older brother and former CdM quarterback Chase Garbers started for the California Bears and led them to a 27-13 win over Cal-Davis. Chase was 16 of 28, for 238 yards, 2 TDs and 1 INT.

The brothers will be opponents next year wen Ethan moves on to the Washington Huskies.

• • •

Eighty-eight-year-old Jack Skinner passed away over the weekend after a lengthy illness. Jack, along with his wife Nancy, were the 2014 Newport Beach Citizens of the Year.

Jack had an internal medicine practice for years in Newport Beach. He was also extremely involved with environmental issues relating primarily to water quality on the Bay.

He began studying Bay quality back in 1982 when he discovered that it was being contaminated by fertilizers that were reaching the water through excess runoff.

The Skinners then worked to get government agencies to regulate runoff.

They continued over the years to stay engaged and the Skinners’ voice became one of the more respected ones offered up at City Council.

Jack will be missed.


Lahaina Galleries to hold reception for Master Artists on September 14

Lahaina Galleries invites the community to chat with four Master Artists at a reception being held on Saturday, Sept. 14, from 4-7 p.m., at the gallery in Fashion Island. Don’t miss the opportunity to spend the evening with Master Artists Roy Tabora, Steve Matson, Rino Gonzalez and Lori Wylie. Come discover their new collections primarily inspired by nature.

Meet the artists:

Roy Tabora – Medium: Oil. Born into a family of painters, Tabora was brought up in a world where art was a way of life. Already an accomplished Realist at age 20, he opted to continue his education, receiving his degree in fine arts from the University of Hawaii. Soon discovered by Hawaii’s leading art galleries, he has since risen to great renown as one of the finest seascape painters in the world. The splendor of Hawaii’s tropical shores is a constant source of Tabora’s inspiration yet in his creative process, he relies even more on his heart than he does on his eye. His original paintings and limited editions prints are highly prized by collectors for the qualities of majesty, mood and meticulous perfection.

Lahaina Galleries Roy Tabora  Lahaina Galleries Tabora Summer High Tide

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Photos courtesy of Lahaina Galleries

Roy Tabora and his “Summer High Tide”

Steve Matson – Media: Computer special effects for moving high-definition paintings and paintings in oil. He received an Oscar for his special effects work created in the movie, The Life of Pi. Matson continues to work in the entertainment industry and has been part of such films as: Star Wars EP3, Superman, Chronicles of Narnia, Polar Express, Percy Jackson and 300, to name a few. He has found a unique way to blend his animation talents to his art paintings by adding actual motion to his works. These “moving paintings” combine painting, photography, videography, animation and sound effects for private television play. Matson has completed multiple 10-minute programs, each taking almost a year to complete in between his busy big screen business. 

Lahaina Galleries Steve Matson Lahaina Galleries Matson MAUKA

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Steve Matson and “MAUKA” image of still from moving high-def painting

Rino Gonzalez – Medium: Oil. With his extraordinary eye for detail, sense of exquisite style, and style and love of storytelling, this fine artist has amassed a great following. At 16 years of age, he, along with his family, emigrated to the U.S. from Manila, Philippines in 1978. Like his father and mentor Lex Gonzalez, Rino grew up in an artistic environment and knew even at a very young age that he wanted to become a fine artist. Art connoisseurs and collectors were quick to notice his works ever since he first started to display them at a well-known art gallery in Los Angeles. His much sought after oil paintings are usually acquired even before completion. In addition, he has been commissioned to produce numerous paintings for art collectors both locally and abroad. This 38-year-old realistic painter continues to create at his studio in Los Angeles and has been featured in one-man and group art shows in California, Hawaii and other states. 

Lahaina Galleries Gonzalez Lahaina Galleries Gonzalez Beauty In Blume

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Rino Gonzalez and his “Beauty in Blume”

Lori Wylie – Medium: Acrylic on Etched Metal. Born in Southern California, Wylie’s first artistic talent emerged through music. She was blessed with musical parents who encouraged her to move forward in the arts by pursuing her love for the violin and piano. At age 12, she designed, created and sold unique jewelry pieces. After studying art history and music at Cal State Sacramento, she taught flute lessons, and played the flute and piccolo in the Camellia Symphony Orchestra. Her years spent training in classical music and improvisational jazz prepared her for the journey in fine art. Transparent and illusionary images such as waves, clouds, sun rays and other subjects in nature, and the ever-changing beauty and complexity of creation, laid the foundation of inspiration behind her work. Much of her current art is inspired by the island of Maui, where she has resided since 2010.

Lahaina Galleries Lori Wylie  Lahaina Galleries Wylie Newport Dream

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Lori Wylie and her “Newport Dream”

If you are interested in attending the reception, RSVP to 949.721.9117 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Lahaina Galleries is located at 1173 Newport Center Drive in Fashion Island (below the Cheesecake Factory), Newport Beach.


Joelle Dueck becomes first female gondolier in Newport Harbor

Gondola Adventures®, Inc. is proud to welcome its first female gondolier in Newport Beach – Joelle Dueck.

For the first time in more than 100 years, there will be a female sailing the waters of Newport Beach Harbor.

Dueck recently rowed her first cruise out with Gondola Adventures with five passengers.

Joelle Dueck Dueck as gondolier

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Joelle Dueck

 “​I have always been passionate about female empowerment, so this job makes sense for me. I am just stoked to have a fun job honestly. And let me tell you, it meets the requirement,” shared Dueck, who aside from being a gondolier is also a graphic designer and avid surfer.

Specializing in making magical moments happen, Gondola Adventures caters to passengers for all occasions. From a simple night out to a three-course meal brought directly to your boat, their vision upholds a long history of client satisfaction and dreams come true. Gondola Adventures currently operates 12 gondolas in Newport Beach.

To learn more or book your gondola adventure, visit http://gondola.com.


Fristers’ Celebration Gala returns to Port Theatre on September 27

Fristers, an Orange County-based nonprofit devoted to helping teen parents thrive, will hold its Celebration Gala on Friday, Sept. 27 at the historic Port Theatre in Corona del Mar. Fristers, its name combining “friends” and “sisters,” has helped more than 2,000 teen parents and children since 2008.

Newport Beach-based CT Realty is the gala’s title, “Community Changemaker” sponsor, while community volunteer Sandy Sizemore will receive the Founder’s Award at the gala for her significant contributions to Fristers. The Costa Mesa resident has donated videography services helping to tell Fristers’ stories over the past 11 years.

Fristers Celebration Gala returns Sanderson and Woodard

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Photo by Bleu Cotton Photography

(L–R) Diana Sanderson, Golden State Foods, with Newport Beach resident and Fristers’ Founder/CEO Ali Woodard

Fristers graduates will share their stories of how the organization has transformed their lives during video testimonies on the big screen at the Port Theatre.

Dress is cocktail attire and the evening begins at 6 p.m. with cocktail hour, opportunity drawings and a wine vault. The Fashion Island Hotel’s Coastal Catering will provide dinner followed by videos, the program and a live auction.

Gala tickets are $150 and sponsorship opportunities are available at https://fristers.org.

All event proceeds benefit Fristers supporting hundreds of teen parents to graduate high school, enroll in college and vocational training schools, get drivers’ licenses, find employment, get off of welfare and become loving, caring, responsible parents and role models to their children. 

Fristers, whose mission is to help teen parents build healthy and stable lives and families through educational classes and workshops, mentoring, case management and the support of a caring community, has helped more than 2,000 teen parents and children.

For more information or to refer a teen parent, visit https://fristers.organd email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The Port Theatre is located at 2905 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar


Childhelp Diamond Jubilee Fall Gala takes place October 19

On Saturday, Oct. 19, the Childhelp Diamond Jubilee Fall Gala - Legends of Hollywood will take place at The Resort at Pelican Hill.

It will be an evening to remember with dinner, dancing to live music by Daring Greatly, silent and live auctions, and casino-style gambling, all to raise money toward stopping child abuse and neglect, and to support the children under Childhelp’s care.

Childhelp Diamond Jubilee couple

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Event Chairs Joy Estrada and Gina Van Ocker along with Honorary Chair Janet Ronnenberg will lead the committee in transforming the main ballroom to bring legendary Hollywood back to life. For 60 years, Childhelp has been working to stop abuse and neglect in Orange County as well as across the country.

Childhelp Diamond Jubilee foursome

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For tickets, sponsorships, donations and underwriting, visit www.bidpal.net/childhelpocgala2019. You may also contact Linda Burns at 949.463.8804 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The Resort at Pelican Hill is located at 22701 Pelican Hill Road South, Newport Coast.


Canstruction design build contest returns to John Wayne Airport

For the 12th year, Canstruction Orange County is engineering its unique design/build competition where the “bricks” are canned food, which are then donated to the Orange County Food Bank. Nine design build teams will construct structures made of food (starting yesterday). Completed structures will remain standing and open to public viewing through September 29. The teams are drawn from prominent architecture, engineering and construction firms throughout Southern California.

Occurring in conjunction with the Festival of Children at South Coast Plaza, and also hosted by John Wayne Airport and ARTIC in Anaheim, Canstruction Orange County is the most creative food drive in the South Coast. Constructions can be viewed at each of these three sites.

Canstruction Design Build structure

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Submitted photo

Canstruction Orange County design build structure created by Fluor on display last year at John Wayne Airport 

Canstruction Orange County is presented by Fluor Corporation, who will once again be creating their “can creation.”

“Fluor is proud to once again sponsor Canstruction Orange County and support the many employees who volunteer their time and talents to make this event a success,” said DeeDee Rosenthal, community relations manager for Fluor.Our involvement, along with the other companies participating, has helped provide 730,306 cans of food over the past 11 years to the Orange County Food Bank providing 467,593 meals for individuals, families and seniors in need.”

The CanstuctionOC Build teams include: Webb Foodservice Design, Gensler & WL Butler, Disneyland Resort | Design and Engineering, HNTB, LPA, Terracon & WD Partners, WATG/RD Olson, SVA Architects and Fluor.

The completed structures will be judged in several categories.

This annual event raises much needed food and money for the Orange County Food Bank, and provides public knowledge while raising awareness about hunger in Orange County, thanks to the efforts that Canstruction teams make to counter hunger in Orange County.


The Red Queen, Mad Hatter and Catepillar invite you down the spooky rabbit hole...today

Combine Alice in Wonderland and Halloween and what do you get? “Malice in Wonderland,” a unique boutique that opened today at Roger’s Gardens at 9 a.m.

Follow the White Rabbit down the rabbit hole to experience Wonderland, a labyrinth full of strange and impossible décor to fill your home for Halloween.

The Red Queen Red Queen

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The Red Queen is expecting you at “Malice in Wonderland”

Enter the Red Queen’s domain, but be cautious of her wrath, or she will threaten to cut off your head with just a snap. Find yourself exploring the Mad Hatter’s workshop, full of treasures, surprises and frights. Celebrate a very merry un-birthday by pulling up a chair for a cup of tea at the Mad Hatter’s Tea Party as the clock strikes midnight.

The Red Queen Caterpillar

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This Hookah-Smoking Caterpillar welcomes you beneath the rabbit hole

In a world that is simply mad, join this unimaginable visit to Roger’s Gardens, where they’re all mad.

Roger’s Gardens is located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar. For more information, visit www.rogersgardens.com.


On the Harbor: Sailing to Catalina during Long Point Race Week

By LEN BOSE

I can feel the close of summer approaching in many ways, one is that my body keeps telling me to look for shade and stay out of the sun, along with asking myself how did the days go by so quickly? Another way of accepting summer ending is that I have just completed Long Point Race Week and have added to all my memories of the good times I have had with my close friends in paradise.

It is amazing just how close to paradise we live, just “twenty-six miles across the sea, Santa Catalina is a-waitin for me...a tropical heaven out in the ocean covered with trees and girls. Water all around it ev’rywhere, tropical trees and the salty air,” quoted The Four Preps. The race from Newport Beach to Long Point, Catalina is sailed on Friday. Saturday’s race is from Long Point to Bird Rock, which is at the isthmus and returns to Long Point. On Sunday, we race back to Newport Beach. The racing is always extremely competitive, with most of Southern California’s top grand prix sailing boats entering the event. In attendance this year was Roy Disney’s Andrews 70 Pyewacket, Jim Devling’s Rogers 46 Carbon Footprint, Jim Bailey’s TP 52 Destroyer and Dave Clark’s Santa Cruz 70 Grand Illusion, just to name a few.

On the Harbor Sailing to Catalina sailboats

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Photo by Joysailing.com

The spinnakers are out during the Long Point Race to Catalina and back

This year’s race over to Catalina was unique, because of the southerly breeze that showed up on Friday morning. This allowed us to head straight for Catalina, rather than heading up the coast before taking over in the prevailing westerly breezes. Most of the participants were tied up to their moorings before all the horns and cannons rang out, indicating it was happy hour or five o’clock. Many crews were setting up their sunshades and swimming before the last horn blast.

Saturday’s sail is always one of my favorite sails of the season, and this year was no disappointment. The breeze filled in earlier than forecasted and we had a lot of weather beat up the face of Catalina. With a fleet of 36 boats and the smaller boats starting first, the intensity level is always high if you can cross in front of your competitor or duck behind them. Once around Bird Rock, the colorful spinnakers pop like popcorn from the boat foredecks, the intensity is increased along with the wind speed, as many crews still needed time to clear their heads from the previous night’s antics. The downwind sail is always memorable and the blending in of the beauty of Catalina just adds that much more flavor to the event.

Over the last 15 years, much attention has been focused on the competitors’ escort boats. Boats reaching the status of megayachts await the racing teams with full staff, five-course meals and a three-page wine list, and let’s not leave out the hot freshwater showers for all the crew members. Less than a dozen of the teams go to that extravagance, yet many of us – the little guys – still seem to be having just as much fun as the one-percenters. The event is quickly becoming who has found this season’s most unique inflatable pool toys rather than being on a megayacht.

We have started the tradition of a parade route starting within the smaller moorings and towing our inflatables in a parade route that takes us outside to where the larger boats are kept after Saturday’s race. Here we come with our inflatable docks, ducks, islands and flamingos with cold beverages in hand and infectious laughter. All tied up together and being pulled by a small powerboat. The one-percenters could barely place down their umbrella drinks without spilling them, while asking if they could join in on the fun, or wonder if they should join the commoners. As one of the jesters, it was quite comical, and we plan on doing it up even more next year.

