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“Cheers for Literacy” – the ultimate cocktail war

On Wednesday, April 25 from 5:30 - 8:30 p.m., join in an evening of friendly competition at “Cheers for Literacy,” taking place at The Winery Restaurant & Wine Bar. Two teams will battle it out in the ultimate cocktail war! The team collecting the most tips – wins.

Cheers Left Cheers Right

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(L-R): Team One - Sabrina Neas and Nina Ardalan vs. Team Two - Michele Babcock and Liz Hurley

Team One from 6 - 7 p.m. is comprised of Sabrina Neas, senior account manager, Zillow Group and Nina Ardalan, trial attorney, Ardalan Law Group. These ladies will go head to head against Team Two mixing it up from 7 - 8 p.m., made up of Michele Babcock, principal, MB Realty Solutions and Liz Hurley, senior VP/partner, VOIT Real Estate Services.

All cash tips help at-risk children learn to read in conjunction with Literacy Project.

So, come root them on! For more information, call 949.721.1319.

The Winery Restaurant & Wine Bar is located at 3131 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach.


Stasha Speaks!

Spring flowers – lovely to look at…but not ingest

Stasha

Submitted photos

April showers bring May flowers is how the saying goes. And though Springtime flowers are beautiful, if ingested by us critters they can be deadly. 

Rocco and Stasha

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(L-R): My brother Rocco and I – ready for Springtime showers

Rocco and I love the Spring rain. My buddy and I put on our raincoats splashing around the yard as things begin to bloom. But our mom keeps a watchful eye on us – especially Rocco, because that dog puts anything and everything in his mouth! He’s a curious dog willing to eat most anything, which could get him in big tummy trouble.

If he were to dig up plant bulbs and munch on them, it could be deadly. Plants with bulbs like tulips, daffodils, narcissus, and hyacinths, can be particularly dangerous to dogs, especially the skin at the bottom of the bulb. Dogs eating these flowers or bulbs can experience nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or worse.

“More severe symptoms as a result of larger ingestions can include increased heart and respiratory rate, foreign body obstructions, and, in rare cases, cardiac arrhythmias (irregular heartbeats),” according to www.petmd.com

If you’re not familiar with Pet MD, you should be. It’s a good website to keep up to date on the latest recalls of pet products, as well as overall information on animal health issues to stay abreast of.

But getting back to dangerous plant-eating for dogs, it’s what’s in bulbs that can be deadly for us furry pals.

Tulips and hyacinth, for example, contain lactone, which when chewed or swallowed, can cause tissue irritation to our mouths and esophagus.

tulips

Daffodils contain lycorine, an alkaloid with something that triggers vomiting.

Daffodils

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Lilies are especially tricky because there are several different types – Peace, Peruvian, and Calla lilies which contain oxalate crystals can cause tissue irritation to the mouth, tongue, pharynx and esophagus – resulting in minor drooling. Potentially fatal lilies are Tiger, Day, Asiatic, Easter and Japanese Show varieties – all of which are highly toxic to cats too! Even small ingestion (such as two – three petals or leaves) can result in severe kidney failure.

Lilies

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There are two crocus plants: one that blooms in the Spring (Crocus species) and the other in Autumn. The Autumn Crocus is highly toxic and can cause severe vomiting, gastrointestinal bleeding, liver and kidney damage, and respiratory failure.

Crocus

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Other plants equally as dangerous to dogs are azalea/rhododendron, foxglove and oleander.

For a complete list of symptoms, plants and fertilizers pet owners should be aware of for the safety of their animals, Nationwide Pet insurance’s page on Summertime Toxins is a good reference. Visit https://phz8.petinsurance.com/pet-health/pet-toxins/10-toxic-summertime-plants. And a good phone number to keep handy is the Pet Poison Helpline’s emergency hotline (1.855.289.0358) available 24 hours a day.

If you suspect your animal has eaten something in the yard that could be dangerous, the first rule of thumb is to get them to a vet at once.

Stay safe this Spring and enjoy the flowers – just don’t eat them. 

Bark at ya later,

Woof Woof

Stasha

You can email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and check out my past columns at www.bvontv.com.


Sign of the times

On Thursdays we give you a partial glimpse of a sign around town. You guess what the overall name of the business is. 

So, we gave you a glimpse of the “Q” on top of this sign. The sign is from Via Lido Drugs at 3445 Via Lido. One correct guess came in from Michelle McCormack. She said, “I’m thinking the Q stands for quality drugs.”

Close Michelle. There is a parent organization over Via Lido Drugs and several other Orange County pharmacies that is called Quality Drug Corporation.

Thank you for playing.

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

Via Lido Drugs

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Stump the Stu

This really is a stairway to heaven

Stump the Stu 4.3.18

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The question for you is where is this? What do you find when you get to the bottom or perhaps it’s at the top? We welcome any and all guesses.

Take the challenge and submit your answers to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The correct answers are in Friday’s edition. We also run the correct guesses on Friday. So, join us in the fun.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Side Deal to appear at Campus JAX

Side Deal

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Submitted photo

On Saturday, April 7, Campus JAX presents Side Deal, a new band of hit makers featuring the founding members of Train, Sugar Ray and Pawnshop Kings.

This one night only intimate performance supports Side Deal’s first vinyl release. Tickets are $75 for VIP (with a special meet and greet and an acoustic set from 5 - 6 p.m.); $50 for general admission for either of two shows at 6 and 10 p.m.; and $500 for a booth. To reserve your tickets, call 949.261.6270.

Campus JAX is located at 3950 Campus Drive, Newport Beach.


NBFF coming later this month; announces film lineup

American Animals at NBFF

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The 19th Annual Newport Beach Film Festival (NBFF) is taking place Thursday, April 26 through Thursday, May 3, and tickets are now on sale.

Kicking off the film line-up is American Animals, a 2018 British-American crime drama (one of the most audacious art heists in U.S. history) written and directed by Bart Layton, that will be having its West Coast Premiere during the festival. Starring Evan Peters, Barry Keoghan, Blake Jenner and Jared Abrahamson, it will be showing at Edwards Big Newport in Fashion Island. The film premiered at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival, and it is scheduled for release this June.

The film fest will feature nearly 350 films from 50 countries. In addition to short subject programs, documentaries, action sports films and narrative movies, there are seminars and panels, retrospective films and post-screening parties every night of the festival.

For more information and a complete schedule of film screenings, galas, costs and venues, visit www.NewportBeachFilmFest.com.


True justice in Newport Harbor?

By DUNCAN FORGEY

California has been the centerpiece of “celebrity” crimes and trials since the beginning of the 20th Century. One of the earliest was the three-trial acquittal of silent film start Roscoe Conkling “Fatty” Arbuckle in 1922. One of Hollywood’s favorite silent movie stars, at the peak of his career, Arbuckle made the equivalent of $14 million in today’s money. He was accused of the rape and manslaughter of actress Virginia Rappe in San Francisco. The entire country was riveted with his court appearances.

Fatty Arbuckle

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Comedian Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle starring in the 1919 silent film, “The Hayseed”

Then, of course, no history buff of California can forget Elizabeth Short, known posthumously as the “Black Dahlia.” She was an attractive young lady found murdered in Leimert Park in LA. Although unsolved (despite more than 500 confessions to the crime), the murder and its gory details had lasting cultural intrigue for Southern California.

Black Dahlia

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The “Black Dahlia” – Elizabeth Short

Recently deceased Charles Manson and his “family” created terror during a cult crime spree in the late 1960s. Murders were based upon his desire to start an apocalyptic race war (Helter Skelter). Having deep connections in both the drug culture and Hollywood, he often used other people to commit many of his crimes. His subsequent trial was a “must follow” battle between Manson and his “family” versus Vincent Bugliosi and the Los Angeles District Attorney’s office.

OJs dream team

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O.J.’s “Dream Team”

But the granddaddy of them all is the story of Orenthal James “O.J.” Simpson. To this day, the O.J. Simpson trial draws tremendous interest and stirs up age-old racial issues. His acquittal of the deaths of his wife Nicole Brown Simpson and waiter Ronald Goldman shocked the Los Angeles District Attorney’s office to its knees. O.J.’s life story of childhood struggles to football and Hollywood successes, to arrest, incarceration and failure is an epic plight proving the old Mark Twain adage: “Truth is stranger than fiction.”

When all these judgements came down, there was shock and disappointment in the legal system. Fatty Arbuckle, not guilty; Elizabeth Short, no arrest nor conviction; Charles Manson, no death penalty; and O.J., not guilty.

But what does this have to do with Newport Beach? Other than our residents following these landmark court cases riveted to their newspapers, radios and TVs, they did not directly affect Newport.

But there was one trial that did. The year was 1947 and the post-World War II boom was gaining momentum. The LA Dodgers hired Jackie Robinson, supersonic aircraft were being tested, Ferrari began its manufacturing of cars and the tubeless tire was born. People like Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn were oft visitors to the then famous Newport Beach. Hillary Clinton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Stephen King and O.J. Simpson were all born in 1947.

And it was the year for Newport Beach’s “celebrity” murder case. It had the same cultural aspects for Southern California as the others. A circus-like environment, packed courtrooms, volatile press coverage and emotional conflicts among all parties were a daily occurrence in the 133-day court trial. The plot line included all the elements of a classic murder mystery: wealth, greed, murder, stupidity and bitterness.

Most Newporters today have never heard of it. Virtually unknown, this crime resulted with laws regarding the sale and accessibility of dynamite. Paralleling today’s cries about accessibility to AK-15s and other guns, this trial changed behavior in America.

The victims were Walter E. Overell, 62, and his wife Beulah, 57. The killing took place on their 47-foot yacht, the Mary E, which was moored in the harbor east of Bay Island. The boat exploded. As police officers Larry Goddard and George Calihan responded, they saw a young couple running hand in hand in the opposite direction. The fire department was called and they found Walter and Beulah dead on the boat. The police scanned the scene, collected evidence and the bodies were taken to Baltz Mortuary in Corona del Mar.

Chris Craft ad

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An advertisement for a 47-foot Chris Craft, the type of yacht that set the scene for the high-profile Overell case

Murder was not a consideration until the autopsy, the unusual evidence that was found and discussions with the Overells’ daughter, Louise, and her boyfriend George “Bud” Gollum, were completed. The young couple happened to be the two running away from the scene that night. They were engaged and in love, but George was not popular with Mr. and Mrs. Overell. The Overells were a high-society couple who lived in Flintridge near Pasadena and Mr. Overell was dead set against this romance.

Living among the wealthy, Mr. Overell made a “modest fortune” in furniture manufacturing and real estate investments. This gave the Overell family access to Newport Harbor, yachts and the “good life” of 1947 Newport Beach. Beulah was a well-known socialite and friend of Senator Frank Flint, developer of Flintridge.

They had one child, Louise. In those days, it was believed that children born to “older” women had inherent problems, and Beulah gave birth to Louise when she was 39. Therefore, Louise, considered unattractive and a spoiled child of wealthy parents, grew up under these circumstances. At the time of the murders, she was a first-year journalism student at USC. Her father had threatened to disinherit her if she married “Bud” Gollum.

Thinking the explosion was caused by a gas leak from the butane tank, Fire Chief Frank Crocker investigated and found a wire leading to 30 unexploded sticks of dynamite attached to a time clock. The clock was set, but failed to go off at the precise time when then the ship’s clock was stopped due to the initial and smaller dynamite explosion. According to the autopsy report, both parents suffered skull fractures that could not have been caused by an explosion. In fact, the injuries to their heads were the exact shape of a ball peen hammer.

The coincidence that the two kids were on board with the parents and happened to row to shore, eat hamburgers and malted milks at the time of the explosion seemed too convenient to Newport police officers, and murder was suspected.

As in most high-profile cases, different investigating parties started to assist each other. They found wire and a switch button to match those on the boat in George Gollum’s car. Plus, there was a bundle of his clothes spattered with blood. As confirmed by the Overells’ housekeeper, the alarm clock on the boat was found to have come from Louise’s bedroom and often did not work properly.

NB Police Chief Hodgkinson, Orange County Sheriff Musick and Captain McGaff of the Bureau of Records compiled the evidence and arrested and booked the young couple for suspicion of murder on March 19, 1947. Proof of purchase of the dynamite, locating the ball peen hammer and “Bud’s” bloody shoes, combined with inconsistent stories of what happened that night, took authorities only four days after the murders to come up with a powerful number of facts linking the young couple to the murder of Louise’s parents. Law enforcement thought they had a foolproof case.

While both suspects were incarcerated and awaiting trial, they started a long string of letters and communication, revealing a dark and treacherous relationship. Despite all of this, the jury voted differently.

Louise Overell

Louise Overell, after a non-guilty verdict

The not guilty verdict was as unsuspected as O.J.’s, Robert Blake’s and Casey Anthony’s from the legal system’s point of view. Just as in these more contemporary cases, a highly aggressive defense team attacked every prosecution witness viciously, discredited items of evidence and used a strategy of illogical conclusions to “confuse” the jury.

Marcia Clarke said after the O.J. trial, that her jury was manipulated from a “reasonable doubt” to a “reason to doubt.” As concluded by historian Brooks Wilson in The Newport Harbor Murders Revisited, the Overell jury was manipulated into deciding between “reasonable doubt” and “unreasonable doubt.” He concludes in the subtitle of his book: “The criminal justice system found guilty.”

Careers were made and ruined by the verdict. Dynamite was forever “controlled” so an impressionable young 21-year-old and his 17-year-old girlfriend could not simply walk in to buy some. 

Newport Harbor 1949

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Newport Harbor, 1949

The post-trial lives of Louise and “Bud” never panned out the way they wanted. There was hostility in the two camps, so they never married after the acquittal. Her inheritance was much smaller than expected because of the trial. As they grew older, their short period of fame faded quickly. This meant that for the rest of their lives, they lived in shame for what they had done.

George “Bud” Gollum died in 2009 in Alaska. No one knew who he was or why he was “famous.” His local paper did not even run an obituary announcing his death. He left behind two ex-wives and two children.