Saturday’s party was full-tilt, because it still felt like I had my jester costume on come Sunday morning during my walk of shame down the trail from the BYC facility to the local pier that leads back to the boat. I recall four pretty ladies referring to me as their dance partner, and with the need to hydrate as one of my top priorities before the start of the last race home.

The god of wind has been very kind to us over the last few years, and we had another great sail home. Some of our harbor’s top finishers were Lew Berry’s It’s OK finishing 2nd overall, Steve Sellinger’s Santa Cruz 52 Triumph in 5th and Jim Devling’s Carbon Footprint taking 6th place. We were a little disappointed in our results. We still had 100 beers onboard the boat, yet our race results were good...finishing in 7th place overall.

Sea ya!

~~~~~~~~

Len Bose is a yachting enthusiast, yacht broker and harbor columnist for Stu News Newport.


NMUSD to celebrate State of the Schools at October breakfast

The Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) will hold its 2019 State of the Schools Breakfast on Wednesday, Oct. 2, at 7 a.m. at Estancia High School.

School, government and community representatives will join to celebrate the neighborhood schools and to learn more about their goals and achievements.

The price to attend is a $32 donation per person representing NMUSD’s 32 schools. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Newport-Mesa Schools Foundation in support of classroom activities. These donations are tax deductible to the extent permitted by law.

To RSVP and pay online, go to NewportMesaSchoolsFoundation.com or send a check to NMSF, P.O. Box 1368, Newport Beach, CA 92659.

Estancia High School is located at 2323 Placentia Ave., Costa Mesa.


Meet Priestley Family Chiropractic for a free backpack posture screening

Now through September 19, residents can stop by Priestley Family Chiropractic for a complimentary backpack posture screening. At the screening, kids will have their posture checked with their backpacks on and be taught ways to overcome potential danger. 

Each time kids pick up an overloaded backpack or wear one improperly, they are increasing their risk of neck, shoulder and back pain. This screening will help them practice backpack safety. 

Meet Priestley Family kid with backpack

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Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at some point in life. This screening will help prevent children from experiencing this avoidable pain. 

Priestley Family Chiropractic is a holistic practice offering whole-patient care for patients of any age and is open Monday through Thursday from 7 a.m.-6 p.m. 

For more information, visit www.priestleyfamilychiropratic.com.

Priestley Family Chiropractic is located at 3 Corporate Plaza, Ste. 200, Newport Beach.


Meet our new fire chief at WAKE UP! Newport next week

On Thursday, Sept. 5, meet our new Newport Beach Fire Chief Jeff Boyles at WAKE UP! Newport. Presented by the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce, come learn about our new fire chief and his plans for the department, and enhancing life safety services for the community of Newport Beach.

Meet our new fire chief Jeff Boyles

Newport Beach Fire Chief Jeff Boyles

Chief Boyles started with the Newport Beach Fire Department in February 2000. During the past 19 years, Boyles has served as a firefighter, paramedic, captain, arson investigator, urban search and rescue team member, battalion chief, department training chief, assistant chief and now as fire chief. He has served as the Newport Beach Fire Association’s vice present and president, president of the O.C. Training Officers, O.C. area director to Cal Chief’s and co-chair of the O.C. EMS Committee. He is a board member with the Chamber of Commerce Leadership Tomorrow program and the Speak Up Newport Board of Directors. Boyles also serves on the city’s Marines 1/1 Foundation.

Schedule: 7:15 a.m., complimentary continental breakfast; 7:45-8:30 a.m., program. The event is free to the public, but the Chamber asks that you make reservations so that they can plan for food and seating. Walkups are welcome on a space available basis. This is a free opportunity to meet one on one with legislative and government officials, and stay updated on current local, state and federal issues. 

For more information, contact Pam Smith at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 949.729.4411.

WAKE UP! Newport takes place in the Central Library’s Friends Room, 100 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach


Flashback Friday

Alpha Tau Omega frat party at Mizzou...

Flashback Friday 8.30.19

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Here is our Flashback Friday...harkening back to yesterday...and we thought it would be fun if you try and guess who it is.

Clue: You have probably heard this “coed’s” voice over others.

Good luck guessing this one. The answer appears today at the bottom of Stu News.

Send in a treasured past photo!

You can submit yourself, wife, girlfriend, boyfriend or family member. We’ll even surprise them if you want. 

We’re looking for eye-catching representations of your Flashback Friday.

Please send them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with Flashback Friday in the subject line. Let’s make Fridays a day to remember.


Flashback Friday: Answer

If you guessed Mike Villani, actor/voice over artist and venue announcer for indoor volleyball at the Olympics, then you are correct!

Send in a treasured past photo!

You can submit yourself, wife, girlfriend, boyfriend or family member. We’ll even surprise them if you want. 

We’re looking for eye-catching representations of your Flashback Friday.

Please send them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with Flashback Friday in the subject line. Let’s make Fridays a day to remember.


Concert at Marina Park presents Tijuana Dogs on September 8

The City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Department presents Concert at Marina Park featuring Tijuana Dogs on Sunday, Sept. 8 from 4-6 p.m.

Bring a beach chair and a blanket and the city will throw in the beautiful bay views. Enjoy an afternoon of fun with rock, R&B and pop sounds.

Concert at Marina Park Tijuana Dogs

Courtesy of the City of Newport Beach and NBPL

For more information, visit www.newportbeachca.gov/recreation, or call 949.270.8150.

Marina Park Sailing Center is located at 1600 W. Balboa Blvd., Newport Beach.


Carnival & Taste to light up Balboa Island’s Marine Avenue with food, music, fun

The Balboa Island Carnival & Taste of the Island will take place on Sunday, Sept. 15, from 1-5 p.m. The event is a perfect way to spend an afternoon with family and friends.

Highlighting the day will be cuisine from Island restaurants at food stations, carnival rides, arcade games, a dunk tank, pie-eating contest, DJ music & entertainment, a fashion walk, face painting, bungee jump, a climbing wall and opportunity prizes. The entire 200 block of Marine Avenue will be cordoned off.

Carnival and Taste street scene

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Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Balboa Island Carnival & Taste of the Island creates a lively street scene on Marine Avenue

Sponsored by the Balboa Island Improvement Association and Balboa Island Merchants Association, the carnival takes place in the 200 block of Marine Ave., Balboa Island.


Are you prepared for a disaster? 

On Saturday, Sept. 7 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m., the City of Newport Beach, Newport Beach Fire Department and Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce will present the Green on the Green Newport Beach Eco Expo and 11th annual CERT Disaster Preparedness Expo on the Civic Green at the Civic Center, 100 Civic Center Drive, Newport Beach.

Learn how to prepare you and your family for an unexpected disaster. This important community event will feature local businesses and organizations showcasing “green” practices, innovation, products and more. Discover how to build a Disaster Supply Kit, organize your neighborhood, and peruse the exhibit booths and educational displays.

Are you prepared for a disaster CERT booth

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Volunteers who have gone through the CERT program will share information during the expo

The City’s Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) will be on hand to share information and answer questions. CERT is a nationally recognized, Department of Homeland Security/FEMA training program which teaches residents how to be prepared for unexpected disasters. Now is the time for Newport Beach residents to get prepared for any unexpected emergency, before it happens.

In addition, there will also be a petting zoo, family activities, free electronics recycling and document shredding. Admission is fre and so is parking.

For more information, contact the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce at 949.729.4400 or www.newportbeach.com.


“A Tribute of Remembrance – Honoring 9/11” hosted by Sons of the American Legion

Join “A Tribute of Remembrance – Honoring 9/11” hosted by Sons of the American Legion on Wednesday, Sept. 11 from 3-7 p.m.

Festivities include a short speech by dignitaries, including Newport Beach Mayor Diane Dixon (schedule permitting) and Benjamin Yu from Irvine, who is currently running for Assembly, along with esteemed First Responders in our community.

A Tribute of Remembrance American Legion Hall

Submitted photo

American Legion Hall

This is a family-friendly event at Veterans Memorial Park. It is free and guests are encouraged to bring their blankets and lawn chairs for an enjoyable afternoon. The So Petty Band, a Tom Petty cover band, will be playing music throughout the afternoon and early evening. There will be food trucks, including: a coffee truck, Sugar and Spice (with dipped bananas, frozen cheesecakes and Balboa Bars), a taco truck, and a hamburger and hot dog cart.

There will also be vendor booths with information and valuable resources including: Red Cross, Suicide Prevention, T-Mobile with offers for first responders and veterans, Humana and a specialty T-shirt booth.

Veterans Memorial Park is located at 207-211 15th Street at Balboa Avenue, Balboa.


Take Five: Meet Eric Cortina, creative director for Roger’s Gardens

By AMY SENK

Eric Cortina started working at Roger’s Gardens 25 years ago, and by 1990, he was creative director and had put together their first Halloween boutique. Since then, the boutique has grown exponentially in size and detail, drawing opening day crowds from throughout Southern California who will line up for a chance to load up on fog machines, spiders and rats, upscale but creepy tableware and more, all displayed amid elaborate props that lend a Hollywood-meets-Haunted House vibe to the shopping experience. I caught up with Eric to find out more.

Eric Cortina Take Five

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Courtesy of Roger’s Gardens

Eric Cortina

Q: The Halloween boutique opens today (August 30). Can you share what the highlights are this year?

A: I’m really drawn to this year’s theme “Malice in Wonderland” since the Alice story is not traditionally thought of as a Halloween theme, but lends itself perfectly. I think all of us can remember a quote or a reference from the story that has now become part of our inherent culture. I also believe that this year is the best visual presentation we have done, and the product selection that is available for our guests is amazing.

Q: What would surprise people most about what goes into creating the Halloween boutique?

A: I think most people don’t realize how much work, planning and merchandise selection go into our displays. We commissioned artists early on to create the characters from Alice in Wonderland but asked them to give each a darker personality. Our merchandisers also are a big part of the presentation since they each take on a project to build props that help to create the atmosphere. We have been working on this since September of last year, so I’m excited to see it come together and become a reality.

Q: Is Halloween your favorite holiday, and if so, has it always been and why? (If not, what is and why?)

A: I honestly can’t decide between Halloween and Christmas, since they are both my favorites. It’s like picking your favorite child from your own family! Both of these holidays were very magical to me when I was growing up, and luckily with my job they still are. I will have to say, though, that my room was always decorated with Christmas lights year-round when I was young.

Q: What’s the craziest thing that ever happened at a Halloween boutique opening, or in general?

A: Long ago Roger’s used to host the Halloween opening at night, and it was an event that drew crowds who would wait in line for over an hour to enter the boutique. We decided to employ actors to entertain the guests as they waited, so one year we found a gypsy fortune teller to spend a couple of minutes with each person. I asked her to be amusing and tell people she saw lots of shopping bags and pumpkins in their immediate future. Well she started spending 15, 20 minutes with guests and doing actual readings for them. Afterwards, people where thanking me for the messages and advice she bestowed on them.

Q: Halloween seems like it’s become a bigger and more elaborate holiday than say 5 or 10 years ago – why do you think that is?

A: I think Halloween has evolved into an adult holiday with the emphasis being now on decorating your home and throwing a party for your friends and family. Halloween is also the beginning of the holiday season, so there is less stress involved at this time of year. People have more time and a lot more fun decorating their homes for Halloween.

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk is a long-time resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


Surfing the Newport dream 

Surfing the wave

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Photo by Stan Sievers (Instagram @stansievers)

Locals are stoked to see summer stick around a little bit longer in Newport Beach


City to discuss possible changes to Short-Term Lodging Ordinance

The City of Newport Beach Community Development Department will be hosting a stakeholder meeting regarding proposed changes to the Short-Term Lodging Ordinance. This is an opportunity for residents, managers, operators and/or brokers to provide feedback.

The meeting will be held Monday, Sept. 16, from 6-7 p.m., in the Civic Center Community Room at 100 Civic Center Drive, Newport Beach.

For additional information or other inquiries, contact Brian Contino, Code Enforcement Officer, at 949.644.3257 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Closures for the Labor Day holiday

City Hall and most City facilities will be closed in observance of the Labor Day Holiday on Monday, Sept. 2.

There will be no street sweeping on Monday, then for the remainder of the week, street sweeping will be on its regular schedule.

There will be no trash collection on Monday, and for the remainder of the week, residential trash will be delayed by one day.

Other closures will include schools, federal offices and banks.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

The sweet, sweet summertime of Texas…hot and muggy!

Fair Game Tom NewSpent the past week traveling to the Dallas area to visit my 89-year-old mom at her new digs in an elderly community in Arlington. At 89, she just qualified.

To say it’s hot and muggy is an understatement. I think I showered my first day here four times by 10 a.m. Oh, but I digress.

Wednesday we hit AT&T Stadium where the Cowboys play. Wow! The place is huge. Just across the street the Texas Rangers are building a new ballpark right next to their old one. It’s hard to tell why they need a new one, other than people say they want a roof for those hot and muggy days. All I can say is they seem to err on the side of “big” down here in Texas.

Yesterday I headed up to the Southern Methodist University campus and toured the George W. Bush Museum.

Very impressed.

The reminders of 9-11 are overwhelming, up to and including a melted steel beam from the Twin Towers smack dab in the middle of one of the display rooms.

It gave me a new respect for “W.”

Definitely worth the time if you’re heading down this way.

• • •

Representative Harley Rouda, 48th Congressional District, will hold a Town Hall this Tuesday, Sept. 3, at 6:30 p.m. in the Aliso Viejo Library, at 1 Journey, Aliso Viejo. Rouda plans to update his constituents on his first six months in office.

He says in his invite that one of his “most important responsibilities is to be available and accessible, not only in letters and phone calls, but in person.”

So, here he is.

• • •

I like fashion, in fact my daughters joke with me because I love to shop almost as much as I like to golf. So, you can imagine how excited I am for STYLEWEEKOC® that hits Fashion Island from September 12-14. It’s the third year and will include “three panel discussions and two keynote speakers with highly acclaimed experts and influencers in fashion, beauty and digital marketing.”

Fashion Island is promising “informative panels” and will offer the latest in fall fashion at in-store parties, which will include activities and treats.

• • •