Louise died in 1965 in Las Vegas, a victim of alcoholism.  

~~~~~~~~

Duncan Forgey, who made his home here in Newport Beach for many years, now resides in Hawaii. He is a monthly contributor to StuNewsNewport.


Stump the Stu

See horse at NBCC

Stump the Stu 3.30.18

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Well Newport Beach, you came through with flying colors. This piece titled “Empress of the Sea” was completed by David L. Spellberg for the Newport Beach Country Club in 2016. The artwork is located at the entryway of the Newport Beach Country Club.

There were many correct guesses: Bill Finster, Doug Forde, Jillian U. Sabaugh, Joe Stapleton, Judy Leeper, Peter Bretschger, Shari Esayian, Tom Anderson, Vicki Hatfield and Rachel Peterson.

Join us on Tuesdays as we try and stump you each week with a picture of something unique in our community.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think StuNewsNewport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Spring Art Show and 2nd Annual Art in the Park celebration this Saturday

Watercolor CCC Art in the Park

Courtesy of Crystal Cove Conservancy

This Saturday, March 31, the Spring Art Show and 2nd Annual Art in the Park Celebration takes place from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. in the Crystal Cove Historic District.

Join Crystal Cove State Park and Crystal Cove Conservancy with free family-friendly art events, such as sea glass wrapping, outdoor musical performances, watercolor painting, sing dancers, basket weaving and more. For a full schedule of events, visit https://crystalcove.org/artinthepark

The Spring Art Show continues through Sunday, April 1 from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Park in the Los Trancos lot (PCH inland at stoplight Los Trancos and then walk across the street or take the shuttle). Day-use fee: $5/per hour (max. $15).


Sign of the times

It’s another edition of Sign of the times. Contestants, put your thinking caps on. Below you’ll find this week’s clue. What you see is a small part of an overall sign in Newport Beach. This one has been a city favorite for a long while…welcoming locals and visitors like.

Good luck!

Send your guesses to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 3.30.2018

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Letters to the Editor:

Maybe we’re asking the wrong questions

I didn’t prepare myself to speak at the City Council meeting on Tuesday about the City Manager’s resignation because, even though I have the greatest respect for Dave Kiff, I felt I needed more facts and information. I basically believe that his sudden announcement to retire early without even the usual “need to attend to health or family matters” excuse is because of something certain City Council members have caused to happen.

I came away from the City Council meeting without much more in the way of facts and information, but I also came away with an opinion, some questions and a not so comfortable observation. My opinion is that at least four of the Council members have acted to coerce/induce the City Manager to resign all of a sudden without any notice to the public and at least to one of the other City Council members. (Brad Avery is totally silent, and Diane Dixon had left the meeting.)  That in itself is alarming, distressful and totally not understandable.

My questions come as a result of my having had the experience of serving on the City Council. It’s always the matter of getting four votes for anything. You can acquire and assure yourself of the four votes by telephone or whatever. In this case the only question that has been asked and answered is whether 3 Council members came to Dave and asked for his resignation – his answer was no. But no one has asked the myriad of other questions. Was it two members who came to his office; was it one member; was it a phone call? Did Council members Dixon and Avery get asked if they wanted to ask for his resignation?  We don’t know because Councilman Avery remained silent and Council member Dixon had fled the meeting.  

My observation was that the four Council persons who were consistently and vehemently accused by members of the public and past elected officials at the meeting chose to absolutely ignore the pleas and comments and people.  They noticeably and I would add arrogantly said nothing. I can’t believe that I, in their place would have said nothing, unless I was indeed in on the very thing the people were complaining about and felt that I could get away with it politically and legally. It looks to me that somebody/s has let their little power trip go to their little heads and this is most definitely not what the people of Newport Beach, let alone the City Manager, deserves. As has been said, it’s disgusting!

Jean Watt

Newport Beach

Former Mayor denounces council in Kiff action

The following is a complete transcript of former Mayor Michael Henn’s comments at Tuesday night’s council meeting.

Mayor Duffield and council members, my name is Michael Henn. I was Mayor of Newport Beach in 2011 and a city councilmember for eight years.

I am here tonight regarding the retirement of Dave Kiff, City Manager.

Dave, among a long line of great city managers for Newport Beach, you are the finest. Your knowledge, dedication, integrity, work ethic and accomplishments are second to none. I count among the foremost blessings of my life the opportunity to work with you for the betterment of our city. 

Congratulations to you and your team on 20 years of superb service to our residents. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. 

I wish you and Tom success and happiness in all the remaining chapters of your life.

However, it is with a heavy heart that I appear here tonight. It is alleged that you were encouraged to retire early by a small group of councilmembers, and that this was done: 1) in private, 2) without the knowledge of councilmembers Herdman, Dixon or Avery, 3) that the councilmembers who did this, did so without the authority of the council acting as a whole, 4) that this action was not based on any sort of performance reason, and without due process.

The voters should know that in my eight years on council, never once did a rogue group of councilmembers engage in such a serious action against a senior city executive without notice, due process or the proper authority.

This action, if true, is a terrible affront and is deeply disrespectful to fellow councilmembers, and to the voters who elected them.

Councilmembers Peotter, Muldoon and O’Neill, and Mayor Duffield, you, or some subject of you, are apparently the rogue councilmembers. You owe the voters of this city answers to the following questions:

1) Are the allegations true? 

2) If so, what were your true motivations? 

3) Who were the councilmembers that conducted this rogue act? 

4) Mayor Duffield: as mayor, one of your prime responsibilities is to assure proper due process and respectful treatment of all your council colleagues. You must have known about this. How could you be so feckless as to standby and allow this disrespectful and insulting action to occur, or worse yet, encourage it

5) Have the rogue councilmembers already picked a new city manager? Is it Mark Denny from Dana Point?

6) If not, how will council assure that a proper, fully-inclusive and objective process be used to select the next city manager?

Most of all, Dave Kiff, Councilmembers Avery, Herdman and Dixon, as well as the voters of Newport Beach, deserve an apology.

Mike Henn

Newport Beach

Kudos to Kiff from friend

In all the years I have known Dave Kiff I have found him to be an intelligent, knowledgeable, hardworking, caring person who will go out of his way to assist when he’s called upon, professionally or otherwise. 

He will always land on his feet and let them take him whichever way he chooses to go because he can!!

And, you can never not like a person that loves dogs!

Let us all know where you land, when you do, so we can keep track of you Dave!

Lynn Cathcart 

Friends of OASIS, Board of Directors

Newport Beach


NB Police Department employees honored

The 47th Annual Police Appreciation Breakfast was held Thursday morning, March 29 at the Hyatt Regency, Newport Beach. The event was hosted by the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce and the Commodores Club, and sponsored by the Maseeh Family, Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian, and Newport Beach & Company.

Members of the Police Department were honored at the breakfast, which was also attended by city staff, community leaders, and members of the local business community.

NB Police Employees

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(L-R): NB Police Chief Jon T. Lewis, Connie Frink, Brandon Rodriguez, Lauren Wyse, Jason Blakely and Marc Spiegel

Nominations for the Police Department Annual Awards are collected by committees for each award category. Members of the Police Department who receive award nominations are discussed by those committees and then recommendations are submitted to the Chief of Police for consideration.

The following members of the Police Department received recognition in the listed categories:

Sergeant Jason Blakely, 2017 Officer of the Year

Sergeant Brandon Rodriguez, 2017 Sworn Supervisor of the Year

Records Supervisor Connie Frink, 2017 Civilian Supervisor of the Year

Dispatcher Lauren Wyse, 2017 Civilian of the Year

Volunteer Marc Spiegel, 2017 Volunteer of the Year

Additional awards were given to the following recipients:

Chief’s Citation presented to Margaret “Peg” Peterson of the Orange County Healthcare Agency

For the last five years, Peterson has been assigned to the NBPD in the role of Psychiatric Emergency Response Team clinician. She has been instrumental in the Department’s work with the homeless population, offering her extensive experience in the mental health field and her ability to build rapport with individuals in crisis. She is recognized for her dedicated service and for being a resource for the staff and our community.

Chief’s Citation presented to Reserve Officer Steve Schogel

In 2017, Reserve Officer Schogel began an innovative project, marrying his work as a part-time Reserve Officer with his profession as a Physician Assistant to create the Newport Beach Police Department Naloxone Program. After extensive research and recommendations by Reserve Officer Schogel, Naloxone (a medication used to rapidly reverse opioid overdoses) has been issued to every field officer in the Police

Department. Use of the medication has already saved a number of lives here in Newport Beach, with a few examples appearing below as Lifesaving Awards. Schogel’s expertise in the medical field has also led him to develop an eight-hour First Aid, CPR, and automated external defibrillator (AED) training course for the Department, ensuring that staff have the tools they need to render aid in critical situations. He is recognized for his diligence and his dedication to these significant projects.

Lifesaving Award presented to Officer Mark Fasano

On October 10, 2017, Officer Fasano responded to a call for medical aid at an apartment complex. A caller reported that his roommate, who had possibly overdosed on heroin, was no longer breathing. The caller began CPR, but when Officer Fasano arrived he found that the man still was not breathing and that his lips had turned blue. Officer Fasano immediately administered Naloxone, with the result that the man inhaled deeply and began to breathe again on his own. Officer Fasano stabilized the man until Newport Beach Fire Department personnel arrived and transported him to a local hospital, where he made a full recovery. Officer Fasano is commended for his quick and decisive action, without which this man might have succumbed to the heroin overdose and passed away.

Lifesaving Award presented to Officers Rachel Cox and Bill Hume

Just before 4 a.m. on August 26, 2017, the Department received several calls about screams emanating from the area of an abandoned building near the intersection of 15th Street and Monrovia Avenue. Officers Cox and Hume responded and began to search for the person in distress. By following the sounds’ muffled moans, they were able to locate a woman lying face down on the ground. She was breathing shallowly, her lips were blue, and her mouth was full of vomit. The officers quickly assessed the woman and identified signs of opioid overdose. At the beginning of that very shift, these officers had received their first training on the use of Naloxone; now, mere hours later, Officer Cox administered the medication. The woman regained consciousness and began breathing again. Both officers are commended for their heroic efforts in saving this woman’s life.

Lifesaving Award presented to Officer Ricardo Adame

On August 8, 2017, Officer Adame was dispatched to the Post Office on Riverside Avenue in response to an emergency call that a man had passed out in the parking lot. When Officer Adame arrived, he found the victim lying on the ground between two parked vehicles. He pulled the man (who was not breathing and had no pulse) out from between the cars, positioned him on his back, and immediately began CPR. Officer Adame continued his life-saving efforts until Newport Beach Fire Department personnel arrived and transported the man to a local hospital, where he regained his pulse and was placed on a breathing machine. The man ultimately made a full recovery. Officer Adame is commended for his quick response and immediate action in saving this man’s life.

Award of Merit presented to Sergeants Josh Comte and Brad Miller, and Officers Jeremy Duenas, Jon Jarema, Chris Kimble, Dennis Maisano and Steve Oberon

On the evening of February 18, 2017, a man called the Department to report that his adult son had been kidnapped and was being held for ransom. The night before, the son had participated in a pre-arranged illegal narcotics transaction, where 60 pounds of marijuana was stolen at gunpoint. The son was blamed for the theft and subsequently kidnapped. The kidnappers threatened to kill the victim if a ransom of $130,000 was not paid by his family. Working under pressure of that threat, personnel from the Detective Division (Sergeant Miller and Detective Maisano from the Special Investigations Unit along with Burglary Detectives Chris Kimble and Jon Jarema) worked alongside Patrol personnel (Sergeant Josh Comte and Officers Duenas and Oberon) to determine the victim’s whereabouts. After an intense investigation, they determined that the victim was being held in an Anaheim apartment, but was being moved to another location. At great risk to their personal safety, this team of NBPD sergeants and officers intervened in the armed suspects’ activities and rescued the victim, who was returned to his grateful family. All seven of these employees are commended for their exceptional work in finding and rescuing this kidnap victim.

Medal of Valor presented to Officer Troy Zeeman

On October 1, 2017, Officer Zeeman was off-duty, attending the Route 91 Country Music Festival in Las Vegas with his wife. At approximately 10:10 p.m., a gunman on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel opened fire on the crowd of 22,000 people below. Officer Zeeman, who was wounded by the gunfire, worked with another off-duty law enforcement officer to get more than 20 other concertgoers to safety, only receiving medical attention for his own injuries five hours after the shooting occurred. He is commended for his heroic actions during this horrific event, which undoubtedly saved multiple lives.

At the Appreciation Breakfast, the Police Department also premiered a video entitled “A Sense of Service.” The video can be accessed at http://bit.ly/SenseOfService.


Movie in the Park to show “Surf’s Up”

Surfs Up

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Submitted photo

On Friday, April 13 from 6:45 - 9 p.m., bring the whole family to Marina Park to enjoy a screening of “Surf’s Up,” as part of the Movie in the Park series.

While you spend some family time outdoors, enjoy the bay view, nautical-themed playground and free movie. There will also be free activities, candy and most importantly, popcorn, for you to enjoy. Food will be available for purchase.

Bring a blanket, towel of folding quad chairs to sit on. The movie begins at sunset.

For more information, call 949.270.8150.

Marina Park is located at 1600 W. Balboa Blvd., Newport Beach.


NBFD’s CERT held bi-annual “Drill the Skills” class

CERT 2

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Photos courtesy of NBFD

“Drill the Skills” CERT classes are led by our Newport Beach Fire Department personnel

The Newport Beach Fire Department held its bi-annual Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) “Drill the Skills” on Saturday, March 24. The Newport Beach CERT “Drill the Skills” is held twice a year and serves as a final drill/graduation for both the fall and spring CERT programs.

This Spring, the Fire Department held two CERT programs – a Thursday Day program and an all-day Saturday program. Each CERT program includes approximately 24 hours of training. In total, 55 participants completed all of the CERT training classes and officially graduated on Saturday.

CERT 3

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CERT Volunteers observe a demonstration by an NBFD firefighter

For the drill, CERT volunteers participate in five hands-on drill stations that cover some of the most important aspects of the CERT training including: how to properly shore and crib, indoor search, fire suppression, triage and a medical operations review station.

The next Newport Beach Fire Department CERT programs will be held in late September with a Tuesday - Thursday evening program and an all-day Saturday program.

For additional information on the Fire Department’s CERT program, go to www.nbcert.org, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

CERT 6

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NBFD firefighters and CERT volunteers join together for a group photo


Orange County Bar Association awards $10,000 grant to Human Options

Human Options, a nonprofit dedicated to breaking the cycle of domestic violence, was presented a $10,000 grant from the Orange County Bar Association Charitable Fund. The grant will support the organization’s Legal Advocacy Program, which has been operating since 1986, and offers legal information, education and more to those affected by domestic violence. The Orange County Bar Association is located in Newport Beach.

The Legal Advocacy Program provides services including education on legal rights and remedies, court preparation and accompaniment, assistance with completing and filing applications for restraining orders, victim compensation, confidential address programs, and VAWA/U-Visas. Legal Advocates also provide support in domestic violence specific housing/lease and employment issues. Additionally, Human Options offers nine free monthly legal clinics with volunteer attorneys throughout the county on family law and immigration law issues. If a victim’s legal needs do not fit within the scope of the program, Human Options refers them to trusted community partners for services. 

Michael and Sandra

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(L-R): Michael Morris, partner at Minyard Morris with Human Options Legal Advocate Sandra Bear

“Legal support is critical for victims of domestic violence. Individuals who have experienced domestic violence often find themselves overwhelmed by a variety of issues in addition to physical abuse, including protection available to them under the law to obtain relief from the abusive partner,” said Maricela Rios-Faust, CEO of Human Options. “With this generous support from the Orange County Bar Association, we’re able to provide these comprehensive victim advocacy services in local courts.” 

Human Options is leading the way to end domestic violence, reaching more than 20,000 community members who received education through their prevention programs. More than 500 individuals found a safe home at their emergency shelter, and their teams have responded to more than 6,500 callers that contacted them for immediate crisis support, information and referrals through their 24-hour hotline.

For more information about Human Options, please visit https://humanoptions.org.


Wake Up! Newport slated for April 5 with FONBAS

FONBAS logo

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On Thursday, April 5 start your day at Wake Up! Newport and Friends of the Newport Animal Shelter (FONBAS). Sponsored by the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce, come hear about a proposed public/private partnership to create a new city-owned animal shelter in Newport Beach. Representatives from FONBAS will outline this new proposal.

The event will take place from 7:15 - 8:30 a.m. at Newport Beach Central Library’s Friends Room.

This free monthly meeting affords participants the opportunity to meet one-on-one with legislative and government officials, and to stay current on local, state and federal issues.

To register, visit www.newportbeach.com. Please make a reservation so they can plan on food and seating. Breakfast treats will be provided. For additional information, call 949.727.4400.

Newport Beach Central Library is located at 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.


Women of Greatness holds Brunch & Bubbly event

The Women of Greatness philanthropy group officially kicked off with the inaugural Brunch & Bubbly event at Fashion Island Hotel on Sunday, Feb 25. The event honored Charlene Immell, their 2018 Woman of Greatness. Immel has been a long-time Club supporter and was the Club’s first female board member and first female board president. Her involvement and impact on the organization over the years is truly inspiring.

Brunch and Bubbly

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(L-R): CEO Robert Santana with board members Nicole Carrillo Hall, loanDepot; and Ronnie Coffie, KPMG; along with keynote speaker, Josephine Lee

The event’s key sponsors were KPMG and Anne MacPherson; other sponsors included Nicole Carrillo Hall, Taco Bell, Frank & Shannon Tucker and First American Trust.

The Women of Greatness philanthropy group that hosts quarterly networking events and the annual Brunch & Bubbly event, remains focused on raising awareness of and funds to support the Club’s family programming. Last year, their Family Strengthening program served 364 unique families through 42 nonprofit and community partners.

Based on the belief that strengthening the entire family unit will put kids on a greater path to success, this initiative works to educate, empower, and equip the parents in our community to improve their family’s education, finances and health.

To learn more about Women of Greatness, contact Kristle Duran at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call 714.543.5540 ext. 305.


Junior League Juniors held cleanup event at 15th Street beach

On Sunday, March 25, Junior League Juniors hosted a beach cleanup event at 15th Street beach in Newport Beach entitled “Keep Our Coast Clean.”

Kids in grades K-5 learned how they can help preserve our local beaches and help local wildlife through recycling, using reusable containers for their lunches and drinks, using less plastic, and knowing what can and can’t break down in the ocean or a landfill.

Junior League Juniors collecting trash

Submitted photos

Junior League Juniors collected more than 14 pounds of debris during the one-day beach cleanup

The Juniors decorated reusable lunch bags and signed pledges that they will help reduce marine debris before participating in a beach cleanup. In less than half an hour they collected more than 14 pounds of debris from the beach – including sporting goods, glass and clay pots, and lots of cigarette butts.

Youngsters decorate lunch bags

Youngsters decorating reusable lunch bags

It was a great event and the Juniors are excited to keep our beach clean and spread the word about how their friends and family can help.

For more information about Junior League Juniors, visit www.jloccc.org.


Independent Bookstore Day coming in April

2018 IBD

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Mark your calendars for Saturday, April 28 to help celebrate Independent Bookstore Day.

Visit Lido Village Books from 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. and enjoy special merchandise created for and only available on this day. There will be free giveaways (while supplies last), and a 10 percent discount on all books purchased. Activities are being planned for youngsters.

For event details, visit www.lidovillagebooks.com.

Lido Village Books is located in Lido Marina Village at 3424 Via Oporto, #102, Newport Beach.


Free monthly Sculptures in Civic Center Park lecture series to begin in April

Art lovers are invited to join artist Grace Divine for a series of free monthly lectures on the Sculptures in Civic Center Park to be held in the Central Library Friends Room, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach, beginning Monday, April 2 at 7 p.m.

David Boyer with Getting your Bearings

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Photo by Ryan Miller, Capture Imaging

/Courtesy of NBPL

Artist David Boyer with his wind sculpture, “Getting Your Bearings,” is the topic of conversation at the Monday, April 2 lecture

Each lecture will feature a different sculpture, discussing the artist, composition, inspiration and unique features of each piece. The first lecture will focus on one of the most prominent sculptures in the exhibition, “Getting Your Bearings.”

Artist David Boyer will be attending to talk about how he crafted the kinetic wind sculpture and its debut at the Burning Man Festival in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada.

The series will consist of nine lectures, each held on the first Monday of the month from April 2018 through March 2019, excluding the months of July, November and December. The complete schedule is as follows:  

April 2 - “Getting Your Bearings” by David Boyer

May 7 - “Cultural Pedestrians” by Sue Quinlan

June 4 - “Be Still and Know” by John Merigian

August 6 - “Cosmic Glints” by Patricia Vader

September 10 - “Burnt Matchstick” by Karl Unnasch

October 1 - “Life is a Balancing Act” by Cindy Debold

January 7 - “Popsicles” by Craig Gray

February 4 - “No Swimming” by Oleg Lobykin

March 4 - “Flight” by Steven Rieman

This program is free with seating on a first-come, first-served basis, limited by room capacity. For more information on Newport Beach Public Library resources and programs, contact the Library at 949.717.3800, option 2, or visit the website at www.newportbeachlibrary.org.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Tuesday’s example of politics was not appreciated by the community as a whole

TomJohnsonCount to 10…just walk away…take a couple of deep breaths…go to your room and read a book. Those were all things my dad used to tell me as a kid when I was about to lose my temper and blow my lid.

Boy I wish my dad would have been sitting next to me Tuesday night in the Newport Beach Council Chambers. Unfortunately, he died in 1996.

Anyway, lots of folks attended Tuesday night’s council meeting to support City Manager Dave Kiff, as a report emerged over the weekend that his employment was going to end.

Some higher ups (our electeds) say he’s decided to “retire,” and others are saying he was “forced.” 

Here’s the difficult part, nobody is talking.

But if the example demonstrated Tuesday by our Mayor, Marshall “Duffy” Duffield, was any example, community participation is not important and not wanted!

Here’s the deal, Tuesday night, “Public Comments on non-agenda items” was one of the first few matters listed on that evening’s agenda. Instead of calling it at its planned time, the council skipped over it. 

In fairness, the Mayor had announced earlier in the evening that that one item would be moved in front of public comments.

I was told after the meeting that the reason was so that “Councilmember Diane Dixon, who had an airplane flight to catch, could participate in the discussion and vote.”

No problem. Who could argue.

It’s what the council did next that was the problem. Instead of moving back to Public Comments and assuming the publicized agenda, the council continued on from there with multiple public hearings.

The audience was mad…and getting madder. 

With every item introduced, audience members questioned the council’s actions.

The council continually reassured.

Forced to stay until the end, the Mayor finally called for “Public Comments on non-agenda items.”

I honestly believe that the members in question for the Kiff action hoped that those watching on TV and in the council chamber audience would become tired and tune out or leave.

Some did, most didn’t. Kudos to two Kiff supporters who stayed the course, 96-year-old Elenor Ramsey and Elaine Linoff, also a nonagenarian, who stayed the course. Shame on you council.

Nearly everyone who remained in the chambers was there for this item. People from all walks of Newport Beach spoke in support of City Manager Kiff and urged a hope to change plans. Many speakers castigated members of the council.

One councilmember even chose to fight back on certain issues. It probably wasn’t the best of ideas.

Overall, the evening was an ugly example of community politics and is an unfortunate example of where our community is.

We should expect more from our council in the months ahead…or vote them out.

Let’s face it, the community is mad that Dave Kiff is leaving. The contract that he most recently agreed to runs into 2019. Most community members believe that Dave would not leave early on a commitment he agreed to, after all, for 20+ years in Newport Beach his integrity has been one of his highest qualities.

Mayor and councilmembers, we expect better from all of you!

Can we all at least be civil and do the right thing?

Breathe…breathe…

• • •

Orange County Youth Sports Foundation hosts OCYSY Sportsman of the Year 2018, Rod Carew, at the Fashion Island Hotel, Thursday, April 25. More details to come, in the meantime, check it out at www.ocysf.com.

• • •

Dr. Henry T. Nicholas III has donated $40,000 to the men’s and women’s UCI crew teams as they head to Georgia later this spring for a championship regatta.

• • •

Congrats to Celine Niu, Newport Beach, tied for medalist honors in the AJGA Preview golf championships in Brookhaven, TX, in the Girls Division. Niu shot rounds of 78-74.

• • •

St. James the Great will reopen to their congregation a week from Sunday, April 8. Details to come Tuesday.


Dig into Spring at Charlie & Me

Frenchies

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Come meet Weston + Fira, two adorable French Bulldogs, of WTFrenchie

You’re invited to “Dig into Spring” at Charlie & Me at Lido Marina Village with special guests, French Bulldogs – Weston + Fira of WTFrenchie.

Join the festivities on Sunday, April 8 from 1 - 4 p.m. for a meet and greet with the Insta-famous duo WTFrenchie, complimentary monogramming with purchase, and a special Vanderpump Pet Pop-Up shop inside Charlie & Me.

During the event you’ll enjoy Dirty Cookie treats, small bites and beverages for you and your four-legged friend. This event is free and open to the public with no RSVP necessary.

Charlie & Me is located at Lido Marina Village, 3505 Via Oporto, Ste. 103, Newport Beach.


Compost giveaway on April 7

Compost

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On Saturday, April 7 from 9 - 11 a.m., the City of Newport Beach and CR&R are holding another free compost giveaway for Newport Beach residents. There is a two-bag limit per household. Proof of residency may be required.

The event takes place in the Big Canyon Reservoir parking lot located at 3300 Pacific View Drive, Corona del Mar.

For more information, call CR&R at 949.625.6735.


City to host Special Olympics basketball tourney fundraiser and you can play

The City of Newport Beach will host a Special Olympics area basketball tournament for the first time in the city’s history on Saturday, April 28. To kick off the festivities, Special Olympics athletes, the City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Department as well as Newport Beach police, fire, city council, local officials and community members will participate in the official Unity Torch Walk, Hometown Hero Hoop Shoot Challenge and BBQ on Thursday, April 5 from 6 - 9 p.m. at the Newport Beach Civic Center. 

Special Olympics

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Newport Beach Mayor Pro Tem Will O’Neill and wife Jennifer announce the Special Olympics fundraiser with a couple of friends

The evening will include live music, craft beer, fine wines and a BBQ provided by Newport Rib Company. The Hoop Shoot Challenge will follow with police, fire, city council, local officials and community members partnering with Special Olympic athletes to battle it out on the court to see which team will be named Hometown Heroes for Newport Beach Hometown Special Olympics. 

Participation in this special event starts at just $65 and money raised will support the year-round training and competition events for the more than 539 Special Olympic athletes that call Newport Beach home. Teams can register to participate in the Hoop Shot Team event, be a torch walk participant or a torch walk supporter.

“The City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Department is energized by all the opportunity that keeps unfolding as we build community partnerships to provide inclusive programs for those with special needs to lead fuller lives and connect with their peers,” said Laura Detweiler, director, Recreation & Senior Services Department, City of Newport Beach. “We were inspired by our involvement with the Special Olympics World Games and are continuing to foster that relationship by co-hosting a Newport Beach Hometown Basketball Tournament. Additionally, we have been working diligently this last year to lay the foundation for a well-rounded special needs recreation program and are excited to see it come to fruition. Together we can do amazing things!” 

You can register and checkout all the information at http://fundraising.sosc.org.


Banning Ranch Conservancy and Newport Banning Ranch settle six-year lawsuit

Banning Ranch trail

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View of a Banning Ranch trail

Banning Ranch Conservancy and Newport Banning Ranch LLC announced on March 16 that they have reached a mediated settlement of attorney fees related to the lawsuit against the City of Newport Beach. The lawsuit challenged the 2012 Certification of an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) and the City’s approval of the Newport Banning Ranch Project that would have allowed up to 1,375 homes.

In March 2017, the California Supreme Court ruled in favor of the Conservancy after a split-decision by the Orange County Superior Court and a setback at the Court of Appeals. As a result of the judgment, the City was ordered to rescind the EIR and project approvals.

“We consider this matter closed,” stated Steve Ray, executive director for Banning Ranch Conservancy. “We are looking forward to putting the contentiousness of the past 10 years behind us and creating a new dialogue with the City and the landowner.”   

Conservancy President Terry Welsh added, “We will continue our efforts to secure funding to purchase the Banning Ranch property for permanent open space.”

Newport Banning Ranch LLC Project Manager Michael Mohler noted, “We will continue to evaluate all options that could lead to accelerated cleanup of the oilfield and public access to the property. Banning Ranch Conservancy will be included in those discussions.”


Second Harvest Food Bank names Newport Beach resident to its board of directors

Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County recently appointed Dan Grable, chief operating officer of Goodman North America, to its board of directors. Grable brings vast knowledge in the areas of operations, administrative development, organization in charitable foundation and leadership to the nonprofit.

Grable, a resident of Newport Beach, is actively involved with all operating and administrative functions at Goodman North America, including finance and accounting, treasury, human resources, risk management, charitable foundation and information technology. He is also responsible for capital markets related functions, including establishing and maintaining banking and lending relationships, and assisting in deal structuring, acquisition and investment activities.

Dan Grable

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Dan Grabel is named to Second Harvest Food Bank board of directors 

Before his time at Goodman North America, Grable gained more than 30 years of investment, finance and management experience in commercial and residential real estate. He served in executive positions with Pharris Properties, Merage Investment Group, LNR Property Corporation, William Lyon Company, Pacific Life, Lincoln Property Company and Price Waterhouse. Over his career, Grable has been involved in more than US$8 billion of real estate transactions.

Grable holds a MBA from Stanford University and a BS in Accounting and Finance from the University of Southern California.

“As we continue to lead the fight to end hunger in Orange County, we welcome the addition of Dan Grable to our board of directors,” said Nicole Suydam, CEO of Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County. “His extensive knowledge, leadership and commitment to the community will strengthen our work and make an even greater impact towards creating a future in which no one goes hungry.”


Uncommon Goods: Artist Book as Object

Uncommon Goods

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Courtesy of newportbeachlibrary.org

The Newport Beach City Arts Commission is hosting an exhibition featuring a reinterpretation of the “book” by 25 University of California, Irvine student artists. Students researched the history and creative production of the artist’s books at the special collections department of UCI’s Langston Library. There they explored the infinite possibilities of constructing and organizing data, or in some cases interweaving visual narratives, using unusual materials, color, line and form.

Their collective activity underscores what Johanna Drucker, visual theorist and cultural critic, suggests that “artist’s books became a developed art form in the 20th century. In many ways, one could argue that the artist’s book is the quintessential 20th century art form. Artists’ books appear in every significant movement in art and literature and have provided a unique means of realizing works within all of the many avant-gardes, experimental and independent groups whose contributions have defined the shape of 20th century artistic activity.”

The exhibition will be on display on the 2nd floor of the Central Library during regular operating hours, April 7 through May 5.

An opening reception is being held on Saturday, April 7 at 12 p.m. in the exhibition area, and some of the artists will attend the opening event and discuss their works.

Newport Beach Central Library is located at 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.


Temple Bat Yahm to observe Passover Seder

Matzo and wine glass

 

Submitted photo

On Saturday, March 31 at 6 p.m., join the Family Passover Seder 2018 at Temple Bat Yahm in Newport Beach. Celebrate Passover with family and friends during the interactive service and Hagaddah reading, which tells the story of Jewish ancestors being led from slavery in Egypt.

There will be live music, children’s activities and kosher ceremonial wine (bring your own wine for dinner). Reservations are required and can be made via the website. Please RSVP by Friday, March 24.

Cost: Adult members, $60; non-members, $70; children 5 - 12 years of age are $30; and children under age 5 are free.

Temple Bat Yahm is located at 1011 Camelback St., Newport Beach. Call 949.644.1999. www.tby.org.


Stump the Stu

Where is this Hippocampus?

Stump the Stu 3.27.18

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Okay Stumpers, you were off your game last week so we’re gonna throw out one that many of you may have seen for the first time in March. Think where you were and what you did.

B-t-w, this sculpture is titled “EMPRESS of the SEA” and was completed by David L. Spellberg. Nice work…probably par for the course.

A hippocampus you ask, comes from the Ancient Greek word hippos meaning “horse” and kampos meaning “sea monster.”

We try and stump you each week on Tuesdays with a picture of something unique in our community.

Take the challenge and submit your answers to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The correct answers are in Friday’s edition. We also run the correct guesses on Friday. So, join us in the fun.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Spring Art Show and 2nd Annual Art in the Park celebration this Saturday

Watercolor CCC Art in the Park

Courtesy of Crystal Cove Conservancy

This Saturday, March 31, the Spring Art Show and 2nd Annual Art in the Park Celebration takes place from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. in the Crystal Cove Historic District.

Join Crystal Cove State Park and Crystal Cove Conservancy with free family-friendly art events, such as sea glass wrapping, outdoor musical performances, watercolor painting, sing dancers, basket weaving and more. For a full schedule of events, visit https://crystalcove.org/artinthepark. Park in the Los Trancos lot (PCH inland at stoplight Los Trancos and then walk across the street or take the shuttle). Day-use fee: $5/per hour (max. $15).


Sign of the times

On Thursdays we give you a partial glimpse of a sign around town. You guess what the overall name of the business is. 

So, we gave you a glimpse of a scripted “tree” edged in green. It came from the new “Wine country cuisine/chef-driven American bistro” Olea. It’s located at 2001 Westcliff Drive in The Walk. One correct guess came in from John Wortmann, from the famous Wortmann clan on Lido Isle.

Thank you for playing.

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

Olea

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School Notes

PTA recognizes young artists

Annually, the Harbor Council PTA hosts a program called “Reflections.” The program is an art recognition program that has been sponsored by the National PTA since 1969.  

Each year, there is a theme established. The program honors students for their achievements in six categories: literature, film/video, visual arts, photography, dance choreography, and musical composition. Students are also divided into four age divisions: Primary (preschool through 2nd grade), Intermediate (3rd through 5th grades), Middle (6th through 8th grades), and High School (9th through 12th grades). Each of these categories and divisions are judged first at the school PTA Unit before being forwarded to the Harbor Council PTA.

After completing its judging, the Harbor Council PTA submitted their selections to the 4th District PTA which represents all schools with PTAs in Orange County. These are the names of the 4th District PTA Award of Excellence and Award of Merit honorees for recognition: Ian Turner, Corona del Mar High School, Award of Excellence, Film Production (High School); Katherine Odeen, Corona del Mar Middle School, Award of Merit, Film Production (Middle); and Angeline Shipman, Newport Coast Elementary, Award of Merit, Photography (Primary).

NHHS 

Spring Choir Concert – Wednesday, March 28, 6 - 8 p.m., Robert B. Wentz Theater

Band/Jazz/Orchestra – Friday, March 30, 6 - 8 p.m., Robins Loats Theater

PTA Executive Board – Wednesday, April 4, 8 a.m., Newkirk Conference Room

Spring Recess – Monday through Friday, April 16 - 23

CdMHS 

Footloose, The Spring Musical, Wednesday, April 4 - Sunday, April 8 Performance times are April 4 at 4 p.m., April 5, 6 and 7 at 7 p.m. and April 8 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $5 at the door for students, and $10 for general admission. You can purchase tickets at www.bapaco.org (BAPACO) or buy tickets at the door.

Spring Festival Concert – Monday, April 9, 7 - 8 p.m.

Vocal Zone Concert – Tuesday, April 10, 7 - 8 p.m.

Spring Recess – Monday through Friday, April 16 - 23

Sage Hill High School

Spring Break – Monday through Friday, March 26 - 30

Parent Association: 12th Grade Parent Lunch – April 4 from 12 - 2 p.m.

Parent Association: 9th Grade Parent Coffee – April 4 from 8 - 10 a.m., Le Bon Family Lobby (Studio Lobby)

Art Reception – April 5, 6 - 8 p.m., Studio at Sage Hill

Advisor/Advisee/Parent Conferences – April 9 (No classes)

Parent Association General Meeting – April 10 at 8 a.m., Le Bon Family Lobby (Studio Lobby)

Multicultural Symposium – April 11 from 9:30 - 11:30 a.m., Sage Hill Campus

One Acts Performances – April 12 and 13 at 7 p.m., The Black Box Theater in the Studio at Sage Hill

Campus Tour – April 16 at 8:30 a.m.

Spring at Sage Parent Information Night – April 17 at 6 p.m., The Black Box Theater in the Studio at Sage Hill

Service Learning Day - Spring at Sage Afternoon – April 18 from 8 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Theater Ensemble Auditions – April 18 from 3:15 - 5:30 p.m., The Black Box Theater in the Studio at Sage Hill

College Counseling: 11th Grade Parent Spring Wrap-Up – April 19 at 5:30 p.m., Argyros Family Lecture Hall (MMLH)

Parent Association - Career Series Mixer – April 19 at 6 p.m., Pelican Hill

Junior Class Grade Level Meeting – April 20 at 9:25 a.m., Argyros Family Lecture Hall (MMLH)

Parent Association Gelato Day – April 28 at 11:30 a.m., Wilkins Town Square

Dance Performances – April 27 and 28 at 7 p.m., The Black Box Theater in the Studio at Sage Hill

Mariners Elementary School

Jog-A-Thon – Friday, April 6.


Register now for the CdM Scenic 5K

CdM race over Goldenrod Bridge

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Submitted photo

CdM Scenic 5K runners crossing Goldenrod Footbridge

Join the popular Corona del Mar Scenic 5K RACE/WALK through the charming streets of Corona del Mar, taking place Saturday, June 2. The race begins at 6 a.m. at Ocean Boulevard and Heliotrope. Walk-in pre-registration takes place on Friday, June 1 from 12 - 7 p.m. at Newport Beach Civic Center (Community Room), 100 Civic Center Drive, Newport Beach.

Race Schedule:

Men’s 5K at 7:55 a.m.

Women’s 5K at 8:20 a.m.

2-Mile Walk at 8:50 a.m.

Youth 2-Mile Walk at 8:45 a.m.

1K Kids Dash at 9 a.m.

Entry fees: Men’s & Women’s 5K Run, $38; 2-Mile Walk & Youth 2-Mile Walk, $28; 1K Kids Dash, $15.

For more information and to register, visit www.cdmchamber.com or call 949.673.4050. Vendor exhibit spaces and sponsorships are also available.


Photographer’s work is on display at JWA

From March 20 - April 19, photography by Stephanie Hager will be on display at John Wayne Airport (JWA) as part of JWA’s Community Focus Space Program.

These works can be viewed on the Departure (upper) Level near security screening areas in Terminals A, B and C, and on the Arrival (lower) Level adjacent to Baggage Carousels 1 and 4.

Stephanie Hager Little Corona arch at night

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Photo by Stephanie Hager/

Courtesy of John Wayne Airport

Little Corona arch at night by Stephanie Hager

“Ms. Hager’s work displayed at John Wayne Airport will engage the viewers’ senses,” said Orange County Board of Supervisors Chairman Andrew Do. “Her world-class photography will be a delight for travelers.”

Hager’s photography is known for having a bold feeling with vibrant energy and clean lines. The negative space provides the observer room for thought.

“My goal is to have the viewer feel something new and unique to themselves through the use of light, color and patterns,” Hager said. 

The photographer graduated with a degree in photo communications from California State University, Fullerton and was fortunate to have studied with some of the top photographers in the United States.

Hager has been a professional photographer for more than 25 years and has worked with advertising and editorial clients photographing outdoor adventure sports and lifestyle, portraiture, architecture and landscapes.


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum & Historical Society

A Look Back 3.27.18

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Flashback to the Easter Holiday, 1951, when a group of girls were perched on a dock railing on their Balboa Island visit

Visit Balboa Island Museum and the Museum Store located at 331 Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Tuesdays - Sundays from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Call 949.675.3952. www.balboaislandmuseum.organd  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Library reconstruction about to begin…but what about the “Seagulls in Flight?”

By AMY SENK

Amid a farewell party, a book sale and logistical details regarding the demolition and reconstruction of the Corona del Mar library branch and fire station – an interesting question popped up at a recent meeting of the Corona del Mar Residents Association.

What will become of the sculpture in front of the Marigold Avenue branch?

The short answer, according to Newport Beach Library Services Director Tim Hetherton, is that the sculpture, “Seagulls in Flight” will be stored at Central Library, out of public sight, for the duration of the construction. When that’s complete, sometime next summer, the artwork will be returned.

Seagulls in Flight sculpture

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Photo by Amy Senk

“Seagulls in Flight” will return to the CdM Library site after reconstruction

It may be a small detail in the overall scope of the project, but the sculpture has a meaningful history for CdM residents, a history that was retold in 2015 when the city spent $4,450 to restore and repair the piece.

The sculpture was donated to the city in 1960, a year after the branch opened, to honor Molly McClintock, who lived in Shore Cliffs and died in a car crash shortly after graduating from Newport Harbor Union High School. The 18-year-old had been a drum majorette and popular student who is regularly remembered at class reunions every year.

Her friends recalled that she had moved to California from the south, and her mother was worried about her finding friends, but she fit in just fine. Her mother “made a huge sacrifice” to pay for the sculpture, which has an inscription that says: “To the youth of Corona del Mar in memory of Molly McClintock.” The piece, which depicts birds in flight with wings touching, originally was placed at Big Corona State Beach, but the salt air and sunlight caused damage, so it eventually was trucked to the shady spot by the library entrance.

Earlier repairs had been inadequate, Hetherton said back in April 2015. The piece was removed, restored, and replaced in about a month. Back then, Hetherton said he hoped to move the piece to another public area during library construction, but instead it will be kept safe in storage.

The branch is now formally closed, but a groundbreaking ceremony is scheduled to take place at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, April 24 (changed from April 10), and the public is invited to attend.

In other news, the California Coastal Commission this month approved an expansion project for the Beachcomber Café at Crystal Cove State Park. Plans call for adding about 422 square feet to accommodate additional outdoor seating, as well as for repairs around the hostess area. About 40 extra seats will be added, with the work to take place during the off-season. According to a staff report from the Commission’s March meeting, such an increase typically results in increased parking demand, but parking already is in demand there, and the extra seating might help by reducing the café’s wait-time, which can be up to two hours on weekends.

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 17 years and was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association and the Corona del Mar High School PTA. She and her husband have two children.


Kiff announces exit from City Manager job

After two decades with the City of Newport Beach (City) and nearly a full decade as its city manager, Dave Kiff has informed members of the City Council that he will leave his post toward the end of 2018. 

Kiff is committed to implementing a smooth transition and to assisting in addressing key initiatives that take additional familiarity, like efforts to limit the noise and pollution impacts of John Wayne Airport. 

Kiff describes the transition as “preparing for Dave 2.0,” where he may focus his energies on specific issues near and dear to him, specifically including homelessness and the outdoors. 

According to Kiff, “I have loved this job and this community a great deal. This is an amazing community to work for, and I have felt honored to do so nearly every day. But this is a pretty grueling job, with demanding issues and a resident base that deserves and expects 100 percent focus. I have to admit that over time that has worn me out a bit. As I get less young, I don’t recharge as quickly. I see, too, that as my “time remaining” (“TR” as Mayor Duffy Duffield calls it) gets shorter, there are other efforts and experiences that draw my interest. 

“But for this community, I know that the next city manager will become the leader of one of the best teams of department heads that I have ever known. I am confident that the City Council will get a number of terrific applicants for this post.” 

Mayor Duffield stated, “Dave’s steady hand at the City’s helm has helped steer the City through good skies and bad. We remain a community thankful for public service and we appreciate Dave’s decades of commitment.” 

Mayor Pro Tem Will O’Neill also commented, “Dave’s willingness to lead regionally on issues like pension reform and homelessness have set him and our City apart. No doubt we will expect similar leadership from Dave’s successor.” 

“I won’t say goodbye yet, as there are more months ahead of me here, but I will say that all is good. I’ll encourage anyone reading this to know that I remain full of optimism for the City’s future and my own,” Kiff said.


You Must Remember This: Preserving Newport’s history might be worth a look at our pavements

By NANCY GARDNER

As a city, we’re not that big on our history. Books have been written about it, we have a couple of historical societies that have small collections, but the physical history succumbs to high property values. When I lived in New Jersey, what impressed me were how many old – and I mean really old – houses there were, and how people seemed to value their age instead of viewing it as an impediment. If someone needed a bigger house, they either bought a bigger house, or they did an artful job of expanding the old house, leaving the historical part and adding on, sometimes in the same style, other times deliberately going very modern in contrast…but I never saw a house scraped while I was there.

Obviously, it’s a much different deal here. There is one old house on Ocean Boulevard that the owners obviously appreciate. Some years ago, they added a second story, and I defy anyone to detect where the original house ends and the new addition begins, because they were so careful to maintain the materials and style, but that is a rare bird. More common is something like this: One of the first houses in CdM? The home of the woman who saved Big Corona from development? That’s nice. Scrape it. So, piece by piece we lose the actual history and have to resort to photographs to remind us of what once was.

Griffith Company in pavement

Courtesy of Nancy Gardner

Griffith Company, 1927 is etched in this Corona del Mar sidewalk

However, there is one piece of physical history that is still pretty common. Walk around CdM and look at the sidewalk. What’s stamped there? Griffith Company, 1927. Ninety years and still going strong. I asked Dave Webb, the Public Works director, if the department made any particular effort to save these historical sections. He said no, so that just means they poured really good cement. Because it was 1927 and because I am sometimes dense and don’t make obvious connections, I decided to see what I could find out about Griffith. It took me about 10 seconds to find a company headquartered in Southern California, established in 1902 – oh yeah, and that has done a ton of work in Newport like Newport Coast Drive and MacArthur. Oh, that Griffith Company. Just to be sure, I sent an inquiry. Yes, indeed, they were the same company, and they provided this link: www.griffithcompany.net/video/centennialpresentation. I went online, and the first part in particular is fascinating. If you want to see what California looked like 60, 70, 80 years ago, they’ve got some wonderful footage.

Griffith wasn’t the only company paving Newport. Sidewalks with J. Paul Benson, Contractor 1926 can also be found, but I couldn’t find anything on Benson. There are also sections stamped CNB 1977, and hopefully come 2067, some resident will stare at them and marvel at the history. Or maybe, they’ll just marvel that our particular history can be told as well or better in the much-trod-upon sidewalks rather than the buildings. 

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, long-time resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to StuNewsNewport.


Junior League to hold 4th Annual Golf Classic

Junior League golf

Submitted photo

Newport Beach-based Junior League of Orange County, California (JLOCC) invites golfers to participate in the 4th Annual Golf Classic and 19th Hole Party on Friday, April 6. The shotgun start is at 12:30 p.m. and the 19th Hole Party begins at 5:30 p.m.

All golfer packages include golf carts, catered lunch by Chick-Fil-A, range balls, gift bags, entry into the $10,000 cash prize Hole-In-One contest and admission to the 19th Hole Party, which will include dinner and a cocktail, live jazz by The Bradford Project and a helicopter ball drop with tickets sold separately, along with a silent auction and awards. Non-golfers are invited to attend the 19th Hole Party. The helicopter ball drop opportunity prize is an overnight stay to New York-New York Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, NV and a pair of tickets to see Zumanity by Cirque du Soleil®. Helicopter Ball Drop tickets will be sold at the door. Tickets for the 19th Hole Party only are $50 per guest. Costs are $225 for single golfers and $860 for foursomes. Golfers can purchase the tournament skills package, including two mulligans and entry into the contests – Putting, Longest Drive and Closest-to-the-Pin, for $40 ahead of the event.

All proceeds benefit the League’s volunteer training programs and community projects in partnership with its community partners that include the Orange County Human Trafficking Task Force, Orangewood Foundation, Samueli Academy, JLOCC’s own initiative, Junior League Juniors, which introduces children to volunteer and make an impact in the community, along with other additional volunteer projects throughout Orange County. There are sponsorship opportunities available, including advertising and event underwriting.

The event takes place at Oak Creek Golf Club, One Golf Club Drive, Irvine.

For information, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and visit www.jlocc.org/golf.


Hop on over to Fashion Island for photos with the Easter Bunny

FI Easter Bunny

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Fashion Island

Continuing through Saturday, March 31, grab your bonnets and your favorite Easter garb and head over to Fashion Island’s Atrium Lawn for photos with the Easter Bunny!

Our favorite bunny is available for pictures in his Spring garden on weekdays from 10 a.m. - 8 pm. and on Saturday from 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Hours of operation are subject to change, so call Guest Services at 949.721.2000 to confirm times.

Fashion Island is located at 401 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach.


Guest Column

Dave Kiff

An insider’s look at what’s going on in and around City Hall

Dave Kiff

Newport Beach City Manager Dave Kiff   

Here’s what’s going on at the upcoming Newport Beach City Council meeting set for (tonight) Tuesday, March 27th at 7 p.m. Meetings are held in the Newport Beach Civic Center at 100 Civic Center Drive – the public is always welcome. I do not highlight all of the items on the agenda – please go to the City’s webpage and review the agenda if you want to see all of the items.

There is no study session in the afternoon, so the Regular Session starts at 7 p.m. The items that seem worthy of highlighting and/or explaining are these:

Council Member Muldoon asked his colleagues to consider a statement in support of a ballot measure proposed for the November 2018 statewide ballot. This relates to tightening up some of the things that arguably were loosened with recent ballot and legislative actions involving the parole system and who is eligible and when. It also would place new penalties on parole violations, among other things.

Some new improvements and maintenance are/is coming for Peninsula Point Park near the Balboa Pier, and Bayview Park near the Marriott Bayview.

I think folks will be happy to see improvements to the crosswalks along Newport Boulevard and Balboa Boulevard – recall that we’ve had a number of community meetings that Council Member Dixon has hosted about further enhancing the visibility of current crosswalks on the Peninsula.  

The Annual “Status Report” on the General Plan and its Housing Element. This is usually a pro forma item, but it allows the staff and Council to ensure that we are following State law relating to reporting in on how we’re implementing the General Plan and whether there have been any recent changes to housing activity in the community.    

I’ve placed Advocacy for a Port Master Plan back on the agenda and will explain why. The goal of having a special carve-out for aspects of Newport Harbor’s public and private permitting is (to me) a good one. Today, nearly all permits to do things like dredging around residential piers, residential pier repairs, sea wall repairs, and more all have to go to the Coastal Commission. Ideally, those permits could be assigned to the City and City Council for approval, provided that we considered them through the same lens that the Coastal Commission would – same concerns, same protections, same compliance with the Coastal Act. This concept will not cause Newport Harbor’s current character to change – it’s about permit authority, not becoming port-like (or even Port-lite). Anyway, in order to even be able to submit a plan for permit authority to the Coastal Commission, we think we need state legislation to allow us to send a Port Master Plan in for Commission review and approval. There are certainly good questions involved in this process, and good reasons to ask questions, but It seems to make sense to try it out. There could come a time in the near future when we decide this isn’t going to work, and our advocacy agreements allow us to pull the plug quickly. Speaking of advocacy, Council Members Dixon and Peotter and I had a good conversation between Council meetings to become more comfortable with the approach and staffing that Don Schmitz and Sean Henschel will provide. Therefore, I was comfortable putting it back on the agenda quite quickly. If anyone has any questions about this at all, please contact me and I’ll wade through it with you.  

A couple of random notes:

A lot is going on regarding homelessness in our region. In fact, I spent last Saturday morning in Judge Carter’s chambers listening to updates about the clearing of encampments in the Santa Ana riverbed as well as a planned clearing of the Santa Ana Civic Center encampment. While I won’t include it here, I recently wrote up an email that I sent to a number of residents about this issue, including what we’re doing as a City and community. I can send that to you if you ask me by return email.

Secondly, Speak Up Newport is planning their Wednesday, April 11 forum on this issue. SUN meets at 5:30 p.m. – with the program at 6 p.m. –  in the Community Room at the Civic Center. Note, too, that a small (12-unit) “permanent supportive housing” location in town has recently completed its renovation and is open for business, housing six veterans and six low-income seniors. It’s an amazing place and looks terrific.  

We’re chugging along on our airport efforts, thanks to great enthusiasm by our key community groups. We’re now in the thick of a data study looking at ways to improve departure procedures so that planes can depart in the quietest manner (but still safely, of course) possible. Our groups like AWG, Air Fair and CAANP are really engaged on this. It’s exciting. I’m happy to fill you in more on this if you ask. This coming week may (emphasis on “may” because stuff like this is very uncertain) also see the first few planes using a new pathway in the Upper Bay that involves two gentle turns, versus the current “just one” turn procedure. I will confess to trepidation as to how this will work, but we’ll be following it very closely.

I hope everyone has a pleasant Easter and great spring break in the upcoming weeks.  

As always, I enjoy hearing from you about this or any other community issue involving the city government. So does the City Council – remember that you can email them at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to express your thoughts or ideas.  

Thanks for reading!

 

Sincerely,

Dave Kiff

City Manager

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

949-644-3001


Farm to Fork: A Foodie’s Point of View Fork

By LANA JOHNSON

Celebrate Easter with these dining choices

Easter Sunday, coming April 1, is less than a week away, so if you haven’t chosen a dining venue yet to celebrate this Springtime holiday with friends and family, here are some suggestions. Make your reservations now to secure seating. This is the second in a two-part series.

Lamb on platter

Click on photo for a larger image

Submitted photo

Bayside is serving both brunch and dinner. Sunday brunch is a three-course pre-prix menu with free-flowing champagne/mimosas. From starters such as roasted ruby beets with goat cheese and strawberries to main-course options ranging from frittata and king crab “Bayside” benedict to flat iron steak, grilled lamb chops and Alaskan halibut and for vegetarians…fusilli pasta primavera…leave room for dessert! There is also a Kids Menu. Cost: Adults, $49.75, tax and gratuity not included; Children 12 and under, $22. Sunday supper begins at 5 p.m. with a pre-fixe three-course menu available in addition to their regular dinner menu. You can select any dessert from their list. Cost: $40 per person, tax and gratuity not included. 900 Bayside Drive, Newport Beach. Call 949.721.1222. www.baysiderestaurant.com

Harborside, where you can celebrate Easter on the Bay! Enjoy the Grand Buffet Brunch served upstairs in the Grand Ballroom from, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Cost: Adults, $40; Children, $16. A bottle of Champagne, $6. Price doesn’t include tax or gratuity. They will be serving dinner beginning at 4 p.m. in the dining room. Reservations are required. Call 949.673.4633. 400 Main Street (Balboa Peninsula), Newport Beach. www.harborside-pavilion.com

Hornblower Cruise on Newport Harbor is awaiting those who enjoy the sweeter things in life. The brunch or supper buffet is brimming with classic breakfast fare, holiday classics and chocolatey treats. They’re taking Easter up a notch with free-flowing Champagne, live entertainment and even a visit from the Easter Bunny! Two-hour cruises take place at 10 a.m. aboard the Wild Goose, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Cost: Starts at $75 per person. Reservations are required. 3101 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach. Call 949.631.2469. www.hornblower.com

Hornblower Yacht

Submitted photo

Easter brunch or the dinner buffet aboard a Hornblower yacht yields spectacular harbor views

Lighthouse Bayview Café in Marina Park is offering a special Easter brunch menu. Start with a bruschetta trio or jumbo lump crab tacos among others, with entrees such as honey ham Monte Cristo, herb crusted New Zealand lamb chops or avocado country toast. Call 949.933.1001. 1600 W. Balboa Blvd., Newport Beach. www.lighthousenb.com

Lighthouse Bayview Cafe

Click on photo for a larger image

Submitted photo

Lighthouse Bayview Café in Marina Park affords bay vistas

Muldoon’s Irish Pub in Fashion Island will be serving a three-course Easter brunch from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Start with a bowl of fresh fruit or split pea soup (with fresh baked soda bread and sweet butter) with your choice of entrees such as Galway eggs benedict, Irish stew, Muldoon’s Reuben or BBQ salmon. Your sweet finish is a chocolate sundae or Irish berry tart. Some of the favorite libations are the Pub Bloody Mary, Irish Mule or Lucky Martini. Cost: $29.95. A children’s menu is available for those 10 years of age and under for $12.95. 202 Newport Center drive, Newport Beach. Call 949.640.4110. www.muldoonspub.com

Soda bread

Courtesy muldoonspub.com

Start your Easter meal at Muldoon’s Irish Pub with fresh baked soda bread

Newport Landing is offering an Easter buffet brunch on the harbor from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Cost: Adults, $40; Kids under 10 years of age, $16. A bottomless glass of Champagne is $3. Price excludes tax and gratuity. 503 Easter Edgewater, Newport Beach. Call 949.675.2373. www.newport-landing.com

Rockin’ Baja Lobster is serving specials all Easter weekend long. It’s Rockin’ Seafood Bucket is filled with Baja style- flavor and it’s made to share. Enjoy Canadian lobster tails, a snow crab cluster, shrimp, skirt steak, grilled chicken, free Caesar salad, grilled corn on the cob, “All You Can Eat” ranchero beans, citrus rice, warm tortillas, their famous honey chili butter and world-class fresh salsa bar. Cost: $59.99 for two. Available Friday, March 30 through Sunday, April 1. Reservations suggested. 2104 W. Oceanfront, Newport Beach. 949.723.0606. www.rockinbaja.com

Roy’s is offering Easter brunch and dinner. From 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., celebrate Easter brunch with their one-day-only, two-course prix fixe menu featuring favorites like lobster & shrimp omelet, macadamia nut crusted mahi mahi and slow roasted prime rib of beef. For dinner service from 3 - 9 p.m., enjoy a special menu of Roy’s classics including their fresh-from-Hawaii blackened island ahi, roasted macadamia nut crusted mahi mahi and new chef creations like their USDA prime New York strip steak. Pricing varies. A children’s (keiki) menu with a fresh fruit medley starter, choice of entrée and beverage is also available for $13. 453 Newport Center Drive (Fashion Island), Newport Beach. Call 949.640.7697. www.roysrestaurant.com

Sol Cocina where Easter brunch and live entertainment come together from 12 - 3 p.m. Enjoy huevos rancheros, chilaquiles, macha and more! Specialty cocktails include the new Sol’s Bloody Mary and Paloma, as well as the Fro-Mo, mimosas and Michelada. Brunch will also be served Saturday, March 31 from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Call about pricing. 251 Pacific Coast Highway, Newport Beach. Call 949.675.9800. To make a reservation, visit www.solcocina.com

Sol Cocina libations

Courtesy of Sol Cocina

Refreshing libations pair perfectly with Sol Cocina’s Easter brunch offerings

The Beachcomber, where you can enjoy brunch on the beach at Crystal Cove. Start with beignets and choose one of the Beachcomber’s delicious entrees, including surf & turf, dulce de leche pancakes, lobster mac & cheese, huevos rancheros and ribeye French dip and more from 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. Cost: Adults, $39.95; Children, $14.95 (who order off the Kids’ menu). Bottomless Champagne, mimosa or orange juice, soda or coffee. 15 Crystal Cove, Newport Coast. Call 949.376.6900. www.thebeachcombercafe.com

Beachcomber shore

Click on photo for a larger image

After Champagne brunch at The Beachcomber, stroll the Crystal Cove shoreline

Submitted photo

The Bungalow is offering their Champagne brunch from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Start off with a basket of freshly baked assorted muffins and your choice of juice or coffee. Among the first course selections: lobster bisque, heirloom tomato salad, Bungalow salad or fresh fruit cup. Among the entrée selections are eggs benedict your way, grilled lime chicken salad, California chicken breast, grilled king salmon, grilled vegetable tart, or mixed berry waffle. For an additional $6, you can enjoy roasted prime rib of beef or New York strip & eggs. Desserts are available for $5 each. Cost: Adults, $29. Bottomless Champagne or Bloody Marys for an additional $10 per guest. There is a menu for children under the age of 12 for $14. 2441 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. Call 949.673.6585. www.TheBungalowRestaurant.com

The Bungalow interior

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of bungalowrestaurant.com

Dining at The Bungalow is always a memorable experience

True Food Kitchen is celebrating with an Easter brunch menu featuring special offerings from its not-yet-released Spring Menu. Guests will have the option to choose from a selection of dishes and Spring beverages that will only be offered on Easter Sunday. Enjoy seasonal flavors with dishes like the new Spring toast, seasonal ingredient salad and a strawberry & rhubarb crisp, along with Spring sips like the lemongrass margarita, strawberry bourbon smash and the refreshing cucumber cooler. Pricing varies. 451 Newport Center Drive (Fashion Island), Newport Beach. Call 949.644.2400. www.truefoodkitchen.com

Happy Easter…

Ciao Vincenza!


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Kiff out at City Hall…others cry foul

TomJohnson

The first clue came just after church Sunday morning, when I was told there was a “plan” to oust Newport Beach City Manager Dave Kiff at the end of tonight’s council meeting. The story had it, true or false, that “three council members visited Kiff, with a fourth vote in pocket, demanding he resign or that he would be terminated.”

One side is saying Brown Act violation, the other says absolutely not.

I immediately sent Kiff an email asking if three council members visited him demanding his resignation or telling him he would be terminated.

Kiff responded with an email straight to the point saying, “Tom, that did not happen.”

I also contacted Mayor Pro Tem Will O’Neill with a similar question. His response also said that “no such meeting has ever taken place.”

Later Sunday afternoon, Tara Finnegan, the City’s Public Information Manager, issued Kiff’s resignation to the media saying, “After two decades with the City of Newport Beach and nearly a full decade as its city manager, Dave Kiff has informed members of the City Council that he will leave his post toward the end of 2018.”

“I am happy in making this request and want the community to know that all is good with me, my family, and my work. There are great things ahead for all of us,” Kiff added in a cover letter.

One source said that they were told “that Kiff was asked to move the press release announcement up to Sunday afternoon” as the story began breaking.

You can imagine the different stories coming out of other camps. One story had Council Members Diane Dixon, Jeff Herdman and Brad Avery urging Kiff to hang on until the community had a chance to voice their concerns at tonight’s meeting.

Obviously, Kiff has said no.

Former Mayor Kevin Muldoon had this to say, “Dave told me a few months ago that he was intending to retire in November. He is the best City Manager in Orange County and will be missed.”

Lynn Swain said, “Dave Kiff is a great city manager and he is highly respected. I think the public deserves an answer regarding the actions of a majority of the council who have been pushing him out to appoint their own person. Team Newport continues to degrade our community with these backroom politics. Dave Kiff was forced to retire or be fired.”

Here are some thoughts from other community leaders (all council members were invited to comment).

City Council Member and former Mayor Diane Dixon: “I am saddened and disappointed by the news of our highly respected City Manager Dave Kiff’s decision to leave the City of Newport Beach.  During my tenure on the Council, I have appreciated Dave’s outstanding professionalism and his commitment to the City and its residents. We are very fortunate to have had a city manager with his years of experience and deep knowledge of government.

The circumstances surrounding the actions of some members of the City Council that led to Dave’s decision baffle me. I only learned of this news this weekend. I am surprised to discover that this process may have been underway for four weeks. It is clear that all members of the City Council were not involved in this process. I expect that we will learn from our Mayor and Mayor Pro Tem more about this mystery at (tonight’s) Newport Beach City Council meeting.  

It is my hope that all of us on the City Council share a common belief that transparency in city government is one of our core values.”

City Council Member Jeff Herdman: “I want to say for the public record that I was not aware of any effort to oust the city manager, to negotiate an exit, or assert that there were four votes, in violation of the Brown Act, to accomplish this illegal act by the council majority (Muldoon, O’Neill, Duffield and Peotter). 

At no time has the entire City Council considered the termination of our city manager’s employment, and I am now deeply concerned about the public’s trust in this body going forward. 

And why did the council majority do this? Is it in the best interest of the city? Knowing that Dave Kiff intended to possibly take an early retirement after the upcoming election, and after getting council members oriented and settled in, they fired him anyway! 

Self-promotion and campaign tactics are at work here. Individually, Muldoon wants to be able to say in his campaign for re-election that he followed through on his 2014 campaign promises (clean the swamp, no tax increases, lowering fees, etc. etc.). 

This being the “Year of the Harbor,” Duffy wants to hire a new city manager that will be at his beck-and-call in terms of accomplishing what he wants to do, and I might add, at a tremendous cost to the taxpayers. 

Peotter? This is just another example of his use of poor judgement for what he thinks will win him reelection. 

As far as O’ Neill is concerned, he was elected on a Team Newport ticket, so I guess he must fall in line! 

Collectively, the Council majority has set the stage for hiring their own city manager that they will be able to completely control and manipulate for the purpose of self-aggrandizement and accomplishing their own personal agendas with complete disregard for their constituents and their needs and wants. 

The Brown Act violation that has occurred, and that can be proven, is known as the “chain effect.” I’ll assume that Muldoon, Duffy and O’Neill thought they were not violating the Brown Act when notifying Dave of the termination of his employment because there were only three of them present. But these three council members did so knowing they had a fourth vote in the form of Peotter and would therefore have no trouble getting council approval (4 votes are all that is needed). Knowing they had his critical fourth vote is the essence of the “chain effect” violation. It is flat out prohibited and illegal. 

After Dave’s departure, the collateral damage that has been created by this action on the part of the Council majority is what we will have to deal with. The council majority must be held accountable for their misinterpretation of Council Policy for which they justified their action under, as well as blatant Brown Act violations.” 

Former Mayor Nancy Gardner: “I have worked with Dave since he was an Assistant to Kevin Murphy. He is a person of great integrity and character. I have seen how much he takes to heart the well-being of this city, and I am very sorry to see him leave.  

It is one thing if he is leaving because he wants to seek new adventures. Then we can only wish him the best. If, as has been suggested, there was a covert effort by certain council members to get rid of him, then this is an insult not just to Dave but to the residents and businesses that he has worked so hard for. It would mean that they were afraid to openly dismiss someone with his standing and popularity in the community and resorted to subterfuge to accomplish this.  

For the sake of our city, I can only hope that this is not true because if it is, it widens the gaps between us when we should be pulling together.”

Keith Curry: “Hiring Dave Kiff was the best decision the city council made in my 10 years serving the city. He has a stellar reputation and he effectively led our city through the recession. His efforts reduced the workforce by more than 100 positions while preserving city services. 

It appears that this decision is the result of members of the city council acting without the authorization and involvement of the entire council to precipitate the action. This is a serious violation of policy and past practices and a full investigation should be commenced.”

City Council candidate (2018) Joy Brenner: “The loss of Dave Kiff is tragic for our city. Dave is well regarded by so many, including most if not all former mayors and council members. It has appeared to me for several years that he has been put in the very awkward position of trying to give the council what they want while legally and ethically staying in integrity. 

Some members of this council play politics so often that I don’t trust anything to be straightforwardly above board. Was there pressure on Dave in an attempt to get more of a “yes” man or woman in this position? We must now demand an open and transparent search for a replacement. And, if actions of certain members of the city council resulted in this announcement, then a Brown Act violation needs to be investigated.” 


Easter Sunrise Service at the beach

Sunrise

Click on photo for a larger image

Submitted photo

On Easter Sunday, April 1, join Christ Church by the Sea United Methodist for its sunrise service at 6:30 a.m. at 14th Street Beach on Balboa Peninsula.

A complimentary breakfast will be provided across the street from the church following the service. Easter worship is also taking place in the Sanctuary at 10 a.m.

Christ Church by the Sea is located at 1400 W. Balboa Blvd., Newport Beach. Call 949.673.3805. www.christbytheseanb.com


Easter Egg hunt for the visually impaired this Friday

Easter Eggs in basket

Submitted photo

On Friday, March 30, the Orange County Sheriff’s Department Hazardous Devices Section (HDS) will help provide a unique egg hunt experience for blind and visually impaired students of the Santa Ana-based Blind Children’s Learning Center. Seventy of the Center’s students will search the grounds of the Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort for beeping eggs built by the HDS, an OCSD team also known as the Bomb Squad.

In the weeks leading up to the event, members of the Bomb Squad sharpen their basic electronic circuit-building and soldering skills to create a beeping component that is encapsulated in large, brightly colored plastic eggs to provide visually impaired students a sensory version of an Easter egg hunt.

“This is a fun way for our bomb technicians to practice a basic skill, but what they look forward to the most is participating in the egg hunt with the students,” said Lt. Martin Ramirez, Special Enforcement Bureau supervisor. “This is a favorite community event for us, and we’re honored to be a part of it.”

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort will welcome the Center’s students from 10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. After the egg hunt, students will receive an Easter basket filled with candy and toys donated by AT&T Pioneers volunteer network and have an opportunity to visit with the Easter Bunny. The students also will be treated to a beachfront picnic provided by Back Bay Bistro to cap off the event.

“Imagine how you would participate in an Easter egg hunt if you couldn’t see,” said Carolyn Baker, director of development for the Blind Children’s Learning Center. “This adapted version of a traditional activity gives our children the opportunity to join in on the fun and excitement. We are so grateful to everyone involved for giving our kids and their families a morning of adventure and special memories.”


College Planning Seminars at Central Library

College planning

Courtesy of NBPL

The Teen Services Department at the Newport Beach Public Library (NBPL) is hosting a series of college planning seminars to help students and parents understand the college admission process and develop a strategy that optimizes the student’s potential for acceptance into a college that matches their goals.

The NBPL has partnered with Collegewise to present three different programs open to the public that are free of charge. The presentations scheduled include: College Planning for Freshmen and Sophomores on Tuesday, April 3; Highly Selective College Admissions on Tuesday, May 1; and Secrets of College Admissions on Tuesday, June 5. Register online to attend. All of the programs begin at 7 p.m. in the Friends Meeting Room at Central Library, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.


Camp James Open House announced

Camp James

Submitted photo

On Saturday, April 14 from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., come experience the joy of Camp James at Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort for yourself! Meet some of their amazing camp staff, try a sample of activities, and check out the gorgeous site for the very reasonable price of free! They look forward to seeing you there.

If you have any questions, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call 949.729.1098 for more information.

Camp James is located at 191 North Bayside Drive, Newport Beach.


Bob’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream fundraising program returns to the OC Market Place

I scream, you scream, we all scream for Bob’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream! In response to inquiries from local, non-profit organizations and in alignment with the mission of the Orange County Market Place® to be the premier gathering place for the Orange County community and to support local organizations, the Orange County Market Place® has reintroduced the Bob’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream Fundraising Program.

Since its inception in 1969, the Orange County Market Place has been active in the community in many ways, including the work with nonprofit organizations for the betterment of the community. To help address the fundraising needs of organizations in the community, the Market Place developed a signature program. Originally developed in response to the September 11, 2001 tragedy, this program has proven beneficial in aiding community groups with their fundraising efforts.

Bobs Old Fashioned

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Courtesy of OC Market Place

“We are elated to reopen the doors of the iconic Bob’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream stand with our first community fundraising group on March 31, 2018 at Grand Opening event,” said General Manager Adela Generally. “Our goal is to have a community group represented each weekend we are open in an effort to help fundraise and garner awareness for their cause in this community.”

The Orange County Market Place is currently accepting applications from 501(c)3 non-profit organizations. Those located within Orange County will be given preference for dates, but any non-profit interested in participating in the program is encouraged to complete the application, found at www.ocmarketplace.com/fundraising-opportunities.

The Market Place is a celebration of food, fun, value and the entrepreneurial spirit. With hundreds of thousands of visitors each year, it has grown to become the centerpiece of the Orange County outdoor shopping experience. Founded in 1969, the Orange County Market Place®, is owned and operated by Spectra and is located on the Orange County Fairgrounds at 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa. The Market Place operates every Saturday and Sunday of the year except during the Orange County Fair in July/August.


Stump the Stu

One reader stumps the masses

Stump the Stu 3.23.18

Click on photo for a larger image

Tuesday’s submission was from Sherry Black. Well Sherry, you stumped ‘em. No correct guesses. 

So, where is it, you ask? This little spot is located near the trellis at the Hyatt Regency Newport Beach and Palisades Tennis Club. Rumor has it that it was a favorite spot of John Wayne’s to relax. Check it out.

Thanks Sherry!

Join us on Tuesdays as we try and stump you each week with a picture of something unique in our community.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think StuNewsNewport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Sign of the times

It’s another edition of Sign of the times. Contestants, start your engines. Below you’ll find this week’s clue. What you see is a small part of an overall sign in Newport Beach. Here’s a fairly new sign, but it’s seen a lot of traffic in its short life. 

Good luck!

Send you guesses to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 3.23.18

Click on photo for a larger image


Police Files

Small plane takes nose-dive at JWA

Yesterday afternoon, March 22 at 12:50 p.m. “a single engine Piper Malibu aircraft skidded off runway 20R while landing, shearing off the nose gear. The disabled aircraft came to rest in the grassy infield ‘safety area’ between the two runways,” according to John Wayne Airport spokesperson Deanne Thompson.

The only person on board was not injured. Both runways at JWA were closed for approximately one hour while a runway safety inspection was completed, and the damaged aircraft was removed.

Man steals car, runs from police, takes meth break and is arrested

Monday morning, March 19, a caller contacted the Newport Beach Police Department to report that a driver of a gold Honda was driving poorly and seemed “out of it.” A check of the license plate showed that the Honda had been stolen earlier the same day in Westminster.  

Officers attempted to stop the Honda near MacArthur Boulevard and the 405, but the driver failed to yield. The pursuit proceeded into Irvine, where the driver ran several red lights and drove at dangerously high speeds. Eventually, with the assistance of air support from HB-1 (Huntington Beach Police Department’s helicopter) and OCSD personnel, an NBPD officer conducted a Patrol Intervention Technique (PIT maneuver) to disable the Honda on McGaw Avenue near Gillette Avenue. 

Then the driver proceeded to start to smoke methamphetamine from a pipe before exiting the vehicle. A search of his car later revealed meth and a meth pipe inside.  

The driver, later identified as Tuan Dinh Nguyen, 32, Santa Ana, initially lied about his identity to officers. He was eventually charged with taking an auto without the owner’s consent, evading peace officers with wanton disregard, possession of a controlled substance, possession of unlawful paraphernalia and a warrant related to receiving stolen property.

Nguyen’s bail was set at $50,000.

Teen makes himself at home while owners out of town

At some undetermined time on Sunday, March 18, Jonathan Villa, 18, of Los Angeles, entered an unoccupied home in the 1500 block of E. Bay Avenue. Villa stayed overnight while the homeowners were out of town and used the shower, ate food from the kitchen and gathered up a number of items that he intended to remove from the house.

A neighbor contacted NBPD to report suspicious activity and Villa was arrested at 7:58 a.m. on Monday, March 19.

He was held on $50,000 bail for residential burglary with no forced entry.

Scroll down to Police Beat for all arrests & crime reports


Photographer’s work is on display at JWA

From March 20 - April 19, photography by Stephanie Hager will be on display at John Wayne Airport (JWA) as part of JWA’s Community Focus Space Program.

These works can be viewed on the Departure (upper) Level near security screening areas in Terminals A, B and C, and on the Arrival (lower) Level adjacent to Baggage Carousels 1 and 4.

Sunset over Catalina

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Photo by Stephanie Hager/

Courtesy of John Wayne Airport

Sunset over Catalina by Stephanie Hager

“Ms. Hager’s work displayed at John Wayne Airport will engage the viewers’ senses,” said Orange County Board of Supervisors Chairman Andrew Do. “Her world-class photography will be a delight for travelers.”

Hager’s photography is known for having a bold feeling with vibrant energy and clean lines. The negative space provides the observer room for thought.

“My goal is to have the viewer feel something new and unique to themselves through the use of light, color and patterns,” Hager said. 

The photographer graduated with a degree in photo communications from California State University, Fullerton and was fortunate to have studied with some of the top photographers in the United States.

Hager has been a professional photographer for more than 25 years and has worked with advertising and editorial clients photographing outdoor adventure sports and lifestyle, portraiture, architecture and landscapes.


On the Harbor: Catching up with my good friend Mark Gaudio 

By LEN BOSE

I picked up the phone this week and called my good friend Mark Gaudio for an interview. If you have ever raced a Sabot, Lido 14, Harbor 20 or Cal 20 the name should be familiar to you.

Gaudio was first introduced to the harbor in the ‘60s by his father, Ed, who first owned a 20-foot Glasspar powerboat. “I remember doing speed circles in the Back Bay with my dad,” Gaudio said. His father was an electrician and after working on a house on Lido Isle, the owner gave him the old Sabot on the side of the house. “I think I was six and my father had painted the boat with some sort of latex house paint in some ‘60s color. We rigged the boat up and went sailing. Just about the time we reached the Lido Isle Yacht Club, we gybed the boat, while dad was sitting on the main sheet, and we flipped the boat,” Gaudio explained.

The Gaudio family was very active in the Orange Coast Yacht Club, which had its clubhouse at the American Legion. Later, the club would merge with the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club and the Gaudios where there for the groundbreaking of the clubhouse now located on Bayside. “I have a photo of dad somewhere with him planting a shovel into the ground on the club grounds.”

Gaudio recalled fond memories on the harbor now lost in time. “We used to sail our boat over to Shark Island, now Linda Isle, and play Army. From there we would walk over the Pacific Coast Highway bridge to Will Wrights for ice cream. Summer days seemed to have the wind blowing 10 knots out of the west. We could pull our boats up onto a beach at the Fun Zone and goof around there, or we would sail up to the 19th Street beach and go to Tasty Freeze. Sometimes Phil Ramming and I would just fill our boats with water balloons and throw them at people on Balboa Island. You cannot do that now, but it sure was a lot of fun then,” Gaudio recalled.

Mark and Len

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Photo by Joysailing.com

(L-R): Mark Gaudio and Len Bose

Today, Gaudio spends most of his time on the harbor coaching sabot sailors. During the summer he has more requests for coaching than he can handle, while during the winter he coaches Friday afternoons for BCYC and gives private lessons on Saturdays. He is the go-to guy when it comes to finding the racing sabot our just tuning one up. “Tuning a sabot is all about mast rake, leeboard angle and a vertical rudder,” Gaudio said. Most sailors in the harbor who have been coached by him recall the words: “Get off your knees.”

I asked Gaudio what are the dos and don’ts for sabot parents? “Parents can be overly competitive, which can lead to performance anxiety at the wrong time. Sailing is a hard sport, with many variables, weather included, it can be frustrating…sometimes physical, but mostly mental. Once a kid starts moving up, stay away from move up itis,” Gaudio said.

Gaudio explained that one of his concerns today is that there is too much focus on racing, with not enough attention on just harbor exploring and having fun. There are some kids out there today that will not leave the dock without a coach. In the end game he feels that this is hurting our sport.

So, before we ended the interview I asked for some simple bits of advice that I can write on my notepad. “Don’t pinch in light air, keep the boat moving, always look around to assess your competition. The wind in our harbor is the trickiest when it is coming out of the southwest with a bearing from 200 to 245 degrees, when you should focus on connecting the dots. When the wind is left at 200 degrees, consider going left; when it is right of 240 degrees, consider the right side of the course. Remember that you have a lot of traffic in the harbor to stay away from, and he always reminds his students to anticipate the high odds maneuvers of competitors.

This Saturday, the Harbor 20 fleet will be racing in the Earl Corkett Regatta out of the Newport Harbor Yacht Club. At BYC, the Lido 14s will be gathering on Sunday for the Harry Wood Regatta. And, the PHRF fleet will be sailing out of BCYC to Catalina on Saturday and returning on Sunday in the Bogart Race.

Keep it fun everyone.

Sea ya! 

~~~~~~~~

Len Bose is a yachting enthusiast, yacht broker and harbor columnist for StuNewsNewport.


Newport Beach’s Laura Oatman drops out of congressional race, endorses Harley Rouda

Newport Beach business owner and architect Laura Oatman dropped out of the race for California’s 48th Congressional District yesterday, endorsing technology entrepreneur and Democratic businessman Harley Rouda.

Recent public polling from Fight Back CA indicated that Oatman was tied with Rouda for the lead among Democratic challengers to Rep Dana Rohrabacher. She had also been backed by several prominent progressive groups, including Democracy for America, Justice Democrats and Our Revolution.

Laura and harley

Submitted photo

Newport Beach’s Laura Oatman endorses Harley Rouda

Calling for Democratic unity, Oatman released the following statement: “I am hoping all local activists…can now unite into one mighty force, and we can work together to get Dana out. I am calling on all six other Democratic candidates to do the same; this is not about any one of us. This is about all of us.

“I know Harley will be a strong and effective leader working to move us forward, from protecting our pristine coastline to fighting for Medicare for ALL, to tackling gun violence, to investing more in renewable energy like wind and solar and working to create more good-paying jobs. Orange County residents need a Congressman who will work hard for them, and after campaigning alongside him for over a year now, I am confident Harley is the right person for the job.”

Rouda expressed his gratitude for the endorsement by stating: “I am deeply grateful for this support from Laura Oatman, a widely respected progressive and environmental leader from our community. I look forward to campaigning with Laura throughout the 48th District in weeks and months ahead. In Congress, I will be an advocate for and champion of Laura’s Envision America 2050 Plan, which aims to create more good jobs and solve climate change.”


Newport Beach tops the list in the “10 Best Places to Visit in 2018” by Livability.com

NB Pier Claudine

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Photo by Claudine Corr

Newport Beach Pier, an iconic city landmark

Newport Beach has topped the list in the “10 Best Places to Visit in 2018” by Livability.com.

Livability editors looked at more than 2,000 cities across the country to determine the 10 Best Places to Visit this year. Their ranking took into account important criteria like each city’s entertainment industry, cultural offerings and number of golf courses and parks, along with ease of transportation, crime rates, and average hot and cold temperatures throughout the year.

“The 2018 Best Places to Visit list includes a really fun mix of famous vacation destinations and off-the-beaten-path gems for any travel style and budget,” said Winona Dimeo-Ediger, Livability.com managing editor. “Whether you’re looking for relaxation of adventure, these great cities will help you make the most of your vacation days.”

According to Livability.com, scoring the coveted No. 1 spot on their list of Best Places to Visit in 2018, Newport Beach is a city that truly has it all – beautiful weather, outdoor adventure, golf, shopping, dining and cultural attractions galore. With 10 miles of coastline and a year-round Mediterranean climate, the community lays claim to Newport Harbor, the largest recreational harbor on the west coast, along with some of the best southern California surf spots that draw professional surfers from as far away as Australia and Hawaii. According to Visit Newport Beach, the area’s most famous place to see spectacular surf is The Wedge, located at 2172 E. Oceanfront, featuring massive waves most certainly not suitable for novice surfers.

“Newport Beach is a seaside holiday retreat beloved by millions of people around the world,” said Gary Sherwin, president and CEO of Newport Beach & Company. “A jewel of the southern California coastline, Newport Beach enjoys nearly year-round sunshine, which inspires an al fresco lifestyle of outdoor activities on the west coast’s largest recreational harbor, as well as dockside dining and shopping. With 10 unique and distinct neighborhoods and a calendar of special events, including the star-studded Newport Beach Film Festival, there is something for everyone.”

For more information, visit www.livability.com.


CdM Chamber Sunset Mixer at Avila’s

All are invited to attend the Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce’s Sunset Networking Mixer on Wednesday, March 28 from 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. at Avila’s El Ranchito in Corona del Mar.

Avilas

Courtesy of CdM Chamber of Commerce

Join Chamber members and community friends for an annual mixer filled with celebrations and festivities at the legendary Avila’s El Ranchito. This is an ideal opportunity to enjoy a glass of wine or a popular margarita and light tray-passed appetizers while sharing your business’ products or services with others.

Cost: The first glass of wine/beer or a margarita is complimentary (special $5 price thereafter). Chamber members are free; non-members are $10.

Avila’s El Ranchito is located at 2515 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. There is parking in the back of the restaurant and on the street. No RSVP is necessary.

For more information, contact the Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce at 949.673.4050, or visit www.CdmChamber.com.


New parking payment system at JWA

John Wayne Airport (JWA) has recently upgraded its parking system with Near Field Communication (NFC) capability as well as Europay, MasterCard® and Visa® EMV chip technology. This new system will provide an additional level of security to credit card transactions as well as enhance the parking experience by providing multiple payment options for JWA guests including the ability to use Apple Pay.

Guests may select either a ticket or ticketless option to enter JWA parking facilities.

Parking machine

For the ticket option, simply press the button on the parking entry kiosk to receive a ticket. Guests will use the same ticket for payment when exiting the parking facility.

Guests preferring a paperless route may use their credit card with a chip or the contactless Apple Pay feature for entry. The same credit card used upon entry must be used to exit the parking facility. Using the credit card or Apple Pay options eliminates the need for a ticket.

John Wayne Airport recommends that guests use the visual guides next to the machines and follow the prompts on the kiosk screen for assistance. Each parking facility has a staffed booth at each exit plaza should guests need additional assistance.

The new parking system upgrade provides additional security enhancements for airport guests using a credit card with a chip or Apple Pay. These options were not previously available. Cash, Visa, MasterCard, Discover Card and American Express are accepted in all airport parking locations.


New exhibition celebrates Dr. Seuss’ “Collection of Unorthodox Taxidermy”

“If I Ran the Zoo,” a new exhibition featuring Dr. Seuss’ little-known “Collection of Unorthodox Taxidermy,” and unveiling the world premiere of his “Powerless Puffer,” takes place at Lahaina Galleries on Saturday, March 24 with a free special opening reception from 4 - 7 p.m.

Eighty years have passed since Dr. Seuss produced what he called his “Collection of Unorthodox Taxidermy,” an amazing menagerie of Seussian animals often constructed from real animal beaks, antlers, horns, lions’ teeth, rabbit ears and turtle shells. In a long forgotten 1938 article featuring his extraordinary taxidermy sculptures, Look magazine dubbed Dr. Seuss “The World’s Most Eminent Authority on Unheard-Of Animals.”

Seuss and sculpture

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Courtesy of Lahaina Galleries

Celebrating the release of Dr. Seuss’s “Powerless Puffer” – the final Marine Muggs cast-resin sculpture in the “Collection of Unorthodox Taxidermy” – the traveling exhibition is being launched to feature all 17 of these incomparable artworks. This new exhibition, “If I Ran the Zoo,” marks the first time all 17 sculptures have been presented together in an exhibition dedicated to Dr. Seuss’ sculptural heritage.

The exhibition highlights Dr. Seuss’ little-known sculptural legacy and spotlights the fascinating correlations between his two-dimensional artworks and three-dimensional sculpture. A featured example of this relationship will be presented as a special tour edition, re-created from Ted Geisel’s 1931 pen and ink drawing depicting two gentlemen in tuxedos and top hats, unsuccessfully attempting to hunt down more than 25 wonderfully Seussian animals.

The Art of Dr. Seuss Collection is relatively unknown by the general public, however, art aficionados have avidly followed and collected estate-authorized editions from the collection for nearly two decades. More than half of the collection’s 17 taxidermy sculptures are sold out, making the exhibit’s premiere of the “Powerless Puffer” an enormous event for art collectors and fine art galleries around the world.

At a recent exhibition dedicated to Theodor Seuss Geisel’s artwork, collection curator Bill Dreyer spoke directly about these artworks: “Originally created in the 1930s during Ted Geisel’s most prolific sculpting phase, Dr. Seuss’ little-known collection of taxidermy rivals some of the hippest postmodern sculpture on the art scene today. Without question, the Unorthodox Taxidermy is a gem of Dr. Seuss’ career, and the authorized estate editions have become one of the most exciting and collectible elements of his entire artistic legacy. Kudos to those who have recognized these avant-garde creations as important and substantial artistic contributions from one of the world’s most important literary icons.”

“The Wonderful World of Dr. Seuss,” Robert Cahn’s July 6, 1957 Saturday Evening Post article said it best, “Ted’s animals are the sort you’d like to take home to meet the family.”

The exhibit will remain on display through April 15. To RSVP to the opening night reception, call 949.721.9117, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Lahaina Galleries is located at 1173 Newport Center Drive in Fashion Island, Newport Beach. www.lahainagalleries.com.


Wine & Shine event at Levik’s Jewelers

You’re invited to a Wine & Shine party at Levik’s Jewelers by the Cove on Saturday, March 24 from 4 - 8 p.m. in the Crystal Cove Shopping Center.

Wine shine event

Come enjoy complimentary wine and appetizers as you browse the trunk show.

RSVP to 949.715.3899.

Crystal Cove Shopping Center is located at 7882 E. Coast Highway, Newport Coast.


National Library Week is coming in April

Enjoy a week’s worth of exciting events and happenings at the Newport Beach Public Library during National Library Week taking place April 8 - 14.

Check out these happenings!

Underground Railroad

Photos courtesy of Newport Beach Public Library

The Underground Railroad by author Colson Whitehead makes for a lively book discussion

Book Discussion Group: April 11 at 9 a.m., Central Library Friends Room – The book group is discussing The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead. All are welcome and the event is free. Sponsored by the Newport Beach Library Foundation.

Shakespeare Reading Group: April 11 at 10 a.m., Central Library Sword Room – UCI Professor of English Andrea Henderson will be moderating this reading group in the discussion of Hamlet on April 11, 18, 25 and May 2, 9, 16 and 23. Registration is required. Call 949.717.3818.

Annie Banannie with balloons

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Meet storyteller and balloon lady, Annie Banannie

Annie Banannie’s Balloon Comedy Show: April 11 at 3:30 p.m., Balboa Branch Library – Audience volunteers help Annie tell fabulous stories with lots of balloon surprises along the way. The mind-blowing finale? The giant six-foot-balloon!

 

Author Annie Spence

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Photo by Alicia Gbur

Annie Spence, author of Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks

Meet the Author: Annie Spence: April 12 from 7 - 8:30 p.m., Central Library Friends Room – Writer/librarian Annie Spence brings her sense of humor to this presentation on her laugh-out-loud collection of love letters to her favorite books in her heart-warming book, Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks: A Librarian’s Love Letters and Break Up Notes to the Books in Her Life. Books will be available for purchase and signing. Admission is free and seating is on a first-come, first-served basis which is limited by room capacity.

Physics Fun!: April 14 at 11 a.m., Central Library Friends Room – Prepare to be amazed by physics teacher James Lincoln as he demonstrates various scientific phenomena, and kids enjoy hands-on experiments.

Wild Wonders boa

Check out this boa at Wild Wonders

Wild Wonders: April 14 at 3 p.m. at Mariners Branch Library – Kids of all ages are wild about live animals, especially in this “Walk on the Wildside” experience. See live animals! Children must be accompanied by an adult. No registration is required. First-come, first-served basis which is limited by capacity.

For more information, visit www.newportbeachlibrary.org.


Guest Column

Will O’Neill

The Blurred Line Between Tax Education and Tax Advocacy

Will O'Neill

Newport Beach Mayor Pro Tem Will O’Neill

After Stanton residents voted to increase their own sales tax, the city’s Finance Director crowed to his fellow municipal finance directors about his city’s successful campaign. According to his article, the only thing that “went wrong” was that Stanton “didn’t suppress the opposition with one-on-one meetings early.”  

Cities throughout our State have been using Orwellian tactics to “suppress” opposition to tax increases through coordinated and premeditated “education campaigns.” These campaigns operate in a grey legal area because each campaign uses public resources to accomplish its goals.

The California Supreme Court in Stanson v. Mott stated resolutely that “a fundamental precept of this nation’s democratic electoral process is that the government may not ‘take sides’ in election contests or bestow an unfair advantage on one of several competing factions.” The Supreme Court in Vargas v. City of Salinas then created its own grey area exception by allowing governmental entities to express publicly an opinion on the merits of a ballot measure so long as the governmental entity “does not expend public funds to mount a campaign on the measure.”

Cities undeterred by the Stanson prohibition or blinded by their own fiscal desperation of their own making have driven Mack trucks through the Vargas limited exception. Cities throughout our State are hiring political campaign consultants or public relations firms to “educate” the public on the cities’ opinion. At what point, though, do campaigns move from education to advocacy?

In 2010, for example, the City of Tracy hired political campaign consultant Lew Edwards in connection with a sales tax increase. According to the consultant’s presentation, the consultant conducted a poll to determine “campaign messaging,” draft the “ballot arguments,” and create the “ballot question wording.” The City then sent “education materials” to voters through broadcast television and City-created newsletters, presentations, emails, and even sent the materials through utility bill inserts.  

Campaign consultants respond to cities’ requests for proposal by touting their “wins” or “successes,” which they define by whether a tax measure passes. One consultant bragged that it has “enacted more than $30 Billion in California revenue measures with a success rate of 94 percent.” Another consultant bragged that its “competitive strength” is that “we WIN.” Where the objective is supposedly public education, though, winning and losing or success and failure cannot be measured by ballot box results.

Enough is enough. Cities must stop using tax dollars to advocate under the thinly veiled guise of education.  

The City of Newport Beach recently passed a resolution prohibiting public expenditure on these “education” campaigns. We invite other City leaders to use our resolution as a model. We also invite residents throughout the State to demand that their leaders stop hiring campaign consultants who view tax increases as “wins.”  

Will O’Neill is Mayor Pro Tem of the City of Newport Beach. He will gladly provide anyone a copy of the City’s Resolution and can be contacted at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Friends of the Library to host book sale this weekend

Friends of the Library will host a book sale this weekend, March 24 - 25, at the Corona del Mar Branch Library, located at 420 Marigold Avenue, Corona del Mar.

The sale will give community members one last chance to visit the branch building before demolition, as well as the opportunity to purchase books at bargain prices.

Friends

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Newport Beach Public Library

(L-R): Friends of the Library Roberta Luque, Judy Kelly and Amy Hunt prepare for the book sale at the Corona del Mar Branch Library

On Saturday, the sale will be held from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. with hardback books on sale at two for $1 and paperbacks four for $1. On Sunday, from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m., bargain hunters will be able to pick up a bag of books for $2. Proceeds from the sale will fund future library collections and programs.

During the construction period, customers will be able to use services at Central Library or concierge services at OASIS Senior Center for pickup and return of materials.

Existing holds set for pickup at Corona del Mar have been re-routed to Central Library. Customers can change their desired pickup location by accessing their account online or by contacting the Library.

Storytimes will be held on Tuesday mornings at 10:30 a.m. and Thursday mornings at 11:45 a.m. at Grant Howald Park’s Community Youth Center beginning April 10. A complete schedule of Central Library storytimes is available on the library website at www.newportbeachlibrary.org.

For more information on Newport Beach Public Library resources and programs, contact the Library at 949.717.3800, option 2, or visit the website.


Free Fun ahead in April at Argyros Plaza

Argyros Plaza

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of scfta.org

Prepare to dance this April, because things are about to start hopping and shakin’ on the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza at Segerstrom Center for the Arts. Among the exciting free events planned is the final Swing Dance Lesson from a series that started in March and a Sip & Swing! Party on April 15 for anyone with all the right moves.

On April 14, the Center invites everyone from around Orange County to extend a heartfelt welcome to the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater on its return to the Center. Revelations Celebration! is a joyful community dance event where hundreds gather on the Plaza to learn signature Ailey dance movements and participate in a grand finale, performing a portion of Alvin Ailey’s beloved work, Revelations. Brilliance: A Night of Music and Light puts the Argyros Plaza in a whole new light! Visitors are encouraged to dress in vibrant colors that will glow and reflect in the special lighting effects planned for this luminescent evening. And for a final note – continue the Argyros Plaza evenings with Live Band Karaoke with Casual Encounters Karaoke.

Schedule of Events:

Swing at Six on Friday, April 6 from 6 - 7 p.m.

Sip & Swing! Party on Sunday, April 15 from 5 - 7 p.m. (Immediately preceding “Postmodern Jukebox” at 7 p.m. in the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, a ticketed event.) The final class in the Center’s Swing Dance lessons that started in March takes place on April 6 from 6 - 7 p.m. All in preparation for the Center’s big Sip & Swing! Party on Sunday, April 15 from 5 - 7 p.m. Martin Parker of Dance Scene Dance Studio in Costa Mesa will teach the West Coast Swing. Then on April 15, it’s all swank, swing and sway to the live music of Dave Stuckey & The Hot House Gang. All experience levels are welcome! Come dressed in your best for the chance to win the Dapper Costume Contest. 

Revelations Celebration! on Saturday, April 14 from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. You’re in for a revelation, indeed – an Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Revelations Celebration! In anticipation of the Ailey’s April 19 - 22 performances in Segerstrom Hall, the Center and AAADT invite the entire community, dance fans and novices, to celebrate the joy of dance and learn signature Ailey movement and choreography from members of the company. It all culminates with a grand community dance where everyone can show off their new Ailey moves as they perform a portion of Alvin Ailey’s classic work, Revelations.

Brilliance: A Night of Music and Light on Saturday, April 21 from 7 - 10 p.m. Celebrating World Creativity and Innovation Day, when the sun goes down you can help to transform the Argyros Plaza into a world of light and color. Gather your friends, wear your favorite light-up or glow-in-the-dark accessories and enjoy a free concert with L.A.’s De Lux, a post-disco dance-punk DIY duo fresh from the South by Southwest Music. De Lux sounds like they could have come out of 1979 or 1982 just as easily as 2013. Take a break in the Center’s light painting booth, try some luminescent face paint and revive yourself with something from the Center 360 Café. At the end of the end, drive home safely with Uber. First-time users, some the Promo Code “SCFTA” and get up to $15 off your ride.

Live Band Karaoke with the Close Encounters on Saturday, April 28 from 6 - 9 p.m. Pick a song, nearly any song, because live band karaoke is back on the Argyros Plaza. Make it a meet up or your own “So You Think You Can Sing” party. Sing out, Orange County!

The Julianne and George Argyros Plaza at Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.scfta.org, or call 714.556.2787.


Villa Real Estate launches new mobile app

Villa Real Estate, one of Orange County’s leading luxury real estate firms, has unveiled a new mobile app to make home shopping easier than ever. The free app, simply named Villa Real Estate, allows home shoppers to search for a home using a variety of criteria, as well as search for a Villa agent based on their areas of expertise.

The Villa Real Estate app offers home searches from the location, size and price, to features such as fireplaces, pools, waterfront properties, and other amenities, for a more in-depth home search. The app refreshes every 10 minutes with current listings directly from the MLS.

Villa app

Submitted photo

Users can swipe to the right on homes they like, or swipe left on homes that don’t fit their needs, to remove those properties from future searches. Home shoppers can tap on home to get more details and information on the property, and even sync open homes to their phone’s calendar.

Home buyers can also mark their favorite listings, share them with others via email or text message, schedule a showing at the click of a button, and communicate with their agent via in-app messaging. The Villa Real Estate app is available for both iOS and Android users. 

“At Villa, we pride ourselves on offering our agents and home shoppers with the latest technology and marketing tools for the best possible real estate experience, regardless if they are buying or selling a home,” said Brittney Champieux, director of marketing at Villa Real Estate, which also recently launched a new website with powerful search criteria. “Our new app provides detailed and accurate information on listings in real time, making home searching an easier process.”

For more information, visit www.villarealestate.com.


Farm to Fork: A Foodie’s Point of View Fork

By LANA JOHNSON

Easter Brunch and more…enjoy the “hunt” for Springtime fare and some surprises, too!

Easter Sunday, coming April 1, is just right around the corner, so here’s a round-up of Newport Beach restaurants offering Easter dining, with a mélange of creative, fresh ingredients on the menu to savor with friends and family. Make your reservations now to secure seating.

Easter Bunny at Back Bay Bistro

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Back Bay Bistro

A visit from the Easter Bunny with some “big kids” at Back Bay Bistro

Back Bay Bistro, overlooking Upper Newport Bay, is serving Sunday brunch from 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. (the last reservation is accepted at 1:30 p.m.)  Enjoy signature breakfast dishes with a build-you-own omelet station, a carving station featuring honey-glazed ham and New York strip steak, a seafood station with King Crab legs, and an array of desserts, including white and milk chocolate fountains. Cost: Adults, $79 which includes bottomless Champagne and mimosas; Children 12 years of age and under, $38. Kids, young and “grown-up,” can expect a special visit from the Easter Bunny! Reservations are recommended. 1131 Back Bay Bistro Drive, Newport Beach (at Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort). Call 949.729.1144. www.NewportDunes.com/bistro

Cucina Enoteca, a California-inspired Italian kitchen and wine shop, featuring Italian classics with a modern twist, is offering an all-you-can-eat buffet from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Cost: Adults, $45; Children, 12 years of age and younger are $18. 951 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach. Outdoor dining available. Call 949.706.1416. www.urbankitchengroup.com

Fig & Olive, known for the best olive oils, flavors and cuisine from the Riviera and Coastal regions of the South of France, Italy and Spain, is offering s prix fixe menu from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Cost: $42 per person. 151 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach. Call 949.877.3005. www.figandolive.com

Fashion Island Hotel, where it’s time to round up the family and hop over for an Easter feast and fashionable fun! They’re transforming the Ballroom into a colorful Easter wonderland with live entertainment, kids’ face painting and egg decorating, pictures with the Easter Bunny and a family photo to capture all the fun memories. The bountiful brunch buffet features favorites like made-to-order crepes, seasonal salads, tasty desserts and a selection of kids’ favorites. And what’s an Easter celebration without an egg-citing egg hunt on the front lawn? Seatings take place at 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Cost: Adults: $80; Children ages 5 - 12, $20. Youngsters four years of age and under are free. Pricing includes tax and gratuity. 690 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach. Call 949.760.4913. www.FashionIslandHotel.com

Fashion Island Hotel candy

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Submitted photo

Confectionery fun at the Fashion Island Hotel

Five Crowns, a Corona del Mar dining icon, is serving brunch from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. and dinner from 4 - 8 p.m. Experience world-class hospitality while indulging in special three-course menus featuring holiday favorites and classic accompaniments courtesy of Executive Chef Alejandra Padilla. Both brunch and dinner prix-fixe menus highlight succulent starters such as lobster bisque with crème fraîche and Pride of the Crowns salad with bacon, toasted walnuts, gruyere and herbs de Provence dressing. Mouthwatering mains feature crab benedict with poached eggs, béarnaise and truffled potatoes on the brunch menu and seared salmon with leek soubise, zucchini, artichokes, dill and garlic chips on the dinner menu. Choose from decadent dessert options including Meyer lemon beignets during brunch and crème brûlée with champagne berries at dinner. Cost: Brunch: $38 - $85; Dinner: $44 - $85. Beverages, tax and tip are additional. 3801 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. Call 949.760.0331. www.lawrysonline.com

Five Crowns Salmon

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Submitted photo

Seared salmon with leek soubise, zucchini, artichokes and garlic chips is on the Easter dinner menu at Five Crowns

Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar, with a commitment to seasonal ingredients, is known for USDA Prime beef and its award-winning wine list of 100 wines by the glass. Enjoy a three-course brunch from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Cost: Adults, $50; Children, 12 years of age and younger are $16. 455 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach. Call 949.720.9633. www.flemingsteakhouse.com

Great Maple Libations and Seasonal Plates, with its appreciation for seasonal produce, responsible seafood and farm fresh meats, is serving Easter specials from 10 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Outdoor dining available. 1133 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach. Call 949.706.8282. www.thegreatmaple.com

Oak Grill Fireside Patio at the Fashion Island Hotel will be brimming with holiday brunch selections to make the Easter Bunny proud. Guests can start their morning by visiting the build-your-own-omelet station or the pancake bar. For seafood lovers, “on the water” offers oysters, shrimp and a build-your-own-poke station. There are plenty of straight-from-the-farm salads, as well as a chef’s carving corner serving up meats and fish such as herb-roasted chicken and whole planked salmon. Kids will love all the live-action stations, but there are chicken tenders, hot dogs and other favorites too. Sweet temptations include vanilla bean cupcakes, lemon panna cotta, Oreo cheesecake and strawberry lemonade cake. To quench holiday thirsts, Hydrate is pouring bottomless mimosas, with Bloody Mary’s and margaritas at an additional charge. Cost: Adults: $90; Children ages 5 - 12, $25. Youngsters four years of age and under are free. Pricing excludes tax and gratuity. 690 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach. Call 949.760.4920. www.oakgrilnb.com

Red O Mexican Taste of Mexico, featuring Chef Rick Bayless’ signature Mexican cuisine with a lighter California-infused menu is presenting a buffet from 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Cost: Adults, $49; Children, 6 years of age and under are $15. 250 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach. Call 949.718.0300. www.redorestaurant.com

Pelican Hill Easter Egg Hunt

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Courtesy of Pelican Hill Resort

Youngsters delight in the Easter egg hunt and a visit from the Easter Bunny at Pelican Hill Resort, with panoramic Pacific Ocean vistas

The Resort at Pelican Hill is offering myriad dining choices from brunch to dinner and a featured lounge menu. 22701 Pelican Hill Road South, Newport Coast. Call 949.467.6833. www.pelicanhill.com

Traditional Easter Brunch in Mar Vista’s Grand Ballroom from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Let the little ones partake in the Easter egg hunt, then visit with the Easter Bunny! Executive Chef Jean-Pierre Dubray presents traditional brunch favorites, accented with California and Tuscan flavors. Easter egg hunts begin at 9:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Cost: Adults: $128; Children, ages 5 - 12, $60; Complimentary for children under age 5. Prices exclude tax and service charge.

Easter at Andrea Ristorante from 12 - 3 p.m. and 5 - 10 p.m. This traditional Easter feast is a prix fixe tasting menu from Chef Troy. Enjoy his award-winning Northern Italian cuisine, along with fine wines from regions throughout Italy. Bring the whole family for a three-course lunch from 12 - 3 p.m. or a four-course dinner from 5 - 10 p.m.

Cost: Lunch - Adults: $95; Children, 12 and under, $50; Dinner - Adults: $130; Children, 12 and under, $65. Prices exclude tax and service charge.

Easter at Pelican Grill. Chef Marc always has a few tricks up his sleeve, and he’s creating a special selection of á la carte dishes for Easter at Pelican Grill from 10:30 a.m. - 10 p.m., for Easter specials and a featured lounge menu. 

Coliseum French Toast

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Courtesy of Pelican Hill Resort

The French toast is an Easter show-stopper at Coliseum Pool & Grill

Easter Breakfast at Coliseum Pool & Grill. Bring the entire family down to Coliseum Pool & Grill, as Chef Diego creates an extraordinary breakfast buffet. All of your favorites will be on display for breakfast from 7 a.m. - 2 p.m., and then they’ll feature á la carte Easter dinner specials into the night. Cost: Adults: $65; Children, 12 and under, $30 for the breakfast buffet; complimentary for children under age 5.

The Winery

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Courtesy of The Winery Restaurant & Wine Bar

A toast to Easter at The Winery Restaurant & Wine Bar

The Winery Restaurant & Wine Bar, on Mariner’s Mile with views of the harbor, will be offering a three-course menu, courtesy of Chef Yvon Goetz, from 10:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Starters include Main lobster bisque, Santa Barbra smoked salmon and wild jumbo shrimp cocktail, among others; entrees such as The Winery eggs benedict and braised short rib hash & fried eggs or the grilled Mary’s chicken sandwich are sure to please; and end with sweet Pastry Chef’s petit fours. Enhance your brunch experience with The Winery seafood tower or Tsar Nicoulai reserve caviar and endless bubbles! Cost for the three-course brunch: $46.95 per guest, excludes tax and gratuity. 3131 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach. Call 949.999.6622. www.thewinerynewport.com

Zinc Café & Market is serving Easter Brunch from 7 a.m. - 2 p.m. Order any of your breakfast favorites right off the menu. Specialties include French toast, breakfast burrito (bowl or wrap), Zinc waffle, huevos rancheros, baked spinach egg casserole, avocado toast and a banh mi sandwich, among others. While you’re there pick up some lemon shortbread chick & egg-shaped cookies baked in house and decorated with colored sugars and packaged in cellophane with a coordinated ribbon. You can also find Springtime basket stuffers such as artisan made chocolates and candies. Outside patio dining available. 3222 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. Call 949.719.9462. www.zinccafe.com

Happy Easter…

Ciao Vincenza!

 

Editor’s Note: This is the first in a two-part series on Easter dining.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Here’s your chance to show off your college pride…

especially those Loyola Ramblers

TomJohnson

Okay, so I was disappointed early in the NCAA March Madness basketball tournament when my team, Arizona, went down in the first round to, dare I say, Buffalo

As Joe Stapleton, an Arizona alum, who runs Spinnaker Investment Group and the Elite OC in Newport Beach told me, “We don’t pay Sean Miller (Arizona coach) $4 million a year to go out in the first round.”

I agree and disagree because I like Miller a lot. But all of this is beside the point. 

(B-t-w, in true disclosure, I did not attend Arizona, however, I paid for an education there for my daughter, so I feel I’m entitled.)

So, even with my team out, the tourney has still been fun to watch. This weekend we move through the rest of the Sweet Sixteen and into the Elite 8.

Here’s the deal, Stu News Newport wants you in your “rooting” college garb. So, identify yourselves by sending us a pic at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and make sure you provide caption names. The more the merrier. Maybe even some of you losers, like me, can still proudly post.

Paul Salata, wake up, I’ll need a picture of you, too, even though I’m thinking of barring NIT teams. Go Trojans!

Last night, the Loyola Ramblers beat the University of Nevada to advance. Loyola Chicago is an 11 seed and is shocking the college basketball world.

So, here’s what we’re going to do, as an added bonus: The first bonafide Newport Beach resident to send in a pic with Loyola Chicago garb (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) on gets a dinner for two at The Bungalow restaurant. I’ll figure out everything with their purveyor and friend Jim Walker.

Last night, the University of Michigan also advanced by easily beating Texas A&M. There have to be some Michigan fans out there. Other winners were Florida State over Gonzaga and Kansas State over Kentucky in a close one.

Tonight, it’s Clemson vs. Kansas, West Virginia vs. Villanova, Syracuse vs. Duke and Texas Tech vs. Purdue for their spots.

Who’s your team? Wear it proud! And don’t forget, send us your photo.