It’s football season and it’s time for me to join some 75 million other folks around the country in Fantasy Football. The first challenge is to select a catchy team name. Mine this year will be “My Luck ran out.” If you can’t get that, you probably shouldn’t be playing.

Next up is the draft that comes next Tuesday night. It seems like there’s a lot of different directions to go.

If you’re playing, good luck. If you’ve already drafted and you selected Andrew Luck and running back Lamar Miller (out with a torn ACL), it’s going to be a long year.

• • •

Well, that didn’t take long. New Fire Chief Jeff Boyles has been on the job probably less than a month and the Chamber has already signed him up to be the featured speaker/guest at the next WAKE UP! Newport on Thursday, September 5.

The “breakfast treats provided” event begins at 7:15 a.m. in the Friends Room of the Newport Beach Public Library.

The event is free to the public, the Newport Beach Chamber would just like an RSVP to make certain they get the “treats” count right.

You can RSVP at www.newportbeach.com.

• • •

Also worthy of a spot on your busy calendar is the 2019 Green on the Green Newport Beach Eco Expo/CERT Disaster Preparedness Expo. The title of the event is so long that they couldn’t even get it on one-page of a flier.

Anyway, here are the details: Saturday, Sept. 7 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the Civic Center Green at the Newport Beach Civic Center.

Local businesses and organizations will be showcasing “green” practices, innovation, products, education and more.

Also, you can attend and figure out if you’re ready at home or at work for the next disaster. 

It’s probably not a question of if, but when.


What’s happening on Segerstrom Center’s Argyros Plaza this fall?

Fall is just around the corner at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts with more than 20 free events in September and October. With events like ARTventure, Segerstrom Silent disco and National Dance Day, there is something for everyone. 

–September 6-7: ARTventure. On Friday, Sept. 6 from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. you’re invited to celebrate the talents of local artists with an opening reception and awards presentation filled with art, live music and refreshments. Then on Saturday, join in for a second day of family-friendly entertainment, including musical, theatrical, literary, culinary and hands-on demonstrations. This free, two-day community event is organized by the Cultural Arts Committee of Costa Mesa.

–September 13: El Grito. Celebrate Mexican Independence, discover Mexico’s cultural heritage and enjoy live music and performances from talented local groups including Mariachi Infantil R.h.y.t.m.o., Pilares de México, Danza de Tecuanes and Chinelos. Singers Ariana Martínez and David Mendoza and ballet folklórico groups Orgullo Guerrerense and Nostalgía Calentana Guerrerense will complete the evening’s festivities. Presented in collaboration with the Consulate of Mexico in Santa Ana. The event takes place from 5-9 p.m.

What's Happening at Segerstrom Center for Arts Fall El Grito Dancers

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Photos courtesy of Segerstrom Center for the Arts

Enjoy dance performances at the El Grito celebration

–September 21: National Dance Day. This year, National Dance Day returns to Segerstrom Center for the Arts as its official West Coast home. Join the festivities on Julianne and George Argyros Plaza for a celebration of all things dance. The day will feature live performances by special guest artists, fully inclusive and interactive dance lessons in a wide variety of dance styles, food for purchase, and the opportunity to learn this year’s official National Dance Day routine. This free community event is for all ages and all abilities. The event runs from 12-6 p.m.

–September 24: Tuesday Dance Night. Back by popular demand, grab your dancing shoes and join the fun during a free dance class. Each week come ready to learn fun dances from different decades. All experience levels are welcome. Dance Nights take place from 6:30-7:30 p.m.

–October 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29: Tuesday Dance Nights. Keep on dancing. The Center continues its popular dance lessons for all experience levels – or no experience – everyone is welcome from 6:30-7:30 p.m.

–October 2, 3, 4: Live on Argyros Stage: Kelly Caballero. Kelly Caballero is a California-based singer/songwriter who uses her urban-indigenous upbringing to inspire songs and stories of life, love and even resistance. Experience her unique blend of world, pop, and folk. The concert takes place 6:15-7:15 p.m. each night.

–October 11: Segerstrom Silent Disco. Silent disco is back, so come ready to dance the night away with the Silent DJs as they spin your favorite tunes. With three channels to choose from on your free light-up headphones, there’s something for everyone to enjoy. The event takes place from 7-10 p.m.

–October 12: Live on Argyros Stage: Rae Khalil. Southern Californian singer/songwriter and rapper Rae Khalil takes the stage at this free evening concert. Applying her smooth vocals and effortless raps, Khalil has formulated her own sound, building a reputation as a natural performer and an artist for the people to champion. The concert is from 6-8 p.m.

–October 16, 17, 18: Live on Argyros Stage: HLLNDR. HLLNDR for three evenings of live music. A singer/songwriter native to San Diego, HLLNDR has opened for numerous artists throughout California, including big name bands such as P.O.D, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, J. J. Heller, Jeremy Camp and Gavin DeGraw. Each night the performance begins at 6:15 p.m. and ends at 7:15 p.m.

–October 19: Fall for All. Enjoy this free fall celebration featuring engaging performances and festive activities for the whole family, with lots of surprises and good fun. The celebration runs 12-4 p.m.

What's Happening at Segerstrom Center all abilities

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All Abilities Celebration commemorates our community’s unique talents

–October 26: All Abilities Celebration. Everybody is invited to participate in this free celebration as we empower the unique attributes, characteristics and perspectives of those in our community. Enjoy live performances, art-making, and a resource fair featuring services and opportunities for individuals of all abilities. The event takes place from 3-6 p.m.

For more information on Segerstrom Center for the Arts events and celebrations, visit www.scfta.org.


The Inside Edge to host Erica M. Elliott, M.D. at The Pacific Club tomorrow

The Inside Edge will host author Erica M. Elliott, M.D. at The Pacific Club tomorrow, Wednesday, Aug. 28. Elliott will discuss her book Medicine and Miracles in the High Desert - A Healing Story for Our Times.

Enjoy breakfast, an engaging speaker, table discussion and live entertainment. Elliott is a medical doctor who has lived and worked around the world. Her book focuses on her experience on a Navajo Reservation near Canyon de Chelly as a teacher and later a medical doctor to the Navajo people.

The Inside Edge to host Erica M. Elliott

Courtesy of The Inside Edge

Erica M. Elliott, M.D. will discuss her book focusing on her time spent with the Navajo people

Doors open, registration and the buffet line start at 6:45 a.m.; the meeting will begin promptly at 7 a.m. Pre-registration for the event is recommended, so to reserve your space, visit www.insideedge.org.

The Pacific Club is located at 4110 MacArthur Blvd., Newport Beach.


Make a Shutterfly photo book at OASIS 

On Monday, Sept. 16 from 10 a.m.-12 p.m. or Tuesday, Oct. 22 from 1-3 p.m., come learn how to make a Shuttefly Photo Book in the OASIS Computer Lab, led by instructor Carole Kamper.

Make a Shutterfly photo book computer with photos

Learn how to make a printable photo album using the website Shutterfly. Using the Shutterfly smartphone app, you will also learn how to upload pictures from your devices directly to your Shutterfly account. Come and explore your creativity in this fun, project-based class. Prerequisite: Basic computer skills with some knowledge of the Internet. The cost is $14 for each session.

For a calendar of upcoming OASIS Senior Center events, visit our Calendars section here.


Balboa Island Classical Concert Series welcomes Le Van Family Ensemble on September 3

On Tuesday, Sept. 3, the Balboa Island Concert Series presents the Le Van Family Ensemble. The performance takes place at St. John Vianney Chapel from 7-8 p.m.

The Le Van Ensemble is a family that performs in a variety of styles and genres of music. Originally from Alsace, France, they moved to America in 2003. The group is comprised of Eric, who is a pianist, with his two daughters, Solene and Sarah, who both sing and play violin.

The performance will be held at St. John’s Vianney Chapel. A limited number of tickets are $10 and available at Island Home Decor, 313 Marine Ave., Balboa Island and online at www.balboaislandnb.org

A reception will immediately follow at the Balboa Island Museum, 210 B Marine Ave.

St. John Vianney’s Chapel is located at 314 Marine Ave., Balboa Island. Street parking.


Autumn silk wreath workshop at Roger’s Gardens

On Wednesday, Oct. 9 from 5-6 p.m., welcome the fall season by joining two designers, Shelley Burton and Ria Ultsch, as they present a guide on how to create Autumn silk wreaths, a perfect piece to welcome the season on your front door or inside your home. Just bring your creativity and they will take care of the rest. 

Silk Autumn Wreath Workshop

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Courtesy of Roger’s Gardens

The workshop fee is $125 per wreath, which includes all materials and step-by-step instructions. Unfortunately, due to material costs, cancellations after October 2 cannot be refunded. Register at www.rogersgardens.com.

The workshop will be held at Roger’s Gardens, 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar. 

For a calendar of upcoming Home & Garden happenings, visit our Calendars section here.


Newport Beach Wellness Week continues

Newport Beach Wellness Week is now in full swing and our community is showing its commitment to staying healthy and fit with city-wide offers allowing locals to enjoy focusing on healthy eats, holistic spa services and family-friendly recreational activities now through August 29.

Newport Beach Wellness Nicole Kniss

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Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Nicole Kniss, owner of Newport Beach, led a “Throwback Thursday” aerobics class at Fashion Island to kick off the week

Some of these special services include:

–Newport Peach - Three (3) classes for $30.

–Balboa Boat Rentals - 50 percent off SUP paddle boards and kayaks.

–Fashion Island Hotel - Spa Experience Package includes two, 60-minute treatments, a $50 daily breakfast credit and complimentary valet parking with a room reservation.

–True Food Kitchen - Special Wellness Week two-course menu for $35 per person.

–Athleta - 20 percent off one full price item at Fashion Island.

So, take a break from the demands of everyday life (especially with summer coming to an end) and find your self-care sanctuary during Wellness Week. Newport Beach invites you to relax, reset and rejuvenate. 

For a complete list of participating vendors, click here.


Join a bluff walk scavenger hunt at Crystal Cove on Thursday

Join a Park Naturalist and learn about “What’s Out There” at the Park on this fun, guided one-mile Scavenger Hunt along the bluff trail to the overlooks, along the wooden boardwalk and back on Thursday, Aug. 29 from 9-10 a.m. Meet at Pelican Point parking lot #4 near the parking lot (PCH coastward at Newport Coast, left at the kiosk to the end lot).

Join a bluff walk scavenger hunt coastline

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Courtesy of Crystal Cove Conservancy

For a calendar of upcoming events at Crystal Cove State Park, visit our Calendars section here.


Gourmet on the Bay to celebrate UNB’s 50 years

On Sunday, Sept. 8 from 4-7 p.m., the Newport Beach Historical Society (NBHS) presents “Gourmet on the Bay” to celebrate the 50th anniversary and history of Upper Newport Bay (UNB).

Enjoy spectacular views, a sunset dinner reception and a culinary journey through nature overlooking the picturesque Upper Newport Bay featuring local cuisine stations from favorite Newport Beach restaurants.

Following dinner, a special program will be presented by speaker Cassandra Radcliff-Mendoza, author of the new book Saving Upper Newport Bay.

Gourmet on the Bay Radcliff Mendoza

Photos courtesy of Newport Bay Conservancy

Author Cassandra Radcliff-Mendoza is the featured speaker

Saving Upper Newport Bay book synopsis: During Orange County’s population boom in the early 1960s, the Robinson family moved to Newport Beach. A short walk from their home was Upper Newport Bay, where they and their neighbors could play on North Star Beach, water ski on the bay’s calm water, or dig in the shallow mudflats for fresh clams for dinner. But land developers and local government officials had a different use for the open space in mind – build a private harbor much like the bustling lower Newport Bay and Balboa Island. In 1963, 14-year-old Jay Robinson rode his bike down to North Star Beach and found a newly erected “private property” sign. His parents, Frank and Frances Robinson, would soon find themselves embroiled in one of the most important ecological battles in California, with friends, neighbors, newspapers, the government and the courts all taking sides. This is the story of two ordinary people’s life-changing journey, which ultimately impacted the history and ecology of southern California.

Radcliff-Mendoza, a writer and editor from Orange County, began volunteering at UNB in 2014 after visiting the park for birdwatching. Her passions include habitat restoration, local history and travel.

Gourmet on the Bay Upper Newport Bay

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A picturesque view of Upper Newport Bay

All proceeds from the event will go to support the Society’s ongoing historical preservation programs. This event is limited, so sign up early for this one-of-a-kind experience. The Society is offering a special discounted $30 ticket price for current members. Non-Members are also encouraged to attend, and as an added bonus, the $50 general admission ticket will include an annual membership to the NBHS. Kids 12 & under are $10. Mail your check payable to: The Newport Beach Historical Society, P.O. Box 8814, Newport Beach, CA 92658. For sponsorship opportunities, call 949.675.0501. For tickets, visit https://allevents.in/mobile/amp-event.php?event_id=200017715398604.

For a calendar of upcoming Upper Newport Bay events, visit our Calendars section here.


Be part of a community tradition as an ENC event sponsor

The Environmental Nature Center (ENC) holds four major events through the year: The Fall Faire & Pumpkin Patch in October, the Artisans Marketplace in December, the Spring Faire in May and the Summer Soiree in June. The ENC is inviting local businesses to be a part of these events, by being a Corporate Sponsor. These events attract thousands of community members each year. 

Be part of a community tradition Fall Faire pony rides

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Pony rides are a popular attraction at the ENC Fall Faire & Pumpkin Patch

On Sunday, Oct.13, the Environmental Nature Center (ENC) will be holding its 45th annual Fall Faire and Pumpkin Patch. This family-friendly festival attracts thousands of visitors who enjoy delicious food from local restaurants at the Savor OC restaurant showcase, entertainment on the Fire Circle Stage, a pumpkin patch, children’s games and crafts, face painting, live animals and more. Companies have the option of sponsoring the Fall Faire or all four of the ENC’s major annual events. (Deadline is September 15 to be included in the first Fall Faire postcard.)

Sponsors will receive exclusive benefits including recognition on the ENC website, in the ENC’s email marketing to nearly 19,000 contacts, on postcards mailed out to thousands of local families, on banners at the event, via the ENC’s social media channels, and more depending on the committed sponsorship level.

To learn more about the benefits of ENC sponsorship, visit http://encenter.org/event-sponsorship/.

The Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach.


IMAGES Salon hosts 18th Annual Childhelp fundraiser

For those needing a haircut or opting for a blowout, IMAGES Salon in Corona del Mar is holding its 18th Annual Cut-a-Thon now through October 31. So why not get a trim or style for a good cause? One hundred percent of the funds raised will directly benefit Childhelp, the charitable organization whose mission centers around the prevention and treatment of child abuse.

18th annual Childhelp IMAGES staff

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Courtesy of IMAGES Salon

IMAGES Salon staff (L-R): Susan Daniele, Michelle Perez, Ron Perez, Ashley Lester, Al Perez and Mark McCardle

Each participating IMAGES Salon stylist is offering a number of donated haircuts, so when calling to schedule an appointment, please mention “Childhelp Fundraiser” and request a haircut and you will be offered the $45 rate. 

IMAGES Salon will also hold its annual opportunity drawing with some fabulous prizes. You can purchase tickets now; prize drawings take place from September 1 through October 31. If you have a prize you would like to donate to the opportunity drawing, it can be dropped off or mailed to the salon now through August 31.

Book your appointment now, as spaces are limited. 

IMAGES Salon is located at 2515 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. For more information and to make an appointment, call 949.675.5531 or visit www.imagessalon.net.


Speak Up Newport: Is Newport Beach Going to the Dogs?

Speak Up Newport will hold its monthly meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 11, presenting “Is Newport Beach Going to the Dogs?” Come hear when and where dogs are allowed in city parks and on the beaches.

The program will address/present the following:

–What is happening at the unofficial Dog Beach at the Santa Ana River mouth?

–See the plans for a new City Dog Park at Sunset View Park.

–What are the rules for Balboa Island and CdM beaches?

–Are dogs compatible with endangered sand dunes and bird habitats on the beach?

–What are the leash laws, and times and places that dogs are allowed on the beach?

–Should the rules be changed?

–Is enforcement sufficient?

Come listen to these featured speakers addressing the issues:

Speak Up Newport Sean Levin

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Photos courtesy of Speak Up Newport

Sean Levin

Sean Levin, the City’s Recreation & Senior Services Department’s Deputy Director, will present the facts on where and when dogs are allowed and give a peek at the City’s new Dog Park in Sunset View Park.

Speak Up Newport Nick Ott

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Nick Ott

Nick Ott, the City’s Animal Control Officer, will present the current City enforcement policies.

Speak Up Newport Garry Brown

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Garry Brown

Garry Brown, president of Orange County Coastkeepers, will present Coastkeepers’ position on Dog Beaches. 

Speak Up Meeting Schedule:

–5:15-6 p.m.: Reception with a complimentary light supper provided by The Bungalow with wine available for purchase.

–6-7 p.m.: Program and Q&A

There is no cost to attend and the public is invited. Reservations are not necessary.

For more information, call 949.224.2266 or visit www.speakupnewport.com.

The Speak Up Newport meeting takes place at the Newport Beach Civic Center Community Room, 100 Civic Center Drive, Newport Beach.


Reception honors Ed Olen’s Sobier Photo Project in Haiti

On Sunday, Aug. 24, Amy and Marshall Senk graciously held an outdoor reception at their exquisite Shorecliffs home in Corona del Mar with stunning ocean views, to honor photographer Ed Olen and his Sobier Photo Project in Haiti in conjunction with The Heart of Hollywood Foundation.

Reception honors Ed Olens Sobier Ed and photo 8.27

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Photos by Lana Johnson

Ed Olen with one of his Sobier photographic portraits 

Since 2012, Olen has traveled to Haiti on yearly mission trips. For the past five years, the organization has focused on the village of Sobier, which wasn’t damaged much by the 2010 earthquake, but is one of the poorest Haitian villages. Along the way, Olen leaned on his photography talents to put together the makings of an art collection of the personalities of the Haitian people, mixed with many of the symbols of U.S. capitalism, creating striking images that demand attention and evoke reaction.

Reception honors Ed Olens Sobier Ed and Amy 8.27

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Ed Olen with Amy Senk, reception hostess and Stu News Newport columnist

“This village is among the most ravaged we’ve seen in Haiti,” Olen said. “It’s third world poverty 75 minutes from Miami. They have no electricity, no running water, no stores, no malls and no internet. They have almost no access to the world around them.”

Reception honors Ed Olens Sobier Steve and Gina 8.27

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Steve Rosansky, president and CEO of Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce with wife Gina

The Heart of Hollywood Foundation constructed a medical clinic for the community. According to Olen, “Now we want to focus on sponsoring a weekly clinic that would include a doctor, nurse and a dentist. We want to focus on bringing water to their community.”

Reception honors Ed Olens Sobier Doug and Jon 8.27

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Doug McClain, senior vice president & chief marketing officer of Newport Beach & Company and Jon Curci, Realtor – McKnown Weinstein Associates

Olen’s art collection of photographs, currently on display at Newport Beach Central Library through September 6, is not to be missed.

Reception honors Ed Olens Sobier Melissa, Jason and Wendy 8.27

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Melissa Jacobi, Dine Newport Beach, with her husband Jason Jacobi and Wendy Clark

Reception honors Ed Olens Sobier ocean view 8.27

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A magnificent ocean view from the Senk residence

If you are interested in donating to the Sobier Photo Project, visit www.sobierphotoproject.com.


Pet of the Week Dog and Cat print

Stu News Newport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

Who’s a supermodel? Bailey is. They haven’t told her yet, but they’re looking to get her an agent. At only 8 months of age, she was a born beauty and gets a Golden Star for her sweet humbleness. She enjoys getting to know others in her gentle and delightful ways. A little bit of patience goes a long way with Bailey. 

Pet of the Week Bailey

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Courtesy of Newport Beach Animal Shelter

MEET BAILEY

The Newport Beach Animal Shelter has her listed as a shepherd mix, with the mix being some sort of medium- to long-haired softer breed. Possibly after some nice spa days, her fur will become silky.

If you are interested in finding out more about Bailey, or any other animals up for adoption, the Newport Beach Animal Shelter is located at 20302 Riverside Drive, Newport Beach. It is open Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. For more information, call 949.644.3656, email Valerie Schomburg at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and visit www.FONBAS.org. The Friends Of the Newport Beach Animal Shelter (FONBAS) also invites you to find out more about their happenings and to possibly consider becoming a founding member of an incredible nonprofit that supports the city’s efforts with providing wonderful opportunities to our stray, injured, ill and owner surrendered domestic pets.

Newport Beach Animal Shelter adoption fees:

–Dogs - $130

–Puppies - $150

–Cats - $90

–Kittens - $110

To find out how you can help support the shelter, visit www.nbpd.org and click on “Our Animal Shelter” to view the wish list. The shelter can always use food and treats; new toys; grooming, hygiene and comfort products; as well as laundry soap, dish soap, paper towels, sponges, scrub pads and lint rollers. If you are interested in volunteering, you can fill out and sign the application on the website.


Queen Nation plays to a packed crowd on the Civic Green

A throng came out to enjoy the sunny weather and listen to the music of Queen Nation, on Sunday, Aug. 24, as part of this year’s summer Concerts on the Green series on the Civic Green near City Hall. Attendees, young and old, spread out beach chairs and blankets, shared picnic dinners and grooved to the live entertainment.

Queen Nation plays two members

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Submitted photos

Two members of Queen Nation belting out a favorite Queen tune

In a tribute to one of the most iconic groups in rock history, Queen Nation featured musicians Gregory Finsley, Mike McManus, Pete Burke and Parker Combs, paying homage to the legendary band Queen, with songs like “We Will Rock You,” “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “We Are The Champions,” “Crazy Little Thing Called Love” and “Another One Bites The Dust.”

Queen Nation plays Gregory Finsley

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Submitted photos

Band member Gregory Finsley (aka Freddie Mercury) sings to some young rockers


First book checked out at new CdM Library: K is for Kindness

By AMY SENK

The brand-new Corona del Mar library branch opened briefly for a tiny crowd Friday morning, August 23, when a few key members of the Friends of the CdM Library group checked out books and posed for photographs.

“We’re so excited,” said Linh Do, who was a founding member of the Friends group. Her daughters, Elise, 3, and Adele 5, were the first new customers, checking out The Little Mermaid and K is for Kindness, a picture book with Elmo on the cover.

First book checked Adele and Elise

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Photos by Amy Senk

Adele (back) and Elise (front) Do check out the first books from the Corona del Mar Library branch

CdM Friends member Karen Carlson was next, checking out two mysteries with a library card she’s had since 1968.

“To me, this is what it’s all about,” Carlson said as she watched Elise and Adele excitedly showing off their books. “Some of my fondest memories of my life are going to the library with my father. I can still remember how the books smelled.”

First book checked Karen Carlson

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Karen Carlson, CdM Friends of the Library member, checks out two mysteries

CdM’s library first opened in a storefront in the mid 1940s, according to a library website. It was at Goldenrod Avenue and East Coast Highway with a monthly rent of $45. In 1952, the library moved, then later moved again to the Marigold Avenue location. Over the years, there was talk of shutting it down to make more room for the adjacent fire station, and in 2014, city staff confirmed plans to tear down both buildings and rebuild. But when plans later revealed a much smaller footprint for the library, Friends of the CdM Library formed and pushed back, led by founder Joy Brenner, now CdM’s Council representative.

First book checked Joy Brenner

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Newport Beach Councilmember Joy Brenner (center), representing Corona del Mar, led the Friends of the CdM Library’s charge for a new, expanded library

Friends of the Library members held meetings with neighbors, attended Library trustee meetings and City Council meetings, gathering support to rebuild the library with more space than originally planned, but also with amenities including stroller parking. At times, there were some who said that library users could simply go to the Central Library a mile away, but the Friends group was adamant, saying that senior citizens, children in strollers, nannies without cars, all relied on the branch for its books, periodicals and storytime events.

Brenner was the fourth person to check out items on Friday, selecting audio books for a road trip she’s taking with family.

Construction began last summer, and an opening ceremony was held in July, where guests had a chance to hear speeches and tour the new facility. But the public opening has been on hold while workers completed a final checklist. Plumbing work, including providing potable water, working restrooms, installation of mirrors and cabinet locks, installing a bike rack and other punch list items all need to be dealt with, said Library Services Director Tim Hetherton, who was on hand Friday.

The library could open the last week of August or the first week of September. The fire station also has not opened, with no date provided for when crews would move from their temporary station in the OASIS Senior Center parking lot at Fifth and Marguerite avenues.

• • •

Meanwhile, Gallo’s Italian Deli at 3900 E. Coast Highway has closed for at least a year for a building remodel. The closure was not unexpected – for months, work has been ongoing on the adjacent lot of part of the plans to build condos and improve the 40-plus-year-old sandwich shop. The plans were first approved by the city in early 2013.

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 20 years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association and the Corona del Mar High School PTA. She and her husband have two children.


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum & Historical Society

Newport Beach A Look Back 8.27.19

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This book might look rather unremarkable, but in the 1960s, this would have been very appealing to sailors. This book was an odd combination of a port map and ship’s log, customized for the sailing vessel it was purchased for to document the many adventures of both ship and crew.

Balboa Island Museum and the Museum Store are located at 210 B Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Friday-Sunday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. For more information, call 949.675.3952, visit www.balboamuseum.org or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Breaking News in Newport Beach

Former CdM athlete killed in freeway hit-and-run

Matt Olson, who was set to become a USC freshman and was a 2019 graduate from Corona del Mar High School, was killed early Saturday morning in a hit-and-run incident in Los Angeles. 

Breaking News Matthew Olson

Courtesy of Facebook

Matt Olson

A report by the California Highway Patrol said that Olson, 18, was struck at approximately 2:43 a.m. by a vehicle on the I-110 S/B, north of 37th St. Olson, according to the report, was walking for an unknown reason between two FasTrak lanes on the freeway, when he was struck by a Toyota, and then hit again by an unknown type of vehicle while he was lying in the roadway.

The driver of the first vehicle to hit Olson stopped, however, the second vehicle then hit him and continued on. He was pronounced dead at the scene by the Los Angeles Fire Department.

The CHP is investigating the entire incident.

Olson played volleyball and basketball for the Sea Kings and was a member of their 2018 national championship team as a middle blocker.


Proposed Lecture Hall architectural firms whittled down to four

The Library Lecture Hall Design Committee met on Monday, Aug. 19 to review submitted proposals for the proposed Lecture Hall. From that group the committee selected four architects to present in front of the committee and community at the next meeting on Thursday, Sept. 19.

The four proposals to be reviewed are from Rob Wellington Quigley, Robert R. Coffee Architect + Associates, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, and Sander Architects and Mithun | Hodgetts + Fung.

Proposed lecture hall Central Library

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Courtesy of NBPL

The Lecture Hall addition to Central Library, spanning 7,000 square feet and seating 275, has an estimated construction cost of $7 million

City staff conducted a request for proposals for an architectural design firm in July. The Library Lecture Hall Design Committee then held its first meeting on July 31 to begin the process of reviewing seven proposals. 

The proposed lecture hall is anticipated to be approximately 7,000 square feet with seating for 275. The final design shall address permits and plans for construction and site landscaping while maintaining connectivity to the existing Civic Center buildings and park setting. The estimated construction cost for this project is $7,000,000.

The next meeting on September 19 will be held in the Crystal Cove Conference Room, Bay 2D, at City Hall. The meeting begins at 8:30 a.m. and continues throughout the day of interviews with the firms.

For more information, click here.


Summer sunset bliss 

Summer sunset palms

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Photo by Michelle Mar (Instagram @msmichellemar) 

The end of summer may be in sight but there’s still plenty of tropical nights in paradise left to enjoy 


Flashback Friday is here, we want your mug

Flashback Friday harkens back to yesterday, and we thought it would be fun if our readers submit their “mugs” and others try and guess who is it.

Send in a treasured past photo. It can be of you, your spouse, girlfriend, boyfriend, family member…you get the idea. 

We’re looking for eye-catching representations of your Flashback Friday to post in Stu News on Friday, to end the work week on a high note.

Please send your photos to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with Flashback Friday in the subject line. Let’s make Fridays a day to remember.


Back to school is almost here

Back to school sandcastle

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Photo by Chris Crosson (Instagram @sandcastlekit) 

Teachers are back to school this week but kids still have one more week to enjoy the beach


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Corona del Mar football’s opening season win is highlighted by Ethan Garbers’ 8 TD passes

Fair Game Tom New

The Irvine Company has announced the promotion of Chief Financial Officer Charles “Chip” Fedalen Jr. to president. He replaces Ray Wirta, who retired in March. Fedalen will continue to also retain his current position as CFO.

Two other moves included Senior Vice President Frank Abeling to executive vice president of real estate operations and Office Division President Doug Holte who added the additional title of lead division president.