• • •

Don’t forget the Friends of the Library will be hosting their “closing for construction” book sale at the CdM Branch Library tomorrow to begin clearing it out. Here’s the deal: Saturday, March 24, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., paperbacks are four for $1 and hardbacks are two for $1. Sunday you can go back from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. and fill up a bag for $2.

The CdM Library is located at 420 Marigold Ave., Corona del Mar.

Run, don’t walk!

• • •

We recently reported that longtime Newport Harbor High School Football Coach Jeff Brinkley stepped down after 32 years. Well, Harbor has gone to the college coaching ranks for their next coach.

Introducing Peter Lofthouse, the former coach of San Diego Mesa College and Citrus College prior. Lofthouse is from Orange County (El Toro High graduate) and looks at the NHHS job as a way to bring his family back home.

Last year, Mesa College finished 9-2 and went on to a victory over Santa Ana College in the Southern California Bowl. Sounds like good news for NHHS to continue the tradition.

And, in case you’re wondering when he starts, he has. Spring practice is upon us.

• • •

Speaking of coaches, John Emme, baseball coach at Corona del Mar High School, posted this on Facebook earlier this week, “Today, I announced to my team I am retiring from coaching baseball at the end of the season. It has been a great run. The field/facility is done, the Hall of Fame is a fixture and the program is in good shape. I am looking forward to my boys making me proud for this one last run. Thanks for 21 great years CDM baseball. You got two-thirds of my adult life and I wouldn’t trade a moment.”

Under Emme, the Sea Kings won CIF Championships in 1999 and 2004.

He’ll certainly be tough to replace. 


CosmetiCare kicks off monthly “Custom You” series

COS

Submitted photo

Newport Beach-based CosmetiCare, one of Orange County’s leading cosmetic surgery centers and medspas, will launch a new “Custom You” event series on Thursday, March 29 from 5 - 7 p.m. The new series will highlight a different treatment area each month while educating attendees about the various treatment options available.

This month’s topic, “All About Skin,” will demonstrate how to combat the harsh elements of winter that take a toll on skin during colder, drier months.  

This exclusive experience will give attendees a chance to learn from CosmetiCare’s industry-leading experts and discover the services available to keep skin more refreshed and revitalized. Attendees can also enjoy champagne, giveaways, exclusive discounts on skincare treatments and more.

Upon arriving, guests can have their photos taken and receive a free photo simulation of cosmetic treatments to tackle their problem areas. Space is limited and an RSVP is required. Call 949.718,.6900 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to RSVP.

CosmetiCare will offer exclusive discounts on products or procedures for those who RSVP.

CosmetiCare is located at 1101 Bayside Drive, Suite 200, Newport Beach. For more information about “Custom You,” visit cosmeticare.com/custom-you-event.


Check out these Spirit Run top winners…and some memorable moments

The 35th Annual Spirit Run, which took place on Sunday, March 18 at Fashion Island, produced some pretty terrific winners as well as memorable moments for all who participated, and/or came out to root on their favorite runners and walkers!

Congratulations to these top winners (and to all those who joined in a day of fun and fitness.)

 

ADULTS

1st Male Overall 

10k - Roosevelt Cook

5k - Daniel Herrera

15k - Roosevelt Cook

Open Mile - Taylor Huseman

Elite Mile - Daniel Herrera

Dog Mile – Eric Dyson

 

2nd Male Overall 

10k - Jose Madera

5k - Jorge Jabas

15k - Jose Maders

Open Mile -  Logan Yu

Elite Mile – Reid Buchanan

Dog Mile – Sean Gildea

 

3rd Male Overall 

10k - JJ Santana

5k - Roosevelt Cook

15k - JJ Santana

Open Mile - Dalton Seckinger

Elite Mile -  Mikey Davila

Dog Mile - Mike Erlanson

 

1st Female Overall 

10k - Shelby Buckley

5k - Margo Malone

15k - Juie Ertel

Open Mile - Olivia Huseman

Elite Mile - Ayla Granados

Dog Mile - Dana Ryan

 

2nd Female Overall 

10k - Mireya Vargas

5k - Maya Weigel

15k - Sue Davis

Open Mile - Donna Mills Honarvar

Elite Mile - Maya Weigel

Dog Mile - Sarah Reyna

 

3rd Female Overall 

10k - Gwendolen Twist

5k - Ayla Granados

15k - Barbara George Thomson

Open Mile - Tania Fischer

Elite Mile - Sandie Raines

Dog Mile - Jennifer Mammel

 

YOUTH

1st Male Overall 

5k - Dmitriy Major

Dog Mile (ages 13 - 18) - David Kennett

Open Mile (ages 13 - 18) - Grant Sweningson

Youth Mile (ages 11 - 12) - Zachary Blum

Youth Mile (ages 9 - 10) - Inban Kathiravan

Youth Mile (age 7) - Owen Lewis

 

2nd Male Overall 

5k - Zeid Hussain

Dog Mile (ages 13 - 18) - N/A

Open Mile (ages 13 - 18) - Dmitriy Major

Youth Mile (ages 11 - 12) - Aidan Yohn

Youth Mile (ages 9 - 10) - Iniyan Kathiravan

Youth Mile (age 7) - Xavier Martinez

 

3rd Male Overall 

5k - Seth Loomis

Dog Mile (ages 13 - 18) - N/A

Open Mile (ages 13 - 18) - Jacob Krantz

Youth Mile (ages 11 - 12) - John Uchytil

Youth Mile (ages 9 - 10) - Akyut Kiklic

Youth Mile (age 7) - Alex Preston

 

1st Female Overall 

5k - Sofia Gibson

Dog Mile (ages 13 - 18) - Kara Pauley

Open Mile (ages 13 - 18) - Ashlee Gallegos

Youth Mile (ages 11 - 12) - Madison Ledgard

Youth Mile (ages 9 - 10) - Elizabeth Lam

Youth Mile (age 7) - Eva Steyvers

 

2nd Female Overall 

5k - Makensie Mcrae

Dog Mile (ages 13 - 18) - Carolyn Kennett

Open Mile (ages 13 - 18) - Leah Farris

Youth Mile (ages 11 - 12) - Britta Wolker

Youth Mile (ages 9 - 10) - Kayla Tasser

Youth Mile (age 7) - Gabrielle Park

 

3rd Female Overall 

5k - Jadyn Zdanavage

Dog Mile (ages 13 - 18) - Michelle Percival

Open Mile (ages 13 - 18) - Sarah Klem

Youth Mile - (ages 11 - 12) - Kadan Lichthardt

Youth Mile - (ages 9 - 10) - Summer Wilson

Youth Mile - (age 7) - Marie Escherich

 

1st Male Overall 

Youth Mile (age 8) - Thomas Yohn

Youth 1/2 Mile (age 5) - Arie Pamell

Youth 1/2 Mile (age 6) - Kendrik Barrington

Youth 1/4 Mile (age 4) -  Breckan Moore

 

2nd Male Overall 

Youth Mile (age 8) - Lucas Dinapoli

Youth 1/2 Mile (age 5) - Jack Escherich

Youth 1/2 Mile (age 6) - Nicholas Steiner

Youth 1/4 Mile (age 4) - Xavier Bocan

 

3rd Male Overall 

Youth Mile (age 8) - Luxton Sorrels

Youth 1/2 Mile (age 5) - Seth Morris

Youth 1/2 Mile (age 6) - Kellen Pizarro

Youth 1/4 Mile (age 4) - Mike Latorre

 

1st Female Overall 

Youth Mile (age 8) - Lia Mcallister

Youth 1/2 Mile (age 5) - Sophia Hernandez

Youth 1/2 Mile (age 6) - Audrey Mosich

Youth 1/4 Mile (age 4) -  Camila Melvin Torres

 

2nd Female Overall 

Youth Mile (age 8) - Megan Moher

Youth 1/2 Mile (age 5) - Amelia Treichler

Youth 1/2 Mile (age 6) - Gemma Dinapoli

Youth 1/4 Mile (age 4) - Rylee Chumo

 

3rd Female Overall 

Youth Mile (age 8) - June Pollock

Youth 1/2 Mile (age 5) - Kt Bland

Youth 1/2 Mile (age 6) - Khloe Lien

Youth 1/4 Mile (age 4) - Londyn Kerr

 

For a complete list of winners and race results, visit http://nmspiritrun.org. For the second consecutive year, Stu News is proud to be a Media Sponsor.

Check out these photos from the Spirit Run

Click on left side photo to see them all in a slideshow

Photos by Lana Johnson


Celebrate Springtime at Lido Marina Village

Eggs

Submitted photo

On Saturday, March 31 from 11:00 a.m. - 3 p.m., you’re invited to celebrate Spring at Lido Marina Village.

Head to the Main Deck for children’s crafts, a roving balloon artist and face painter, live music, sweet surprises in the Secret Alley and fresh flowers from French Buckets for sale.

Kids will make fun bunny tail bags and then follow Bunny Treat maps to receive candy from participating merchants. Expect tons of family-friendly fun to officially welcome Springtime to Lido.

Lido Marina Village is located at 3434 Via Oporto, Newport Beach. www.lidomarinavillge.com


Celebrate Easter at Newport Dunes…the hunt is on for 6,000 eggs!

Easter Egg Hunt

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Submitted photo

Newport Dunes’ Annual Easter Egg Hunt returns to the scenic waterfront resort on Saturday, March 31 beginning at 9 a.m. Hundreds of children will gather on the shores to search for more than 6,000 eggs containing goodies ranging from candy and toys to golden eggs containing cash prizes. One lucky kid will pick up an egg enclosed with a token for a new bicycle. The Easter Bunny himself will lead the hunt and be available for family photos. The hunt is free of charge.

Easter Sunday, April 1 at Newport Dunes begins with the renowned Sunrise Easter Service delivered by Mariners Church Pastor Tim Lukei at Pavilion E starting at 7 a.m.; enter at 101 Bayside Drive.

The service is followed by a gourmet Easter Brunch at Back Bay Bistro from 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. with signature breakfast dishes, a build-your-own omelet station, a carving station featuring honey glazed ham and New York strip steak, a seafood station with king crab legs, an array of desserts including white and milk chocolate fountains and more. Bottomless champagne and mimosas are included for adults, and children will enjoy a special visit from the Easter Bunny. Reservations are recommended.

For more information, visit www.NewportDunes.com. To make reservations for Easter Brunch at Back Bay Bistro, call 949.729.1144 or visit www.NewportDunes.com/bistro.

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort is located at 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach.


Author Maira Kalman to speak at Central Library

Newport Beach Public Library Foundation hosts members and guests for a lively discussion with renowned author and illustrator Maira Kalman on April 6 and 7 from 7 - 8:30 p.m. The third speaker in the Foundation’s Witte Lectures Series, Kalman will speak on “Art & The Power of Not Knowing.”

Maira Kalman

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Newport Beach 

Public Library Foundation

Maira Kalman to speak at Central Library as part of the Witte Lecture Series

Kalman is the author and illustrator of 25 books for children and young adults including Why We Broke Up, which she created with Daniel Handler and received the 2012 Printz Honor Award, as well as the recent bestselling illustrated work Beloved Dog. A longtime contributor to The New Yorker magazine, Kalman is currently at work on an illustrated column based on her travels to museums and libraries. She is also in collaboration with choreographer John Heginbotham on a ballet inspired by her work The Principles of Uncertainty. In addition to performing in the ballet, Kalman has also created the costumes, sets and libretti.

Other celebrated projects include an illustrated edition of the Strunk and White classic, The Elements of Style. She and composer Nico Muhly created an “opera” of the text that was performed at the New York Public Library, “Dia Beacon” on the Hudson and Lincoln Center. Kalman’s design work is as extensive and successful as her literary work. She has designed fabrics and accessories with Isaac Mizrahi, Kate Spade, Michael Maharam and the Target Corporation, as well as ballet sets and costumes for the Mark Morris Dance Company and mannequins for Ralph Pucci.

There is a wine reception at 6:30 p.m. with the lecture and Q & A beginning at 7 p.m. Book sales and signing take place at 8:15 p.m. Tickets are $50 for the general public; $40 for Library Foundation members; and $20 for students/teachers. Dessert and coffee will be provided.

For additional information and to purchase tickets, visit www.nbplfoundation.org/content/The-Witte-Lectures.html or call 949.548.2411.

This event takes place in the Central Library Friends Room, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.


Newport to Santa Ana: more than just a modern highway

By DUNCAN FORGEY

In the 19th Century, when Orange County was open and rural, its hills and valleys provided some of the most beautiful and serene vistas anywhere. Orange County, established after a dispute with Los Angeles County in 1889, was mostly open land with only a small number of key towns. Each settlement was separated by undisturbed natural landscape or sculptured farmlands. Tustin, Anaheim, Huntington Beach, Laguna Beach and Newport Beach were individual hamlets, each with its own ambience.

The center of this spider web of townships was Santa Ana. For many reasons, location being a key, this settlement grew into the most influential city in Orange County’s early history. As the hub for agricultural products from all parts of Southern California, Santa Ana was the kick start for today’s massive economic engine that is Orange County. With direct ties to San Pedro and McFadden’s Landing in fledging Newport Beach, Santa Ana became the steady conduit for business in and around Newport Beach. Newport’s harbor was virtually useless up to that point, but with the birth and growth of Santa Ana, the waters of our bay became a key factor in the import and export of local goods. By 1891, Santa Ana was the 15th largest city in California marking the beginning of a “boom” that Orange County has ridden to this day.  

Dory Entrance

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Submitted photos

Dory Fishing Fleet entrance, a famous Newport Beach landmark

Not only is Newport Beach connected to Santa Ana through business, farming and politics, there is one pioneer family that can be noted for the early development of both towns. They first come to light, when ex-Kentuckian, William “Uncle Billy” H. Spurgeon came to Southern California via Panama and the gold rush. He was tall, and contemporaries said his long legs were a definite advantage, allowing him to see over the tall foliage that covered the Santa Ana Valley.

Uncle Billy and his partner, Ward Bradford, bought 74.2 acres of this unused and fertile land. Because of the abundance and height of the mustard plants, Spurgeon climbed a sycamore tree, located near today’s Fifth and Sycamore Streets. His quotation is quite notable in describing what the early pioneers of Orange County were blessed to see as they arrived in the area: “I climbed up into the tree quite a way, perhaps 20 feet. I could look out over the mustard which appeared like a sea, with here and there sycamore trees rising above it.”

In his head, he quickly calculated that at $8 an acre, cultivating mustard would not sustain the property. There was definite risk in the purchase. So, within six months, he split the land which left Spurgeon with 33.5 acres. His total investment to this point was $297 plus a one-dollar transfer fee. But like millions of others would find out over the subsequent century, the cost proved a mere pittance to pay for what would become prime Southern California property. 

Elizabeth Hawleys tents

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Elizabeth Hawley’s tents, 1890s, went for $15 per week

Realizing that he must subdivide to make his money back, Spurgeon staked out 24 city blocks. The city of Santa Ana was born with the speculation of Uncle Billy and Orange County took its first baby steps towards today’s incredible megalopolis. After relocating in Newport Beach, the Spurgeon family lived here for four generations. Bill Junior, Bill III and Bill IV have all been played vital parts in the changing Newport Beach culture. It started with the great grandfather opening a store near the pier and being instrumental in not only the building of McFadden’s Wharf but the laying of a railroad to the beach. This ensured that his Santa Ana goods had a port. Other Spurgeon family highlights were William III’s work with Myford Irvine and the expansion of the ranch’s many acres. This included UCI and the industrial complex near Santa Ana Airport. William III was instrumental in organizing the Boy Scout Jamboree in 1953 and in partnership with long-time harbor advocate Ralph Whitford helped established the Sea Scout Base. If you’re a coffee drinker at Blackie’s surf spot near today’s pier, you’ve probably seen Bill Spurgeon IV stand up surfing or taking photos. A former Santa Ana school teacher, Bill IV was part of Newport’s early surf generation, an Eagle Scout and graduate of Newport Harbor High School. The Spurgeons, like the Beeks, Vallelys, Grundys and Stanley/Gallants are pioneer clans that are still in town. Truly an example of life’s circle going forth.

About the same time that Uncle Billy was founding Santa Ana, a 35-year-old New Yorker, James McFadden and his brothers, decided to subdivide their lands. (approximately 5,000 acres north and west of present day Costa Mesa) In order to attract buyers to his property he, too, sold acres for $8 - $10 an acre. Coming via covered wagons, these hardy souls bought up McFadden property loaded down with “an endless supply of scorpions, ground squirrels, fleas, jackrabbits and rattlesnakes.”  Roaming coyotes kept everyone alert at night. Tents and adobe structures were common due to the lack of usable wood, which could only get here via Los Angeles or San Pedro harbors and then wagoned south, making them expensive.   

McFadden Wharf

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McFadden Wharf, 1895, when the rail went to the sea

Now that Orange County had started to grow, the only thing missing was a port.  Newport Harbor lay awaiting its true calling. Seizing the opportunity, the McFadden brothers built a wharf in the mudflats of lower Castaways. Utilizing the upper levels as a staging area, they were able to transport agricultural product from inland and load them onto schooners. This also allowed the arrival of precious wood and building materials seriously needed by the evolving townships of Orange County.

The concept worked well with the exception of one major flaw. The entrance to Newport Harbor, known as San Joaquin Bay, was open to the Pacific Ocean. Great storm waves traveling thousands of miles from all directions hit the entrance with deadly force. Big waves, as demonstrated today with the pounding the peninsula takes each summer, made accessing McFadden’s Landing dangerous. Add to this, thousands of years of sand deposits moving about like men on a checkerboard and you have a situation ripe for disaster. Ships like The Vaquero from San Diego, loaded with 5,000 shingles and 5,000 square feet of lumber and the Golden Gate laden with fence posts, sailed off the briny ocean safely into Newport. Four months after these successes, the Solana went aground on a sand bar near the entrance to Newport Harbor. Thus, begins a decades-long struggle between the settlers of Newport Beach and the crafty ways of the ocean between the end of the sand peninsula and Rocky Point (Corona del Mar). 

The McFaddens knew that something had to be done if they were to establish Newport as a viable stopover for commerce. Analyzing the coastline, they came up with an idea. Move the wharf outside of the harbor to the open ocean. This was tricky in that most locations up and down Newport’s ribbon of sand simply took too much energy from the sea. Crashing shore break and huge storm swells were typical for 98 percent of the beach. They identified a spot where the peninsula takes a bend between southern and northern exposures. This turned out to be the perfect spot. Not knowing about a deep ocean canyon just offshore which softened the waves, they commenced construction and built a pier stretching nearly a quarter mile out to sea. Outbuildings and businesses were built at the foot of the pier. Within two years of this feat, a rail line was laid connecting the new sea port to Santa Ana. With that, Newport Beach was truly born and the infant city was healthy and ready to grow.

Market Spot

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Market Spot is now Hershey’s Market on Marine Avenue

The McFaddens, partnering with their friend Bill Spurgeon, created an outlet for merchandise and agricultural products accelerating growth in the county. Other influential real estate men like Edward J. Abbott, Benjamin Flint, Llewellyn Bixby, William S. Collins and James Irvine all provided land, clout and finances to other speculative real estate efforts.

Scottys Fish Fry

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Scotty’s Fish Fry

Soon McFaddenʻs Hotel and Sharpʻs Hotel, along with Mrs. Sarah Salter’s store for medical emergencies stood in the same locations as Blackie’s By the Sea, Oceanfront 21, Scotty’s Fish Fry and Henry’s Market – all are historical locations and icons for later generations of Newporters.

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Duncan Forgey, who made his home here in Newport Beach for many years, now resides in Hawaii. He is a monthly contributor to StuNewsNewport.


School Notes

Ensign Intermediate

The Ensign Engineering Showcase is on Wednesday, March 28 from 5 - 7 p.m. at Ensign Intermediate School’s Engineering Lab/The Hive.

Come discover everything that Ensign Engineering students have accomplished in the first seven months of their inaugural year. They have been hard at work creating robots, designing and building foot orthoses and toy prototypes for children with cerebral palsy, writing programs and developing skills that can change the world.

There will be student demonstrations and presentations as well as information on their plans for next year and beyond!

Ensign Intermediate School is located at 2000 Cliff Drive, Newport Beach.

Ensign students

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Courtesy of Ensign Intermediate School

Ensign Engineering students team up to work on a foot orthotic project

HOPE Clinic to stay open later on select Wednesdays

Beginning Wednesday, March 21, HOPE Clinic will be open until 5 p.m. on select Wednesdays of the month.

Services include well child exams, sports physicals, immunizations, flu vaccines, tuberculosis screening, developmental assessments, health education promotion, resource information, and referral and health insurance assistance.

For appointments, call 949.515.6725.
HOPE Clinic is located at the BESST Center, 2045 Meyer Place, Bldg. C,

Costa Mesa.

NHHS 

PTA General Meeting – Wednesday, March 21, 8:30 a.m., Library Reading Room

Arreis Dance Production – Wednesday - Saturday, March 21 - 24, 7 p.m., Robins Loats Theater

Spring Choir Concert – Wednesday, March 28, 6 - 8 p.m., Robert B. Wentz Theater

Band/Jazz/Orchestra – Friday, March 30, 6 - 8 p.m., Robins Loats Theater

PTA Executive Board – Wednesday, April 4, 8 a.m., Newkirk Conference Room

Spring Recess – Monday - Friday, April 16 - 23

CdMHS

Spring Festival Concert – Monday, April 9, 7 - 8 p.m.

Vocal Zone Concert – Tuesday, April 10, 7 - 8 p.m.

Spring Recess – Monday - Friday, April 16 - 23


Spirit Run brings out the best in race action and fun

The 35th Annual Spirit Run took place on Sunday, March 18 at Fashion Island. What a turn out…when so many came out for a day of exercise, fun and to support our local schools!

Ayla Granados

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Photos by Lana Johnson

Ayla Granados, who competes for Strava Track Club in the Bay Area, took first place in the Female Elite Mile, female 20 and up

There was a race for everyone – from the Elite Mile to the Juan Ramirez 15K to the Dog Mile, Family Mile and eight races for children, including the Toddler Trot. Spirit Run arguably has the most impressive prizes of any running event around. It offered a $3,800 cash purse in the Elite Mile and more than 250 non-cash prizes. More than 150 were eligible to win the most coveted food prize: free pizza every month for a year at Blaze Pizza, Fashion Island. Other prizes included gift cards from Fashion Island, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Lazy Dog Café and Baking Betty’s and certificates for massage from Spa Gregorie’s.

Two runners 5k finishers

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Before and after the races, there was plenty of fun in store at Spirit Run’s Youth, Fitness and Dog Expo. Plum’s Café served a gourmet pancake breakfast and the kids took in all the action including the bungee trampolines, a rock climbing wall, a mini-skate park, a photo booth and giveaways. An array of vendor booths rounded out the festivities.

Among the top winners:*

Elite Mile

1st Place - Daniel Herrera, Male 20 and up in 3:58, New Orleans, LA

1st Place - Ayla Granados, Female 20 and up in 4:39, Chico, CA

Open Mile 

1st Place - Taylor Huseman, 19-99 Male in 4:22, Okoboji, IA

1st Place - Olivia Huseman, 19-99 Female in 4:55, Milford, IA

10k

1st Place - Roosevelt Cook, 35-39 Male in 31:02, Hesperia, CA

1st Place - Jose Madera, 25-29 Male in 31:03, Santa Ana, CA

1st Place - Michelle Genin, 35-39 Female in 45:44, Running Springs, CA

1st Place - Shelby Buckley, 25-29 Female in 35:36, Newport Coast, CA

5k

1st Place - (Elite Men) - Daniel Herrera, 25, Male in 15:10, New Orleans, LA

1st Place - (Elite Women) - Margo Malone, 24, Female in 17:07, (city not available)

Youth 5k

1st Place - Dmitriy Major, 15-19, Male in 16:39, Laguna Hills, CA

1st Place – Sofia Gibson, 13-14, Female in 18:43, Irvine, CA

OLQA Borzoi Dog Mile

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For more information about Spirit Run, visit www.nmspiritrun.org.

For the second consecutive year, Stu News is proud to be Spirit Run’s media sponsor.

*Editor’s Note: Detailed race results and a slideshow with more photos will appear in Stu News Newport this Friday, March 23.


Newport Beach Chamber to hold March Sunset Mixer

Wine glasses

Submitted photo

The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce invites you to make connections and build your network at their March Sunset Mixer on Thursday, March 22 from 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. at Five Crowns restaurant. Come discover new business relationships while enjoying a great atmosphere.

The evening’s festivities include opportunity drawing prizes, complimentary hors d’oeuvres and a no-host bar. Reservations are not required. Cost: Chamber members are free; guests are $35. There is free self-parking; valet parking is $6.

For more information, contact Member Services Director Pam Smith at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call 949.729.4411.

Five Crowns Restaurant is located at 380 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar.


Orange County’s legal community joins together for “Suits for a Cause” clothing drive

OCWLA group shot USE! 

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Courtesy of the OC Women Lawyers Association

Orange County Women Lawyers Association rallies for WHW

During the month of March, the Orange County legal community joins together for the 8th annual “Suits for a Cause” clothing drive, to support the job seekers of nonprofit WHW, which provides the unemployed and underemployed the skills and resources they need to get and keep a good job.

Sixty-nine law firms and legal businesses and organizations are working together to donate professional suits to WHW for one of the nonprofit’s largest clothing drives of the year, particularly for complete suit donations for job seekers.

The “Suits for a Cause” clothing drive concludes with a celebratory luncheon on Thursday, March 29 from 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. at the Orange County Bar Association located at 4101 Westerly Place, Newport Beach.

During the luncheon, Justice Eileen C. Moore will provide an exclusive presentation on “Gender Issues in the U.S. Supreme Court and Hollywood Movies,” which will look at law and culture with regard to women including how issues involving women have evolved in the nation’s highest court and how the movie industry has portrayed women at these same times. Her presentation is MCLE certified and fulfills the Elimination of Bias requirement for attorneys.

WHW was founded by two legal professionals and survivors of domestic abuse who faced the task of rebuilding their professional wardrobes and self-esteem to return to the workforce in 1993. WHW has grown from providing 63 women with professional apparel to help prepare them for interviews 25 years ago to now serving more than 8,000 job seekers (men and women) each year and empowering them to navigate a complex job search with a multitude of tools. WHW is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year and since its inception has served more than 90,000 job seekers with programs including Employment Readiness Workshops, Computer Training, Job Placement Assistance, Employment Retention Assistance and Professional Apparel including interview-appropriate apparel and accessories.

For more information about “Suits for a Cause” and the full list of participating legal firms, groups and companies visit http://whw.org/contribute/suits-for-a-cause.


Pet of the WeekDog and Cat print

StuNewsNewport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

Cupcake

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Courtesy of Newport Beach 

Animal Shelter

MEET CUPCAKE

The shelter would like to introduce you to Cupcake, one of two sisters who arrived at the shelter. She is a tad bit shy with her initial meeting of new humans, but comes around quickly. She is as cute as a button, and it is believed her breed type is miniature poodle mixed with dachshund. Cupcake seems to be the less-shed fur type. She is a really fun dog and will just continue to show her true personality the more secure she becomes. Shelter staff is certain that she will excel in a quiet home with pet parents that spend lots of time with her. 

 At any given time, the shelter can have 4 - 5 dogs and 7 - 8 cats/kittens and other pets available for adoption. At times, they receive owner turn-ins that would do best adopted out together. 

Adoption costs at the shelter:

Dogs - $130

Puppies - $150

Cats - $90

Kittens - $110

If you are interested in finding out more about Cupcake, or any other animals up for adoption, the Newport Beach Animal Shelter is located at 20302 Riverside Drive, Newport Beach. It is open Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Call 949.644.3656. Email Valerie Schomburg at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To find out how you can help support the shelter, visit www.nbpd.org and click on “Our Animal Shelter” to view the wish list. They can always use food & treats; new toys; grooming, hygiene & comfort products; as well as laundry soap, dish soap, paper towels, sponges & scrub pads and lint rollers. If you are interested in volunteering, you can fill out and sign the application on the website.

in volunteering, you can fill out and sign the application on the website.


Police Files

Two out-of-towners arrested on identity theft and drug charges

Mitchell Austin Scott, 22, from North Hollywood, was arrested Wednesday, March 14, in the Pavilions shopping center in the 2600 block of San Miguel Road at 4:42 p.m. 

Scott entered a store in the center attempting fraud/forgery, with the attempt to commit a felony crime by false personation on another and identity theft by impersonating another to get money.

Scott, who did not list an occupation, was held on $20,000 bail.

Meanwhile, an acquaintance of Scott’s, Brian Clayton Campi, 21, Burbank, was also arrested nearby at Ford Road and San Miguel Drive. Campi was charged with possession of a narcotic controlled substance and possession of one oz. or less of marijuana while driving.

He was held on $2,500 bail.

Scroll down to Police Beat for all arrests & crime reports


Tsunami workshop planned for Thursday

In conjunction with Tsunami Awareness Week, the City of Newport Beach will host a Tsunami Awareness Workshop on Thursday, March 22 at 6:30 p.m. at the Newport Beach Central Library Friends Room. 

The workshop will have presenters from the State of California and the City of Newport Beach. Attendees will learn about the tsunami threat to Newport Beach, what the City and State are doing to prepare and what residents can do to prepare themselves. 

The workshop is free of charge and no registration is required. For additional information on the workshop, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..   

Newport Beach Central Library is located at 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.


Stump the Stu

What a perfect place for a relaxing chat!

Stump the Stu 3.20.18

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The Stu found this one in our inbox. Another great submission, this one sent in by Sherry Black of Newport Beach. She also gave us some other details on this spot, but before we tell you those, you tell us where it is.

We try and stump you each week on Tuesdays with a picture of something unique in our community.

Take the challenge and submit your answers to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The correct answers are in Friday’s edition. We also run the correct guesses on Friday. So, join us in the fun.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!

Editor’s Note: In our March 16 edition, we shared that the “Mural on the Wall” was located at Avila’s El Ranchito at 2800 Newport Blvd. and painted by Clayton Parker in 2004. We also needed to mention that this terrific “Stump” spot was submitted by Paul A. DeRidder, MD, MBA. Thanks so much, Paul!


Workshop for Landlords on Fair Housing Rights & Responsibilities

The Fair Housing Foundation will host a free workshop for landlords on Tuesday, March 27 from 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. The workshop will be held in the Corona del Mar Conference Room (first floor, Bay E) of Newport Beach City Hall, 100 Civic Center Drive. This workshop is open to the public.

Fair Housing Foundation logoWorkshop attendees will learn about the rental application process, managing rental property, occupancy standards, rental increases, credit checks, and how to seek prospective tenants. They will also learn about Fair Housing Laws, the eviction process, the rights and responsibilities of a landlord or property management professional, housing discrimination, and foreclosure information.

The Fair Housing Foundation serves the Newport Beach community under an agreement with the City of Newport Beach. It receives funds through the Community Development Block Grant program. The Foundation educates the public about fair housing rights and responsibilities through workshops, trainings and community events. 

For more information or to RSVP for the Landlord Workshop, call 1.800.446.FAIR or visit www.fhfca.org.


Sign of the times

On Thursdays we give you a partial glimpse of a sign around town. You guess what the overall name of the business is. 

So, we gave you a glimpse of a scripted “Fashion” from the new Fashion Island Hotel signage recently installed. Correct guesses came in from Dierdre Michalski, Jeff Parker, Joe Stapleton, Jorge Portillo, Mary Bacon, Patricia Zartler, Randall Ex, Rebecca Lightfoot and Terry Callahan.

Thank you all for playing.

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

Fashion Island Hotel

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Junior League Juniors seeking beach cleanup volunteers

Girl cleaning up beach

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Submitted photo

Organizers of the Junior League Juniors program, based in Newport Beach, are looking for kids and their families to join forces on Sunday, March 25 from 1 - 3 p.m. for a beach clean-up activity in Newport Beach, that will show them how our trash and recycling habits affect our local community. The group is meeting at 15th Street beach on the peninsula.

If you are interested in helping keep our beaches and ocean clean and want to sign up, visit www.jlocc.org

This program, in its third year, works to create a community of compassionate kids in Orange County. Through activities and philanthropic opportunities throughout our area, they strive to expose local children grades K-5 to ways they can begin to make an impact and better their community. Past events have included focuses on healthy eating, social isolation among the elderly, mental health, bullying and self-confidence, and caring for a community garden, among others. 

For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Interfaith Council to hold April luncheon in Newport Beach

Save the Date! The Newport-Mesa-Irvine Interfaith Council is holding its April luncheon on Wednesday, April 18 from 11:45 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. at St. Mark Presbyterian Church.

The topic of discussion will be Interfaith 101: The Religion of Zoroastrian presented by Maneck Bhujwala.

Cost: To RSVP, tickets are $12; at the door, $15.

For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.nmiinterfaithcouncil.org.

St. Mark Presbyterian Church is located at 2200 San Joaquin Hills Road, Newport Beach.


Heroes Hall to host “A Salute to Women”

Heroes Hall 

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Submitted photo

The Heroes Hall Veterans Museum, situated on the Orange County Fair & Event Center grounds, will host “A Salute to Women” on Thursday, March 22 from 5:30 - 7 p.m. This free event celebrates those who came before, and those who inspire us today.

Schedule of Festivities:

5:30 - 6 p.m.: Wine & Cheese Reception

6 - 6:30 p.m.: Guest speakers include Eileen More, Robin Umberg, Barbara Bagneris and Ashleigh Aitken

6:30 - 7 p.m.: Guided tours of Heroes Hall Veterans Museum and Education Center

The public is invited to honor our female veterans and active military. To RSVP,

visit www.hhsalutetowomen.eventbrite.com.

The Orange County Fair & Event Center is located at 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa.


Elite OC grows organically to largest young professionals group in Orange County

On Thursday, March 15 at the Fashion Island Hotel, with more than 150 leading young professionals in attendance, Elite OC hosted a lively discussion on “The Media Revolution – Adapting & Leveraging to Succeed” with top media/publishing executives including Brian Calle, publisher and CEO of LA Weekly; Samantha Dunn, executive editor of COAST Magazine; and Richard Reisman, publisher and CEO of the Orange County Business Journal. Attendees were asked to bring new towels, blankets, snack foods, or board games to benefit Orangewood Foundation, Samueli Academy and Junior League of Orange County. This is the first of four educational events that will take place this year, thanks to the sponsorship of New Majority Orange County.

Joe Stapleton et al 

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Photos courtesy of Elite OC

(L-R): Joe Stapleton, co-founder of The Elite OC and president of Spinnaker Investment Group; Richard Reisman, CEO and publisher of the Orange County Business Journal; Samantha Dunn, executive editor of COAST Magazine; Brian Calle, CEO of LA Weekly; Stacey Kaszton Jones, co-founder of The Elite OC and president of La Voz Marketing. 

The Elite OC (Elite OC), a nonprofit business league that empowers leading young professionals to positively impact the local community and grow professionally, has grown organically to be the largest young professionals group in Orange County. 

Focused on quality programming for leading, charity-minded individuals, Elite OC has hosted more than 100 events to date benefitting a variety of local Orange County-based charities. Instead of charging for events, Elite OC asks attendees to bring a donation for the chosen monthly charity, which has resulted in donations exceeding $135,000 and 23,000+ life-enhancing items given to 95 local charities since inception. Items such as books, school supplies, instruments, hygiene kits, and canned food have benefitted recipients from low-income families to veterans and the homeless.

In 2017 alone, Elite OC fed 1,485 low-income families with healthy meals and donated 60 new musical instruments to local schools. The group also partnered with a local low-income school, Heritage Elementary School in Garden Grove, to make a meaningful impact on young students. In addition to hosting a pep rally to welcome students back to school and reading to the classrooms, Elite OC donated $10,000 to fund the renovation of a new “Learning Commons” for Heritage Elementary.

Elite OC Women

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(L-R): Stacey Kaszton Jones; Michelle McCullagh, vice president of The Elite OC and sales representative at Lincare; Emily Kaszton, principal at Kasz Photo Creative; and Clare Bielecki, business development manager at Kitchell

Founded by Joe Stapleton and Stacey Kaszton Jones, The Elite OC is a 501(c)(6) nonprofit that ignites career growth and supports regional nonprofits through a variety of event types including: networking “schmoozers” at hip local venues, educational programs featuring established business leaders, VIP experiences with organizations such as Angels Baseball or Segerstrom Center for the Arts, and annual Signature events such as the “Cruise for a Cause.”

“Positively impacting the community is a primary focus of our organization and distinguishes us from other young professional groups,” said Joe Stapleton, president of Spinnaker Investment Group. “Being actively involved with the Elite OC can have tremendous benefits on your career and prepare you for other Board involvements.”

A purely volunteer-based board of directors (comprised of leading young professionals in distinct industries), generous community sponsors and member support enable the Elite OC to stay focused on driving results for local charities. Elite OC’s 2018 sponsors include: The UPS Store, Spinnaker Investment Group, CommerceWest Bank, Irvine BMW, New Majority and Laguna Family Dentistry.

We nurture current and future business leaders by offering quality educational and relationship-building programs that prioritize philanthropy,” said Stacey Kaszton Jones, president of La Voz Marketing. “Our events deliver a dynamic, comfortable way to grow your career or business and make a difference.”

For more information about the organization and membership, visit www.TheEliteOC.com, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or join the group on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.


Capturing iconic Newport Beach

Back Bay

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 Artwork by Don Krotee

Upper Newport Bay near the Interpretive Center captured through pencil and architectural marker on paper. This is the view into the garden near the dirt road.

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Don Krotee has been a resident of Newport Beach since 1986. He is a board member of the Newport Heights Improvement Association and SPON, and is an architect who has been drawing and painting from an early age. His architectural marker drawings are featured periodically in StuNews.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Special kids get special attention in community fundraiser

TomJohnsonImagine if we all joined in and supported Autism Awareness Month in the Newport-Mesa School District for the month of April. 

After all, newly released data shows that one in 42 boys and one in 189 girls in the United States have the disorder. Virtually everyone knows someone.

Autism T shirtSo, for a fundraiser, the school district is selling Autism Awareness T-shirts. The money raised is going to autism programming and classrooms throughout the district.

You can purchase an Autism Awareness T-shirt for $20, and the T-shirts are cool, then wear it each Tuesday during April.

Click here for more information.

• • •

Arguably college baseball’s greatest coach, Augie Garrido, died last Thursday, March 15, in Newport Beach, following complications from a stroke. He was 79.

Garrido was a long-time coach at Cal-State Fullerton where he led the Titans to three NCAA titles in 1979, 1984 and 1995. 

He then moved on to the University of Texas where he coached until 2016 and won two more NCAA titles.

He was named national coach of the year on six different occasions.

Garrido is survived by his wife, the former Jeannie Grass of Newport Beach and a daughter.

• • •

People ask me what’s going on at the Orange County Market Place? You know what I’m talking about, the “swap meet” that takes place virtually every weekend on the Orange County Fairgrounds

Well, we all know that Bob and Jeff Teller moved out of the picture, but I’m happy to report that a new group has moved in and they’ve promised the community a great grand re-opening on Saturday, March 31.

Here’s what’s in-store: Obviously the Market Place itself, with all of the booths and food and deals, okay you get the idea. But also, Behind the Picket Fence, a vintage and handmade marketplace, will add to the mix; an Easter scavenger hunt, face painting, wine tasting, an Easter egg hunt in Centennial Farm and more.

Proceeds from the day benefit COA (Community Outreach Alliance), a non-profit organization, whose goal and mission “is to offer fun and healthy activities to our community that has been deeply affected by the drug and addiction epidemic.”

Mark it down and plan to attend, it’ll run 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.

• • •

I usually don’t recognize other media in this column, however, I actually urge people to check out the piece written yesterday in the Orange County Register by David Whiting.

You might remember that in January, Stu News reported the suicide death of 16-year-old Patrick Murphy from Corona del Mar High School. Murphy was found in a park near his home.

Shortly thereafter, we ran a community letter composed by Newport Harbor High School Principal Sean Boulton discussing the challenges young people face today. It was truly galvanizing to the community.

Whiting’s column continues that discussion. Find it here.


Adam Trent brings next generation of magic to Segerstrom Center

The Magic of Adam Trent

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Photo by Matt Christine/

Courtesy of www.scfta.org

The Magic of Adam Trent is direct from Broadway

Broadway and TV star Adam Trent brings his signature brand of magic and illusion to Segerstrom Center for the Arts on Sunday, July 1 in a high-tech stage spectacle in Segerstrom Hall.

Produced by the creative team behind The Illusionists, the world’s best-selling touring magic show, The Magic of Adam Trent (www.AdamTrent.com) is an immersive entertainment extravaganza of magic, comedy and music designed to entertain the entire family.

Showcasing his futuristic brand of magic, Trent has mesmerized live audiences around the globe, in person and as a featured guest on America’s Got Talent, The Today Show, Ellen, Rachel Ray Show and Disney Channel among countless other TV appearances. The 32-year-old also stars in his own 10-episode TV series, The Road Trick, on Red Bull TV.

Tickets for Adam Trent start at $49 and are available online at www.SCFTA.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa or by calling 714.556.2787. For inquiries about group ticket savings for 10 or more, call the Group Services office at 714.755.0236. The Center offers many services for patrons with disabilities including removable wheelchair locations, binoculars and assistive listening devices. To learn more, visit www.SCFTA.org/accessibilityinformation.