• • •

Tennis players beware. The Palisades Tennis Club is in a tenuous position at best as the lease on their property expires. Actually, there are two leases involved.

One is for the front six courts and parking lot. That lease is held through the Hyatt Regency Newport Beach along with their land lease.

The Hyatt got new owners just around a year ago and have not as of yet developed a comprehensive property plan moving forward. They’re reportedly wanting to work with Palisades, but more on a month-to-month basis until their long-term plan is decided.

Real estate developer Russ Fluter, on the other hand, owns a separate lease on the back 10 courts and the clubhouse land which is set to expire on August 31. He has had an idea of possibly moving in a different direction other than the tennis moving forward, perhaps with condos.

A Palisades members’ meeting earlier this week attempted to generate pressure on Fluter to come to the table and renegotiate. Rumors are that he is now considering it.

Palisades is home to the Newport Beach Breakers professional tennis team and serves a membership of around 400. However, that number has declined in recent years.

• • •

Okay, our Newport Beach Police Department has been busy keeping law and order in our fair city. 

However, when they’re not doing that you just might catch them giving back. An example, Tuesday night the men and women in blue had a Tip-A-Cop fundraiser at Javier’s in Crystal Court to benefit Special Olympics.

The final total, $8,215. Not bad for a night’s work.

• • •

Speaking of the police, tonight, August 23, between the hours of 8 p.m.-2 p.m., the NBPD will hold a DUI/Driver’s License Checkpoint at an undisclosed location within the city.

Take this as fair warning. For those that don’t, you just might see your name in next Tuesday’s edition of Stu News Newport. And, that’s not a good thing.

This checkpoint is part of the NBPD’s Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign which runs from August 16 through September 2 (Labor Day).

• • •

Congrats to new Fire Chief Jeff Boyles who received his new badge this week. Boyles follows retiring Chief Chip Duncan.

He’ll oversee all fire and lifeguard operations for Newport Beach.

• • •

On a sad note, Gini Robins, of Theodore Robins Ford family fame, passed away earlier this month.

Gini, of course, was the wife of Bob Robins, owner of Robins Ford and together wonderful community philanthropists. Bob preceded Gini in death back in 2016.

A Celebration of Life for Gini will take place Friday, Sept. 13, at 11 a.m. in the St. Andrews Presbyterian Church Chapel

She would have been 90 next month.

• • •

Several issues ago we told you that baseball star Mike Trout has purchased a magnificent home in town. 

Well, the celebrity purchases continue.

This one isn’t quite as big, and if you’re like me, you might have to ask yourself, who?

But Christina El Moussa, formerly of the TV show Flip Or Flop, moves on to her new show Christina on the Coast. The show’s premise focuses on her personal move from Yorba Linda into Newport Beach and the renovation of her new home, following her recent publicized divorce from Tarek El Moussa.

You can watch for the new show on HGTV.


What’s happening at the OC Fair & Event Center during the month of September?

There’s something for everyone in September at the OC Fair & Event Center. Here’s a lineup of the upcoming events.

–August 31-September 1: Great Labor Day Cruise. One of the longest running events offering non-stop cruising around a 1.25-mile route at the 150-acre venue. Owners can pre-register their vintage cars or register at the event. Proceeds from the Great Labor Day Cruise are donated to the Warrior Foundation Freedom Station supporting U.S. veterans. Hours: Saturday, Aug. 31, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 1, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. General admission is $12. Active military (with ID) and kids 12 and under receive free admission. A two-day pass is $20. Parking is $9. For more information, visit www.thelabordaycruise.org.

–September 7: Costa Mesa Speedway-Knobby Night. For 50 years, Speedway motorcycle races have entertained spectators with the thrill of speed, precision and sliding around turns. Gates for the event open at 6 p.m. with the first race beginning at 7:30 p.m. at Action Sports Arena. General admission is $20; $15 seniors (65+), military and juniors (ages 13-17); $10 children (ages 3-12); free for kids 2 and younger. Parking is $9. For more information, visit www.costamesaspeedway.net.

What's Happening at the OC Fair Hangar Cars

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 Photos courtesy of OC Fair & Event Center

Don’t miss out on the unique cars that will be cruising around during the Great Labor Day Cruise, August 31-September 1

–September 7: Pacific Symphony - Tchaikovsky Fireworks Spectacular.  Celebrate the summer’s end with Pacific Symphony playing Tchaikovsky’s “1812” overture, as well as more of the composer’s greatest hits. The event will begin at 8 p.m. at the Pacific Amphitheatre. Admission ranges between $25-$99. For more information, visit www.pacamp.com.

–September 8: Pacific Symphony - Hail to the Heroes. American country music artist, Lee Greenwood, joins Pacific Symphony for a concert that celebrates U.S. veterans, the heroes who make our community and our country great. Experience a day of music, celebration and remembrance, to honor those who are serving, salute those who defended American’s ideals and remember those who never returned. The event starts at 7:30 p.m. at the Pacific Amphitheatre. Admission: $25-$99. For more information visit, www.pacamp.com

What's Happening at the OC Fair veterans

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Hail to the Heroes celebrates U.S. veterans through music, celebration and remembrance

–September 13-15: Sand Sports Super Show. The biggest and most exciting dune and dirt sports expo in the world. Join three days of fun and get up close to the latest Sand Rails, UTVs, ATVs, accessories, apparel and more. Friday, Sept. 13, 4-10 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 14, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., and Sunday, Sept. 15, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at OC Fair & Event Center. Admission: $15 online ($20 at the door); $15 for military (with ID); children 12 and younger are free. Two-day passes are $30; three-day passes are $45. Parking is $9. For more information, visit www.sandsportssupershow.com.

–September 20-22: Harvest Festival. Three days of shopping, entertainment, prizes and family fun. Shop hundreds of artisans exhibiting 24,000 American handmade and embellished art & crafts. Taste delicious baked breads, soups, desserts, candied apples and much more. The kids will enjoy activities in the Kidzone. Friday, Sept. 20, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 21, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., and Sunday, Sept. 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. in the Costa Mesa Building, Huntington Beach Building and Santa Ana Pavilion. General admission, 9; $7 seniors (62+) and military; $4 for juniors (ages 13-17); Free for children 12 and younger. Parking is $9. For more information, visit www.harvestfestival.com.

–September 21: Costa Mesa Speedway- Super Hooligan National Championship Series. Flat-track Super Hooligan racing comes to the Costa Mesa Speedway. The atmosphere and the noise is second to none, especially during floodlit night-time races. Saturday, Sept. 21. Gates open at 5:30 p.m., qualifying is at 6 p.m., first race is at 7:30 p.m. at Action Sports Arena

General admission, $20; $15 seniors (65+), military and juniors (ages 13-17); $10 children (ages 3-12); free for kids 2 and younger. Parking is $9. For more information, visit www.costamesaspeedway.net.

What's Happening at the OC Fair Sand Sports

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Check out the latest Sand Rails, UTVs, ATVs and accessories at the Sand Sports Super Show 

–September 28: 51st U.S. National Speedway Championship/Juniors. One of the most exciting, colorful and unpredictable live action racing events in the nation. Costa Mesa Speedway has put fans right on top of all the action from the comfort of Arena-style grandstand seating since 1969. Suitable for the whole family. Saturday, Sept. 28. Gates open at 6 p.m., first race is at 7:30 p.m. at Action Sports Arena. General admission, $20; $15 seniors (65+), military and juniors (ages 13-17); $10 children (ages 3-12); free for kids 2 and younger. Parking is $9. For more information, visit www.costamesaspeedway.net.

–Saturdays and Sundays: OC Market Place. 8 a.m.- 4 p.m. Admission is $2; free for kids 12 and younger. Located in Lot A. For more information, visit 

www.ocmarketplace.com.

Orange County Fair & Event Center is located at 88 Fair Drive, Costs Mesa. For more information, visit www.ocfair.com.


StyleWeekOC® returns September 12-14

Attention, fashionistas! StyleWeekOC® returns September 12-14 to Fashion Island, when Fashion Island teams up with SIMPLY for fashion and beauty fun.

For the third year, SIMPLY is returning to Orange County for a chic afternoon with three panel discussions and two keynote speakers with highly acclaimed experts and influencers in fashion, beauty and digital marketing.

Listen in on informative panels and shop the latest fall fashions at the in-store parties, and enjoy stylish treats and activities all for three days.

Screen Shot 2019 08 22 at 10.25.29 PM

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Courtesy of StyleWeekOC®

Schedule of Events:

Thursday, Sept. 12

–VIP Nordstrom Trend Sweepstakes at Nordstrom Fashion Island. Enter to win access into the VIP Nordstrom Trend event. Visit the Fashion Island Instagram page for contest rules. (INVITE only!)

–Shopping Party.Stop by C|Dobbs for a shopping party in celebration of StyleWeekOC® and enjoy sips while you shop and 10 percent off your purchase.

Friday, Sept. 13

–Shopping Party at Casablanca Bridal at Crystal Cove Shopping Center from 5-7 p.m. Refreshment, gown shopping advice and inspiration. Book an appointment for a future bridal fitting experience and get 25 percent off your Casablanca gown. (Offer valid on gown only, not on custom changes. Offer is not valid on previous purchases. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Offer is exclusive to Casablanca Flagship Store.)

–Shopping Party at VICI at Corona del Mar Plaza. Stop by VICI from 5-7 p.m. Enjoy rosé, desserts and personal styling sessions with one of their amazing stylists. Spend $150, $250 or $500 to receive a special gift with purchase.* (*Cannot be combined with any other offer or promotion.)

–VIP Dinner Sweepstakes. Round up your friends and enter to win dinner for two at Fashion Island during the StyleWeekOC VIP Influencer Dinner from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Enjoy delicious bites along with top influencers and leave with a goodie bag full of amazing products. This exclusive event is INVITE only, but they’re giving 2 people (and a friend), the chance to join the party. Enter at www.shopfashionisland.com/stylesweeps.

Saturday, Sept. 14

–Live Q&A with First Keynote in the Neiman Marcus – Bloomingdale’s Courtyard in Fashion Island from 1-1:30 p.m. (More details to follow.)

–Fashion Panel in the Neiman Marcus – Bloomingdale’s Courtyard in Fashion Island from 1:40-2:25 p.m. Guest speakers: Gorjana Reidel, jewelry designer known for gorjana; Cassydy Berliner, Infuencer; and Lo VonRumpf, image consultant and fashion correspondent with LVR Style. RSVP here.

–Beauty Panel in the Neiman Marcus – Bloomingdale’s Courtyard in Fashion Island from 2:35-3:20 p.m. Guest influencers: Courtney Kerr, Christine Kon and Olia Majd. RSVP here.

–Fashion Panel in the Neiman Marcus – Bloomingdale’s Courtyard in Fashion Island from 3:30-4:15 p.m. Guest speakers: Becca Tobin, actress, singer and host; Brandy Pham, phanoly founder; Casey “Quigley” Goode, content creator; and Rocky Barnes, model and brand ambassador for AmEx and MAC. RSVP here.

–Live Q&A with Second Keynote in the Neiman Marcus – Bloomingdale’s Courtyard in Fashion Island from 4:25-5 p.m. (More details to follow.)

–Shopping Parties after the panel discussions. Enjoy shopping parties from 5-7 p.m. at Neiman Marcus, Bloomingdale’s Macy’s, AG, Athleta, Anthropologie & Co. and more.

For additional information, visit www.orangecountyzest.com/styleweekoc.


Beauties on the Beach coming September 14 

On Saturday, Sept. 14, the inaugural Fall Classic Car, Trucks, Motorcycles & Silent Auction Show takes place from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on the beach in front of Newport Elementary on Balboa Peninsula.

Presented by the Knights of Columbus Balboa Council #15083 and Our Lady of Mount Carmel, the festivities include vendors, BBQ, music, opportunity drawings and more.

Save the Date Beauties Classic Car

Courtesy of kofcbalboa.com

For vendor and additional event information, contact John Gleason at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call 949.981.3867.

Newport Elementary is located at 1327 W. Balboa Blvd., Newport Beach.


Newport Beach Wellness Week has arrived

Newport Beach Wellness Week officially starts today, August 23, and continues through August 29. The week kicked off last night with a “Throwback Thursday” 80s-themed aerobics class at Fashion Island led by Newport Peach owner Nicole Kniss, in which more than 250 fitness enthusiasts dressed in their ‘80s best.

Newport Beach Wellness workout

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Courtesy of Visit Newport Beach

Getting a workout on the Lido Marina Village deck during last year’s Newport Beach Wellness Week

Special offers on healthy eats, spa services and recreational activities from local businesses will be available all around town. You can book a personalized wellness hotel package from one of Newport Beach’s revitalizing properties including the Fashion Island Hotel, Balboa Bay Resort and Hyatt Regency John Wayne Airport.

To add some fun to your stay, select from a roster of accommodations, spas, restaurants, shopping and things to do. A complete list of participating vendors is available here.

Now, go out, have some fun and get fit!


Child Abuse Prevention Center adds Newport Beach residents to its board of directors

The Child Abuse Prevention Center (CAPC) has announced the addition of four new professionals to its board of directors, three of whom are Newport Beach residents

Newport Beach resident Marjon Ghasemi, attorney at law and supporter of numerous nonprofit organizations in Southern California, will join other business, industry and philanthropy leaders currently serving on the CAPC board. Ghasemi is senior principal of corporate development for CoreLogic in Irvine. A graduate of the University of Southern California’s Gould School of Law, she also taught as an adjunct professor at Western State University College of Law.

Child abuse prevention Marjon Ghasemi

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Photos by Ian Wiant

Marjon Ghasemi

Orange County philanthropist Catherine Sorensen, a resident of Newport Beach, brings years of experience working with family foundations and other nonprofit organizations to the CAPC board. Sorensen played a board leadership role with the Lloyd E. and Elizabeth H. Klein Family Foundation, the Community Foundation of Orange, the Center for Investment and Wealth Management at the University of California, Irvine, the Assistance League of Anaheim and others.

Child abuse prevention Catherine Sorensen

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Catherine Sorensen

Richard Swinney, a retired attorney at law with 34 years of experience working in the financial institutions industry, was also named to the board. Swinney is a longtime community activist with board leadership positions at the Exchange Club of Newport Harbor, California State Parks/Crystal Cove Conservancy and the MillionKids nonprofit group, among others. He is a veteran of the United States Air Force having served in the Air National Guard. Swinney lives in Newport Beach.

Child abuse prevention Richard Swinney

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Richard Swinney

Frederique Georges, president and CEO of Freddie Georges Production Group, a custom exhibit and experiential marketing company based in Huntington Beach, has also joined the board. Freddie Georges Production Group is one of the largest woman-owned exhibit and experiential marketing agencies in the country. Georges lives in Huntington Beach.

Child abuse prevention Frederique Georges

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Frederique Georges

The new board members round out a diverse group of experienced Orange County leaders in business, law, philanthropy and finance, according to Lisa Fujimoto, executive director of CAPC.

“The addition of these four community leaders to our already outstanding board will help guide us as we grow our mission to prevent and break the cycle of child abuse,” Fujimoto said. “Their leadership backed by years of experience will inspire us to create new solutions and programs for the challenges we face. We are honored that all of our board members have elected to serve alongside our excellent staff and team of volunteers.”