2018 SoCal Xcel State Gymnastics Championships this weekend

American Gymnastics 

Courtesy of OC Fair & Event Center

This weekend, Friday, March 23 from 2 - 10 p.m. through Saturday and Sunday, March 24 and 25 from 8 a.m. - 10 p.m., the 2018 SoCal Xcel State Gymnastics Championships take place in The Hangar at the Orange County Fair & Event Center.

All levels of Xcel compete for State Championship awards and also to qualify for the Regional Championships.

Cost: $10 general admission; $8 senior and military with valid ID; $5 for children 12 and under. Parking is $8.

The Orange County Fair & Event Center is located at 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa. For more information, visit www.american-gymnastics.com.


Letter to the Editor:

The BBC, where Dorothy knew everyone’s name

Loved the story about Dorothy Yardley. When I first came to the Balboa Bay Club as the wife of the new owner, Bill Ray, the first person I met was Dorothy, the heart of the club. She knew the name of every member, and to me, scared to death as I could recall NO names, she was my savior. In the reception line before a big party, Dorothy was always there to tell me the names as the members passed through the lines, saving me great embarrassment.

Once, when my dad was coming to California with his buddies to play golf, Bill and I wanted to give a party to welcome the Texans to Newport. I asked Dorothy if she thought John Wayne would come to the party if invited. “Well, of course he would,” she said. The four Cowtown guys were standing on the porch when The Duke ambled up, put out his hand and said, “Hi, I’m John Wayne.” Well, those four guys were speechless, thrilled to meet face-to-face with their long-time hero, and I can guarantee you, they were still talking about it at the 19th Hole at Colonial Country Club for years after!

Yes, Dorothy was the heart of the BBC, and no she didn’t pass after a long stay at a retirement home. Dorothy passed at Hoag Hospital after a short illness, but is still a fixture at The Club, having a drink with one of her multitudes of friends. I, still, think of her often as my mentor and much-loved friend.

Beverly Ray

Former Owner Balboa Bay Club

Newport Beach


Junior League Juniors seeking volunteers for beach cleanup

kids cleaning up beach

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Submitted photo

Organizers of the Junior League Juniors program, based in Newport Beach, are looking for kids and their families to join forces on Sunday, March 25 from 1 - 3 p.m. for a beach clean-up activity in Newport Beach, that will show them how our trash and recycling habits affect our local community.

If you are interested in helping keep our beaches and ocean clean and want to sign up, visit www.jlocc.org. The specific meet and clean-up location is being determined, so check back for more details.

This program, in its third year, works to create a community of compassionate kids in Orange County. Through activities and philanthropic opportunities throughout our area, they strive to expose local children grades K-5 to ways they can begin to make an impact and better their community. Past events have included focuses on healthy eating, social isolation among the elderly, mental health, bullying and self-confidence, and caring for a community garden, among others. 

For more information, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Youth Track Meet of Champions coming April 6

On Friday, April 6, from 4 - 8 p.m., local youths, ages six to 15 (born between 2003 and 2011), will compete in fun, track and field events designed for all skill and experience levels during the 2018 Youth Track Meet of Champions. The competitions will be held at the Corona del Mar High School track.

Youth Track Meet

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Runners competing in last year’s Youth Track Meet of Champions

The City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Department in conjunction with the Newport-Balboa Rotary Club co-host this multi-event competition, which is held in memory of Frank E. Anderson, a long-time Rotarian and supporter of youth sports. 

Depending on age and year of birth, participants are placed into one of eight divisions to compete against others their own age. The top six finishers in each event and division are eligible to receive awards. Field events include: long jump, high jump, softball throw and shot put. Running events include: 50m and 100m dash, 200m, 400m, 800m and 1600m run. Youngsters can enter a maximum of three events: two running and one field, or two field and one running, only.

All participants will receive an event T-shirt. Must be a Newport Beach resident, or attend a Newport Beach school to be eligible for records (as of 2016).

Registration fees: Newport Beach Resident - Before Friday, March 23: $10; after Saturday, March 24: $15; Non-Resident - Before Friday, March 23: $13; after Saturday, March 24: $18. Club Teams must submit a full team roster in Excel, individual waivers and register by Wednesday, March 21. Check in is held at the stadium entrance from 2:30 - 4 p.m.; opening ceremonies begin promptly at 4 p.m.

The school that earns the most points for its students’ performance wins the Spirit Cup (only NMUSD teams and schools will be eligible).

In addition to the Youth Track Meet, participants placing first through sixth, will qualify for the Orange County Champions Meet on Sunday, May 20 at Estancia High School. From there, they may move on to the Southern California Track Championships held on Sunday, June 3 at Warren High School in Downey.

For more information and additional guidelines on the day’s events, visit www.newportbeachca.gov/sports and email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call 949.644.3151.

Corona del Mar High School is located at 2102 Eastbluff Drive, Newport Beach.


You Must Remember This: Yardleys leave behind a legacy in Newport Beach

By NANCY GARDNER

Many years ago, I did a brief stint at the Bay Club, and during my short sojourn I got to know Dorothy Yardley who was the social secretary, a role she had held basically since the inception of the club.

My Aunt Marion was a good friend of Dorothy’s and described her as someone who “takes all the air in the room.” If you made a film about her you would cast Maggie Smith. What amazed me, seeing her every day, was her energy.

I can’t think of anything more exhausting than being a social secretary, having to be pleasant to everyone, constantly smiling, putting in long, long days – and yet even though she was well past the first flush of youth, I never saw her flag. She took care of member issues and made sure every guest was welcome, including a number of U.S. presidents. She seemed to be the very soul of the place, and it was hard to imagine the Bay Club without her, but she did eventually retire. I don’t know whether she then resided at home or went to a senior community, but if she did the latter, you can be sure that their social activities reached a new level.

George Yardley

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Submitted photo

George Yardley, 1958, who played forward for the Detroit Pistons

Dorothy had two sons, George and Bob. I remember Bob vaguely from my childhood. He was one of those kids who actually acknowledged younger kids, which is probably why I remember him. Unfortunately for Bob, he was doomed to exist in the shadow of his brother. Both were good athletes, playing college basketball, but George went on to play for the Pistons, and he didn’t just play in the NBA – he set records.

In 1957-58, George set the single-season scoring record, the first player to score 2,000 points in a season. He made the all-star team six of the seven years he played, and in 1996 was elected to the NBA Hall of Fame.

For many years, the George Yardley Award was given annually to the outstanding Harbor High athlete. I couldn’t find anything on the school district site about the award, so I don’t know if it’s still given, but it was a huge honor in its day. He had graduated from Stanford with a degree in engineering, and after retiring from the NBA he started the George Yardley Company, which continues to this day.

Always the athlete, George took his skills to the tennis court where he was hard to miss. He looked like the Tin Woodman with all the braces and tape to hold together a body that showed the wear and tear of running up and down a basketball court for so many years. He couldn’t run anymore, so singles was out, but he still had great reflexes and at 6’5”…great reach. In a doubles match, he’d plant himself at the net and dare you to pass him. Those that tried usually failed.

George died of ALS (2004) which is such a terrifying disease for anyone, but it seems particularly malicious when it strikes someone of such athletic ability.

As for Dorothy, since her era, the Bay Club has become the Balboa Bay Resort. There have been all sorts of changes and improvements added, but I doubt very much, they’ve been able to improve on her.   

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Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, long-time resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to StuNewsNewport.


Stump the Stu

Enjoy this mural with perhaps a taco and an ice cold cerveza

Stu 3.16.18

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Some of you are good! This mural, painted by Clayton Parker in 2004, is found on the wall of Avila’s El Ranchito at 2800 Newport Blvd. 

Correct guesses came in from Bobbi Schaff, Joe Stapleton, again, and Tony Shaw (who recognized the artist’s name!). 

Join us on Tuesdays as we try and stump you each week with a picture of something unique in our community.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think StuNewsNewport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Sign of the times

It’s another edition of Sign of the times. Contestants, ready, set, go. Below you’ll find this week’s clue. What you see is a small part of an overall sign in Newport Beach. This one could be difficult because the signage recently changed and this is part of the new branding.

Good luck!

Send your guesses to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 3 16 18

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Pacific Life Foundation presents $10,000 grant to Human Options

Human Options, a nonprofit dedicated to breaking the cycle of domestic violence, was presented a $10,000 grant from Newport Beach-based Pacific Life Foundation. The grant will support the organization’s core services and programs, which includes crisis counseling, referrals, residential and education programs. The Pacific Life Foundation has been assisting the nonprofit through grants and volunteer efforts for more than 14 years. 

“We’re honored to stand together with Pacific Life Foundation in our ongoing and collective mission to prevent – and ultimately end – domestic violence in California,” said Maricela Rios-Faust, CEO of Human Options. “Their commitment to the safety of victims and survivors is critical to supporting our vital services and programs, which help individuals heal from the physical and emotional trauma of domestic violence.”

Pacific Life

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Submitted photo

Human Options staff, volunteers and board member Doug Jackson and his wife, Sandi (front left), pose with volunteers from Pacific Life Foundation during a parent and teen conference as part of Human Options’ “Love Shouldn’t Hurt” campaign to raise awareness on teen dating violence

The grant will fund the nonprofit’s 24-hour bilingual hotline, crisis counseling, residential programs and community-based intervention and education programs. These programs provide safety, healing, education and a way forward for those affected by domestic violence. The overall goal of these core services and programs is to provide the tools and education necessary to increase awareness, prevent abuse and make Orange County a healthier place to live.

Human Options is leading the way to end domestic violence, reaching more than 20,000 community members who received education through their prevention programs. More than 500 individuals found a safe home at their emergency shelter and their teams have responded to more than 6,500 callers that contacted them for immediate crisis support, information and referrals through their 24-Hour hotline. 

For more information about Human Options, visit www.humanoptions.org.


NMUSD announces Classified Employees of the Year

Newport-Mesa Unified School District (NMUSD) announces the 2018 Classified Employee of the Year awards program winners. The winners will proceed for consideration in the Orange County Classified Employees of the Year Program.

The Classified Employee of the Year awards program recognizes employees that go above and beyond the expectations of their job duties to provide exemplary service to students, families and colleagues.

The 2018 Classified Employee of the Year winners are:

Daniela Logan, Office and Technical

Francine Harms, Transportation

Maria Gomez, Para Educator

Patricia Sanchez, Child Nutrition

Daniela Logan

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Photos courtesy of NMUSD

Daniela Logan (center) was honored in the category of Office and Technical

Daniela Logan serves as an accounting assistant III and has worked for NMUSD for more than 20 years and is the employee of the year in the category of Office and Technical. Logan is a talented and dedicated employee whose customer service focus builds strong relationships with various departments and school employees across the district. Her positive attitude and ability to truly connect with people of varying personalities, needs, and budget knowledge make her an invaluable resource to the fiscal team and district as a whole.

Logan is critical in assisting the management of programs that directly impact students such as early childhood education, after school enrichment programs and the preschool programs. She also developed and implemented a budget training program for the school sites and departments that she supports. This gives those departments a greater understanding of the budget process. Living in Long Beach, Daniela also serves students in that area too. She is a member of the Assistance League of Long Beach Mentoring Program. In this program she serves local high school students and connects them with internship opportunities, raises funds for college scholarships, organizes career-oriented workshops, and hosts cultural activities. She is dedicated to ensuring that all students know that anything is possible.

Francine Harms

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Francine Harms (third from left) was recognized in the category of Transportation

Selected as employee of the year in the category of Transportation, Francine Harms has worked with the district for more than 10 years in the transportation department. She started as a trainee bus driver and has worked her way up through the ranks and is now a bus cover driver managing 58 bus routes. Her ability to manage bus routes, placement of students, particularly those with special needs, mentoring drivers, maintaining records and general office management makes her a perfect fit in the transportation department.

Harm’s charismatic personality builds camaraderie, support and success. She regularly mentors, trains new drivers, and provides ongoing support and recommendations to experienced drivers. She comes to know drivers so well that she can actually tailor bus routes to match drivers to students that they can best connect with. She also has participated in the Bus In The Classroom program, which teaches students with special needs life-long skills in independent mobility. She is a positive change-agent, kind hearted and a collaborative problem solver. Harms works to build great morale among those around her in the workplace in many ways. Her random notes of kindness to drivers and positive inspirational quotes around the office make a deeply positive impact.

Maria Gomez

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Maria Gomez (center) garnered recognition in the area of Para Education

Maria Gomez has worked as a special education instructional assistant at Killybrooke Elementary for 12 years, and was selected as employee of the year in the category of Para Educator and Instructional Assistance. She is extremely creative, animated and models good behavior for her students. Gomez takes the time to get to know her students’ personalities, abilities, and preferences and then uses that to encourage success. She goes above and beyond what’s expected in order to help students unlock their passion and meet their full potential.

Gomez believes in helping students become more involved, build friendships and helping general education students become more accepting of all students. One year at a talent show, she had a student that loved dancing, so she worked with that student to choreograph a routine along with backup dancers. Gomez took the extra time and effort to make sure the students were prepared and comfortable. This is an example of how her passion and care benefits more than just the students that she works with directly. Due to her years of experience, Gomez also is able to offer tips and ideas to colleagues on how to encourage students.

Patricia Sanchez

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Patricia Sanchez (second from right) was honored for her service in Child Nutrition

Patricia Sanchez has worked for NMUSD for more than 25 years. She currently works at TeWinkle Intermediate School where she has served for the past 10 years. As employee of the year in the Child Nutrition category, Sanchez has served in a variety of roles in school kitchens. She displays this invaluable experience each day as she assists in the preparation of more than 700 meals at her site.

She has a genuine care for each student and impacts their lives in a positive way each school day. Sanchez regularly encourages students to eat healthy and trade cookies and chips for fruits and vegetables. She takes time to get to know students’ favorite meals so that when they are honored with an exemplary behavior award she is sure to reward those students with their favorite foods. She is extremely flexible and cooperative in the kitchen and steps into the leadership role easily when her supervisor is absent. Sanchez is able to lead and direct the work of her colleagues in a respectful and collaborative manner. She consistently exudes happiness and helpfulness in ensuring that the school lunch program is a healthy, positive place for staff and students.

The Classified Employees of the Year will be recognized at a future NMUSD board meeting and will be considered countywide for the Orange County Classified School Employee of the Year. 

For more information, visit www.nmusd.us


Newport Harbor Kappa Delta Sorority to hold Shamrock Luncheon

Shamrock

Submitted photo

On Saturday, March 24 beginning at 10:30 a.m. at the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club, the Newport Harbor Kappa Delta Sorority will hold its annual Shamrock Luncheon for the Prevention of Child Abuse.

The featured speaker is Dr. Edward Greer, who will provide a presentation about his experiences helping children and other victims in Haiti, as a member of the Doctors Without Borders organization.

Enjoy a delicious entrée of grilled salmon salad or Chinese chicken salad and a crème brulee tart while experiencing a silent auction, valuable gift baskets, an opportunity drawing, and onsite jewelry and clothing vendors.

Tickets are $55 per person, with all proceeds benefitting charities: 80 percent directed to the Women’s Transitional Living Center (a local shelter for abused women and their children), and 20 percent going to Prevent Child Abuse America.

To reserve you seat, RSVP to Barbara Harrington by March 9 at 714.556.6508, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club is located at 1601 Bayside Drive, Corona del Mar.


Newport Beach Chamber to hold luncheon on customer retention

Keep customers magnet

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If you would like to discover how to keep customers coming back, then you won’t want to miss the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce’s business luncheon series on customer retention on Wednesday, March 21 from 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. at Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar in Fashion Island. 

As a business owner, find out how sales and marketing has changed in today’s world; how businesses need to adapt by finding and using the right tools for their business, based on their needs and budget; who your best customers are; where your customers are spending their money; and why using technology is important to customer retention and driving repeat customers.

The featured speakers, who will shed light on all these important topics, are Vicki Hoang, marketing director, REVZI and Eric Klauss, president, Partner Source Solutions and Amazon bestselling author.

In addition to these two informative speakers, come meet new fellow Chamber members and business professionals, and leave with contacts for your business success.

Cost: Newport Beach Chamber members with a reservation, $35; members at the door and potential members, $40. This includes lunch and free self-parking ($6 valet parking is also available).

You can register at the Chamber website: www.NewportBeach.com, or call 949.729.4411.

For more information, contact Member Services Director Pam Smith at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar is located at 455 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach.


New Directions for Women celebrates 10th Annual Circle of Life Breakfast

Sue Bright

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New Directions for Women’s Executive Director Sue Bright

On Monday, March 19, New Directions for Women (NCFW) is celebrating its 10th annual Circle of Life Breakfast from 8 - 9:30 a.m. in the Balboa Bay Resort Grand Ballroom, Level 1. The organization’s largest fundraising event, it provides scholarship funding for women, their children and families in need of drug and alcohol treatment. Attendees are from the recovery and addiction field and philanthropic individuals who have been touched in some way by alcohol or drug addiction.

NDFW’s new Executive Director Sue Bright will share her vision for the future of the 41-year-old nonprofit organization. NDFW is an exclusively female, private drug and alcohol rehab program providing addiction treatment services for women of all ages, including pregnant women, women with children, women who have relapsed, and/or had prior treatments and suffer from a co-existing disorder.

To make a donation, contact Tania Bhattacharyya at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call 949.313.1192, ext. 300.

The Balboa Bay Resort is located at 1221 W. Coast Highway, Newport Beach.


Increased DUI patrols planned for St. Patrick’s Day

As one of the country’s most popular holidays, St. Patrick’s Day is an occasion for millions of Americans to celebrate their Irish ancestry, and for many more to join in the festivities. Tragically, March 17 has also become one of the nation’s deadliest holidays. In 2016 alone, 60 people across the nation died as a result of drunk-driving traffic collisions during the St. Patrick’s Day holiday period (6 p.m. on March 16 to 5:59 a.m. on March 18).

To help lower the number of deaths and injuries, the Newport Beach Police Department will be deploying extra officers on overtime this weekend to target problem areas (places with high numbers of DUI collisions and DUI arrests). Between the hours of 6 p.m. and 3 a.m., these DUI patrols will join our regular officer deployment in looking for the tell-tale signs of impaired driving.

St. Patricks Day

Courtesy of NBPD

The unfortunate truth is this: While many people are making plans for St. Patrick’s Day, they aren’t all planning out a way to get home safely. Follow these tips to stay safe:

Before you start celebrating, decide whether you’ll drink or you’ll drive. You can’t do both. Some revelers think that they can play it by ear, and wait until after they drink to decide whether or not they’re “okay to drive.” By then, it’s too late.

Remember that “DUI Doesn’t Just Mean Booze.” Drugs (such as many prescription medications, marijuana, or illicit drugs) can also lead to impairment and unsafe driving. If you mix in even a small amount of alcohol, the effects can be compounded.

If you do decide to drink, you have many options: designate a sober, reliable driver; find a taxi company (or two) and keep their numbers in your phone; or download the California Office of Traffic Safety DDVIP (Designated Driver VIP) mobile app to get connected with free designated-driver incentives at local establishments or to order a sober ride from Uber, Lyft, or Curb.

Help those around you be responsible too. If someone you know is impaired by alcohol or drugs, help them get home safely.

Be alert and report drunk drivers by calling 9-1-1 immediately.

One aspect that is often overlooked is that of pedestrians who have had too much to drink. The NBPD would like to remind the public that walking while intoxicated can be deadly, as lack of attention can put a pedestrian at risk of getting hit by a vehicle.

Funding for this deployment is provided by a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety, through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.


Family-friendly pink paddle out at Newport Dunes raises awareness of breast cancer

Group Paddle

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Submitted photo

More than 1,000 breast cancer advocates and paddling enthusiasts will unite on Saturday, May 5 for the 7th Annual Standup for the Cure (SUFTC) fundraiser at Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort. All proceeds from the family-friendly event will benefit Susan G. Komen Orange County to support local breast health education, services and research.

“Standup for the Cure’s focus is to introduce non-paddlers to the healthy lifestyle of standup paddling while building a supportive community bound by the desire to save lives through early breast cancer detection while we search for a cure,” said Executive Director Dan Van Dyck.

The kid-friendly event welcomes beginner and experienced standup paddlers alike, as well as “dry-foot” participants who can enjoy activities on land, including yoga classes, free breast cancer and skin cancer screenings provided by Kaiser Permanente, live music and a delicious lunch. There is also an opportunity to win great prizes through the drawing and silent auction.

“Seeing the Sea of Pink paddlers united on the water and in their commitment to support women with breast cancer, I appreciate how powerful we are when we come together as a community, and our incredible potential to save lives,” said Lisa Wolter, Executive Director of Susan G. Komen Orange County. “Every day in Orange County, at least five women are diagnosed with breast cancer. The fundraising from Standup goes a long way to helping turn patients into survivors.” 

Schedule of Events:

8 a.m. - Registration opens

9 a.m. - Free standup paddleboard clinic and standup yoga clinic for all levels

9:30 a.m. - Kaiser Permanente Health expo opens for breast and skin screenings

10 a.m. - Hawaiian blessing of survivors and white dove release followed by the Sea of Pink, a ceremonial parade for all paddlers in attendance

10:30 a.m. - Advanced (5K) and Intermediate (2.5K) races (optional)

11 a.m. - Kids’ races and on-land yoga class for all levels (optional)

11:30 a.m. - Team relay races/Happy Hour begins with live music by Timo (optional)

12:30 p.m. - Lunch served by KJ Catering

2 p.m. - Prizes for races and top fundraisers are announced

Since its inception in 2012, Standup for the Cure has raised more than $1 million for the Susan G. Komen organization including $495,000 for the Orange County Affiliate. In addition, more than 1,800 women have received breast cancer and skin cancer screenings free-of-charge at Standup for the Cure events held across the United States, including in Miami, Seattle and Muskegon, Mich. Entry fee is $35 per person for regular registration and $30 for breast cancer survivors. Participants can register as individuals or as a team and set a fundraising goal at https://www.crowdrise.com/NewportBeachStandUpfortheCure2018. Online registration includes a complimentary pink Standup for the Cure jersey. All-day parking is available at Newport Dunes for $5 per vehicle. Although there will be plenty of boards available, participants are encouraged to bring their personal boards or rent them for the full day for easier access to the water. For more information, visit www.suftc.org.

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort is located at 1131 Back Bay Drive, Newport Beach.


CdM High School unveils state-of-the-art learning resource center

By AMY SENK

If you want to get a blank look, or a laugh, just ask any Corona del Mar High School student about the last time they checked out a book at the school library. The answer – they haven’t. Not for years.

“Over 80 percent of the books had not been checked out in five to seven years,” said parent Joe Stefano, a CdM Foundation board member. “In some cases, it was 10 years. It’s a different world.”

Stefano, along with about 75 parents, students, teachers and district officials, gathered on Wednesday, March 14 at the official ribbon-cutting ceremony for the brand new CdMHS Learning Resource Center (LRC).

Navarro and Dufffy et al Ribbon cutting

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Photo by Amy Senk

 (L-R): Superintendent Dr. Fred Navarro, Newport Beach Mayor “Duffy” Duffield, CdM High School Principal Kathy Scott and NMUSD board trustee Karen Yelsey 

Before, the 6,000-square-foot library was old-fashioned and underutilized. Then three years ago, the Foundation began to study ways to revitalize and modernize the space. Board members visited Mater Dei High School and toured its modern library space, interviewing that school’s librarian who also happens to have advanced degrees in library science and technology. The board then began raising money – the project cost about $2 million, partially paid for with district funds but with $1.5 million from the Foundation, the school’s PTA, Booster group and ASB. Construction began in the fall, and the new space was used for the first time since the ribbon-cutting ceremony, last night (Thursday, March 15) for an event for 100 kids and 47 colleges.

At Wednesday’s ceremony, the principal, district superintendent, board members and Newport Beach Mayor Marshall “Duffy” Duffield and City Councilman Jeff Herdman were all on hand to make comments and help cut the blue ribbon. After, students gave tours and demos.

The new LRC has an open floor plan, with a classroom, “media scape” area and three private conference/study rooms. Each study space – the entire LRC in fact – has technology and sound throughout. The goal was to have rooms for students to work collaboratively within the library space, a concept used on top-tier university campuses across the country.

The space also features a corner area, about 600 square feet, designed for actual, physical books. “Fiction books,” Stefano said. “Students still want to sit down and hold those books.”

LRC frontSML  LRC classroomSML

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Renderings courtesy of CdM 

High School Foundation

(L-R): Façade of the CdM Learning Resource Center and a classroom

The LRC concept is the first for a district high school, Stefano said, but it could mark the future throughout Newport-Mesa. Superintendent Fred Navarro said he expected other representatives from other district high schools to tour the space and decide which elements would work for them in the future.

In other CdMHS news, a new CdM Alumni Association group has formed and will hold a kickoff party later this month. The group’s goal is to bring together former CdMHS students from all eras for reunions and social mixers, but also to network and offer help to current students, whether it be for senior projects, meetups during college campus visits or for summer jobs and internships.

The Taco Tuesday kickoff party will take place at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 20 at the offices of Titan HST at 500 Newport Center Drive. Complimentary food and beverages will be served. To reserve a spot, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

~~~~~~~~

Amy Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 17 years and was formally the publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association and the Corona del Mar High School PTA. She and her husband have two children.


Birds of Prey visit Central Library this Sunday

Bird of Prey

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Courtesy of Newport Beach Public Library

Kids…come “flock” to Central Library this Sunday, March 18 for “Making Memories for Children: Nature Series, Birds of Prey in Our Neighborhood,” presented by the Orange County Bird of Prey Center from 2 - 3:30 p.m.

This program will focus on some of the feathered predators that we see every day. Led by both human and feathered creatures, the Orange County Bird of Prey Center will be bringing along some of its bird ambassadors to visit.

This program is free, but registration is required. A $10 suggested donation at the door is requested.

For more information and to register, visit www.nbplfoundation.org or call 949.548.2411.

This event takes place in the Central Library Friends Room, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.


Big Brothers Big Sisters announces appointment of Todd Pickup as board chair

Todd Pickup

Submitted photo

Todd Pickup has been named new board chair of Big Brothers Big Sisters

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County and the Inland Empire, a nonprofit providing youth facing adversity with one-to-one professionally supported mentoring relationships, has announced its slate of changes to its board of directors for 2018.

At the helm, is Todd Pickup beginning his two-year term as board chair. Pickup is a private equity investor specializing in public securities, private corporate investments, private portfolio management and hospitality assets. Currently, he is the CEO of International Bay Clubs, the parent company of the Balboa Bay Club and Newport Beach Country Club. A seasoned investment strategist, he is a graduate of the University of Southern California and served on the Big Brothers Big Sisters executive board of directors before becoming chair in 2018.

Rounding out the appointments are Navin Narang promoted to vice chair, with new additions Matthew Stowe to the executive board, and Matt Bailey, Blake Johnson and Guy Johnson to the governing board.

With these new appointments, Big Brothers Big Sisters has a roster of 46 members on its executive and governing boards who are helping to maintain the local agency’s success as the second largest of 320 affiliates nationwide.

“We are thrilled to welcome these individuals to the board of directors,” said Melissa Beck, CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County and the Inland Empire. “The diverse range of their expertise, along with new leadership under Todd and Navin, will help the board continue providing an incredible level of support as we serve more youth and help our graduating seniors pursue sustainable independence after high school.”

For more information on Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County and the Inland Empire, visit www.ocbigs.org.


Artist Carole Boller commissioned to create N2E artwork

Carole Boller

Photos courtesy of Carol Boller

Artist Carole Boller sailing on her boat

The Newport Ocean Sailing Association has commissioned esteemed local artist Carole Boller to create its annual artwork, a celebrated tradition that captures the spirit of the Newport to Ensenada International Yacht Race (N2E).

“Sailors Delight”, a 24’ x 30’ oil on linen painting, portrays classic yachts against a brightening amber sky amidst wind and waves which evokes the feeling of sailing while reflecting the early years of this iconic race.

“I am pleased, honored and delighted to have been selected by the NOSA’s Commodore to paint this year’s image,” Boller said.

Images of “Sailors Delight” will appear on the cover of the annual race program, on printed and digital event invitations, on race wear and other promotional materials. Prints will be available for purchase.

Sailors Delight

“Sailor’s Delight” painted by Carole Boller

NOSA Commodore Daniel Hodge said he tasked Boller to create something exciting, colorful and dynamic; a feel the “wind-in-your-face” painting. He also stressed the importance of having a local artist involved since the race is so vested in the history and culture of its namesake city.

Boller grew up in the Midwest, got her pilot’s license and graduated from the Art Institute of Chicago with a Masters of Fine Art before moving here. Finding wind and air traffic conditions less favorable for flying and more conducive for sailing, she enrolled at Orange Coast College to learn basic sailing. So enamored, she bought an Islander 32, aptly named En Plein Air and became a part of local the sailing community.

Boller first volunteered with N2E in 2004 handing out skipper’s packets at the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club. The Laguna Beach resident still volunteers for NOSA, working this year at events like the VIP Skipper’s Reception days before the race.

NOSA also commissioned Boller to create the race’s annual artwork in 2016 and 2007.

“What a gift to me that throughout my years in Southern California, I have had the opportunity to get to know this sailing community and to be able to paint a story of the race,” Boller said. She hopes that racers will see the painting and feel that it conveys the sensations of sailing.

Later this year, Boller will be exhibiting at the famous Laguna Beach Sawdust Art Festival and will lead an artist’s retreat and workshop to Eastbourne, England, a seaside town on the English Channel. Here at home, Boller teaches a painting class on Balboa Island twice a month on Thursdays, called “Art with a Twist.”

Following the race, board members decide the painting’s destiny. The works of art have been donated to charity, gifted to the local mayor, auctioned for charity or bequeathed to the Commodore as a thank you. Larger limited-edition prints are historically given to foreign dignitaries and sponsors as a thank you and potentially generating additional exposure for the artist.

Registration for the 71st annual N2E is in full swing. More than 40 classes of sailboats will race from the Balboa Pier on one of three courses April 27. To catch up or sign up, visit www.nosa.org.

For more information about the artist, upcoming exhibits or classes, visit www.BollerArt.com.


Adoption Guild Patroness Spring Luncheon featured Spring fashion trends

The 57th Annual Adoption Guild Patroness Spring Luncheon unfolded at the chic Balboa Bay Resort attracting 250 women for the fashion event. Featuring seasonal prêt-à-porter from Grayse Fashion Island, a lively fashion runway show was produced by Couture Productions, with special guests Marie and Kelly Gray, entertaining the women who had a serious purpose in mind coming together.

As the hotel staff served its signature salmon salad, the talk was all about raising as much money as possible to support the work of Holy Family Services Adoption and Foster Care (HFS). Wallets were opened wide. Silent auction items, which were focused on celebrating family, inspired generous bidding. Success of the Patroness Luncheon helped put the Adoption Guild well on its way to their annual $100,000 donation to Holy Family Services.

Making it happen were a host of stand-up women led by co-chairs Maria Zucht and Christine Johnson, supported by Guild president Chris Garber. Mistress of ceremonies Stephanie Peleuses kept the pace lively with auction/opportunity drawing items including the Grand Prize of a $2,500 gift certificate to Fashion Island.

Co Chairs

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Submitted photos

(L-R): Adoption Guild Patroness Spring Luncheon Co-Chairs Maria Zucht and Christine Johnson

Spring attire, worn by Pam Fossler, Janie Merkle, Pam Selber, Harriet Selna, Nancy Collins, Angela Grasso, Patrice Werschmidt, Jeannie Hidey, Garnet Thompson, Patricia Houston, Peggy Ogden, Suzanne Wyrick, Libby Doughty, Michelle Kaminsky, Karen Sugden and Britt Meyer, complemented the verdant display of blossoms adorning the tables, donated by Trader Joe’s and arranged by Anna Ziebath.

As the guests enjoyed a decadent dessert, speeches inspired the crowd. Adoption Guild leaders shared with the women the value of their generosity.

“Did you know that most adoption agencies provide counseling to the birth parent for just three months after giving birth?,” said Guild patron and former president Pam Selber. “I am proud to say that HFS birth parents are promised free counseling whenever they need to talk, now or 10 years from now. HFS professional counselors are available to discuss grief or guilt, or any aspect of their decision to give up their child to offer confirmation that the child they gave birth to will be loved. Donations make this possible.”

In addition, funding from the Guild supports the services of registered pediatric nurse Connie O’Neill, also a certified doula. O’Neill is thoroughly involved with providing infant care education, support during pregnancy, labor and delivery, as well as extensive follow up after infant placement.

Finally, Adoption Guild funding supports the vast record keeping of Holy Family Services. Its files are a vital link to the past for adopted children seeking information as adults.

“HFS is the intermediary between the adoptive family, adoptee and the birth parents,” Sieber said. “This important historical link along with providing very basic services such as supplying new adoptive families with diapers, formula and all the necessities required for infant care, are all part of the process funded by Guild donations.” 

Marie and Kelly Gray

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 (L-R): Marie Gray and Kelly Gray of Grayse Fashion Island

Celebrating the success of the day, Holy Family Services’ Julie Brown joined loyal Guild members, Jaci Lindstrom, Joyce Macardican, Jeannie Mullen, Sue Podany, Laurie Rounds, Ryann Carissimo and Bettie Shepard.

Coming up over Memorial Day Weekend, the Adoption Guild will sponsor its major annual event, the 57th Annual Roy Emerson Adoption Guild Tennis Classic in Orange County. For more information, visit www.adoptionguild.org.


90-year-old artist shows paintings at NB Library

Agnes Schenk in her garage studio

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Courtesy of Newport Beach Public Library

The Newport Beach Arts Commission presents an exhibition of art by Agnes Schenk at the Newport Beach Central Library. The Library features the work of the talented 90-year-old local artist in an exhibition titled “Paintings for All Seasons.” An artist’s reception will begin at 6 p.m. on Thursday, April 5 in the Central Library Friends Meeting Room.

At 90 years young, Schenk, or “Aggie” as she prefers to be called, works from her garage studio/gallery and attends painting classes twice a week nearby her home in Laguna Beach. Over the years, she has studied under several master painters such as local artists Frank Tarallo and Bill Alexander, who introduced her to big brushes and slapping on paint, and Gary Jenkins, who showed her how to work wet into wet, painting realistic large flower paintings. Aggie’s colorful oil paintings of flowers have become her signature subject, but this exhibit includes a selection of landscapes and seascapes as well as her exquisite florals.

The artist grew up in Illinois and had a very successful career as a fashion designer in Los Angeles. She also owned and operated a women’s clothing boutique in Laguna Beach for many years. She returned to her love for oil paint, brushes and canvas when she retired 30 years ago, but didn’t show her work until 2015, when she had her first exhibition at the Newport Beach Public Library. The response from the community was so enthusiastic, that the prolific painter has returned to the Library for another show.

Newport Beach Central Library is located at 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.  The art exhibit is free and open to the public during library hours from March 5 through May 4.  Hours are as follows: Monday - Thursday, 9 a.m. - 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.; and Sunday, 12 - 5 p.m.

For more information, call 949.717.3802 or visit the website at www.newportbeachlibrary.org.


17th Annual Multicultural Fair this weekend at Sage Hill School

Dancers

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Photos by Rick Davitt/

Courtesy of Sage Hill School

On Saturday, March 17, from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m., Sage Hill School will open its campus to the community for a day of food and festivities at the 17th Annual Multicultural Fair.

The Newport Coast hillside will transform into a global village as an expected 1,000+ visitors enjoy 14 authentic international food booths, lively cultural entertainment, an ethnic bazaar, a philanthropic marketplace run by Sage Hill students and hands-on craft making.

Parent organizers Niv Pidaparty and Sarah Yang said the World Crafts area will encourage guests of all ages to participate in fun activities such as henna tattoos, face painting, Japanese and dragon crafts, creating hardware jewelry and more. A vibrant ethnic bazaar will beckon with souvenirs – colorful jewelry, unique purses and handmade goods – from all over the world. There will also be a photo booth with props and costumes from different countries.

A visit to the Multicultural Fair is like traveling the world without leaving Newport Beach. The event features a continual lineup of entertainment that celebrates music and movement from around the globe, as well as America’s own cultural heritage. Student and faculty performers will be joined by professional artists from the extended community for a lineup that includes: Chinese Lion performances; Irish dancing; Korean folk Nongak drumming, singing and dancing by KAYPA as well as Korean “K-pop/Nanta”; Mariachi dancing; and Sage Hill student bands, guitar duos and many others.

Korean parent cooks

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New to the international food booths this year will be flavors of Bosnia, Israel, Africa and the Caribbean. Visitors can stroll along the plaza where freshly prepared tastings from China, France, India, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Persia, Vietnam, Japan and Poland will also be available. For the first time, an international dessert and snack booth allows more people in the Sage Hill community to participate and represent their countries. There will be featured desserts from Ecuador, Sweden, Austria, Turkey, Canada, Greece, England, Norway, the Philippines and more. Among the delicious food options will be specialties from the kitchens of the Resort at Pelican Hill and the Sage Hill Cafe.

Admission is $5 per person; free for children ages 5 and younger. Food tickets are $1 each. Most food items are priced at two to four tickets per serving. A family 4-pack includes four wristbands for entry and 50 food/activity tickets for $60 ($10 savings).

A family 3-pack includes three wristbands for entry and 40 food/activity tickets for $45 ($10 savings). Tickets are available online at www.sagehillschool.org/multiculturalfair.

Sage Hill School is located at 20402 Newport Coast Drive, Newport Coast.


Vijay Singh brings home the win at Toshiba Classic

Vijay Singh

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Courtesy of Toshiba Classic

Vijay Singh takes home the crystal trophy from the 2018 Toshiba Classic

Vijay Singh made five birdies coming home in the final round of the Toshiba Classic to shoot 66 and win the Toshiba Classic at 11 under Sunday. 

Singh started the day two shots in back of second round leader Tom Pernice Jr. However, coming to the 18th hole Sunday, Singh stood tied with clubhouse leader Tommy Tolles at -10, needing birdie for the lead. He hit his second shot pin-high on the par five, two putting from the fringe to take the lead.

Playing in the final group behind Singh, Scott McCarron’s chances ended with a three-putt bogey on 17. He finished one behind Singh at -10, tied with Pernice and Tolles.

Singh’s win earned him $270,000 and was his first individual title on the PGA TOUR Champions Tour. In fact, Singh had not won an individual title since the Dell Technologies Championship on September 1, 2008. Since then, he has made 237 individual starts (210 PGA Tour, 25 PGA Tour Champions, 2 European Tour) between those victories.

The 20th Toshiba Classic celebrating Hoag Hospital took place this past week at Newport Beach Country Club.

John Daly and musician

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Photos by Lana Johnson

John Daly and his personal musician, Phillip “Jocko” Deal, sing a riveting duet of “Free Falling” out on the course between the 6th and 7th holes

Bernhard Lange

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Bernhard Langer won the Toshiba Classic in 2008, is a two-time Masters champion and worldwide, he’s won more than 100 times

Check out more photos from the exciting Toshiba Classic

Click on left side photo to see them all in a slideshow

 


Stump the Stu

Mural, mural on the wall…

Stump the Stu 3 13 18

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The Stu found this one in our inbox. They asked us if we’d consider running this special mural. We replied, “Sí.”

Do you know where it is?

We try and stump you each week on Tuesdays with a picture of something unique in our community.

Take the challenge and submit your answers to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The correct answers will be in Thursday’s edition.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Spirit Run Elite Milers go the distance…and have fun

Elite Mile start line

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Photos courtesy of Spirit Run

Elite Mile start line

Many Newport Beach residents who grew up with Spirit Run, or whose children did, think of it as simply a fundraiser for local schools. For several Spirit Run participants, from near and far, it’s so much more.

Spirit Run began in 1983 with an Adult 5k and a single youth race. Since then, it added a 10k, 15k, Youth 5k, and six separate youth mile races. In 2016, Spirit Run introduced Adult Mile races including the Elite Mile.

The Elite Mile is open to men who can finish a mile faster than 4 minutes, 15 seconds, and women who can finish faster than 4 minutes, 50 seconds. It takes place on a fast, point to point course that travels on a slight decline. Its first year drew about a dozen local elite runners.

Now in the Elite Mile’s third year, Spirit Run is expecting elites from throughout California and beyond. Several competed in Spirit Run 2017 and couldn’t wait to return. Others were attracted by the fast course and great competition; the perfect combination to run a fast time, maybe even set a personal record. Undoubtedly, the $3,800 cash purse also helped.

Reid Buchanan

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Reid Buchanan took first place in Spirit Run’s Elite Mile and 5k in 2017

Reid Buchanan, winner of Spirit Run’s Elite Mile and 5k in 2017, is excited to return. Buchanan, a Kansas native, attended the University of Portland where in 2016 he was First Team NCAA All American and finished 5th in the 10,000 meters. Currently, he trains with Andrew Kastor as a member of Mammoth Track Club. Buchanan recently became the 513th American to break 4 minutes in the mile on the track.

“I had the Newport Spirit Run on my calendar the day after I competed in it last year,” Buchanan said. “I love competing in local races and especially ones where the race coordinators are competent in putting on a top-notch event.”

Buchanan admits the cash purse is a draw, but not the only one. “With an increase in prize money, there has been an increase in competition and this has me excited to surely have the opportunity to set a new course record,” Buchanan explained. “No matter the outcome, I know this will be another great day in Newport Beach.” 

Natasha LaBeaud

 

 

Natasha LeBeaud Anzures has her eyes set on the Tokyo 2020 Olympics

Kansas seems nearby compared to another Elite Miler’s hometown. Canadian Natasha LaBeaud Anzures was ranked second in the 10k and third in the 5k for Canada in 2014.

“I have had the privilege to race in countries around the world with great competition. I have my eyes set on the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games for the 10,000 meters and marathon,” LaBeaud stated.

Currently, LaBeaud lives in San Diego and is happy to add Spirit Run to her world tour. “I am looking forward to this year’s Spirit Run because of the great competition and the chance for me to test my wheels at a shorter distance.”

Sarah Attar

Sarah Attar competed in the London 2012 Olympics as one of the first-ever female Olympians from Saudia Arabia

But Sarah Attar has LaBeaud beat, at least in terms of competing for the most distant country.

“It was along the (Southern California) coastline, I logged many miles leading to my historic run in the London 2012 Olympics as one of Saudi Arabia’s first-ever female Olympians,” Attar explained. “(Spirit Run) is very important to my speed development working towards my goal of qualifying in the marathon for Tokyo 2020, and representing Saudi Arabia for a third time in the Olympics.”Ayla Granados

 

Ayla Granados is a favorite to take first this year in the women’s Elite Mile

Of course, most competitors are from California. Ayla Granados, last year’s second female in the Elite Mile, is a favorite to take first this year. She competes for Strava Track Club in the Bay Area. Granados shared why she’s making the trip for Spirit Run.

“I’m thrilled to be part of the Spirit Mile for a second year in a row,” Granados said. “Everything about it was so inviting and fun from the pancake breakfast, the prizes, the truly awesome crowd, and the beautiful location. It was a huge reminder of why I love this sport so much.”

Her primary motivation, however, is the challenge of winning. “What I’m looking forward to about this race the most is putting all else aside and just racing entirely to win,” Granados continued. “Placing runner-up last year, and the generous prize purse are huge motivators going into this year’s race. The field of women is perfectly stacked where I know I have the chance to win, but I’m going to have to leave it all out there and have to fight to the very end to do so.”

Shelby Buckley

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Shelby Buckley, a CdM graduate, won the 10k in the 2017 Spirit Run

Newport Beach’s Shelby Buckley won the 10k in 2017 and is likely to win again in 2018. Buckley, a 2008 Corona del Mar High graduate, was a standout on the cross country and track team. She was the only female athlete in Orange County history to place top five at the State Cross Country meet over four consecutive seasons. Other accolades included OC Register Athlete of the Year, 2004 CIF State cross country individual champion, member of the national champion 4 x 1600 meter relay, member of the winning 4 x 1-mile relay team at the Nike Outdoor Nationals and third at the 2007 State Meet in the 1600 meters. Buckley went on to run for University of California, Los Angeles and then University of Southern California.

Currently, Buckley is training to qualify for the Olympic Trials in the marathon. She looks forward to Spirit Run’s training benefits and more.

“I’m very excited USA Track & Field Southern California chose the Spirit Run for the Mile and 10k Championships this year. Bringing these championships to Newport is a great way to build excitement for the sport,” Buckley stated. “It’s also such a treat to be able to support the local schools and our community every year.”

These elites are only a handful of the elites competing at this year’s Spirit Run. Visit www.nmspiritrun.org/elite-competitors/ to view profiles of more than a dozen more. Keep checking back as more profiles are added leading up until Sunday’s race.


Sign of the times

On Thursdays we give you a partial glimpse of a sign around town. You guess what the overall name of the business is. 

So, we gave you a glimpse of an accented “E” from the Kean Coffee sign at Westcliff Drive and Irvine Avenue. Correct guesses came in from Dominic Tucci, Joe Stapleton and Rachel Peterson.  

Thank you all for playing.

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

Kean Coffee

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Police Files

Man tries home break-in, car break-in and is arrested

Shortly before 3:30 a.m., on Friday, March 9, a woman in the 1600 block of Mesa Drive called the Newport Beach Police Department to report that an unknown man had tried to open a window to her home. Responding officers found a man matching the suspect’s description in a nearby parking lot, attempting to open car doors by pulling on the handles.  

The man, later identified as John Paul Denny, had some stolen property in his possession, as well as gloves and burglary tools, and prescription medication (without an accompanying prescription).

Denny, 38, a mechanic from Costa Mesa, was subsequently arrested on charges of commercial burglary with attempted forced entry, receiving stolen property, tampering with a vehicle, possession of burglary tools and possession of a controlled substance.

Later that same day, another victim called NBPD to report a vehicle burglary in the same area. The victim identified several of the items that had also been in Denny’s possession.

He was arrested on $20,000 bail.

Scroll down to Police Beat for all arrests & crime reports


Pet of the Week Dog and Cat print

StuNewsNewport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

Brooklyn

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Courtesy of Newport Beach 

Animal Shelter

MEET BROOKLYN

Brooklyn is an un-typical Calico. She’s sweet, sweet, sweet and not in the diva sort of way. She’s agreeable and easy going. She loves and showers all those she meets with her affections. She’s playful in a calm cat sort of way and goes along with just about anything. Her energy is delightful, and she is as much of a companion animal as a companion animal could ever be. She has only ever known indoor living, so her remaining in a peaceful indoor home is a true necessity.

At any given time, the shelter can have 4 - 5 dogs and 7 - 8 cats/kittens and other pets available for adoption. At times, they receive owner turn-ins that would do best adopted out together. 

Adoption costs at the shelter:

Dogs - $130

Puppies - $150

Cats - $90

Kittens - $110

If you are interested in finding out more about Brooklyn, or any other animals up for adoption, the Newport Beach Animal Shelter is located at 20302 Riverside Drive, Newport Beach. It is open Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Call 949.644.3656. Email Valerie Schomburg at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To find out how you can help support the shelter, visit www.nbpd.org and click on “Our Animal Shelter” to view the wish list. They can always use food & treats; new toys; grooming, hygiene & comfort products; as well as laundry soap, dish soap, paper towels, sponges & scrub pads and lint rollers. If you are interested in volunteering, you can fill out and sign the application on the website.


On the Harbor: My sail from San Diego to Puerto Vallarta 

By LEN BOSE

The clocks have moved forward and spring sailing season is underway. This last week I was sailing aboard the yacht “Horizon” in the 2018 San Diego to Puerto Vallarta Yacht Race.

The Newport Beach entries were John Raymont Andrews 40 “Fast Exit,” Steve Sellinger Santa Cruz 52 “Triumph,” John Shulze Santa Cruz 50 “Horizon,” Manouch Moshayedi BakeWhite 100 “RIO” and Tom Corkett Andrews 70 “Runaway.” “Horizon” started on Friday, March 2 in Division 5 with the other Santa Cruz 50’s & 52’s.

The forecast was for a light sea breeze out of the south and dying off as we reached Ensenada. This forecast left Friday starters with a bit of a hindrance, because the smaller boats in Division 7 had started the day before with a clearing westerly and there were reports of 40 knot squalls and blown up spinnakers. Saturday starters are the big boats like the 100-footer “Rio,” Andrews 70 “Runaway” and Roy Disney Andrews 70 “Pyewacket.” Their forecast was for 15 knots out of the southwest.

With that aside and a 1,000 mile-race to Puerto Vallarta, we knew that there would be many opportunities for us to make that time up on the other boats for the overall standings. One thing that always comes to mind is that the race is never over until you cross the finish in a Mexico race. I first heard this saying from Newport Beach City Councilmember Brad Avery back in the ‘80s and have always remembered it.

Horizon and Lucky Duck

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Photo by Joysailing.com

“Horizon” and “Lucky Duck” after the start of the race

Out of the starting gate it was our class favorites “Horizon” and “Lucky Duck” side by side reaching out of San Diego harbor and pointed for the Coronado Islands. At this point, on “Horizon” it officially became duck season. The two boats exchanged the lead at least five times down the Baja coast, always staying within eyesight of each, and crossing jibes under the light of the full moon at night. When two competitors meet up like this, they normally push their boats that much harder with the sail changes happening with each wind shift rather than giving it the old five-minute rule and waiting to see if the wind will shift back.

Life aboard “Horizon” goes into a four-hour off, three-hour on watch system after the first dinner with three people staying on deck, unless we have to make maneuvers and everyone is called on deck. With each maneuver, be it sail changes or gybing each crew member, the assigned position throughout the race never changes. For example, the same person will drive the boat, just like the same person will be in charge of pulling up and letting down the halyards that lift the sails up and down.

I am listed as the chef aboard the boat and by today’s race boat standards that’s not too far from the truth. In an effort to save weight, most competitors are chocking down freeze dried foods which I hear are not that bad if you can add your favorite hot sauce. Aboard “Horizon,” breakfast consists of yogurt and granola or cereal with fresh fruit. Every other day I will warm up some Jimmy Dean breakfast sandwiches, which are always well received. There is nothing more appreciated than a warm meal while you are out to sea. For lunch, I’ll fix deli meat sandwiches with avocado, onion and lettuce, and on odd days serve up hot dogs, which have seemed to be the crew’s favorite. For dinner, we ask for volunteers to provide the boat with dinner casseroles with favorites being beef stroganoff, pasta bake and enchilada pie. Each dinner is served with a fresh salad and choice of dressing. After the galley is cleaned up, I’ll fill a container with candy bars, trail mix and or some dried fruit along with leaving the Starbucks instant coffee and hot chocolate packets out for the crew. Now that might not seem as much of an effort on my part, but have you ever tried boiling water for hotdogs while tight reaching with the 3A spinnaker up and the boat leaned over in a mixed sea? It is rather challenging just serving the meals to the crew.

One of the largest obstacles of this race is navigating past Cabo hole, which creates wind before entering the Baja Gulf on your way to Puerto Vallarta. So, there we are with the Duck just close enough that we can talk to them. As night falls and the full moon has not yet risen, the two boats split so that we can’t make out our running light. This is when our navigator, Alex Steele, puts his plan into effect on how to work our way through the Cabo hole as fast as possible. Steel put in a ton of time studying this part of the course and just crushed it. The next morning, the Duck was more than 30 miles behind us in four knots of wind, while we were closing in at 15 knots headed straight for the finish line.

Like I mentioned before, a Mexico race is never over until it’s over, and we kept the throttle down until we crossed the line with a first in our class and seventh overall. Another great race with a solid group of sailors from our harbor! This years’ crew was John Shulze, Len Bose, Alex Steele, Justin Law, Tom Okeefe, Creig Chamberlain, Andrew Dippel, Doug Cary and Greg Newman. Now we have to get the boat home and start getting ready for the upcoming Ensenada race.

Sea ya!

~~~~~~~~

Len Bose is a yachting enthusiast, yacht broker and harbor columnist for StuNewsNewport.


OC Fair to hire 1,500 workers for summer jobs

OC Fair

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Courtesy of OC Fair & Events Center

There is a lot of work that goes into putting on the annual OC Fair, and hiring is now underway to fill about 1,500 seasonal positions. Jobs include everything from selling carnival tickets, parking cars and building exhibits to working as an accounting clerk, mechanic or audio assistant.

“We are looking for smiling, enthusiastic people to help our guests make wonderful memories,” said OC Fair & Event Center CEO Kathy Kramer. “We have the best summer jobs ever – and there are terrific perks. These are perfect positions for educators, students and anyone who wants to have a great time while earning a paycheck.”

There are also a handful of year-round civil service jobs available, including a Community Engagement Director and a Heroes Hall Supervisor. Most positions that are currently open fall into the seasonal part-time category with opportunities available for department leads and specialists.

With only about 150 year-round employees, the OC Fair & Event Center staff works hard to gear up for the busy summer season. Most seasonal jobs have been posted at www.ocfair.com/jobs and positions are available for people 16 years of age and older. Hiring has begun for key jobs, with other start dates staggered toward the OC Fair, to be held July 13 - August 12.

There are jobs available for those who have always wanted to be a costumed character, sign language interpreter, data analyst, auto mechanic, dispatcher, lighting technician, farm attendant, or a safety and security representative.

Perks include free admission to the OC Fair, the option to purchase up to 20 Fair tickets for $1 each for friends and family, and the opportunity to win a Fair employee scholarship.

For more information, visit www.ocfair.com/jobs or contact the OCFEC Human Resources Department at 714.708.1563, Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

The Orange County Fair & Events Center is located at 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa.


Newport-Balboa Rotary to hold family barbecue at ENC

Butterflies and bluegrass

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Submitted photo

Join the Rotary Club of Newport-Balboa at the Environmental Nature Center (ENC) for a family barbecue on Saturday, April 14 at 5 p.m.

This family-fun event, “Butterflies & Bluegrass,” features award-winning author, Chris Epting. Adding to the barbecue festivities are silent and live auctions, music, crafts and tours.

Proceeds will support local Rotary education projects and the ENC Butterfly House.

Admission: Adults, $50; Children 10 and younger, $25.

The Environmental Nature Center is located at 1601 E. 16th St., Newport Beach.


Newport Harbor Kappa Delta Sorority to hold annual fundraiser

Shamrock heart

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Submitted photo

On Saturday, March 24 beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club, the Newport Harbor Kappa Delta Sorority will hold its annual Shamrock Luncheon for the Prevention of Child Abuse.

The featured speaker is Dr. Edward Greer, who will provide a presentation about his experiences helping children and other victims in Haiti, as a member of the Doctors Without Borders organization.

Enjoy a delicious entrée of grilled salmon salad or Chinese chicken salad and a crème brulee tart while experiencing Yearsley Company Accessories & Fashions, a silent auction and opportunity drawing prizes.

Tickets are $55 per person, with all proceeds benefitting charities: 80 percent directed to the Women’s Transitional Living Center (a local shelter for abused women and their children), and 20 percent going to Prevent Child Abuse America.

To reserve you seat, RSVP to Barbara Harrington by March 9 at 714.556.6508, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club is located at 1601 Bayside Drive, Corona del Mar.


Mesa Water re-accredited as a “District of Distinction”

Atkinson headshot

Mesa Water District (Mesa Water®), a top-performing public water agency, was recently re-accredited as a “District of Distinction,” by the Special District Leadership Foundation (SDLF) for its sound fiscal management policies and practices in district operations. This is the sixth time Mesa Water® has received this biannual accreditation.

“Due to the efforts of our staff, management team, and Board members, Mesa Water has again achieved the highest transparency performance standards,” said Mesa Water Board President Jim Atkinson. “Mesa Water’s ongoing commitment to transparency is evidenced by our receiving this biannual award for the sixth consecutive time.”

Requirements for receiving the “District of Distinction” recognition include: regular financial audits with no major deficiencies; policies and procedures that conform to all state law statutes and regulations; proof of training in the areas of ethics, governance, and harassment prevention; and more. Additionally, www.MesaWater.org was reviewed to ensure it includes postings of the required transparency elements such as board meeting agendas and schedules, current budget and most recent financial audit, compensation for board members and staff, and elections procedures and deadlines.

Certificate of reaccreditation

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“Mesa Water is dedicated to satisfying our community’s water needs, and our strategic plan includes the goals of being financially responsible and transparent, increasing public awareness about Mesa Water and about water, and providing outstanding customer service,” said Mesa Water General Manager Paul E. Shoenberger, P.E. “Government accountability, openness, and transparency is incorporated within our strategic plan which guides our organization and operations.”

SDLF is an independent, non-profit organization formed to promote good governance and best practices among California’s special districts through certification, accreditation and other recognition programs.

“SDLF provides an independent audit review of the last three years of the district’s operations to ensure prudent fiscal practices,” said Neil McCormick, SDLF Chief Executive Officer. “The committee members who review the audits are volunteers from the special district community, including district controllers, directors of finance and certified general managers.


Mayor’s Egg Roll on the Civic Green is coming…

Easter Egg hunt

Submitted photo

The City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Department is hosting the 4th annual Mayor’s Egg Roll on Saturday, March 24 from 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. at the Newport Beach Civic Center. The event is free and open to the public.

Community members of all ages are invited to join Mayor Duffy Duffield for some springtime fun. City staff will coordinate sack races, various games and most importantly, egg races across the lawn. There will be photo opportunities with the Civic Center bunnies, and attendees can enjoy bounce houses, face painting, train rides, popcorn, cotton candy and take home spring goodie bags, while supplies last.

There is ample, free parking in the parking structure.

For more information, call 949.644.3151


Lost Cleopatra film and discussion coming to NB Library

Theda Bara and Franz Leiber

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Submitted photo

Theda Bara (Cleopatra) and Franz Leiber (Caesar) starred in the lost film, “Lost Cleopatra”

For the centennial of its filming in Newport Bay, documentary filmmaker Phillip Dye will introduce his reconstruction of this lost movie – Lost Cleopatra – which starred Theda Bara, the siren of the silver screen. The event takes place on Thursday, March 29. Doors open at 6 p.m.; program starts at 6:30 p.m.

A small presentation and talk will be followed by a screening of his reconstruction. There will be time for a Q & A following the presentation.

Presented by the Newport Beach Public Library and the Newport Beach Historical Society, the event is free and takes place at Newport Beach Central Library’s Friends Room, 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach. www.newportbeachlibrary.org


Letter to the Editor:

Stop Playing Games at Taxpayer Expense

Once again, Mayor Duffield and Mayor Pro-Tem O’Neill, in a desperate attempt to find something, anything, to serve as a record to run on, have proposed an unnecessary and foolish prohibition to using city resources to advocate for city and county ballot measures. This of course is already prohibited by state law and has been so for many years.

Much like the misguided effort to refuse our gas tax funds, this proposal is fraught with unintended consequences.

For example, when our local transportation tax measure, Measure M, was reauthorized in 2006, Newport Beach, like every other city in Orange County, was represented by elected officials and staff in working groups leading up to the drafting of the ballot measure to ensure that local priorities were considered and included in the measure. This policy would preclude the representation of Newport Beach in the preparation of any extension of our local transportation funding source and likely result in our city losing valuable street and road improvement funds. Measure M has been used to improve our traffic signals, repair our roads, provide a needed bridge over Superior at Sunset Ridge Park and even fund our summer bus service on the Peninsula.

Secondly, we all know that any tax increase must be voted on and none is projected to be submitted to the voters. Where this policy may come into play, however, is in the case of a natural disaster. Laguna Beach was required to go to the voters to seek special tax funding to make emergency repairs to Bluebird Canyon after a catastrophic landslide. This policy would prohibit the city from even explaining the need for special funding to the voters and would delay emergency improvements. Consider what would happen if we had a Tsunami, canyon fire or earthquake.

Third, the city spent millions in the 1990s in indirect support of the three ballot measures related to moving the airport to El Toro. Since taxes are part of any airport plan, this policy could have prevented advocacy on one of the most important issues to city residents.

Ironically, the only recent use of city resources to advocate on tax issues was the August 31, 2017 council meeting hastily called by Team Newport to reverse themselves on their misguided refusal to accept our own gas tax funds. The resolution included a statement of city opposition to SB1, the state gas tax bill and thus engaged in advocacy.  

Let’s stop playing political games and wasting tax dollars on empty gestures such as this.

Keith Curry, Former Mayor 

Newport Beach


Is your house next? NBPD Speaks Up to discuss current crime trends

Tomorrow evening, Wednesday, March 14, Speak Up Newport will present the community topic “Is Your Neighborhood Being Targeted for Residential Burglaries?” at the Civic Center Community Room, 100 Civic Center Drive.

This program, with speaker Andi Querry from the Newport Beach Police Department, will focus on current crime trends as they relate to residential burglary, as well as theft from cars.

Andi Querry

Querry will discuss where in the City it is most prevalent, who is doing it (and how), what they are taking...and what you can do to prevent it. She will discuss common sense techniques you can use, as well as the latest in technology and what a good home security plan looks like – whether you live in a multimillion-dollar home, a condo or an apartment.

Querry is a Crime Prevention Specialist with the Newport Beach Police Department and has worked in the field of crime prevention for more than 22 years. Her current assignments include coordinating neighborhood and business watch programs, community presentations to educate residents and visitors on crime trends and a variety of crime prevention methods. She also conducts commercial and home security inspections.

The evening begins at 5:15 p.m. with a reception hosted by The Bungalow and then the program runs from 6 - 7 p.m.

As Speak Up Newport reminds us, “Come to this important program and hear how

you can protect yourself and your property.” 

There’s no charge to attend. 


Guest Column

Dave Kiff

An insider’s look at what’s going on in and around City Hall

Dave Kiff

Newport Beach City Manager Dave Kiff  

Here is a summary of what’s on the agenda of the next City Council meeting (set for Tuesday, March 13th). I don’t summarize the whole agenda. To see that, please click here.

Study Session begins at 5 p.m., and the Regular Session at 7 p.m. 

At the Study Session, Council will congratulate the NHHS Girls’ Water Polo team on their CIF-SS Division 2 championship win. 

Then the only business item is our annual “Early Look” at the Capital Improvement Plan for Fiscal Year 2018-19. This is staff’s chance to go over with the Council (and community) what construction, repair, and maintenance projects are slated for the coming months and year. Public Works staff will summarize things like road projects, water & wastewater, facilities, parks, and more. This is a good issue to follow if you’re a community member wondering “when will _____ be built?” or “when can I expect my key commuting road to be resurfaced so that two weeks of my life can be ruined?”

The Regular Session at 7 p.m. has these items that caught my attention:

We received a new state grant to help us corral fuel spills on the Harbor. This is another expansion of our new Harbor Operations work, in this case maybe allowing us to be a little more nimble out there when we see a problem. The grant is $35,000.

Another state-related item is one that asks the City to identify to the State key roadways, in this case San Joaquin Hills Road, as the first place that about $1.4M in new gas tax revenue would go as a result of the State’s recent increase in the tax (aka SB 1). We have to let the State know which roads upon which we will use the revenue by May 2018.

A proposed new Council Policy would consider whether the Council would explicitly block any expenditure of funds on advocacy measures related to a tax. 

The State also requires us to complete a detailed assessment of how Sea Level Rise might affect our Tidelands, including our harbor and ocean beaches. This $134K item would undertake that review to make sure we comply with the law. 

We have a small item accepting about $23K in funds from the California Library system for our literacy program. If you don’t know about that program, it’s a great one. Primarily led by volunteers, the program has small group and one-on-one tutoring for low-literacy individuals, and it’s been going on quietly for 25 years. It’s helped many, many folks get the skills they need to prosper in society. If you want to help volunteer or to learn more about it, click here.

The City will also consider hiring advocates to help marshal AB 2464 (Harper) through the State Legislature. This is a bill that would create a special carve-out for Newport Harbor so that, potentially, the City Council could issue local coastal approvals for various infrastructure efforts on and near the waters of the Harbor. Today, residents and businesses have to go to the Coastal Commission for these permits. A local “Port Master Plan” would be akin to a “Local Coastal Program” or LCP for the waters, versus just the land.

A few notes:

Thanks to all who attended our 5th “Friday Forum” on the airport on Friday, March 9th. It was a really interesting presentation on how the Airport Noise and Access Office allocates “slots” for air carriers. We were appreciative of the attendance of Supervisor Michelle Steel (2nd District), her assistant Tim Whitacre, a representative from Congressman Rohrabacher’s office, as well as officials from Laguna Niguel and Costa Mesa. If you missed any of the forums, we’re posting the materials from each one on our website, so you’ll want to click here. I’m happy to report that there seems to be a larger groundswell of support towards continuing to work on ways to reduce noise and pollution from JWA. While hurdles are ahead, I remain optimistic. My thanks, too, for everyone who sent me the articlefrom the Wall Street Journal about how airspeed restrictions are being considered at Boston/Logan. That’s worth reading for all of you airport followers.

Harbor Commission meets this coming Wednesday, March 14th at 6:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers. 

The City’s Finance Committee meets this coming Thursday, March 15th at 3 p.m. in Bay 2D of City Hall at the Civic Center.

Thanks to all who have written in about a proposed new “Permanent Home” for the Newport Beach Junior Lifeguard Program. We really appreciate the messages. This is one of several projects desired by community members and groups that, if successful, will likely have to have a very robust private donation program to carry the ball forward. Please reach out to the Newport Beach JG Foundation at http://nbjg.funraise.org for more information. 

Thank you for reading. Please forward this Guide to family, friends and members of your HOA if you represent one. I always like hearing from you, too, so please don’t hesitate to ask a question or offer a comment. 

Sincerely,

Dave Kiff

City Manager

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

949.644.3001


Gift of Literacy Luncheon features bestselling author

Janelle BrownBookcover

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Courtesy of Newport Beach Public Library

Bestselling author Janelle Brown’s newest novel is “Watch Me Disappear”

Newport/Mesa ProLiteracy presents the 11th annual Gift of Literacy Author Luncheon on Friday, May 18 at 11:30 a.m. at The Pacific Club, 4111 MacArthur Blvd., Newport Beach.

The luncheon will feature guest speaker, author Janelle Brown, bestselling author of the novels “Watch Me Disappear,” “All We Ever Wanted Was Everything,” and “This Is Where We Live.” 

An essayist and journalist, Brown’s writing has appeared in The New York Times, Vogue, Elle, Wired, Self, RealSimple, Lenny, Los Angeles Times, and numerous other publications. Her riveting new novel, “Watch Me Disappear” is a suspenseful page-turner that captures a family’s search for answers after the disappearance of a beautiful, charismatic mother.

Brown began her career as a staff writer at Wired during the dotcom boom years, working on seminal Web sites like HotWired and Wired News. In the 1990s, she was also the editor and co-founder of Maxi, an irreverent (and now, long-gone) women’s pop culture Webzine.

Tickets for the luncheon are $95 per person and include a copy of the book “Watch Me Disappear.” The event will also include a silent auction and opportunity drawing, as well as an opportunity for additional book purchases and signing. Tickets can be purchased online at www.newportliteracy.org.

Proceeds from the event help fund the Newport Beach Public Library Literacy Services (Newport/Mesa ProLiteracy) program, which serves more than 200 adult learners annually with free literacy instruction. The program offers one-on-one tutoring, writing workshops, conversation classes and other programs designed to develop the literacy skills of adults and empower them to achieve greater success in their lives – at home, at work and in the community. 

For more information, contact Literacy Services at 949.717.3874 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Toshiba Classic to become Hoag Classic and Folino named chairman

TomJohnson

Kudos to Toshiba Classic Executive Director Jeff Purser and the entire Hoag team behind him for another successful tournament week out at Newport Beach Country Club.

Despite rain, despite some cold and breezy conditions, the tournament came together almost flawlessly, with golfing great Vijay Singh eventually winning on Sunday.

But there was plenty of other news coming out of the week’s event. First, Toshiba ended their 20-year partnership with the tournament following the end of play this year. 

“I want to thank Toshiba for an incredible 20-year partnership,” said Purser, who has served as the executive director since 1998. “Not many tournaments are lucky enough to have a title partner for two decades, and their support has allowed us to accomplish more than any other tournament in history.”

The Classic has raised more than $20 million for Hoag Hospital and other local charities over the past 20 years.

The naming for the event next year will feature Hoag as the title sponsor and then feature several presenting sponsors. The first of those named is Konica Minolta.

Purser expects others in the coming weeks.

Then there’s retired Emulex chairman and noted philanthropist Paul Folino who has been named the 2019 Hoag Classic Chairman, replacing the outgoing Ira Garbutt.

“I am honored to become only the third tournament chairman in this prestigious PGA Tour Champions tournament’s history and look forward to leading the community development for Hoag Charity Sports as we rebrand this event in Orange County,” Folino said. “I am confident that with Hoag’s name on the title, even more companies and individuals will be motivated to support Orange County’s only PGA Tour event that benefits a world-classic health care organization serving our community.” 

The tournament, which will be played March 4 - 10 in 2019, will continue to benefit the Mary & Dick Allen Diabetes Center and other Hoag programs.

Garbutt, meanwhile, served 10 years as chair, but acknowledged to me over the weekend that he’ll use the extra hours gained enjoying grandchildren. 

All I can say is, “Great choice!”

On Saturday, prior to golf, the Toshiba Classic honored active, retired and reserved service members with Military Appreciation Day. Free admission was offered to 3,000 service members and their families. Additionally, the Classic donated approximately $50,000 to military causes and organizations including the Open Hearts for Purple Hearts Foundation, Marine Corps Scholarship Fund, and the Navy Memorial Foundation

Distinguished guests of honor included: John J. Swigart Jr. (USN), Bill Birnie (US Army), Dr. Anthony Caffarelli (USMC), Colonel Norman Ewers (USMC, Ret.), Colonel Bing Girling (USAF Ret.), Betty Storch (USN), Major Harry H. Selling (USAF, Ret.), Lieutenant General Edward Hanlon Jr. (USMC, Ret.), Rear Admiral Gregory C. Horn, Rear Admiral Frank Thorp, IV (USN, Ret.), Admiral Tomas C. Lynch (USN, Ret.), Commander John Mastrocol (US, Ret.), Steve Wilburn (USMC), Captain J. Charles Plumb (USNR, Ret.), William Wagasy (USN), and Patrick Folino (US Army).

The celebration took place in the social media tent opposite the Newport Beach Country Club clubhouse and was surrounded by spectators.

Other notes, 68-year-old Tom Watson shot or bettered his age for the eighth time on the PGA TOUR Champions circuit and the second time this season; and, if you thought pro John Riegger’s caddie looked a lot like Los Angeles Angels pitching great Chuck Finley, you were right.


Enter the City Arts Commission photo contest for prizes

Calling all photographers to give us your best shot!

To encourage public awareness of the Sculpture Exhibition in Civic Center Park, the Newport Beach City Arts Commission is sponsoring a photography contest, and you are invited to enter.

From now through April 15, submit your photographs of one or more of the sculptures on display in Civic Center Park, 100 Civic Center Drive, Newport Beach.

Getting Your Bearings

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Sculpture by David Boyer/

Courtesy of the City of Newport Beach

Inspired by antique industrial artifacts that can be found in the historic areas of the Western United States, “Getting Your Bearings” by David Boyer, is a kinetic wind sculpture that is monumental in size, whimsical in style and antique in appearance.

Interaction with the sculptures is encouraged, however photos cannot depict any climbing, hanging, modification or physical abuse of the sculptures. Note: The “bunnies” in the park are not considered sculptures.

The contest is open to all, professional and amateur, regardless of age, gender or nationality. Entrants under 18 years of age require the permission of a parent or guardian. Submissions should be emailed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Entries will be accepted through April 15. Complete entry guidelines and instructions can be found at www.newportbeachca.gov/culturalarts.

Grand Prize, Runner Up and Honorable Mention will be awarded. Prizes include gift certificates donated by local restaurants, including Modo Mio Rustic Italian Kitchen, Bluewater Grill and Bistango. Winning photos will be displayed on the City’s Cultural Arts website. For more information, contact the Cultural Arts office, at 949.717.3802 or send an email to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

So…get clicking!


Dr. Henry T. Nicholas surprises UC Irvine men’s and women’s crew teams with $40,000 pledge

UCI Crew

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Submitted photo

At a ceremony on Saturday, March 3 attended by supporters of UC Irvine crew and team members, philanthropist Dr. Henry T. Nicholas III announced that he would close the gap on fundraising that ensures UCI’s men’s and women’s crew members will be participating in the 2018 American Collegiate Rowing Association National

Championship Regatta in Georgia this May.

With the cost of sending the teams and their boats to Georgia at about $45,000, and with $4,000 raised at Saturday’s luncheon, silent auction and award ceremony, which followed the Henry T. Nicholas III-UC Challenge Cup Regatta in Newport Harbor, the Nicholas gift amounted to approximately $40,000, surprising and delighting student crew members.

“Crew is a sport that gets very little glory, but requires tremendous commitment, heart and character,” Nicholas said after the lunch ceremony. “I like to support unsung heroes who succeed through hard work, discipline and teamwork, and we saw all of those qualities at today’s Regatta. I am extremely proud of all of the superb scholar-athletes who competed and gave it their all, and I am especially proud of the UCI crew teams. They deserve to go to Nationals and compete with the best.”

Nicholas, co-founder of Broadcom and a major philanthropist, has been a long-time supporter of UCI crew, donating more than $1 million to the program. He has been a major force behind a major statewide rowing competition, the Henry T. Nicholas III-UC Challenge Cup Regatta in Newport Harbor, that brings together teams from several University of California campuses.

In addition to his support for UCI crew, Nicholas is a co-founder of the Nicholas Academic Centers, based in Santa Ana and attended by high students who receive academic tutoring, counseling, and assistance with college applications with the goal of becoming college-eligible and receiving scholarships.

On Saturday, dozens of the Centers’ excited students, many of whom had never been on a boat, watched the Regatta from an observation boat as part of the Centers’ efforts to enrich its scholars outside of the classroom as well.

This year’s Regatta included men’s and women’s teams from UCI, UC Santa Barbara, UC San Diego, UCLA and UC Davis. UCI’s men’s and women’s teams each took third places, with UCSB’s men’s and women’s teams each taking first.

Crew is the first and oldest ongoing competitive sport at UCI. Founding Chancellor Dan Aldrich started the program, which is now in its 52nd year. UCI Men’s Crew Coach Austin Brooks, whose salary is paid by the Friends of UCI Rowing, has built the UCI club program from a dozen students a few years ago to more than 50 now.

“The growing strength of our program over the last several years is in large part due to the tremendous support of Dr. Henry Nicholas and our other supporters who share a passion for crew,” Brooks said. “We are extremely grateful to our supporters. My rowers were ecstatic when they heard they would be going to Nationals.”

Saturday’s Regatta Results: Men’s Varsity Crew: 1: UC Santa Barbara; 2: UC San Diego; 3: UC Irvine; 4: UCLA; 5: UC Davis/Women’s Varsity Crew: 1: UC Santa Barbara; 2: UC San Diego; 3: UC Irvine.


OC Market Place to hold grand re-opening

Tyke at OC Market Place

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Courtesy of OC Market Place

Experience the new Orange County Market Place during its Grand Reopening on Saturday, March 31. Spectra, managers of the OC Market Place, is hosting this free community gathering and relaunch event from 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. and you’re invited!

The Grand Reopening includes a full day of activities featuring a ribbon cutting supported by the Costa Mesa Chamber of Commerce followed by a performance by the Costa Mesa High School Band. The day is dedicated to the Orange County community with a fundraiser and live entertainment event, “Taste of the Arts,” supporting the Community Outreach Alliance (COA). COA artists will perform on stage in the South Event Space, and host art installations and experiences, alongside a car show with the Cadillac Kings Car Club.

Concurrently, patrons can shop the Market Place while experiencing the vintage handmade market, “Behind the Picket Fence,” located in the East Event Space of the property. Easter activities are available for families with children, including Easter egg hunts in the Centennial Farm, face painting and an Easter Scavenger Hunt throughout the Market Place.

Take advantage of the food and beverage offerings, with a contest to name their new featured burger. Sip, shop and stroll with through the North Event Space for a wine tasting and sampling event where you can purchase a full bottle to go, and peruse and purchase fresh produce in the Farmers’ Market.

For more information, visit www.OCMarketPlace.com.

The Orange County Market Place is located on the Orange County Fair & Events Center grounds at 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa.


Come out to the Spirit Run and discover Camp Newport

sand volleyball kids

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Submitted photo

Kids! Come check out the youth camps and programs that the City of Newport Beach has planned on Sunday, March 18 from 6:30 - 10:30 a.m. at Fashion Island.

With a kaleidoscope of camps to choose from, the City’s Recreation & Senior Services staff with be at the Spirit Run in the Expo Area. You can ask questions, pick up program materials and register for summer camps on the spot!

Among the camps offered are aquatics; beach, sailing and surf; robotics & science discovery; cultural & performing arts; enrichment; movement and fitness; and sports.

Spirit Run takes place at Fashion Island, Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach.

For more information, visit www.campnewport.com.


Capturing iconic Newport Beach

Royal Tern

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 Artwork by Don Krotee

“Royal Tern” portrays a tern visiting the coast, captured through pencil and architectural marker on paper

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Don Krotee has been a resident of Newport Beach since 1986. He is a board member of the Newport Heights Improvement Association and SPON, and is an architect who has been drawing and painting from an early age. His architectural marker drawings are featured periodically in StuNews.


You Must Remember This: Rand McNally Atlas, a historical chronicler

By NANCY GARDNER

I was going through a box, looking for a specific photo, and came across one of my father’s re-election brochures: Retain Superior Court Judge Robert Gardner, Proven Judicial Ability, Election June 1, 1948. Inside, there was the usual resume of accomplishments, and then a list of his campaign committee, representing all the cities in the county including Olive and Greenville. Now I had seen Olive on a map at some point, and a search explained that it still exists as an enclave within Orange, but I couldn’t find anything on Greenville, except that there’s a street and a school in Santa Ana. Then I remembered the old atlas. It’s a Rand-McNally published in 1890. I turned to California – and it was quite interesting.

Judge Gardner

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Photos courtesy of Nancy Gardner

Superior Court Judge Gardner re-election brochure

First of all, there was no Orange County. A quick check of the county’s history established that it was formed in 1889, too late to be included. (There was also no Riverside County, 1893, or Imperial County, 1907). Newport Harbor was shown, but not Newport Beach. In fact, the only cities in Orange County were Santa Ana, Anaheim, San Juan (not San Juan Capistrano), San Mateo and possibly in what would become Orange County – Aluchiolo. No Greenville, so I’ll just presume it was absorbed into Santa Ana at some point. As for San Mateo, there is still a San Mateo creek, although I didn’t find reference to a town by that name, and I could find nothing on Aluchiolo.

Rand McNally Atlas

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Rand McNally Atlas, published in 1890

The atlas also includes the results of the 1880 census for California: Males, 518,176; Females, 346,518; Native, 571,820; Foreign, 292,874; White, 787,181; Colored, 97,513; including 75,122 Chinese, 86 Japanese, 16,277 Indians and Half-breeds. The number of Japanese was startling, but what really struck me, given the date, was that there were so few Indians, so I went back and looked at the census numbers of the other states. Nationally, there were 6,741,948 individuals who fell into the “Colored” category. Indians made up less than one percent of that total. In fact, what had seemed low to me was actually a high number. California had three times as many Indians living here as the next state, Michigan. Delaware had the least, at five. The atlas also had a section on the Indian Territory. which existed at the time. As explained in the atlas, this area congregated all Indians in one territory, to be theirs forever. Or until the State of Oklahoma was formed. In a few pages, you had a pretty good chronicle of Native American history.