Established in 1983, the Child Abuse Prevention Center serves at-risk children and families in crisis to prevent and break the generational cycle of child abuse and trauma. The center matches families at risk of child abuse with professional caseworkers who work with them directly within their homes. CAPC also works with adolescents and adults in crisis who need intervention services dealing with depression and suicidal ideations. The center employs more than 120 professional staff members, two-thirds of whom provide direct services to individuals in need. In 2018, the center’s programs served more than 10,000 individuals in crisis and families.

More information about the Child Abuse Prevention Center can be found at www.brightfutures4kids.orgor by contacting Lisa Fujimoto, executive director, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Fujimoto can also be reached at 714.955.6506.


Award-winning jazz trumpeter Theo Croker to perform special tribute to Parkland students

Segerstrom Center for the Arts will become the first performing arts center in the U.S. to feature the “Instrument of Hope” on Friday, Aug. 30 during the final Free Summer Jazz concert on the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza.

The “Instrument of Hope” is a one-of-a-kind trumpet made from one hundred spent bullet casings, the same number used in the 2018 Parkland, Fla. high school mass shooting. It will be played by Echo Award nominee and Theodore Presser Award-winning jazz trumpeter Theo Croker in a special tribute. 

award winning jazz Theo Croker

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Photo by Craig Carpenter

Award-winning jazz trumpeter Theo Croker

The “Instrument of Hope” is a project initiated by students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Publicis New York, and ShineMSD, Inc., a nonprofit organization created by Parkland students to advance healing through the arts. The “Instrument of Hope” was designed and hand-crafted by Josh Landress, an NYC-based instrument specialist who donated much of his time and labor for the fabrication of the trumpet. The student-led group from MSD have inspired an instrument born from violence, now transformed into hope – using music to shine a light through the darkness of the school shooting. 

Judy Morr, the Center’s executive vice president, producing director, remarked: “Segerstrom Center for the Arts deeply believes that the Arts can provide a catalyst to bring everyone together for healing and engender hope for humanity. We are honored to be the first performing arts center in the United States to feature the ‘Instrument of Hope’ and know its sound and sight are an important vessel for conversation, collaboration and community.”

award winning jazz Instrument of Hope

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Courtesy of scfta.org

“Instrument of Hope” is a one-of-a-kind trumpet made from one hundred spent bullet casings

Since its first performance, the “Instrument of Hope” has been played by Panic! At the Disco, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, Keyon Harrold and Brian Newman. Parkland’s Glen Friedman used it to play the National Anthem to open an NBA game between the Miami Heat and the Boston Celtics. 

Three months after the shooting, Stoneman Douglas High School students Sawyer Garrity and Andrea Peña composed the song “Shine” to help in their own personal healing. Students later created a music video titled “Shine” to commemorate the victims and to help other survivors with their healing. “Shine” raised awareness and funds for organizations that promote healing through the arts, working through ShineMSD, a nonprofit created by the students. ShineMSD’s mission is to promote healing through the arts and, specifically, music.

Seventy-one musicians, including Arturo Sandoval, Randy Brecker, Wayne Bergeron, Jeff Beal, Chuck Findley and Terell Stafford recently recorded a new version of “Shine” that will be released this fall. 

The August 30 Summer Jazz performance begins with Sweet Baby J’ai at 7 p.m., followed by Croker and the “Instrument of Hope” at approximately 8 p.m. The program concludes with The Women of Jazz. This event is free and n-ticketed.

Julianne and George Argyros Plaza is located at Segerstrom Center of the Art, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.scfta.org.


Take Five: Meet Joette Pierce, principal of Pierce & Associates Appraisals

By AMY SENK

Maybe you are curious because of changes in the art market, maybe you have no idea which artist created a favorite piece inherited from a favorite aunt, maybe you need to know the value of a favorite piece because you’re going through a divorce, or maybe your insurance agent has recommended appraising your belongings to make sure you’re covered in case of theft or disaster. Enter Joette Pierce, principal of Pierce & Associates Appraisals, a Corona del Mar-based firm that specializes in researching, identifying and assessing the value of items in your personal collection. I caught up with Joette to find out more about the process.

Take Five Meet Joette Pierce

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Courtesy of Joette Pierce

Joette Pierce

Q: As a personal property appraiser, you deal frequently with fine art. What is your educational background, and did you study art?

A: My early educational background was in business with art history classes. I began my career as a stockbroker (the numbers side) and continued in interior design and antiques, appraisal classes with the American Society of Appraisers and connoisseurship classes at UCI. I have increased my art knowledge by working with gallery owners and museum curators and attending appraisal conferences all over the United States and England. 

Q: How does the process work?  What goes into appraising an artwork?

A: The process is to identify the work, then research the value for the intended purpose of the appraisal – insurance, estate, charitable donation, division of assets or sales advice. Prior to the inspection, I review introductory information regarding the artist, if possible. Once at the inspection, I look for clues as type of work, brush strokes, signature or monogram. Usually the back of the artwork provides a wealth of information relating to the artwork such as previous owner, auctions, numbers, shipping information, tacking strips, indications of repairs, age of canvas and stretchers. Also, the framing is important. Was it created by the artist? Is it an important frame? The client’s paperwork is also reviewed. I then continue the research; subscription databases provide thousands of details regarding sales. I research my in-house library and also visit and review books about the artists, catalogue raisonnés, or exhibition information located at universities, select libraries and the Getty Museum. Recently, I applied as a reader at the Huntington Library and Museum and was allowed to review the earliest documents on the known works of an artist. All books were set in a velvet cradle. In some institutes, gloves are required. Experts, dealers in that particular artist, auction specialists, and even artist foundations are contacted for information. What’s hot, what’s not and why not? Many times, I contact the artist directly who shares their time discussing their past work, future work, and upcoming exhibitions and shows. The information is then analyzed to provide an “opinion of value” for the intended purpose of the appraisal. The report is then written with the intended user in mind – the insurance company? the IRS? the court? only the client? or the heirs? Each report has its own set of requirements.

Q: Have you ever discovered a piece that was shockingly valuable, or do you have any crazy stories along those lines that you could share?

A: Many, many times, clients do not know the value of their artwork, especially if it was inherited. If the artwork was purchased years ago, they have not realized the huge leaps in value of some contemporary art. I had one client that had hired me to determine what may be of value in an estate. On the floor pushed aside was a 1930s painting marked $75 on the back, now it was worth over $30,000, and they ignored it in order to hang their Disney collectibles. One interesting story was while visiting the studio of artist Nelson Shanks, the portrait painter for President Clinton, I gasped when I noticed in his mock-up of the oval office and President Clinton, he included the “blue dress,” which became a shadow in the finished

portrait. Many artists include some type of symbolism in their work.

Q: Which artists are popular among Newport Beach collectors, and which artists or artworks seem to be rising the most value-wise in the global market?

A: Over the years, Newport Beach collectors collected early traditional California art, oils on canvas and watercolors – also collected by the Irvine family from the 1900s through the 1960s. Globally, rising- value-wise, David Hockey, Jeff Koons, Brian Donnelly, who goes by KAWS, Edward Ruscha, Yayoi Kusama are just a few names.

Q: If you could put together a dream collection, which five artists would you make sure to include? 

A: I would have a place in my home for Edouard Manet, Edouard Vuillard, Childe Hassam (New York flag paintings), Picasso (rose period) and Banksy. But there are many others.

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk is a longtime resident of Corona del Mar and a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


You Must Remember This: Garry Brown, environmentalist

By NANCY GARDNER

To say that environmentalists tend to be casual in their garb is to understate. It is almost impossible to be the worst-dressed person in a group of greens, which my daughter insists is why I hang around with them. Certainly, Garry Brown is an outlier when it comes to appearance. His hair is blown dry, every lock in place. He usually wears a suit and tie. He looks like the lobbyist he once was, not a tree hugger, and yet he not only started Coastkeeper, but as its head, has led the organization to an amazing string of accomplishments. 

You Must Remember This Garry BrownOne of his first victories also became his most controversial. The ocean below Crystal Cove State Park is an ASBS, Area of Special Biological Significance. One of the protective factors that comes with this classification is that you aren’t allowed to discharge directly into an ASBS. The controlling word is “directly.” As the Irvine Company was developing Crystal Cove Promenade and the communities above it, it became clear that this would create runoff to the ASBS.

“Stop!” cried environmentalists. “This is a violation of the no discharge rule!”

“Au contraire,” countered the Irvine Company attorneys. “The rule says that you may not discharge directly into an ASBS. We are not discharging directly. We are discharging into a creek which eventually discharges into the ASBS.”

“Eventually? It’s about 50 feet!”

“Fifty feet is 50 feet. Not directly.”

To everybody’s amazement (meaning the environmentalists), the Water Control Board bought the company’s argument. Everybody vilified the Irvine Company, castigated the water board and slumped in defeat – everybody except Garry. Coastkeeper sued and won. As a result, the Irvine Company was forced to build the natural treatment system (which you see directly to the south of Crystal Cove Promenade). Oh happy day! Everyone (again the environmentalists) danced around lauding Garry...until Coastkeeper gave the Irvine Company an award for the treatment system. Talk about a mood change. How could he give an award when all the company did was obey a court order? People suddenly remembered Garry’s former career as a lobbyist. All sorts of conspiracy theories flourished, but Garry didn’t flinch. He pointed out that the company had gone well beyond what the court required. The company should be recognized for this. He didn’t convince many in the green community, but in hindsight it seems like a wise decision. Garry was smart enough to understand that it is both carrots and sticks that create progress. From that time on, the Irvine Company became much more sensitive to its impact, incorporating all sorts of water quality protections and sustainability elements in both their commercial and residential projects. It would probably have gotten there on its own, but Garry can certainly be credited with speeding the process.

In the years since then, Coastkeeper has flourished. The organization works to educate the coming generations, does all sorts of restoration including local eelgrass and native oyster projects, has a demonstrations garden...the list is a long one, including the establishment of the Inland Empire and Coachella Valley Water Keepers to treat things at the source, and it was all done without a hair out of place.

Speaking of things out of place, I should mention Ryan Kelly who was instrumental in the early success of Newport’s Surfrider chapter. Matt Gadow and I had decided to start a chapter, so we put out fliers for an initial meeting at the old Hobie’s in Corona del Mar (now a rug store). Surfers are another very casual group, so everyone showed up in shorts and flip flops except for this young guy in a suit who offered to be president. His credentials? He had been president of his fraternity. Great. A Greek in a suit with a bunch of surfers. It didn’t seem like a match made in heaven, but it was. Since we had no money, we went any place anybody needed volunteers in hopes of a donation, often working five or six hours and coming back with $100 if we were lucky. Nine months into this, Ryan called a halt. “We’re going to burn ourselves out at this rate,” he said, and he  had it all figured out. “The Surfrider logo and name are worth something. From now on, if people want to associate themselves with us and use the logo and name, they have to guarantee us a base amount.” We all looked at him like he was crazy, but he wasn’t. For such a young guy he brought an old eye to things, and we soon had a treasury that actually allowed us to accomplish things like Teach and Test. This was a program dreamed up by Ryan and Mr. Starkweather, a teacher from CdM High School. The chapter provided professional grade equipment which allowed students to test the water where they surfed or swam.  The students loved it, and it gave them a great understanding of the various issues that impact the ocean.

So the lesson from this, is that just because you wear a suit and a tie it doesn’t mean you’re not into the environment. It just means that you’re going to look like you’re not. 

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, longtime resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to Stu News Newport.


OCSD announces changes to jail operations to increase custody mental health services

Orange County Sheriff-Coroner Don Barnes announced major changes to Orange County’s jail operations to efficiently use Department resources and address the increasing need for inmates requiring mental health services.

“Since 2015, we have seen a 40 percent increase in open mental health cases in our jails,” said Sheriff Barnes. “The number of mental health cases now reach almost 1,800 on any given day. Consequently, we must focus on enhancing our mental health services and expanding the number of beds available for individuals with mental health needs.”

OCSD announces Don Barnes

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Courtesy of OCSD

Orange County Sheriff-Coroner Don Barnes

The number of inmates requiring mental health treatment in jail settings continues to climb, along with the severity of the mental illnesses. At present, approximately 30 percent of the jail population requires various levels of mental health services and that number has been increasing exponentially over the last five years. Mental health services include counseling, medication management, intensive outpatient care, discharge planning, acute psychiatric inpatient care (hospitalization) and emergency psychiatric medications. OCSD has seen continuous increases in the number of inmates requiring mental health services from Correctional Health Services (CHS).

OCSD announces average daily census

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Courtesy of OCSD

Average daily census of inmates with mental health needs

To address these increasing needs, OCSD will upgrade three existing housing modules at the Intake Release Center to treat inmates with mental health needs. ADA compliant cells and restrooms will be added. When complete, the upgrades will add approximately 500 behavioral health beds allowing for the security, care and treatment of male and female inmates. In order to accommodate the demand for mental health treatment and programming, increased staff will be added in mental health housing units. These upgrades and staffing will be more conducive to providing programs.

In addition to being a primary provider of mental health care, jails across the nation are also quickly becoming front line providers for substance use disorders, particularly in responding to the opioid epidemic. In 2018, approximately 40 percent of the jail population reported some type of substance use, and more than 100 inmates required frequent monitoring and assessment for drug and/or alcohol detoxification on a daily basis. With the upgrades, there will be designated areas for both males and females to focus on detoxification and treatment, in addition to added services and programing specific to drug use.