As for today, the 2010 census shows how greatly our population has grown. From less than a million we number slightly over 37 million, which helps to explain traffic and other woes. Unlike 130 years ago, we have more women than men. Could this be why we have two female senators?

~~~~~~~~

Nancy Gardner, former Mayor of Newport Beach, long-time resident and daughter of Judge Robert Gardner, is a regular contributor to StuNewsNewport.


Toshiba Classic Pro-Am, where the pros and amateurs enjoy great golf and lively camaraderie

Toshiba scoreboard

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Photos by Lana Johnson

The Toshiba Classic runs today through Sunday at Newport Beach Country Club. It brings players with more than 400 worldwide professional victories and more than 50 major championships to our community. Tee-off times today begin at 10:30 a.m.

The tournament marks Hoag Hospital’s 20th anniversary as host, manager and beneficiary of the event, generating more than $1 million annually for charity. As it has since 2011, proceeds from this year’s Toshiba Classic will benefit the Mary & Dick Allen Diabetes Center and other Hoag programs.

Among the many notable players you’ll have the opportunity to watch are Jay Haas, who is defending his title; Tom Watson; Colin Montgomerie; Bernhard Langer; Scotty McCarron; Vijay Singh; Mark O’Meara; Tom Lehman; and Corey Pavin.

The Pro-Am took place Wednesday and Thursday, and we captured some fun shots out on the course, we hope you enjoy.

For more information on this weekend’s tournament play and special events, visit www.toshibaclassic.com.

Jay Haas and amateurs

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Pro golfer Jay Haas (center), pictured with his amateur teammates, defends his Toshiba Classic title this year

John Daly and two guys

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(L-R): Chris Leggio and Mark Leggio, of Mark Christopher Chevrolet, flank pro golfer John Daly 

Scotty McCarron and volunteer

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(L-R): Pro golfer Scotty McCarron poses with a Toshiba Classic volunteer on the 9th hole 

Check out more photos from the Toshiba Classic Pro-Am

Click on left side photo to see them all in a slideshow


Stump the Stu

Did you know it? Five locals did

Stump the Stu 3.9.18

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“I remember it’s a souvenir and art gallery shop at the Crystal Cove Conservancy,” Debbie Williams-Lopez responded. You are correct! But you have some company. Congrats also to Bill Finster, Debra Finster, Ellen Trujillo and Doug Thomas. 

We try and Stump you each week on Tuesdays with a picture of something unique in our community.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think StuNewsNewport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Sign of the times

It’s another edition of Sign of the times. On Fridays we give you a partial glimpse of a sign around town. You guess what the overall name of the business is and where it’s located. 

Here’s the key to this week’s guess…it’s a favorite local hangout.

Send your guesses to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

We’ll print the names of those that correctly guess on Tuesday.

Good luck and happy hunting.

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

Sign of the Times 3.9.18

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Sherman Library to hold Open House

Jubilee Celebration Float

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Courtesy of Sherman Library & Gardens

Float in the Jubilee Celebration Industrial Parade, Los Angeles, 1898

You’re in for a treat when Sherman Library holds its 5th annual Open House on Tuesday, March 20 from 5 to 8 p.m.

Star of Hollywood

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Ad for a gambling ship anchored off Newport Harbor

The event will provide the opportunity to see the latest changes to the Library (including fresh paint, new carpeting and reupholstered chairs), new donations, and to take a tour of the archives storage, which is usually closed to the public. The tour will include a display of unique items from the Library’s collections, including a California Gold Rush era letter, cyanotype photographs of the Arizona Territory, early photographs of Newport Beach and more.

Arizona stagecoach

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Arizona stagecoach, circa 1890

Light refreshments will be served. Sherman Library requests an RSVP by calling 949.673.1880.

Sherman Library & Gardens is located at 2647 E. Coast Highway, Newport Beach. www.slgardens.org

Lee Carrillo

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Actor Lee Carrillo, 1940


 Segerstrom Center’s HAMILTUNES: AN AMERICAN SING-ALONG on the Plaza has been rescheduled

Jon Patrick Walker

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Photo by Joan Marcus, 2018

Jon Patrick Walker in the HAMILTON National Tour

Segerstrom Center for the Arts invites fans and fanatics of Broadway’s mega hit Hamilton to gather on the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza and let their collective voices ring out during HAMILTUNES: AN AMERICAN SING-ALONG.

Due to inclement weather, including an expected nor’easter in New York City which prevented travel for HAMILTUNES host, Broadway veteran Seth Rudetsky, as well as uncertainty in own local weather forecast ,the March 3 event has been rescheduled to March 31 from 4 to 6 p.m. Rudetsky is three-time Emmy Award-nominated Broadway conductor, pianist, comedian, writer, SiriusXM Broadway channel deejay and host of his own talk show,

HAMILTUNES is absolutely free, and there are many ways to participate. For those with stage fright – join the chorus of your Hamilfriends who will share the Argyros Plaza with you. Those who aspire to portray solo roles must sign up in advance on the Center’s website at www.SCFTA.org, and answer three questions: What songs would you like to sing?, What role would you like to portray?, and Within the role you would like to portray, which of that character’s songs would you like to sing? No previous experience anywhere is required. Casting is at random on the evening of the show.

Some roles may be multi-cast, with several people portraying the same character. Individuals singing solo roles will be coached and rehearsed by Rudetsky prior to the performance. Who will portray King George? Who will be Aaron Burr? Who will be the Schuyler sisters? And…who will be the evening’s Alexander Hamilton? It will be a great event when voices from all over Orange County gather to sing out for HAMILTUNES. 

The Julianne and George Argyros Plaza is located at Segerstrom Center for the Arts, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. www.scfta.org


SAVE THE DATE: Classic car auction this summer

Classic red car

Submitted photo

Classic car enthusiasts…save the date! Russo and Steele Collector Automobile Auctions is coming to the Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort from June 8 - 10 (with an auction preview on June 7). 

With more than 400 vehicles and an auction-in-the-round showcasing highly collectible European sports, American Muscle, Hot Rods and Customs, bidders can register online at www.russoandsteele.com.

General admission tickets for Friday and Saturday are $20; Sunday, $10.

Newport Dunes Waterfront Resort is located at 1131 Back Bay Resort, Newport Beach.


Political Notebook Newport Beach Banner

Stoaks announces fall run against “Duffy”

–From a press release

Newport Beach resident Tim Stoaks has announced his candidacy for City Council for District 3, with a planned run against incumbent Marshall “Duffy” Duffield in November.

Tim StoaksStoaks, who moved to Newport Beach back in 2003, has been heavily involved in the local community over the years serving on the boards of the Santa Ana Heights Redevelopment Project Advisory Committee, AirFair, the Santa Ana Heights fire station design committee, the City of Newport Beach Environmental Quality Affairs Committee (EQAC), the OASIS building fund committee, Bristol Street Revitalization Committee and the Harbor Educational Foundation, to name a few.

Recently, Stoaks has also been intimately involved in the development of the Friends of Newport Beach Animal Shelter (FONBAS) and their early fundraising efforts.

Stoaks is an architect by trade, previously working locally for Allergan, but is also a vital member of the Line in the Sand, a Newport Beach political action committee. Line in the Sand, of course, was instrumental in opposing the Museum House project in 2017. Stoaks refers to his policy on growth as “balanced development.” He demonstrated great pride in the responsible development of the Allergan campuses, of which he was a part.

Some of the goals Stoaks intends to work on are drawing out people in the community to come to the table with “talent to help resolve issues,” to be respectful and trusting to community members or what he calls being a “good neighbor,” and working with John Wayne Airport to move back to the higher departures, thus reducing noise and pollution.

He also wants consideration in making the Newport Beach City Attorney an elected position and to work toward district elections versus citywide elections for councilmembers.


Police Files

Illegal shopping spree leads to a fight, an arrest, and a $120,000 bail

On Sunday, March 4, at 2:24 p.m., officers were dispatched to a retail store in the 600 block of Newport Center Drive in response to a reported theft. The caller stated that a female suspect was caught making fraudulent purchases from the store. She then attempted to flee, flinging the wallet involved in the purchases into the street, before engaging in a physical fight with loss prevention officers outside the store.  

Another witness called to report that a possibly involved vehicle was seen fleeing the scene with two other subjects inside (a male driver and a female passenger).

Officers arriving on the scene took the female suspect, later identified as Kathy Lee Garner, 57, of Pasadena into custody.

They recovered the wallet and were shortly contacted by the rightful owner of said wallet, who had been alerted to the fraudulent purchase activity by the retail store. She reported that her wallet had been stolen from her purse at some point between 1:20 and 2 p.m. that day, while she was running errands. The victim’s credit cards and ID were then used for multiple fraudulent transactions.

After several interviews and a thorough field investigation, Garner was arrested for forgery, using a credit card fraudulently, forging a name on a credit card, identity theft, grand theft and receiving stolen property. Garner also had a warrant related to identity theft. Her bail was set at $120,000.

Motorcycle Safety Operations focus of NBPD

As part of the City’s grant-funded Special Traffic Enforcement and Crash Prevention (STEP) activities, the Newport Beach Police Department is conducting specialized Motorcycle Safety Enforcement Operations on Friday, March 9 and Friday, March 23. Extra officers will be on duty patrolling areas that are frequented by motorcyclists and where recent traffic collisions have occurred, in an effort to reduce injuries. 

Education and enforcement will be targeted at drivers and motorcycle riders alike. The officers will be focused on specific offenses including driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, speeding, driving on a suspended or revoked license, violations of motorcycle license endorsement, and any other dangerous activities.

Motorcycle fatalities have risen dramatically in California, showing a 28 percent increase over the decade low of 352 in 2010. In 2013, 453 motorcyclists lost their lives, marking the highest number of deaths in the previous five years. California collision data shows that the primary causes of motorcycle-involved collisions include speeding, unsafe turning, and driver/rider impairment due to drugs or alcohol.

During the past five years in the City of Newport Beach, 13 persons were injured in traffic collisions involving motorcycles and, tragically, four people lost their lives. The Police Department remains dedicated to preventing traffic-related deaths and injuries. They encourage everyone on the road to stay alert and be aware of their surroundings, especially when turning or changing lanes. Whether you are on two wheels, or on four, it’s your responsibility to share the road safely.

Safety tips for motorcycle riders: See and be seen, use your lane position to increase visibility; change lanes only when there is ample room; match your speed to surrounding traffic; always wear a DOT-compliant helmet and brightly colored protective clothing; and ride with lights on, even during daylight hours.

Safety tips for drivers: Share the road; look twice for motorcyclists, especially when entering the roadway, turning, or changing lanes; remember that motorcyclists are allowed in HOV lanes, unless prohibited by signage.

Motorcycle riders are urged to get training through the California Motorcyclist Safety Program. Information and training locations are available at http://www.californiamotorcyclist.com/ or 1.877.RIDE411 (1.877.743.3411).

Funding for this program is provided by a grant from the California Office of Traffic and Safety through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Sheriff Hutchens looking for changes with SB 54

Please see the statement below from Orange County Sheriff Sandra Hutchens regarding a lawsuit filed today by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, which challenges recent state legislation. 

“Following passage of Senate Bill 54, local law enforcement was restricted from communicating with federal immigration authorities on matters that, in my view, are critical to public safety. Despite my disagreement with SB 54, I was obliged to abide by the new law. Based on case law and direction from legal counsel, a Sheriff is responsible for following all state statutes unless they are formally ruled unconstitutional by a court. Until a statute is ruled against, it is presumed to be constitutional and law enforcement is obliged to follow the provision. 

“Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ action today gives the court an opportunity to provide legal direction on this issue. My hope is that the court will remove SB 54’s restrictions on communication. Local law enforcement has no desire to enforce immigration law, however we must have the ability to work with our federal partners to remove dangerous criminals from our community.” 

Scroll down to Police Beat for all arrests & crime reports


Newport Beach Saint Paddy’s Day Pub Crawl is coming

leprechaun and pot of gold

Submitted photo

Newport Beach is holding its “Luck of the Irish” St. Patrick’s Day Pub Crawl on Saturday, March 17 from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., and you’re invited! Enjoy top-rated drink specials at some of the best bars in town on the Peninsula.

Here’s how it works:

There are multiple starting locations (registration venues), and you only need to choose one. At each of the registration venues, the event staff distributes the same wristbands and customized maps that allow you to access the entire crawl and take advantage of the drink specials throughout the entire duration of the event. Prices vary by registration venues, due to the popularity of the starting location. You will receive the exact same wristband and map at any of the registration venues. The starting point/registration bar is simply the venue where you would like to begin the event.

You must be 21 years of age or older to participate; a valid Sate ID is required. Participating venues and advertised times are subject to change. No refunds, and all sales are final. If a venue is at capacity, then you may have to wait or proceed to another venue. To purchase tickets, visit www.PubCrawls.com.


New culinary school opens at OC Fair & Event Center 

A new cutting-edge cooking academy has launched at OC Fair & Event Center to empower underserved youth through free culinary education and mentorship. A commercial kitchen on the fairgrounds is being transformed into Hatch Culinary Lab.

The new education program is a partnership between OC Fair & Event Center (OCFEC), CulinaryLab Cooking School, Anaheim’s Innovative Mentorship Experience program (AIME) and Spectra, the Fair’s master concessionaire.

OCFEC is investing an initial $54,000 in equivalent value in this community program that this year will provide up to 50 students with training in everything from knife skills, cookery basics and making healthy meals to safety and sanitation. The spring session started February 28 with the first 20 students from Kennedy, Savanna and Western high schools working for eight weeks. A summer internship program and fall certification series will follow, culminating in an event to feed the local homeless community.

“We have an opportunity to change the lives of students through Hatch Culinary Lab and it is important for us to step in to help,” said OCFEC CEO Kathy Kramer. “Here at the OC Fair we love food, so this program is close to our hearts and ties in perfectly with our community give-back mission. I look forward to growing this program to include training for both kitchen staff and front-of-the-house positions.”

The team from CulinaryLab in Tustin is donating staff and time to the program and has created new curriculum tailored to provide students with the basics on how food works, healthy cooking skills and simple recipes they can practice at home with minimal cost and prep time. The goal is to excite students about cooking and food service and empower them to be confident individuals ready to secure employment.

Ryan Wagner

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Submitted photo

Chef Director Ryan Wagner of OC Fair & Event Center’s CulinaryLab Cooking School

“At CulinaryLab, we do everything we can to immerse students in the world of cooking with experimentation, tons of repetitive hands-on practice, and by involving local chef partners in the teaching process,” said Chef Ryan Wagner. “The goal of the Hatch program is to bring that same high-level culinary education to high school students who might otherwise not have access to it.”

The OCFEC commercial kitchen has been revamped from a solely commercial facility to a fully equipped teaching kitchen with additional cooking stations, appliances, storage, tables and cookware. The approx. 6,500-sq.-ft. facility is operated by Spectra, and manager Juan Quintero says the company will also donate kitchen labor, such as dishwashers, to support the program.

“The Spectra team is excited to be part of this community education program. This is really a win-win situation for us,” Quintero said. “Not only do we get to work with the student chefs and see their transformation, but we want to hire program graduates to work at the OC Fair doing kitchen prep and cooking for special events.”

Students from Anaheim Unified School District’s AIME program have been selected to participate in the first Hatch Culinary Lab sessions. More than 70 percent of AIME students come from economically challenged backgrounds and spend their time outside of school assisting their families, either at home or by working. The program will provide transportation and additional supervision for Hatch students.

There are plans for the program to expand through partnerships with Costa Mesa and Santa Ana school districts to serve up to 80 students annually. Wagner estimated that students will gain up to $20,000 worth of culinary education through the Hatch program and he is seeking to secure restaurant partners to help further students’ training.

CulinaryLab is a forward-focused cooking school where timeless techniques meet cutting-edge curriculum and real-world training to cook up bold, contemporary cuisine. CulinaryLab seeks to reinvent culinary training with programs that harnesses the power of today’s innovations to train tomorrow’s culinary arts and management visionaries. CulinaryLab is the first school of its kind that combines community-built curriculum, tech-savvy training, hands-on learning and a 1,000-hour apprenticeship in high level local restaurants.

CulinaryLab’s Chef Ryan Wagner is a Certified Executive Chef with 23 years of food and beverage experience, including running restaurant kitchens, high-profile event catering and various leadership roles in culinary education.

For more information, visit www.culinarylabschool.com.


My perspective on real estate

By DON ABRAMS

We welcome Don Abrams, owner of Abrams Coastal Properties, as a new contributing real estate columnist.

A little background – and my love of classic homes…

I began my love affair with classic homes when my parents bought a circa 1895 beach cottage on Long Island Sound in Connecticut, and I spent my 13th summer restoring the interior of this great home.

Victorian home

Photos courtesy of 

Don Abrams Coastal Properties

A Victorian house that Don Abrams refurbished in Washington, D.C.

During my late ‘20s and ‘30s, I worked during the day as an attorney with the U.S. Justice Department, and in my off hours, restored seven Victorian homes in the District of Columbia. I then went on to becoming CEO of a home furnishings business.

News clipping of Don

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Don Abrams is featured in “The New Haven Register” on Monday, Jan. 7, 1980

In the modern era, I’ve lived in one of two houses on Balboa Island. In 1992, I bought my first home at 324 Grand Canal, a 1937 Streamline Moderne, and in 2004, I purchased 200 Grand Canal, a 1940 Mid-Century. Over the years, I have worked on restoring each of these beautiful homes, moving back and forth during the process.

In 1998, I purchased my brokerage on Balboa Island, as the possibility of walking to work to my own Island brokerage was too good to pass up. I quickly learned that selling homes was very different than buying and restoring them, but I used the skills I had developed in my first two careers, and set out to master a new one.

Aerial View

An aerial view of Don Abrams’ two homes along Grand Canal on Balboa Island

Early on, I discovered that showing up and answering the phone (today also email and text) was a key ingredient – and since 1998 – my phone has been on non-stop. I also learned that honesty, hard work and perseverance were just as important in real estate as in every other profession, and I endeavored to exemplify those traits. Finally, I perceived myself as a presenter of accurate facts and options; I’ve never pushed a buyer or seller to take any action, and this has been attractive to my clients.

I am now starting my 20th year in the business. I’ve been so fortunate to be able to work at a profession I love, while being able to walk three blocks to work on this one-of-a-kind Island. 

• • •

Where is our local real estate market headed in 2018?

To delve into this, let’s take a quick look at 2017. According to Dataquick, 1,450 homes were sold in Newport Beach in 2017; interestingly, this was less than in 2015 and 2016. The high end really took off though – with a record number of sales at more than $3,000,000 (419) and $5,000,000 (160).

The lag in number of homes sold can be attributed to a few factors:

A continued low level of inventory

Sellers unsure of pricing on a trade-up home

Buyers questioning the overall high prices

One complicating factor going forward will be the effect of the new Tax Law. The plus factor is that high wage earners have lower potential taxes. The negatives are the limit on property and state tax deductions of $10,000, and the limit on home mortgage interest deductions of $750,000.

Prediction: An expected interest rate bump and the Tax Law effect may combine to level off prices. If this happens, sales should return to robust levels for the remainder of the year.

~~~~~~~~

Broker Don Abrams lives on Balboa Island with his wife, Gwenn, and son, Benjamin (10). After careers as Assistant U.S. Attorney with the U.S. Justice Department, and as CEO of a national retail company, Don purchased a small real estate firm and transformed it into Abrams Coastal Properties, one of Coastal Orange County’s most successful independent brokerages – now entering its 20th year. Don is passionate about people and houses – his legal and negotiating skills, along with his innate business and marketing sense, have enabled him to offer the most professional service available to buyers and sellers alike.


Letter to the Editor:

“Lucky us” because we spent our youth in CdM

Nancy Gardner’s article brought back wonderful memories of my youth in Corona del Mar. My younger sister and I, seven and ten, lived in a duplex apartment at 514 Avocado in 1950 with our mother. Dad was in the army in Korea, and Mother worked at the iconic Merle’s Drive In as a car hop to make ends meet.

Mom and Dad at Merles Drive In

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos courtesy of Gayle Jones

Gayle Jones’ Mom and Dad at Merle’s Drive In, where her mother worked as a car hop

Merle’s site is now Corona del Mar Plaza, with magnificent Fashion Island on a hill to the north. (As chance would have it, my company built the Plaza for The Irvine Company in 1999.)

Merles Drive In

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The iconic Merle’s Drive In, where Corona del Mar Plaza is now situated

Besides jumping off rocks into Newport Bay in China Cove, our playground was a field across from our Avocado duplex. We ran up and down the ravines in summer and made Christmas tree forts in winter. We also rented horses by the hour from the stables in the middle of the field. Mother was working, and we were on our own, always feeling safe. Lucky us. The stables moved to the south of Cameo Shores when the residential community, Irvine Terrace, was developed. Remarkably, our duplex still stands; it’s even the same color.   

514 Avocado home

The 514 Avocado Avenue duplex in Corona del Mar, where Gayle Jones grew up, still stands today and is the same color

On Saturdays, my sister and I would have lunch at our favorite coffee shop before we made our way to the Port Theater for a matinee. A nice lady behind the counter took our melted cheese sandwich and chocolate shake order, and her husband cooked our delicious lunch. Of course, this was Audrey and John McIntosh’s Snack Shop. Lucky us.

The Snack Shop Group was a restaurant empire in Orange County when my husband and I moved to Shore Cliffs in 1976. The McIntoshes were neighbors and it was fun sharing stories of “old” Corona del Mar with Audrey. My husband, Roy, shared the love of fishing with John. We also visited with Nancy’s father, Judge Gardner, on our walks around Shore Cliffs. Lucky us. 

Thank you, Nancy Gardner and the talented folks at StuNews, for keeping Newport Beach residents entertained and informed. I never miss an issue.

Sincerely,

Gayle (Willinger) Jones

Newport Beach


Gas rupture closes Coast Highway yesterday causing traffic mess

Mariners Mile

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Photo by Lana Johnson

Did you fight traffic yesterday afternoon and evening heading down Coast Highway through Mariner’s Mile? You’re certainly not alone. A leak caused by a ruptured gas line in the 2200 block of Coast Highway “related to some construction work being done in a retail area,” according to the Newport Beach Police, was the culprit. PCH was closed in both directions between Dover Drive and Tustin Avenue, for nearly four hours.

SoCalGas responded and repaired the leak, but have still not determined what caused the rupture. 

Coast Highway was closed from the first report at 1:48 p.m. and then reopened with one-lane in each direction at 5:58 p.m., according to the Newport Beach Police reports.

Shortly thereafter, the highway was fully re-opened in both directions.


Free upcoming events on Segerstrom Center’s Agyros Plaza

Cloud Gate Dance Theatre

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by LIU Chen-hsiang

There’s variety, excitement and reasons for celebrating life and community during Segerstrom Center’s upcoming line-up of free events on the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza!

¡DAMAS! – Celebrating Women Creators on Saturday, March 10 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., preceding the 7:30 p.m. performance of globalFEST in Samueli Theater.

In honor of International Women’s Day (March 8), the Center invites you to celebrate the power and diversity of Orange County women. You’ll have the opportunity to hear compelling and inspiring real-life stories from female creators and learn powerful and effective forms of self-expression. ¡DAMAS! will recognize the innovative ways women use art to better our community. Try something new: participate in a yoga class, bind your own journal and add your unique twist to a collaborative community art project. Tickets to globalFEST in Samueli Theater, where critically acclaimed all-female Mariachi band Flor de Toloache will perform along with Las Cafeteras, are $65 and available at www.scfta.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa or by calling 714.556.2787. For inquiries about group ticket savings for 10 or more, call the Group Services office at 714.755.0236.

Taiwanese musicians perform on the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza on Friday and Saturday, March 16 and 17 from 6:15 to 7:30 p.m. Takes place prior to the two performances by Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan in Segerstrom Hall (ticket event).

Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan comes to Segerstrom Center for the first time performing the West Coast premiere of its new work, Formosa. The ballet tells the legend of Portuguese sailors gazing out from the decks of ships off the coast of China during the 16th century. They saw a great green mass, thick with mountains and trees, rising from the sea. “Formosa!” they exclaimed – “beautiful!” – anointing the verdant place that would come to be known to the world as Taiwan.

Swing at Six on March 23 and 30, and April 6, a series of three free Swing Dance classes capped by a wonderful Sip & Swing! Party on April 15 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Brush up your best dance moves in preparation for the Center’s big Sip & Swing! Party…so grab your dance shoes! Mandy Mykitta of Dare to Dance studio in Huntington Beach will teach Single Time East Coast Swing on March 23, Janelle Przytulski of Bella Ball in Orange will teach the Lindy Hop on March 30, and Martin Parker of Dance Scene Dance Studio in Costa Mesa will teach the West Coast Swing on April 6. Then, if you think you can dance – come back for the Sip & Swing! Dance Party on April 15 from 5 to 7 p.m.!

 The Julianne and George Argyros Plaza is located at Segerstrom Center for the Arts, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. www.scfta.org


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Toshiba Classic arrives to town and brings more than just golf

TomJohnson

The Toshiba Classic is officially underway today out at Newport Beach Country Club. One of the big news stories yesterday was that Champions Tour professional Fred Couples is out this weekend with a bad back. Couples, who has battled his back throughout his career, missed yesterday’s pro-am event.

Speaking of the pro-am, Tom Byrum’s team won Wednesday’s event with a score of 53. Byrum’s team included amateurs Chris Callero, Bill Gross, Chuck Smith and Dick Pickup

They’re all so rich they could buy the golf course, for Pete’s sake. Actually, one of them already did.

One stroke back was Mark Calcavecchia’s team that included Mike Cattone, Jim Speak, Brett Osborne and Jim White.

Thursday’s winners were the Rocco Mediate group that included William Sales, Keith Harvey, David Hannah and Jack Hokema, and the John Daly group with Marshall Faulk, Rob Clark, Jeff Burum and Christopher Leggio. Both teams came in at 53.

And, an important note, balls go in the air today at 10:30 a.m.

Here are some individual starting times today: Fred Funk (10:50), John Daly (11:20), Colin Montgomerie (11:50), Jerry Kelly and Tom Watson (12:10) and Bernhard Langer (12:20), all off the first tee.

Off the tenth tee will be Tom Lehman (11:30), José María Olazábal (11:50) and Vijay Singh (12:20).

Following this year’s tournament, Newport Beach will say goodbye to the name Toshiba Classic, as Toshiba backs away from their long-time commitment. Don’t worry, golf will remain an annual event, it’s just that next year will have a slightly different look. Details to follow as they finalize.

Thanks to Mark Simon and the folks at Toshiba for their wonderful community support over the years. It was a fantastic run!

• • •

There’s a story elsewhere in today’s Stu News Newport about an upcoming City of Newport Beach Special Olympics fundraiser event. 

First off, they’re going to have this big event. Music, food, but here’s where it gets interesting, you can enter a Hoop Shoot Team. To support the event, you bring four players to compete on a team. They’ll give you T-shirts, but more importantly, a Special Olympics athlete will also be assigned to your team. Then, all five players compete in the Hoop Shoot Competition.

In addition, all players will be entered into the Hometown Hero Fundraising Challenge and receive entry into the Torch Walk and barbecue.

It’s going to be a wonderful community event on a lot of levels. I urge you to check it out at www.fundraising.sosc.org and see how you might get involved.

It all takes place at the Newport Beach Civic Center on Thursday, April 5, from 6 to 9 p.m.

• • •

Here’s the report from jail: Samuel Woodward, 20, the Newport Beach man being held in the murder of 19-year-old Blaze Bernstein is said to be “depressed in jail and feels remorse for his family,” according to his attorney Edward Munoz.

Other reports from Munoz have Woodward “reading the Bible” and meeting regularly with his family’s Catholic priest.

Woodward appeared in court last week and agreed to push back a preliminary hearing until June 14.

• • •

I read this past week that Ed Hochuli, one of the top National Football League officials for the past 27 years, is retiring. You know him, he’s the old guy, that looks young, with the guns for arms in a lot of televised NFL games. His replacement was named this week and his replacement is his son Shawn Hochuli, who is currently a back judge in the NFL.

So, you can imagine what I did when I ran into our own local NFL official from Newport Beach, Laird Hayes, out at the Toshiba Classic this week. B-t-w, he didn’t have his striped shirt on, so I hardly recognized him.

I said to Laird, “So I see what Hochuli is doing for his kid, what about you?”

Laird told me his kid doesn’t need his help.

Truth be told, my sources tell me Andy Hayes was promoted to Lifeguard Officer earlier this month. That’s full-time and tough to get. It’s cool, Andy was born and raised in Newport Beach, was a junior guard, cadet and then a seasonal guard. He attended Newport Harbor High School and then USC. Does it get any more Newport Beach than all that?

Congrats on a job that allows you to calmly sit in a lifeguard tower, while your dad continues to run up-and-down the field with reckless abandon. Andy, I think you made the better choice…just don’t forget your sunscreen.


Dine under the stars…all for a worthwhile cause

Community Table Rich Mead

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Courtesy of Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens

(L-R): Evan Marks, executive director of The Ecology Center and Rich Mead, owner and executive chef of Farmhouse

Farmhouse Owner and Executive Chef Rich Mead is hosting an evening of unforgettable food and great company on Monday, March 19 from 6 to 9 p.m. Taking place during Roger’s Gardens’ annual Spring Celebration and benefitting The Ecology Center, the Local Artisan Dinner will feature an exclusive, multicourse menu and beverage pairing highlighting the season’s freshest flavors.

Under the stars and amongst the olive trees, meet and mingle with the real stars of the evening, the local food and drink artisans who made the special dinner possible. In attendance will be Evan Marks of The Ecology Center; Alex Weiser of Weiser Family Farms; Sherry Mandrell of the Tehachapi Grain Project; Peter Schaner of Schaner Family Farms; Meredith Bell of Autonomy Farms; Brian and Robin Christenson of Blinking Owl Distillery; Sara Lezama and Kyle Titterud of Rye Goods Co.; Meredith Bell of Autonomy Farms; Paddy Glennon of Superior Seafood; local fisherman, Scott Brenneman, and many other notables in the SoCal culinary circle.

The evening will begin with signature cocktails, beer by Docent Brewing, wine and hors d’oeuvres. A coursed dinner will highlight the freshest local fruits and vegetables from Weiser Family Farms and Schaner Family Farms, fresh cod from Superior Seafood, pastured chicken from Autonomy Farms as well as grains from the Tehachapi Heritage Grain Project. Farmhouse’s pastry chef will prepare a seasonal dessert; cocktails, beers and wines will be served.

Local Artisan Dinner Menu:

Starters

Ridgeback Shrimp

Rye Goods Co. Grilled Rye Toast

Seasonal Soup Shooter

First Course

Schaner Farms Citrus and Avocado Salad, butter lettuce, sesame vinaigrette,

toasted pine nuts

Second Course

Grilled Kumquat Glazed Cod, Tehachapi Heritage Grain Project sonora grain,

rapini, cipollini onions, sugar snap peas, pureed carrots

Third Course

Grilled Carolina Barbecue Glazed Autonomy Farms Chicken, arugula

Sides

Pickled Beets

Romanesco Cauliflower, garlic, capers and butter

Braised Greens and White Beans

Farmhouse chimichurri

Dessert

Grilled Satsumaimo Sweet Potato and Ginger Pound Cake, citrus banana

compote, rum sauce

*Menu is in progress and subject to change due to product availability.

Cost: $150 per person, tax and gratuity included.

For tickets: Space is limited. To purchase tickets, visit http://farmhouserg.com/spring-celebration-farmhouse-local-artisan-dinner/.

For reservations and more information, call 949.640.1415, visit http://farmhouserg.com and follow @farmhouseatrg.

Farmhouse at Roger’s Gardens is located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar.


City to host Special Olympics basketball tourney fundraiser and you can play

Special Olympics

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Submitted photo

Newport Beach Mayor Pro Tem Will O’Neill and wife Jennifer announce the Special Olympics fundraiser with a couple of friends

The City of Newport Beach will host a Special Olympics area basketball tournament for the first time in the city’s history on Saturday, April 28. To kick-off the festivities, Special Olympics athletes, the City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Department as well as Newport Beach police, fire, city council, local officials and community members will participate in the official Unity Torch Walk, Hometown Hero Hoop Shoot Challenge and BBQ on Thursday, April 5 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Newport Beach Civic Center. 

The evening will include live music, craft beer, fine wines and a BBQ provided by Newport Rib Company. The Hoop Shoot Challenge will follow with police, fire, city council, local officials and community members partnering with Special Olympic athletes to battle it out on the court to see which team will be named Hometown Heroes for Newport Beach Hometown Special Olympics. 

Participation in this special event starts at just $65 and money raised will support the year-round training and competition events for the more than 539 Special Olympic athletes that call Newport Beach home. Teams can register to participate in the Hoop Shot Team event, be a torch walk participant or a torch walk supporter.

“The City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Department is energized by all the opportunity that keeps unfolding as we build community partnerships to provide inclusive programs for those with special needs to lead fuller lives and connect with their peers,” said Laura Detweiler, director, Recreation & Senior Services Department, City of Newport Beach. “We were inspired by our involvement with the Special Olympics World Games and are continuing to foster that relationship by co-hosting a Newport Beach Hometown Basketball Tournament. Additionally, we have been working diligently this last year to lay the foundation for a well-rounded special needs recreation program and are excited to see it come to fruition. Together we can do amazing things!” 

You can register and checkout all the information at www.fundraising.sosc.org.


Christopher Radko Trunk Show arrives this month

Radko

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Courtesy of Roger’s Gardens

For more than 30 years, the Christopher Radko Company has caught the attention of many collectors with their beautiful European, hand-crafted glass ornaments. Each piece is hand painted with exquisite artisanship.

Roger’s Gardens will be showcasing the new 2018 collection in their new collectible boutique as part of the Spring Celebration on Saturday, March 17 during the Christopher Radko Trunk Show. Select from a wide variety of styles that can bring the joy of Christmas into any home.

Roger’s Gardens is located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar. Visit the website for a complete listing of seminars and workshops being held during the Spring Celebration. www.rogersgardens.com


Baroque Music Festival takes a French twist

Musicians

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Photos courtesy of Baroque Music 

Festival, Corona del Mar

This year’s 38th annual Baroque Music Festival, Corona del Mar, features a charming French repertoire in a program cast as “French Fare with a Dash of Handel” that is sure to delight. Set in a menu of five individual concerts within an eight day period, it takes place June 17 - 24, with an extraordinary mix of Baroque musicians performing at three select venues in Corona del Mar and Newport Beach.

In her eighth year as the Festival’s artistic director and concertmaster, Elizabeth Blumenstock has created yet another inspired program. An internationally renowned Baroque violinist, Blumenstock has performed throughout the world, playing a 17th century Guarneri violin. In addition to her musical leadership of the Baroque Music Festival, she serves as concertmaster of both Philharmonia Baroque and the American Bach Soloists, and teaches at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music and the Juilliard School of Music.

The program includes Sunday performances that feature the Festival Orchestra. The three concerts positioned between these “bookends” showcase solo recitals and small chamber ensembles. The Festival Finale – that “dash of Handel” – also includes a pair of stunning sopranos.

In addition, audiences are invited to enjoy Baroque music performed al fresco by the South Coast Brass beginning 45 minutes before each concert. Following all performances, audience members and musicians enjoy mingling for conversation and refreshment at a wine and waters reception. 

Blumenstock

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Baroque Music Festival Artistic Director and Concertmaster, Elizabeth Blumenstock

Concert Schedule:

Sunday, June 17 at St. Mark Presbyterian Church, 2200 San Joaquin Hills Road, Newport Beach at 4 p.m. performing “Parisian Divertissements.” Elizabeth Blumenstock leads the Festival Orchestra in a mélange of French concertos by Rebel and Leclair, plus Corelli’s Christmas Concerto and Rameau’s ballet suites. 

Monday, June 18 at St. Michael & All Angels Episcopal Church, 3233 Pacific View Drive, Newport Beach at 8 p.m. performing “Bach and the French Style.” A recital by extraordinary organist Jonathan Dimmock, cofounder of the American Bach Soloists, and the first American to hold the prestigious position of Organ Scholar of Westminster Abbey. 

Wednesday, June 20 at Sherman Library & Gardens, 2647 E. Coast Highway, Newport Beach at 8 p.m. performing “Stylus Phantasticus.” Harmonically adventurous and texturally rich chamber music from Becker, Biber, Scheidt, Schein and Schmelzer. 

Friday, June 22 at Sherman Library & Gardens, 2647 E. Coast Highway, Newport Beach at 8 p.m. performing “Les Petits Concerts.” Elizabeth Blumenstock (violin), David Shostac (flute), Andrew McIntosh (violin, viola), Michael Kaufman (cello) and Lara Wickes (oboe) perform chamber works by Boismortier, Guilleman and Telemann. 

Sunday, June 24 at St. Mark Presbyterian Church, 2200 San Joaquin Hills Road, Newport Beach at 4 p.m. performing “Festival Finale: Handel’s Orlando.” A spirited concert version of this charming opera features the Festival Orchestra, sopranos Amanda Keenan and Josefien Stoppelenburg, alto Robin Bier, countertenor Clifton Massey and bass Graham Bier, accompanied by an entertaining narrative. 

The Baroque Music Festival offers a subscription for all five concerts at $280 that includes priority seating at each event and a private post concert dinner following the Festival Finale on Sunday, June 24. Additional information about the 2018 Baroque Music Festival, as well as ticket sales for this year’s series or single concerts (ranging from $30 to $50), may be found at the Festival website: www.bmf-cdm.org, or by calling 949.760.7887. 


Ten reasons to participate in Spirit Run 

The 35th Annual Spirit Run will take place in less than two weeks on Sunday, March 18 at Fashion Island. Have you registered yet? Below are 10 reasons to register now!

No. 1Wide range of running events for adults of all ability levels.

Mile: Depending on your age, and how fast you can finish, there are several options.

Elite Mile: This is open to men and women who can finish in four minutes fifteen seconds, and four minutes, fifty seconds, respectively. It is also USA Track & Field Southern California’s (SCA USATF’s) 2018 Road Mile Championship.

Elite Mile competitors

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Photos courtesy of Spirit Run

Elite Milers mid-race at Spirit Run

Open Mile: If you’re not elite but can finish a mile in ten minutes, set a personal record or check your fitness in the Open Mile.

Family Mile: This new event is for families to jog and/or walk together. Participants have 20 minutes to finish.

5k: Spirit Run’s 5k course loops around Fashion Island. The 5k attracts highly competitive runners, and more casual runners looking for exercise and fun.

10k: Spirit Run’s 10k is essentially a double loop of the 5k. Selected as SCA USATF’s 2018 Championship race, the competition should be great. Like the 5k, however, it’s also great for those wanting a great workout.

The Juan Ramirez 15k – Marathoners and other distance runners race the 10k and 5k and their finishing times are combined and ranked. Those who can’t seem to get enough, race the Open Mile in between the 10k and 5k!

Youth runners at starting line

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Youth runners take off at the starting line

No. 2 – Watch your children compete in one of Spirit Run’s youth races.

Spirit Run hosts eight races for children.

Youth 5k: The Youth 5k allows children to compete against one another without adult interference, and for a child to break the finish line tape. Parents may register for the Adult 5k and run with their children in the Youth 5k.

Youth One-quarter, One-half and Open Mile: Spirit Run hosts a one-quarter mile race for age four, a one-half mile race for ages five and six, and three separate mile races for ages seven through 12. Children ages 13 - 19 may compete in the Open Mile.

Toddler Trot: Spirit Run strives to include everyone, even the little ones. It takes place in a fenced area with Astroturf in the Expo area. Most of the tots run over and over again!

Toddler Trot

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Toddler Trot takes place in the Expo area – always a great photo opportunity

No. 3 Run or walk with the whole family, even the grandparents.

Walk or run one of Spirit Run’s family events – the 5k Family Walk or the new Family Mile. The entire family is welcome, from your baby in his/her jogger, to the grandparents. Don’t worry about the price tag, either. Rather than charging each family member an individual entry fee, Spirit Run has a new Family Rate allowing a family to save as much as 30 percent off standard individual pricing. Add the grandparents to save even more!

No. 4 Run with you canine in the Dog Mile.

Have fun with your pooch in the Dog Mile. With 15 minutes to finish, you can jog or walk. But, this race is also popular with the speedsters. Last year, the winner and his dog finished in four minutes 41 seconds!

Lady with 2 dogs

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Jog or walk the Dog Mile with your favorite furry friends

No. 5 Compete to win as much as $1,000 and non-cash prizes.

Spirit Run arguably has the most impressive prizes of any running event around. It is offering a $3,800 cash purse in the Elite Mile and more than 250 non-cash prizes. More than 150 can win the most coveted food prize – free pizza every month for a year at Blaze Pizza, Fashion Island. Other prizes include gift cards from Fashion Island, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Lazy Dog Café and Baking Betty’s and certificates for massage from Spa Gregorie’s. 

No. 6 Double or triple your workout and compete to win multiple prizes.

Spirit Run invites you to compete in two, even three races. Those in The Juan Ramirez 15k run the 10k and the 5k. Their times are combined and ranked, and prizes are awarded. But why stop there? In between the 10k and the 5k, there’s time to jump in the Open Mile, or join your dog for the Dog Mile. Another option is to race the Elite, Open, or Dog Mile, take a breath, and then run the Adult 5k. Even the children double their fitness and fun. Many run the Youth 5k followed by their age appropriate mile race.

The best news – you are eligible to win in every race you complete! 

No. 7 Be a fan.

Not up for racing or walking? Come watch instead. With 12 races, there is plenty to see. Be part of the excitement when the winner breaks four minutes in the Elite Mile. You won’t be able to hold back a smile when you see the human dog duos in the Dog Mile. You’ll be amazed to see some pairs finish in less than five minutes. And, of course, it’s always delightful to watch the kids compete, especially the little ones in the Toddler Trot.

3 Cheerleaders

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Newport-Mesa cheerleaders keep the energy high at Spirit Run

You can also be entertained by high school students performing at Spirit Run. Experience the sounds of the Corona del Mar Middle and High vocal students as they sing patriotic songs and the National Anthem before the races. Corona del Mar’s Drumline and Jazz Band are also performing. Feel the energy of the Newport-Mesa cheerleaders.

Girl bungee jumping

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This girl is high in the sky at the Bungee Jump

No. 8 Enjoy the Youth, Fitness, and Dog Expo.

Before and after your race, there’s plenty of fun in store at Spirit Run’s expo. Stop by Plum’s Café for a gourmet pancake breakfast including buttermilk pancakes, Oregon pepper bacon, and Tillamook cheddar egg frittatas. The kids won’t want to leave the action including the bungee trampolines, a rock climbing wall, a mini-skate park, a photo booth, giveaways, and so much more. 

Adults, cool down after your event with a free massage. Meet health and fitness professionals. Discover Camp Newport’s many summer day camps and away camps at Gold Arrow and Yosemite Sierra Summer Camps. Finally, bring your dog or adopt a new one at the Dog Expo. Your pooch can enjoy free food samples and more.

No. 9 Raise funds for youth fitness and education.

By participating in Spirit Run, you are supporting local youth. Spirit Run is presented by a 501(c)(3) non-profit dedicated to youth fitness and education, and its net proceeds are donated to local schools. More than $1,500,000 has been donated, with more than $300,000 in the last seven years alone. Participating Newport Mesa Unified (NMUSD) schools and high school teams benefit from Spirit Run’s net proceeds. Schools outside NMUSD may also fundraise through Spirit Run’s “Dash for Cash” fundraiser.

Steve Scott leading kids at start line

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Three-time Olympian and Word Record Holder Steve Scott leads kids on the course

No. 10 Celebrate a morning with your family, friends and community.

Spirit Run’s vibe is contagious. Students from participating schools and their families attend, as well as teachers, principals and other school supporters. The enthusiasm of parents watching their children compete and the school spirit is palpable.

Even Olympians have caught the Spirit Run bug. Steve Scott, three time Olympian and World Record Holder for the most sub-four minute miles, has attended every year since 1983. Scott warms up the kids before each youth race and leads them on the course. 

Olympic Silver Medalist Julie Swail has competed at Spirit Run for well over a decade. She appreciates the challenge of running multiple races (she raced three last year). She also loves the rewards, as she typically walks away with three or four prizes.