The Intake Release Center booking operations triage area where inmates first come when they are brought to jail will be redesigned and remodeled with privacy partitions to provide greater confidentiality when screening inmates for medical and mental health issues. 

In order to fund and increase staffing ratios for inmates with mental health and substance use disorders, Sheriff Barnes has developed a jail operations reorganization plan.

“I have made the decision to make two significant changes to our jail operations,” said Sheriff Barnes. “These decisions are intended to mitigate the risk of litigation from the state while, at the same, minimize costs to Orange County taxpayers.

“Jail operations at the James A. Musick Facility will be temporarily suspended and our agreement with the Federal Government to house Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detainees will be ended.”

The Sheriff’s Department has leased bed space to ICE since 2010. The current agreement expires in July 2020 and allows for early termination. In order to address the mental health crisis within Orange County jails, OCSD has notified ICE of the intent to terminate the agreement. Once formally terminated, ICE has 120 days to transfer the detainees to other facilities. Unfortunately, based on statutory language within SB-54, those individuals housed on behalf of ICE will most likely be transferred outside of California, separating them from family members who reside within this state.

The conclusion of the ICE agreement will allow maximized use of jail bed space and focus on the needs of the mentally ill. The loss of revenue will be offset by the savings through the temporary closure of housing operations at the Musick Facility.

The Musick Facility will be reopened when the construction of two new state-funded housing facilities are completed. The 512-bed and 384-bed facilities are specifically designed to meet the growing needs of today’s inmate population. The estimated completion is fall of 2022.

The decision to end the ICE agreement will not impact public safety. OCSD will continue to work with ICE within the confines of SB-54 to ensure they are alerted to the release of serious and violent offenders within their custody who have ICE detainers.

Treating those with mental illness in our jails is only one portion of the larger challenge policy makers must address with regards to the influx of the mentally ill in our community.

“We are obligated to do everything we can to provide care for the inmates in our custody and connect them to services,” said Sheriff Barnes. “We have a shared interest in rehabilitating inmates with mental health challenges and substance use disorders to be stable and sober, with the ultimate goal of having them not return to jail.”


NMUSD announces 2019-2020 nutrition program

Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) has announced its policy to serve nutritious meals every school day under the National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, and/or Afterschool Snack Program. Effective July 1, 2019 through June 30, 2020, children are eligible for free or reduced-price meals if the household income is less than or equal to the federal guidelines.

Households do not need to turn in an application when the household receives a notification letter saying that all children automatically qualify for free meals when any household member receives benefits from CalFresh, CalWORKs, or FDPIR. Children who meet the definition of foster, homeless, migrant, or runaway, and children enrolled in their school’s Head Start program are eligible for free meals. Contact school officials if any child in the household is not on the notification letter. The household must let school officials know if they do not want to receive free or reduced-price meals.

NMUSD announces 2019 2020 income table

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Courtesy of NMUSD

Table shows eligibility for free and reduced price meals

Applications will be sent to the household with a letter about the free and reduced-price meal program. Households that want to apply for meal benefits must fill out one application for all children in the household and give it to the nutrition office at 2985 Bear Street, Building B, Costa Mesa, CA 92626. For a simple and secure method to apply, use the online application at http://nmusd.schoolunchapp.com. Contact the Nutrition Services Office at 714.424.5090 for help filling out the application. The school will let you know if your application is approved or denied for free or reduced-price meals.

Households may turn in an application at any time during the school year. If you are not eligible now, but your household income goes down, household size goes up, or a household member starts receiving CalFresh, CalWORKs, or FDPIR, you may turn in an application at that time. Information given on the application will be used to determine eligibility and may be verified at any time during the school year by school officials. The last four digits of the Social Security number from any adult household or checking that you do not have a Social Security number is required if you include income on the application.

Households that receive Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) benefits may be eligible for free or reduced-price meals by filling out an application.

NMUSD announces 2019 2020 cups of fruit

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Courtesy of NMUSD

Foster children are eligible for free meals and may be included as a household member if the foster family chooses to also apply for the non-foster children on the same application. Including foster children as a household member may help the non-foster children qualify for free or reduced-price meals. If the non-foster children are not eligible, this does not keep foster children from receiving free meals.

Your child’s eligibility status from last school year will continue into the new school year for up to 30 school days or until the school processes your new application, or your child is otherwise certified for free or reduced-price meals. After the 30 school days, your child will have to pay full price for meals, unless the household receives a notification letter for free or reduced-price meals. School officials do not have to send reminder or expired eligibility notices.

If you do not agree with the decision or results of verification, you may discuss it with school officials. You also have the right to a fair hearing, which may be requested by calling or writing the hearing official: Dale Ellis, Director, 2985 Bear Street, Building B, Costa Mesa, CA  92626, Phone: 714.424.5090. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

NMUSD announces 2019 2020 food station

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Courtesy of NMUSD

NMUSD has amended its policy for serving meals to students under the National School Lunch, School Breakfast Program, and/or Afterschool Snack Program for the 2019-2020 school year. All students will be served lunch and breakfast at no charge at the following sites:

–Adams Elementary

–College Park Elementary

–Pomona Elementary

–Rea Elementary

–Wilson Elementary

–Whittier Elementary

–Tewinkle Middle School

For additional information, contact the Nutrition Services Office at 714.424.5090.

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.) should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing, or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call 866.632.9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

1. Mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights

1400 Independence Avenue, SW

Washington, D.C. 20250-9410; or

2. Fax: 202.690.7442; or

3. Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Living in a tangerine dream

Living in sunrise

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Photo by Jason Berry (Instagram @its_jason_berry)

“O, Sunlight! The most precious gold to be found on Earth.” –Roman Payne


Gracias Madre to replace Gratitude Kitchen & Bar this fall

By EMILY SPAIN

Gratitude Kitchen and Bar is set to close on Tuesday, Sept. 3 for renovations that will transform the space into a new restaurant: Gracias Madre. Both Gratitude Kitchen and Gracias Madre belong to the Love Serve Remember restaurant group owned by Matthew and Terces Engelhart. Gracias Madre’s Newport Beach location will mirror its sister location in West Hollywood serving delicious plant-based Mexican food.

Gracias Madre bar

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Photos provided by Gracias Madre

Gracias Madre’s bar will offer an impressive selection of Mezcal brands to deliver delicious margaritas and cocktails

Chef Alan Sánchez Lázaro from Mexico City will oversee the Newport Beach kitchen, adding his own signature items like Bowl Uno, Flautas de Camote, Jackfruit Carnitas Tacos and Coliflor Frito. Gracias Madre’s bar will offer organic, artisanal tequila and mescal craft cocktails such as their Purista and El Jefe signature margaritas. The bar will also serve a wide variety of mezcal brands spanning across wild agave varietals like espadin, mexicano, tepeztate, madrecuixe, tobala, ensambles, bacanora, raicilla and more.

As for physical changes to the space, Wendy Haworth Design Studio will refresh the space to reflect Gracias Madre’s aesthetic. Mexican tiles will accent the bar, the focal point of the indoor dining area, and updates to the expansive patio include a perimeter of tall hedges, centralized mature trees, new flooring, draping, light fixtures and more. Additionally, a private dining room will be added to accommodate larger celebrations. Gracias Madre will also offer catering services. 

Gracias Madre pozole

Gracias Madre’s mouthwatering Pozole: A traditional hominy stew, ancho chile broth, cashew crema, avocado and tortilla strips

Before Gratitude Kitchen closes, make sure to take advantage of the restaurant’s August “Month of Gratitude” specials. Every Thursday, enjoy Happy Hour prices and menus all day for Thankful Thursdays. For the rest of the month, a Grateful Prix Fixe Menu, including some of Gratitude’s most popular dishes for $30, will be offered to lunch and dinner guests. Additionally, customers who come in to dine at Gratitude this month will also receive a postcard, which can be redeemed for two margaritas on the house at Gracias Madre when it opens.

Gratitude Kitchen and Bar/Gracias Madre, 1617 Westcliff Drive, No. 112, Newport Beach.


Flashback Friday

Taking her first communion…

Flashback Friday 8.23.19

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Here is our Flashback Friday...harkening back to yesterday...and we thought it would be fun if you try and guess who it is.

Clue: This paisana is a “case” study in giving back to our community.

Good luck guessing this one. The answer appears today at the bottom of Stu News.

Send in a treasured past photo!

You can submit yourself, wife, girlfriend, boyfriend or family member. We’ll even surprise them if you want. 

We’re looking for eye-catching representations of your Flashback Friday.

Please send them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with Flashback Friday in the subject line. Let’s make Fridays a day to remember.


Flashback Friday: Answer

If you guessed Marie Case, principal of Case Communications and Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce Commodore, then you are correct!

Send in a treasured past photo!

You can submit yourself, wife, girlfriend, boyfriend or family member. We’ll even surprise them if you want. 

We’re looking for eye-catching representations of your Flashback Friday.

Please send them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with Flashback Friday in the subject line. Let’s make Fridays a day to remember.


Crystal Cove coastline

Crystal Cove glow

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Photo by Michelle Mar (Instagram @msmichellemar) 

Summer crowds are clearing and the beaches are gleaming


Congressman Harley Rouda backs Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris

U.S. Representative Harley Rouda has announced his support for Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris’ re-election to the California State Assembly, representing the 74th District.

In announcing his support for Assemblywoman Petrie-Norris, Congressman Rouda released the following statement: “Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris is a successful self-made businesswoman who knows how to get big jobs done for the people she serves. In the Assembly, Cottie has authored and helped push through critical legislation to help business owners, protect our beautiful coastline and invest in local schools. Cottie fights hard for Orange County; we need her in the State Assembly.”

Congressman Harley Cottie Petrie Norris

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Submitted photo

California State Assemblywoman Cottie Petrie-Norris

Congressman Rouda was elected to represent California’s 48th Congressional District in the United States House of Representatives in 2018, when he defeated longtime incumbent Dana Rohrabacher. Prior to his service in Congress, Rouda was a successful businessman, attorney and technology entrepreneur. Rouda and Petrie-Norris both represent all or portions of the cities of Costa Mesa, Huntington Beach, Laguna Beach and Newport Beach.

Cottie Petrie-Norris was elected to represent California’s 74th Assembly District in 2018. Over the course of her first year in office, she has introduced more than a dozen bills, including important legislation to combat sea-level rise, improve services for veterans, expand access to birth control and save small business owners money. As part of the 2019-2020 State Budget, Petrie-Norris secured $4.5 million to help the Orange County Fire Authority’s Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance project to protect Southern California from wildfires and $2.9 million to end Veteran homelessness in Orange County.

Petrie-Norris serves as Chair of the Assembly’s Accountability and Administrative Review Committee and as Chair of the Select Committee on Student Debt. She also serves on the Assembly’s committees for Appropriations, Judiciary, Revenue and Taxation, and Veterans Affairs.

After working her way through Yale University, where she double majored in Economics and English, Cottie Petrie-Norris had a successful 20-year career in finance and technology. She helped to build businesses and led teams at Fortune 500 corporations, small companies and startups.

Petrie-Norris lives in Laguna Beach with her husband, Colin, their two sons, Dylan and Hayden, and their rescue dog, Flounder.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Irvine Company names new president and Palisades Tennis Club sees expiring lease in their future

Fair Game Tom NewThe Irvine Company has announced the promotion of Chief Financial Officer Charles “Chip” Fedalen Jr. to president. He replaces Ray Wirta, who retired in March. Fedalen will continue to also retain his current position as CFO.

Two other moves included Senior Vice President Frank Abeling to executive vice president of real estate operations and Office Division President Doug Holte who added the additional title of lead division president.

• • •

Tennis players beware. The Palisades Tennis Club is in a tenuous position at best as the lease on their property expires. Actually, there are two leases involved.

One is for the front six courts and parking lot. That lease is held through the Hyatt Regency Newport Beach along with their land lease.

The Hyatt got new owners just around a year ago and have not as of yet developed a comprehensive property plan moving forward. They’re reportedly wanting to work with Palisades, but more on a month-to-month basis until their long-term plan is decided.

Real estate developer Russ Fluter, on the other hand, owns a separate lease on the back 10 courts and the clubhouse land which is set to expire on August 31. He has had an idea of possibly moving in a different direction other than the tennis moving forward, perhaps with condos.

A Palisades members’ meeting earlier this week attempted to generate pressure on Fluter to come to the table and renegotiate. Rumors are that he is now considering it.

Palisades is home to the Newport Beach Breakers professional tennis team and serves a membership of around 400. However, that number has declined in recent years.

• • •

Okay, our Newport Beach Police Department has been busy keeping law and order in our fair city. 

However, when they’re not doing that you just might catch them giving back. An example, Tuesday night the men and women in blue had a Tip-A-Cop fundraiser at Javier’s in Crystal Court to benefit Special Olympics.

The final total, $8,215. Not bad for a night’s work.

• • •

Speaking of the police, tonight, August 23, between the hours of 8 p.m.-2 p.m., the NBPD will hold a DUI/Driver’s License Checkpoint at an undisclosed location within the city.

Take this as fair warning. For those that don’t, you just might see your name in next Tuesday’s edition of Stu News Newport. And, that’s not a good thing.

This checkpoint is part of the NBPD’s Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign which runs from August 16 through September 2 (Labor Day).

• • •

Congrats to new Fire Chief Jeff Boyles who received his new badge this week. Boyles follows retiring Chief Chip Duncan.

He’ll oversee all fire and lifeguard operations for Newport Beach.

• • •

On a sad note, Gini Robins, of Theodore Robins Ford family fame, passed away earlier this month.

Gini, of course, was the wife of Bob Robins, owner of Robins Ford and together wonderful community philanthropists. Bob preceded Gini in death back in 2016.

A Celebration of Life for Gini will take place Friday, Sept. 13, at 11 a.m. in the St. Andrews Presbyterian Church Chapel

She would have been 90 next month.

• • •

Several issues ago we told you that baseball star Mike Trout has purchased a magnificent home in town. 

Well, the celebrity purchases continue.

This one isn’t quite as big, and if you’re like me, you might have to ask yourself, who?

But Christina El Moussa, formerly of the TV show Flip Or Flop, moves on to her new show Christina on the Coast. The show’s premise focuses on her personal move from Yorba Linda into Newport Beach and the renovation of her new home, following her recent publicized divorce from Tarek El Moussa.

You can watch for the new show on HGTV.


Segerstrom Center for the Arts prepares for a glorious 2019-2020 Fall Season

A most incredible season of breathtaking dance, Broadway blockbusters, stars and celebrities stand ready to kick-off Segerstrom Center for the Arts’ 2019-2020 Season. An all-new production of Broadway’s history-making Miss Saigon comes to Segerstrom Hall, followed by the incomparable Mariinsky Ballet and Orchestra performing its opulent production of Marius Petipa’s La Bayadère. Anastasia, the hit Broadway adaptation of the beloved movie, comes to the Center for the first time.

Musical theater fans are in for magical evenings up-close-and-personal with Tony Award winner Betty Buckley and Smash star Megan Hilty in the Cabaret Series. Music lovers can delight in evenings of jazz with the Vijay Iyer Trio or Italy’s preeminent classical quartet, Quartetto di Cremona.

Among the many special events to take in are Cirque Mei with world-renowned Chinese acrobats, the all-star group of illusionists Champions of Magic and Lila Downs, back with her new show, Día de Muertos: Al Chile.

There is something for everyone at Segerstrom Center for the Arts this fall – take a look:

International Dance Series

–Mariinsky Ballet and Orchestra: La Bayadère, October 16-20 in Segerstrom Hall – Amid the sweeping vistas and grand temples of mystical India, Petipa’s great Russian classic is an epic of eternal love and godly revenge. La Bayadère offers tour de force performances by the Mariinsky’s legendary ballet stars as the tale’s doomed temple dancer Nikiya, the warrior who betrays her, Solor, and her archrival, Gamzatti.

La Bayadere

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Photo by Natasha Razina © State Academic Mariinsky Theatre

Courtesy of sfta.org

La Bayadère with the Mariinsky Ballet and Orchestra transports you to mystical India

Broadway and Curtain Call Series

–Miss Saigon, October 1-13 in Segerstrom Hall – In this new production of the legendary musical, take in the epic story of Kim, a young Vietnamese woman orphaned by war and forced to work in a bar run by a notorious character known as the Engineer. There she meets and falls in love with an American G.I., an encounter that will change their lives forever.

Miss Saigon

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Photo by Matthew Murphy

Courtesy of scfta.org

Emily Bautista as Kim and Anthony Festa as Chris in the North American Tour of Miss Saigon

–Anastasia, November 5-17 in Segerstrom Hall – Inspired by the beloved films, ths romantic and adventure-filled new musical transports us from the twilight of the Russian Empire to the euphoria of Paris in the 1920s. A brave young woman sets out to discover the mystery of her past. Pursued by a ruthless Soviet officer determined to silence her, Anya enlists the aid of a dashing conman and a lovable ex-aristocrat. Together, they embark on an adventure to help her find home, love and family. 

Cabaret Series

–Betty Buckley, October 17-19 in Samueli Theater – Buckley is a Tony award-winning Broadway, film and television star, but when she takes the cabaret stage, her personal song favorites are undeniably in the hands of a master artist. Without fail, she knows when and where to let it ride, when to pull back or lean in, providing a generous gift of memories for her devoted fans.

Betty Buckey

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Courtesy of scfta.org

Tony award-winning Betty Buckley returns to Samueli Theater

–Megan Hilty, November 14-16 in Samueli Theater – Most recognizable for her portrayal of seasoned triple-threat Ivy Lynn in NBC’s musical drama Smash, Megan Hilty has triumphed on Broadway, too, earning Tony and Drama Desk nominations for her performance in the hilarious comedy, Noises Off. Her sweetness, sincerity and levity make her one of today’s most beloved new artists.

Jazz Series

–Vijay Iyer Trio, October 5 in Samueli Theater – A MacArthur “Genius” Fellow with a Ph.D. in physics from U.C. Berkeley, Iyer is considered one of today’s most vital young jazz pianists. His trio, at its core, is distinguished by a profound sense of pulse, seemingly effortless unity and radiating groove with an intoxicating style.

–Lisa Fischer and SF JAZZ Collective, October 25 in Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall – Grammy Award winner Fischer returns to Segerstrom Center with her band, Grand Baton, to provide a soulful set to open the evening. Then, SFJAZZ Collective celebrates the 50th anniversaries of two influential albums from 1969: In A Silent Way, regarded as Miles Davis’ most influential works creating a sound world between jazz and rock, and Stand by Sly and The 

Family Stone, marrying funk and rock.

Chamber Music Series

–Quatteto di Cremona, October 24 in Samueli Theater – With a tribute to fellow countryman, Giuseppe Verdi, this Italian quartet brings the composer’s only surviving chamber music work to Costa Mesa along with a World Premiere by Dr. Byron Adams, professor of music at U.C., Riverside. 

Family Series

–Sonia De Los Santos, September 21-22 in Samueli Theater – Singing in both English and Spanish, De Los Santos has been performing her positive, multicultural, family-friendly music since 2007. Her songs are inspired by various Latin American rhythms hailing from Mexico, Colombia and Peru as well as the North American folk traditions. They reflect her experiences growing up in Mexico and moving to another country, learning about other cultures, and, in the process, feeling closer to her own heritage.

–Sugar Skull! A Dia de Los Muertos Musical Adventure, November 9-10 in Samueli Theater – Sugar Skull! is a joyous, heart-felt adventure that delves into the rich, tuneful traditions of Día de los Muertos. Young Vita thinks her family has gone loco planning a celebration for deceased loved ones. But when a candy skeleton on her abuelita’s cemetery ofrenda (offering) suddenly springs to life, Vita finds herself on a magical, musical journey to unravel the true meaning of the Day of the Dead.

Special Events

–Cirque Mei, September 14-15 in Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall – With a company of 40 elite circus artists and acrobats, Cirque Mei is a colorful and lively celebration of the internationally renowned Chinese circus arts. Their performances will include many of the most popular Chinese circus routines including lion dancing, contortion and hoops diving.

Cirque Mei

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Courtesy of scfta.org

Cirque Mei delights with Chinese circus artists and acrobats

–Piff the Magic Dragon, September 27-28 in Samueli Theater – This production is 50 percent comedian, 50 percent magician and 100 percent dragon. The standout star of NBC’s America’s Got Talent and Penn & Teller: Fool Us makes his Segerstrom Center debut.

Piff the Magic Dragon

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Courtesy of scfta.org

Piff the Magic Dragon, a one-of-a-kind comedy, magic show

–Lila Downs’ Dia de Muertos: AL CHILE, October 27 in Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall – Known as one of Mexico’s greatest singers and cultural ambassadors, the multi-Grammy Award winning Mexican-American singer comes to Segerstrom Center with her new show, which is a celebration of music, dance and ritual.

–Farruquito Flamenco, November 6 in Segerstrom Hall – Heir to the most renowned Gypsy flamenco dynasty, Farruquito has been called “the greatest flamenco dancer of this new century” by The New York Times.

–Champions of Magic, November 23 in Segerstrom Hall – Following sold-out shows around the globe, these five world-class illusionists make their Segerstrom Center debut with a mind-bending theatrical production that’s perfect for the whole family. 

Tickets are available for purchase online at www.scfta.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa or by calling 714.556.2787. For inquiries about group ticket savings of 10 or more, call the Group Services office at 714.755.0236. 

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


Summer Dive-In Movie this Friday at Fashion Island Hotel...come see Game Night

TGIF at Fashion Island Hotel this Friday, as the luxe hotel’s Summer Dive-In Movie nights are back. Film lovers of all ages can sidle up poolside or relax on their own pool floats while sipping specialty cocktails and other beverages and munching popcorn and other yummy snacks.

Families, couples and groups of besties are cordially invited. This week’s feature film is Game Night.

Summer Dive In Movie Game Night

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Courtesy of Amazon.com

“Game Night” is a mystery/crime flick that is family friendly

Synopsis of this mystery/crime film: Max and Annie’s weekly game night gets kicked up a notch when Max’s brother Brooks arranges a murder mystery party – complete with fake thugs and federal agents. So when Brooks gets kidnapped, it’s all supposed to be part of the game. As the competitors set out to solve the case, they start to learn that neither the game nor Brooks are what they seem to be. The friends soon find themselves in over their heads as each twist leads to another unexpected turn over the course of one chaotic night. Stars: Jason Bateman and Rachel McAdams. Runtime: 93 minutes.

The cost is $10 for locals and free for hotel guests. For tickets, click here.

Fashion Island Hotel is located at 690 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach. For more information, visit www.FashionIslandHotel.com.


OCMA to present Cinema Orange | Siqueiros, Season 2 programs, Time Boomerang

The Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA) is presenting some exciting exhibits, programs and performances in August and September.

Here’s closer look at the museum happenings:

Cinema Orange | Siqueiros: Walls of Passion on Thursday, Aug. 22 at 7 p.m.

OCMA to present Siqueiros

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Courtesy of Newport Beach Film Festival

“Siqueiros: Walls of Passion,” presented in partnership with the Newport Beach Film Festival

Siqueiros: Walls of Passion tells the story of artist David Alfaro Siqueiros (1896-1974) and the resurrection of his Los Angeles mural America Tropical. One of the great Mexican artists of the 20th century and one of three great Mexican muralists (with Diego Rivera and José Clemente Orozco), Siqueiros was a controversy-stirring revolutionary and lifetime activist who painted on an epic scale. Presented in partnership with Newport Beach Film Festival and organized by Leslie Feibleman, director of special programs and community cinema, Newport Beach Film Festival. RSVP is required; email iThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Season 2 Closing Weekend Programs on Saturday, Aug. 31 from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 

–11 a.m. - Monster A.: Monster Mom Part II. Los Angeles-based performance artist Matt Savitsky (a.k.a. Minty) activates artworks by Victoria Fu and Matt Rich to explore their ambiguous function and versatility. 

–12:30 p.m. - Reception with the Artists

–1 p.m. - Backhausdance With(in) OCMA: Ravel. Inspired by the exhibition Victoria Fu and Matt Rich: Monster A., Ravel comments on the physicality of domestic labor, the implications of gender roles and our capacity to connect with others.

–4 p.m. - UuDam Tran Nguyen: TIME BOOMERANG: California Edition From S.E.A. Sea Atolls to the Next Dead Stars. OCMA exhibiting artist UuDam Tran Nguyen discusses the California phase of his TIME BOOMERANG project in the context of his larger practice. 

TIME BOOMERANG California Map Breaking Performance every Friday, Saturday and Sunday through September 1.

OCMA to present TIME BOOMERANG

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Photo by Chris Bliss

Installation view of UuDam Tran Nguyen: TIME BOOMERANG” 

Participate in UuDam Tran Nguyen’s TIME BOOMERANG project and, in the artist›s own words, “help create the next freaking world order!” Be part of this dynamic and playful exhibition that looks at historic maps of Europe, Asia and the Americas in order to gain an understanding of changing ideas of territorial control over time. Visitors are invited to drop plaster maps, in effect smashing the “old world order” and making way for a new one. Two maps can be broken every Friday, Saturday and Sunday; first come, first served. 

On View: Season 2 through September 1.

OCMA to present Open Air

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Photo by Chris Bliss

Installation view of Hiromi Takizawa: Open Air” 

Don’t miss this last chance to see the current exhibitions of work by Diego Berruecos, York Chang, Victoria Fu and Matt Rich, Fritzia Irízar, UuDam Tran Nguyen and Hiromi Takizawa. 

OCMA to present Fritzia Irizar

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Photo by Chris Bliss

Installation view of Fritzia Irizar: CaCO3

Coming soon: Season 3 with a member preview on Friday, Sept. 20 from 6-8 p.m.; public opening, Saturday, Sept. 21 from 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

Season 3 features six new projects by artists Carolina Caycedo, Daniel Duford, Ximena Garrido-Lecca, Mulyana, Robert Zhao Renhui and Yang Yongliang, whose work considers the complexities of our relationship to nature. 

OCMAEXPAND-SANTA ANA, located in South Coast Plaza Village at 1661 W. Sunflower Ave., Santa Ana, is the museum’s temporary venue while it builds its Thom Mayne-designed new home at Segerstrom Center for the Arts. Admission to and parking are free. Hours: Thursday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. and Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. 

For more information, visit www.ocmaexpand.org.


NMUSD welcomes new school leadership throughout the district

Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) has named a number of new principals and assistant principals to begin the 2019-2020 school year.

Dr. Eugene Kwong has been named the new principal for Costa Mesa High School. He has 17 years of experience in education, most recently serving as associate principal for Lawndale High School in Centinela Valley Union High School District. 

NMUSD welcoms new school Dr. Eugene Kwong

Photos courtesy of NMUSD

Dr. Eugene Kwong 

As associate principal, Dr. Kwong supervised many areas including master scheduling, counseling, School Site Council, professional development, instructional leadership, feeder school articulation, graduation ceremony and student recognition.

He served as committee chair for the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), where he evaluated the school’s self-study report to identify strengths and areas of growth in their curricular and instructional practices. 

He also served as a mathematics teacher and assistant varsity boys basketball coach at Hawthorn High School, as well as the intramural coordinator for the John Wooden Center at the University of California Los Angeles. 

Dr. Kwong obtained his Bachelor of Science in mathematics and psychology, as well as his Master of Education in mathematics from UCLA. He obtained his Doctorate in educational leadership from California State University Long Beach. 

Cindy Pedroso has been selected as the principal of Pomona Elementary. Pedroso has enjoyed a successful 18-year career in education, including experience as a bilingual and resource teacher, literacy coach and most recently as an administrator for Ocean View School District’s early learning program. 

NMUSDwelcomes new school Cindy Pedroso

Cindy Pedroso 

As an administrator, Pedroso worked with school sites to transition to new language arts curriculum, create an inclusive preschool program and promote positive school culture. She also was instrumental in incorporating technology to engage and enhance student learning and places a strong focus on tailored implementation of interventions for the success of all students. 

Pedroso is known for her ability to connect with and build rapport with teachers to determine supports and purposeful interventions for student achievement, while garnering support and maintaining positive relationships with staff, students and parents. 

She obtained her Bachelor of Science in elementary education from Florida Atlantic University, her Master of Science in education reading from Nova Southeastern University and a Master of Science in educational leadership from Lynn University. 

Nina Glassen