Members of the University of California Irvine’s Track Team are Spirit Run supporters. For many years, they have volunteered in Spirit Run’s Awards booth. With more than 250 prizes, it is a very busy place. 

To register and for more details about Spirit Run, visit www.nmspiritrun.org.

For the second consecutive year, Stu News is proud to be Spirit Run’s media sponsor.


Sherman Library & Gardens to hold Private Gardens Tour

Painting of gardens

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Courtesy of Sherman Library & Gardens

The 22nd Annual Private Gardens Tour, hosted by the Sherman Library & Gardens Volunteer Association, is scheduled for Saturday, April 21 and will feature six amazing gardens in the Newport Beach area from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Attendees will mingle with musicians and artists as they stroll the gardens. The Tour includes a light lunch at Sherman Library & Gardens from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

This year, the Garden Tour Committee has found gardens that they believe will inspire, engage and stimulate your sense of what a garden can be. These gardens are an extension of the house and the people who live in them. They are examples of how gardens make the house a home and connect your family to the natural world. 

For the third year, proceeds from the Tour will go toward the PCH Frontage and Entrance Redesign Project. Ruben Flores of Visionscape, Inc. has completed the conceptual design, keeping with the style and history of the Library & Gardens. The plans will be unveiled in a few months as the official fundraising campaign is launched.

Thanks to the support of the Tour by Friends of Sherman Library & Gardens and many in the community, the Volunteer Association has already donated $50,000 in support of the frontage project. You are invited to participate by attending the Tour and to also help by making an additional donation.

Tickets: $50 Friends; $60 Non-members. Tickets purchased online will be mailed the week of April 9. There is a $1 postage fee per ticket. Tickets will include a map of the gardens. You can start at any garden you like and visit the gardens in any order you wish. Shuttle tickets, which are optional, are $45. The shuttle will visit each garden on the tour, plus make a one-stop at Sherman Library & Gardens for the light lunch. The shuttle meets in the front of the Yard House restaurant in Fashion Island at 10:30 a.m. It will depart promptly at 11 a.m. There will be no other shuttles after 11 a.m.

To purchase tickets, visit www.slgardens.org/22nd-Annual-Private-Gardens-Tour. Sponsorship opportunities are available.

Sherman Library & Gardens is located at 2647 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. www.slgardens.org.


Seeking Newport Beach nominations for MOMS Orange County 2018 Champion for Babies and Families Award

MOMS Orange County, a Santa Ana-based nonprofit dedicated to helping mothers and their families have healthy babies, is now accepting nominations for its 2018 Champion for Babies and Families Award. The award is given annually to celebrate an Orange County employer that creates a working environment exceptionally supportive of employees who are expecting, as well as new parents.

Recognizing the challenges of returning to work after having a baby, MOMS Orange County seeks to honor employers who help make that journey easier.

In 2017, PIMCO was the inaugural recipient of the award for their outstanding benefits to support new and expecting parents including educational events, parental leave guides, expectant mother parking, five Mothers Rooms with a private space for pumping, hospital-grade breast pumps, a refrigerator, sink and reclining chairs and more. In addition, PIMCO’s New Expectant Mother Support Team (NEST) pairs two experienced mothers with one new/expecting mother to answer questions related to work issues and to create a support system around her. PIMCO offers gender-neutral paid leave: fully paid for 16 weeks for the primary caregiver and for three weeks for the secondary caregiver.

MOMS OC

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Courtesy of MOMS Orange County

PIMCO Families Program Committee members with MOMS Orange County CEO Pamela Pimentel (center). MOMS Orange County presented PIMCO with the inaugural “Champion for Babies and Families” award in 2017 at the PIMCO offices in Newport Beach for their outstanding support of new and expecting parents.

For the first time in history, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that both parents work in just over 60 percent of married couple families with children. In 2013, 74 percent of employed women worked full time, compared to 87 percent of men employed with the same full-time status. But despite the fact that more than half of women return to work and attempt to continue breastfeeding due to known health benefits for babies, according to a study from the Jacob’s Institute of Women’s Health, less than 40 percent of women have access to both break time and a private, non-bathroom area in which to express milk, despite federal law requiring both of those. Low-income and single mothers are disproportionately less likely to have time and space to pump at work.

“With an astounding number of working parents today, it is vital that we recognize employers who are champions for families, making it possible for new moms and dads to have a positive reentry to the workforce,” said Pamela Pimentel, RN, CEO of MOMS Orange County. “At MOMS Orange County, we believe companies will recruit and retain their best employees by going above and beyond the legal guidelines and offering exceptional support to new and expectant parents.”

Nomination guidelines for the 2018 Champion for Babies and Families Award include the employer must be located in Orange County, Calif., and the employer can be corporate, nonprofit or a government entity. Nominations are being accepted now through April 30, 2018. Visit www.momsorangecounty.org/biz4babies for more information.

MOMS Orange County formed more than 25 years ago in response to a crisis in access to prenatal healthcare for low-income, at-risk women. Today, MOMS Orange County serves more than 3,300 low-income families annually, directly influencing improvements in birth outcomes, maternal health and developmental indicators among infants within a highly disadvantaged population. The nonprofit offers group classes for new and expectant mothers and fathers, parent-baby group classes, as well as monthly home visits to track immunizations, promote breastfeeding and nutrition, offer health risk screenings and enhance parenting and safety skills. To learn more about MOMS Orange County, visit www.momsorangecounty.org.


School Notes

City of NB comes through for Newport El rehab

The City of Newport Beach approved a budget amendment to provide the additional needed funding for the rehabilitation of the Newport Elementary School Playfield project. The City has agreed to provide $163,000 from the Oceanfront Encroachment Fund, along with $200,000, for a combined total of $363,000. Newport-Mesa Unified School District previously committed $250,000.

NHHS 

NHEF Anchors Aweigh Benefit on Friday, March 9, 6 - 10 p.m.at the Balboa Bay Resort

PTA Executive Board Meeting - Wednesday, March 7, 8 a.m., Newkirk Conference Room

NHEF Board Meeting – Tuesday, March 13, 6:30 a.m., Heritage Hall

PTA General Meeting – Wednesday, March 21, 8:30 a.m., Library Reading Room

Spring Choir Concert – Wednesday, March 28, 6 - 8 p.m., Robert B. Wentz Theater

Band/Jazz/Orchestra – Friday, March 30, 6 - 8 p.m., Robins Loats Theater

CdMHS

The CdMM/HS Learning Resource Center (LRC) will open to a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Wednesday, March 14 at 4:30 p.m. The conversion of the school library into a modern LRC includes an open floor plan with collaborative and computer spaces. It also includes three study rooms and a small conference room. This project was made possible by CdM Foundation’s commitment to raise funds for the project.

2018 CdM Orchesis Dance Company presents Dream On at the NHHS Robert B. Wentz Theater March 8 - 10 with performances at 7 p.m.


Publisher’s Note:

When you wake up this Thursday, March 8, and go to your inbox to look for StuNewsNewport, and find nothing, please remember that this is the week we change delivery dates. Our next edition will be delivered the same way as always on Friday, March 9, then again next week on Tuesday, March 13.

From there on out it’s StuNewsNewport on Tuesdays and Fridays.

Spread the word!


The double “discoveries” of Newport Harbor

By DUNCAN FORGEY

Explorers Ship

Submitted photos

The San Salvador is representative of an explorer’s ship

In past geological time, Newport Harbor was once covered in sea water. As California was forming, the great oceans extended all the way to Nevada. Our insignificant little harbor was born after millions of years of retreating waters opened up the Golden Stateʻs coastline. It was then that El Rio del Dulcissimo de Jesus de las Tremblores (The River of the Sweet Name of Jesus of Earthquakes), later named the Santa Ana River, started working on molding, shaping and reshaping Newportʻs harbor and beaches.

By the arrival of the Europeans, the sand spit we know as Balboa was half the size of what it is today. In 1542, Cabrillo explored the western coastline in a failed attempt to reach China. In the process, he discovered a great bay he named San Miguel (San Diego) and on October 7, 1542, he came upon Santa Catalina Island. Local Gabrielino natives, who “put their bows and arrows on the ground,” met these odd and mysterious visitors upon his two ships San Salvador and Victoria. With the help of the locals, the explorers sailed eastward to Baia de Los Fumos. (Bay of Many Smokes). Smoke emanating from the considerable number of domesticated fires in the LA Basin was the first introduction to the famous Los Angeles inversion layer that now traps in smoke and smog upon much of Southern California.   

Native American

A Native Americaån woman who may have lived along the Santa Ana River

Newport Harbor was not “visited” by the Spanish until 1769 when Don Gaspar de Portola and his “leather jacketed soldiers” got within a few miles of the actual harbor.  Traveling along the Santa Ana River, they explored and enjoyed the friendly Native Americans. A Franciscan Monk named Friar Juan Crispi documented these earliest encounters all the while christening a number of the Gabrielinos.

The name Gabrielinos came from their work at the San Gabriel Mission in 1771. This tribe of “Mission Indians” spread out to many parts of Orange and LA counties.  Working with the missionaries exposed the locals to intense labor and disease making them victims of this new way of life. As necessary workers in the expansion of Spainʻs Alta California, Indian lifestyle and beliefs were smothered. According to their Franciscan overseers, these “heathens” needed “the gentle yoke of Christ.” The Franciscan believers in St. Francis of Assisi turned the domesticating of local tribes into a disaster for the tribe. With the discovery of gold in the north and an aggressive number of new settlers, human cruelty laid a heavy toll on Indians in California. The numbers of Native Americans, estimated to be around 300,000 in 1770, had declined to around 20,000 in three generations. The Gabrielinos and their culture have disappeared into the megalopolis that now resides on coastal lands in Southern California. 

San Gabriel Mission

San Gabriel Mission

Fast forward to the making of the “future” city that would become Newport Beach.  It started some 46 years before it was incorporated. Newport was “discovered” again when a skilled marine surveyor found a “new port” which had some commercial possibilities. In the month of September 1860, on a typically warm and windy day, the Coast Guard Schooner Humbolt dropped anchor off the sandy peninsula protecting a then inaccessible harbor. Home to nothing but thousands of seabirds, the entrance was dangerous and untamed. East of the “useless” beach area was a swampy upland area named Rancho de Las Ranas. The property of Jose Andres Sepulveda of Los Angeles, this bay was not good for agricultural use…so it stood empty. The United States government, however, was looking for new marine locations along the recently acquired 31st state of the union.

The leader of the Humbolt expedition was William E. Greenwell. Greenwell was known as the “best surfer” in the Coast Guard and would map areas of the California coast until 1918. He felt the inlet looked promising and organized a small party to go ashore to survey the uncharted harbor. With Saddleback Mountain as a dramatic backdrop, he lowered his small skiff into the waters near the southern portion of todayʻs Balboa Peninsula. Prepped with survey equipment and a team of rowers, Greenwell ordered his men ashore. Unbeknownst to him, but common knowledge today, September brings some of the biggest swells to Newport. Greenwell and his men were about to become the very “first” to surf Newport Beach. This proved to be one of his greater challenges, inasmuch as, he had arrived on one of the peninsulaʻs large south swells. His small skiff was tossed wildly about, almost capsizing on several occasions.  Yelling orders to his men, they used their oars while he worked the tiller to “surf” through the crashing waves. The boat worked its way ashore, riding large waves and ending up in the calmer waters on the leeward side of the peninsula.  

1850 Survey

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The 1850 survey by William Greenwell

Commencing his hydrographic survey, he and his men made notations of the feasibility of making this “new harbor” into a port or commercial stop over. Upon their return, it was published with a positive recommendation. It, however, was not used for 15 years because of the outbreak of the Civil War. By the time the idea of using Newport Harbor was revisited, sand movement on the point made Greenwellʻs survey useless. The mouth of the Bolsa de San Joaquin had shifted eastward to its present site near Rocky Point (Corona del Mar).

It would not be until 1870, with the arrival of a small sternwheeler steamer named Vaquero, that the dangerous harbor entrance was again penetrated. This helped the entrepreneurial McFadden Brothers decide to pursue their fledging Newport Landing at the present site of lower Castaways. It was this action on the part of the McFaddens that put into play the steps that started the growth of modern day Newport Beach.  

~~~~~~~~

Duncan Forgey, who made his home here in Newport Beach for many years, now resides in Hawaii. He is a monthly contributor to StuNewsNewport.


It’s a Spring Celebration at Roger’s Gardens

Spring Celebration with urns

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Photos courtesy of Roger’s Gardens

From Friday, March 16 through Sunday, March 25, Roger’s Gardens is holding its Spring Celebration with an innovative approach to inspiration in all forms.

Roger’s is introducing their “display gardens,” where you can take away their ideas, vision and knowledge, and reinvent your very own garden, balcony or yard scape into something original. 

Experience inspirational and contemporary gardens, where whimsy meets elegance, soil cultivates farm-to-fork, floral installations result in dramatic landscapes and vibrant colors reign.

Display Garden Crawl

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Their gardens have been inspired by Spring itself with photo opportunities abounding. You’ll get to view the combined talents of floral artists, landscape designers and a creative team; with daily personalized workshops and educational “how-to’s.”

Roger’s Gardens is located at 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar. Visit the website for a complete listing of seminars and workshops being held during the Spring Celebration. www.rogersgardens.com.


Leadership in Heels speaker series to discuss “breaking the glass ceiling”

Scharrell Jackson

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Photo by Kait McKay Photography

Leadership in Heels Founder and CEO Scharrell Jackson

The next event in the Leadership in Heels speaker series, entitled “Breaking the Glass Ceiling: What Happens When the Heels Get Too High,” will be held on Thursday, March 22 from 7 to 9 a.m. at the Center Club. The event will feature a panel of C-suite executives who will authentically share their stories on what it takes to break the glass ceiling, the rewards of being glass-breaking executives and the sacrifices and struggles of “the heels getting too high.”

Leadership in Heels Founder and CEO Scharrell Jackson, a full-time Partner, COO and CFO for Squar Milner in Newport Beach, one of the top 70 accounting firms in the nation, will moderate and share the challenges and rewards she has faced as a glass-breaking executive. Jackson began the leadership series with the goal to authentically pivot lives forward personally and professionally while stimulating the mind and penetrating the heart.

“Many businesswomen want to break the glass ceiling but don’t quite know how. Others don’t consider the cost against the reward,” Jackson said. “I have shattered the glass ceiling, reaped many rewards and shed many tears. It is my goal to ensure that we understand not only what it takes to break the glass ceiling, but what happens when the heels get too high and how to win all the time!”

According to the Department of Labor in a report on this topic, the glass ceiling is an “invisible barrier between women and the executive suite, preventing them from reaching the highest levels of the business world regardless of their accomplishments and merits.”

Panelists will share personal experiences with breaking the glass ceilings in their respective careers, including:

Kim Letch, Managing Partner of Irvine-based Ernst & Young LLP

Cheryl Osborn, President at Casco Contractors in Irvine

Dr. Jackie Eubany, Cardiologist

Pernille Spiers-Lopez, Former President and CEO of IKEA North America and Author of the book Design Your Life

Specific topics to be discussed will include:

Navigating at the top of your game and balancing responsibilities at home and work.

Maintaining style and grace while addressing the expectations of others without losing yourself.

Dealing with the challenges of leading the pack in a male-dominated environment.

Each Leadership in Heels event has sold-out. Attendees include c-suite executives, middle managers, entrepreneurs, community leaders, those just beginning their careers, and college students. Leadership in Heels is for everyone. Both men and women are invited to attend.

In addition to interactive presentations and exercises, the Leadership in Heels speaker series offers breakfast, networking and giveaways. Plus, each event honors an extraordinary business leader and on March 22, Leadership in Heels will honor Pattie Grimm, host of the “Women Kicking Glass” radio show. Grimm was chosen for her unwavering commitment to highlight women who have broken the glass ceiling.

A portion of the net proceeds from “Breaking the Glass Ceiling” will benefit Irvine-based nonprofit the American Heart Association, which is dedicated to building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Leadership in Heels has raised thousands of dollars for Orange County nonprofits including WHW, Human Options, Girls Inc. of OC, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County and the Inland Empire, Successful Survivors, THINK TOGETHER, and Working Wardrobes.

Sponsorship opportunities, including event seats and sponsor recognition, are available starting at $1,500 for gold sponsorships, $3,000 for platinum sponsorships and $5,000 for presenting sponsorships. For sponsorship details, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Tickets for “Breaking the Glass Ceiling: What Happens When the Heels Get Too High” are $75 and can be purchased at https://lih-breakingtheglassceiling.eventbrite.com.

For more information about Leadership in Heels, visit

www.scharrelljackson.com/about-leadership-in-heels.  

The Center Club is located at 650 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


Letters to the Editor:

Opposed to any large development

I totally oppose your view regarding the Koll Residences. I totally oppose your view regarding developer fees making this or any large development OK.

I’ve been a resident of Newport Beach for 47+ years. I’m not against more houses, more buildings, more development. But I am against large developments. In the case of the three 15-story Koll Residences, this is too large of a project. It doesn’t fit the General Plan. It is too tall and too dense.

To read your article in StuNews that Developer Fees are needed, then this large development is fine. A grin and bear it.

I totally disagree.

This project will generate several million dollars in developer fees. But we’ll have this project for maybe a hundred years…we’ll have this project’s traffic and the imprint that its residents make on our city.

My friends and I feel you are incorrect and you do a disservice to your paper in taking a stand that is so unrepresentative of the citizens of Newport Beach.

Thanks for listening,

Jo Carol Hunter

Newport Beach

Reader shares “wanted” sour cream recipe

Several issues ago, we published one of Nancy Gardner’s always entertaining columns. One reader, Jamie McGrew, wrote afterwards saying, “Your mention of the Sour Cream salad dressing, nearly brought tears to my eyes; and it sure as heck re-ignited my taste buds just recalling its great flavor. I can’t even recall the countless times I’ve tried to re-create it at home. If you have any clues about that sour cream dressing recipe, please advise.”

Well Jamie, today’s your lucky day. “I saw this letter (Jamie’s) and after I resolved a few reservations, I decided to send it. Hope it makes a few people happy,” Leslie Betz.

I worked for the Snack Shop/Far West Services between 1962 and 1966. I started as a dishwasher in the Huntington Beach restaurant, No. 8. I was also a bus boy, host, and eventually a cook. I worked in the Coco’s on 17th Street and Harbor at Adams. I also worked at the Reuben E. Lee as a kitchen steward. 

While at Coco’s, one of my duties was making the sour cream and house dressing. The dressing was made in five-gallon buckets. I reduced the recipe down to about a quart.

There is a small group of former Snack Shop employees who get together here in OC at least twice a year. At one of our dinners, I whipped up a batch and put the dressing in Mason jars to give everyone a sample. Everybody remembered the dressing and said it was a great replica.  

Snack Shop sour cream salad dressing

1 1/4 cup good mayonnaise

1 cup sour cream

1/2 cup butter milk

2/3 cup milk

1 T garlic salt

1/4 t pepper

1/4 cup parmesan cheese

3T white wine vinegar

Mix all ingredients and put in refrigerator for 24 hours. The next day, it will be thicker and may need thinning with more buttermilk. 

Enjoy this great recipe. I feel okay to share it with those who remember a great company. It was a great place to work while going to college.

Leslie Betz 

Newport Beach


Newport Beach – A Look Back 

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum & Historical Society

A Look Back 3.5.18

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Sometimes we see these old photos and it makes us long for the simpler times of old. Here, circa 1938, is the Market Spot. Notice the fresh fruits and vegetables out front of the market and the chat stand next store entering the liquor store. Can’t you just imagine that these types of places gave the locals the updated news of the day.

Visit Balboa Island Museum and the Museum Store located at 331 Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Tuesdays - Sundays from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Call 949.675.3952. www.balboaislandmuseum.organd This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Passenger traffic creeps up at JWA

Airplane

Submitted photo

Airline passenger traffic at John Wayne Airport increased in January 2018 as compared with January 2017. In January 2018, the Airport served 817,258 passengers, an increase of 3.0 percent when compared with the January 2017 passenger traffic count of 793,774.

Commercial aircraft operations increased 1.1 percent and commuter aircraft operations increased 5.6 percent when compared with January 2017 levels.

Total aircraft operations increased in January 2018 as compared with the same month in 2017. In January 2018, there were 25,041 total aircraft operations (take-offs and landings), a 24.5 percent increase compared to 20,116 total aircraft operations in January 2017.

General aviation activity, which accounted for 70.4 percent of the total aircraft operations during January 2018, increased 37.9 percent when compared with January 2017.

The top three airlines in January 2018 based on passenger count were Southwest Airlines (311,854), United Airlines (134,898) and American Airlines (127,165).


Stump the Stu

It’s more than a door...it’s an entrance to...?

Stump the Stu 3.5.18

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You don’t knock on this door, it’s open, so you’re encouraged to come in invited or not. Maybe you’ll even find a little something you like or a trinket as a remembrance. This one might be tough, but we think you’re up to it. Where and what am I the entrance to? 

Take the challenge and submit your answers to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The correct answers will be in Thursday’s edition.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think Stu News Newport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Sign of the times

On Thursdays we give you a partial glimpse of a sign around town. You guess what the overall name of the business is. 

So, we gave you a peek of the peak of the Lido House sign. Correct guesses came from Libby Huyck, Diane Dixon, Bobbi Schaaf, Cara Farley, Charlie Davison, Cindy Elder, Melissa Kelly, Paul Blank, Tony Shaw and Rush Hill.

Former Mayor Hill added this, “It’s our new Lido House Hotel! A great new entrance to the Peninsula and a developer who has presented his masterpiece! I can’t wait until that roof top bar opens. And I am very proud to have been the Mayor that signed the ground lease on behalf of the city. Truly a long-term asset bringing social and financial benefit to all of Newport Beach.”

Gary Sherwin, can you say TOT? Cha-ching.

Thank you all for playing.

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

Lido House

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Pet of the WeekDog and Cat print

StuNewsNewport is delighted to be working with the Newport Beach Animal Shelter to help get the word out in search of loving homes for pets that deserve a warm, nurturing environment and a place to call “home.”

Silk

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Courtesy of Newport Beach 

Animal Shelter

MEET SILK

Say hello to a sweet boy – Silk. He’s truly lovely. One of the mellowest and sincere kitties currently available. He’s the kind of guy that will say hello when you arrive home, won’t be bothered if you have a late night or two out on the town and will be your most supportive buddy through thick and thin. He has a calming energy that fills your soul like hot chocolate and a warm fireplace.

At any given time, the shelter can have 4 - 5 dogs and 7 - 8 cats/kittens and other pets available for adoption. At times, they receive owner turn-ins that would do best adopted out together. 

Adoption costs at the shelter:

Dogs - $130

Puppies - $150

Cats - $90

Kittens - $110

If you are interested in finding out more about Silk, or any other animals up for adoption, the Newport Beach Animal Shelter is located at 20302 Riverside Drive, Newport Beach. It is open Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 949.644.3656. Email Valerie Schomburg at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

To find out how you can help support the shelter, visit www.nbpd.org and click on “Our Animal Shelter” to view the wish list. They can always use food & treats; new toys; grooming, hygiene & comfort products; as well as laundry soap, dish soap, paper towels, sponges & scrub pads and lint rollers. If you are interested in volunteering, you can fill out and sign the application on the website.


Figurative Sculpting Workshop at Urban Arts OC

Figurative Sculpture

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Submitted photo

On Saturday, March 10 and Sunday, March 11, join a figurative clay sculpting workshop with sculptor and guest artist Jim Lee. In this workshop, you will learn how to sculpt the human (full) figure in water-based clay. There will be a live (nude) model; adults only.

Receive hands-on instruction. Tools, armatures, clay and materials are provided for class use.

Enjoy one day with one pose for $350, or two days with a second pose for $450.

The workshop takes place at Urban Arts OC, 4250 Scott Drive, Newport Beach.

For additional information on art classes, visit www.urbanartsoc.com.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Toshiba Classic arrives to town and brings more than just golf

TomJohnsonIt’s Toshiba Classic Week in Newport Beach, so let the good times roll. 

Today, Newport Beach Country Club is actually closed to the public as the first of several pro-ams kick off this week’s events. 

These, along with sponsor-donations, are the way the tournament will make enough money to donate $1M back to charity, primarily Hoag Hospital, at the week’s conclusion. 

The Classic Pro-Am takes place Wednesday and Thursday. Gates will open both days at 8 a.m. to the public. These are the more casual days where you, the fan, can get a lot closer to the pros and sometimes even strike up a conversation.

In between the pro-ams is Breakfast with a Champion on Tuesday, March 6 at the Balboa Bay Resort. This year’s Champions Tour speaker is Lanny Wadkins. Lanny is in the Golf Hall of Fame after a career that included 21 PGA Tour wins, one PGA Championship and a long stint as a TV golf commentator.

He’s always been a brash, speak-what’s-on-his-mind kind of a guy, so it should be fun. The pros always have such great stories to tell. It’s probably sold out, but if you’re offered a seat, take it.

Back to the tournament itself. That runs Friday through Sunday. There’ll be good golf every day and, of course, good food and drinks in the tents. 

But this week, there’s a lot more going on besides just the pros playing, that you need to know about.

On Saturday the Toshiba Classic will celebrate their Third Annual Military Appreciation Day. The day includes free admission to all former, active and reserves and up to three of their guests…pretty cool. Please tell anyone you know.

The day begins with an opening celebration on the first tee, shortly after 9 a.m., that will include a color guard procession, national anthem and a flyover from a C-47B, courtesy of the Lyon Air Museum.

(There’s a Nancy Gardner/late Jack Callahan story/joke that could be inserted here, but I’ll save it for another day.)

Back to Saturday, there’s more. And, this just might be the biggest news of the weekend, short of crowning the new champion Sunday evening. 

On Saturday, after golf is all done, there will be a closing ceremony for Military Appreciation Day on the 17th hole called “Party of the Pond.” The event will feature a live performance by the one and only John Daly. Folks, we’re talking music here, not golf…and it’s free to all.

This is one of those, “You don’t want to miss this” events. 

And just so you know, the Toshiba Classic takes Military Appreciation Day seriously and donates nearly $50,000 to military causes each year, including Open Hearts for Purple Hearts Foundation, the 1/1 Foundation and the Marine Scholarship Fund.

So how can Sunday beat Saturday, you ask?

It’s what I call “Lose your Kids at the Toshiba Classic Day.” No, honestly, it’s better than it sounds

Kids can enjoy the Second Annual Student Day: obstacle courses, life size tic-tac-toe, putting contests, crafts station, photo booths and scavenger hunts. The Kids Fun Zone is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Check it out here. Students have to register prior.

Get out there and enjoy yourself. There are more than a million good reasons to do so and they all benefit the local community.


Enter Roger’s Gardens’ CALIFORNIA FRIENDLY® Gardening Contest

Pugh Contest Winner

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Courtesy of Roger’s Gardens

First Place – Grand Prize Winner 2017, Pugh Garden in Newport Beach

Now and continuing through Friday, June 1, enter Roger’s Gardens’ 11th Annual Orange County CALIFORNIA FRIENDLY ® Gardening Contest.

A California Friendly garden features smart and sustainable landscaping. It is designed in harmony with the surrounding environment using beautiful less-than-thirsty plants, state-of-the-art irrigation control and precision sprinkler heads. The CALIFORNIA FRIENDLY® Garden Contest celebrates and rewards these outstanding gardens with cash prizes and other awards. Enter the contest at: http://rogersgardens.com/ca-friendly-gardening-contest/.


CERT Meeting at Sherman Library & Gardens

CERT

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Submitted photo

Emergency Preparedness…what’s your plan?

On Wednesday, March 7 from 5:30 to s7:30 p.m., join Sherman Library & Gardens staff and your community neighbors for a CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) discussion and planning meeting.

Topics to be discussed include: Organizing CERT contacts in case of an emergency, an update from CERT leaders and purchasing supplies you will need in an emergency.

CERT is designed to prepare you to help yourself, your family and your neighbors in the event of a catastrophic disaster. Because emergency services personnel will not be able to help everyone immediately, you can make a difference by using CERT training to save lives and protect property.

Sherman Library & Gardens is located at 2647 E. Coast Highway, Corona del Mar. www.slgardens.org.


CdM library to close with celebration…book sale to follow

CdM library

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Submitted photo

Corona del Mar Branch Library customers are invited to say farewell to the 60-year-old neighborhood branch and celebrate the beginning of a new chapter in its history on Wednesday, March 14 from 2 to 4 p.m. The branch will close at 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 17. 

Groundbreaking for the new library and fire station (“fibrary”) project is scheduled for April 10 at 2 p.m. It is anticipated that the project will be completed in summer 2019.

The Newport Beach City Council approved funding for the reconstruction of Corona del Mar Branch Library as part of a joint project combining the library and Fire Station No. 5. The new library collection will concentrate on popular new fiction and non-fiction, DVDs, Blu-rays, audio books and current periodicals. A children’s area will provide space for storytimes as well as a wide-ranging collection of books and materials. An outdoor patio and stroller parking are included in the architectural plans in response to community requests.

Friends of the Library will host a book sale on March 24 - 25 that will give community members one last chance to visit the branch building before demolition, as well as the opportunity to purchase books at bargain prices. The sale will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday and from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday. Proceeds from the sale will fund future library collections and programs.

During the construction period, customers will be able to use services at the Central Library or concierge services at OASIS Senior Center for pickup and return of materials. Existing holds set for pickup at Corona del Mar have been re-routed to the Central Library. Customers can change their desired pickup location by accessing their account online or by contacting the Library. Books and Babies storytime will be held on Tuesday mornings at 10:30 a.m. at Grant Howald Park’s Community Youth Center. A complete schedule of Central Library storytimes is available on the library website at www.newportbeachlibrary.org.

For more information on Newport Beach Public Library resources and programs, contact the Library at 949.717.3800, option 2, or visit www.newportbeachlibrary.org.


Art in the Park Celebration at Crystal Cove

Crystal Cove Artwork Spring Art Show

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Courtesy of Crystal Cove Conservancy

The shimmering ocean and rolling hillsides of Crystal Cove State park have long inspired artists to photograph, compose, tell stories, dance and sketch. Be it a watercolor, a poem, or a musical composition, artists from different genres continue to be inspired by the beauty of the park and spectacular landscapes, breathtaking scenery and abundant gifts of nature.

On Saturday, March 31 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., come join Crystal Cove State Park and the Crystal Cove Conservancy art show and the 2nd Annual “Art in the Park,” for a day filled with free family-friendly art events, such as sea glass wrapping, outdoor musical performances, watercolor painting, sing dancers, basket weaving and more.

For a complete schedule of events, visit https://crystalcove.org/artinthepark/.


A True “American Dream” story

What does it take to make history? In March, as we celebrate Women’s History Month along with International Women’s Day on March 8, we’re reminded of the incredible females who fought – and fight – the good fight to change our society for the better, beating all odds to get there. Philanthropist and entrepreneur Twila True is one of these revolutionary women.

Call it the True “American Dream” story. Twila True is an Oglala Lakota Sioux who grew up on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota, where living conditions for the 35,000-plus tribal members are beyond harsh. A staggering 97 percent of the population lives below the national poverty line and unemployment is at 90 percent, which has led to high rates of alcoholism, drug abuse, hopelessness and suicide. “Pine Ridge is the poorest county in the nation,” True said. “Yet, most people outside of the Dakota State don’t know that Pine Ridge exists.”

Twila True

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Submitted photo

Twila True

True rose above these tremendous challenges, and has become a self-made success. With only a high school education behind her and a passion to help others, in 2012, she and her husband Alan co-founded True Family Enterprises, which currently owns and operates a multitude of thriving businesses across Southern California, including the Twila True Fine Jewelry boutique located at 980 Coast Highway in Newport Beach.

True has never forgotten about the deep struggles of her Oglala Lakota Sioux people. In 2015, True founded the True Sioux Hope Foundation with the mission to provide critical aid to the Sioux people and help fight the many social problems its tribal members face. “The Foundation was born from the belief that with a little help, the strength and spirit of the grant Sioux nation can thrive once again with pride and confidence,” True stated.

Through revenue from True’s enterprises, private donations and support from partners such as Deseret Industries, Mack & Moxy and Arizona State University, the Foundation not only provides critical aid to the most vulnerable, but it implements models of sustainability to foster permanent, positive change. This includes programs that support education, health and employment. For example, the nonprofit raises funds to fight infant mortality, which is at 20 percent – the highest on the continent – and provides childcare, proper nutrition and parenting classes. As hunger on the reservation is rampant and more than one third of the population is diabetic, the Foundation partners with Thrive Market to create custom healthy food box options to supply families in need. Since May 2017, the True Thrift Store offers employment opportunities and provides tribal members a place to purchase clothing and household items. And, thanks to a higher education program, youth from the reservation can receive a college education.

True has also launched the Twelve Cycles initiative to provide basic feminine resources and education to girls on the reservation. “The life span for women on the reservation is a devastating 52 years,” True said. “A woman will menstruate for 40 of these years. Yet, most girls on the reservation don’t have a single month’s supply of feminine pads or tampons.” Also, many females don’t have access to proper care for health issues and painful conditions related to their menstrual cycle, such as endometriosis. “As a result of poor menstrual hygiene management and knowledge, girls will skip school an average of five days out of the month, which negatively impacts school performance and in the end, their economic potential,” True explained.

While the Foundation is accomplishing extraordinary things, True says that in the beginning, the biggest challenge was to create enough awareness around the Oglala Sioux issues to make an impact. She thanks her work ethic for pushing her forward: “I know I have to stay driven and expect hurdles and hard work,” she said.

The Oglala Lakota Sioux desperately needed a voice and today, True and her Foundation are that voice. “Our goal is to encourage everyone on the reservation to help, hope and thrive,” True said. It’s worth noting that True’s Sioux name means “Woman Who Walks toward Future.” That’s exactly what True does. This woman is influencing history to change our society for the better, and she inspires others to follow her on her path.

To learn how you can support the True Hope Sioux Foundation, visit www.truesiouxhope.org.


“Project Gratitude” reaches out to community servants

Jon Lewis with two ladies

Photos courtesy of Christ Church by the Sea

(L - R): Christ Church by the Sea Pastor, the Rev. Joy Price and lay leader Karen Mascitelli deliver hand-written notes as part of “Project Gratitude” to Newport Beach Chief of Police Jon Lewis

Christ Church by the Sea United Methodist, located on Balboa Peninsula, thanks those who serve in our Newport Beach community through an ongoing program, “Project Gratitude.” Members of the congregation send out thank you notes on a regular basis to show their appreciation to those who give of themselves to our city – from school teachers, aides and administrators to police, fire and lifeguards.

Hand written notes

Individually addressed, hand-written notes to our police officers

Recently, members of the church hand delivered 72 individual, handwritten thank-you cards, each addressed to one of our patrol officers. In response, the police shared: “Every day, we are so blessed by the support of our incredible community. Yesterday, we had 72 more reasons to be grateful. Thank you to everyone who took the time to make our cops feel so appreciated.”

Christ Church by the Sea United Methodist is located at 1400 W. Balboa Blvd., Newport Beach. www.christbytheseanb.org


Sunday Musicale features world-renowned harpist

Cristina

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Courtesy of Newport Beach Public Library

On Sunday, March 25 from 3 to 4 p.m., the Newport beach Public Library is presenting Sunday Musicale featuring harpist Cristina Montes Mateo.

Mateo is currently Solo Harpist at the Orquestra de la Comunitat Valenciana in the Palau de Les Arts Reina Sofía, an orchestra conducted by Zubin Mehta. She has also been Principal Harp with the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra.

Presented by Friends of the Newport Public Library, the event is free and takes place in the Central Library Friends Room.

Newport Beach Public Library is located at 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.


The Decorative Arts Society announces March lecture series

The Decorative Arts Society of Orange County will host Nashville Tennessee-based landscape architect Ben Page on Monday, March 12 at their fourth lecture in their five-part lecture series. The event takes place at Edwards Big Newport Theater.

Growing up in Tennessee, Page gleaned knowledge of the land, natural systems and horticulture during a childhood spent on his grandparents’ and great grandparents’ farms, long before he considered landscape architecture as a career. While he was pursuing a medical education with the intent of becoming a doctor, fate intervened and he discovered a passion for his chosen field. Specializing in residential landscape architecture, his work is richly detailed and often incorporates a deep combination of historical influences interpreted for the 21st century.

Ben Page

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Courtesy of Pelican Hill

Landscape architect Ben Page

Page loves interacting with clients, and highly values the relationships that evolve during a project. He also considers it his great fortune to have had clients who deeply share his passion. As his work has evolved, the influence of his farm roots has begun to assert itself more often, and he has become more involved in horse farm management, hunting plantation management and master planning for environmentally based communities.

His work has been published nationally and featured on HGTV, and has received numerous awards. Page received his Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree with honors in 1973 from the University of Georgia. 

“One of the wonderful things about our lecture series is that we welcome speakers from all over the country and the world, each a master of his/her trade,” said Maureen Madigan, president of the Decorative Arts Society. “Ben Page brings to us his southern landscape architectural passion, which is a treat to hear about here in Southern California.”

The Decorative Arts Society, established in 1995, is a membership group of community-minded women and men who support the organization by participating in an annual lecture series presented by nationally and internationally known experts in the field of the decorative arts, including interior and fashion, architecture and landscape design. Through this series their members expand their knowledge of the decorative arts. Their subscriptions and donations to the Decorative Arts Society provide funds for projects and programs which benefit women and children in Orange County.

The cost to attend this lecture is $75 and is payable at the door. A breakfast buffet begins at 9:30 a.m., and the speaker is scheduled from 10 to 11 a.m.

For more information and membership opportunities, contact Laraine Eggleston, Membership Chairman at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and visit www.decorativeartssociety.net.

Edwards Big Newport Theater is located in Fashion Island at 300 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach.


SAVE THE DATE: NB Wine & Food Festival

Chef Rick Moonen

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Courtesy of Newport Beach Wine & Food Festival

Celebrated chef Rick Moonen at the 2017 Newport Beach Wine & Food Festival

Mark your calendar for the Fifth Annual Newport Beach Wine & Food Festival, scheduled in the fall on October 5 - 7 at the Newport Beach Civic Center. The festival always proves to be one of the most exclusive, intimate and world-class epicurean lifestyle events in Southern California.

Attendees will enjoy one-of-a-kind dinners by celebrity chefs and local masters, taste bites from 40 different top restaurants with their exclusive chefs and sip from more than 250 varieties of wine, spirits and craft brews. Highlighting the festivities are VIP events, celebrity chef cooking demonstrations, master sommelier tasting panels and interactive mixology courses.

For tickets and the featured line-up, visit www.newportwineandfood.com.


SAVE THE DATES: City of Newport Beach upcoming Spring events 

Boy sailing

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Submitted photos

Camp Newport Expo: Sunday, March 18 – With a kaleidoscope of camps to 

choose from, there is something for everyone. Hosted by the City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Department. For more information, visit www.campnewport.com.

Girl hunting eggs

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Mayor’s 4th Annual Egg Race: Saturday, March 24 – There will be photos, egg roll races, bounce houses, a train and more. Takes place on the Civic Center Lawn, 100 Civic Center Drive, Newport Beach from 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Kids running track

Youth Track Meet of Champions - Spring 2018: Friday, April 6 – Youth who are born between the years of 2003 and 2011 are eligible to compete. Takes place at the Corona del Mar High School Track. Presented by the City of Newport Beach Recreation & Senior Services Department, and Newport-Balboa Rotary Club, and in memory of Frank E. Anderson. For more information, visit www.newportbeachca.gov/sports, or call 949.644.3151.


Sign of the times

It’s another edition of Sign of the times. Contestants, start your engines. Below you’ll find this week’s clue. What you see is a small part of this business’ overall sign. This one could be tough because it’s new on the scene. That all being said, here’s the one clue we’ll give you all: the “flag” is huge to Newport Beach’s future. 

Good luck!

Send you guesses to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

If you’re a business and you want to play, you can send us a high-quality photo of your sign and we’ll take it from there and challenge our readers.

Let’s have some fun!

SOTT 3118

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Stump the Stu

“You gotta have art” and you need to know where to find it

Stump the Stu 3118

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I can tell baseball season is heating up because everyone swung and missed on this one. Many guesses came in citing names of schools, but no one came in with the correct guess of Newport Heights Elementary. 

To those who guessed, thank you and keep your entries coming in.

If you have a unique spot or icon around town that you think StuNewsNewport readers would enjoy finding out about, please shoot it, share it and give us the answer, so we can challenge them!


Lantern Festival to light up Argyros Plaza

Paper lanterns in the sky

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Submitted photo

On Sunday, March 4 from 12 to 6 p.m., bring the entire family and celebrate Pacific Symphony’s third annual Lantern Festival. Pacific Symphony and South Coast Chinese Cultural Center/Irvine Chinese School are partnering to present this free, family-friendly event to commemorate the end of the Lunar New Year.

Handmade lanterns will transform the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall and the Julianne and George Argyros Plaza, while performances will feature local music and dance groups. In honor of the Year of the Dog, watch the dragon dance and lantern parade, visit furry friends from Canine Companions for Independence, try your hand at solving riddles, learn Chinese folk dancing, partake in lantern making with Bowers Museum, enjoy a puppet show, try samples from food trucks, and more.

For more information and to reserve your free tickets, visit www.pacificsymphony.org. Admission will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis, due to venue capacity.

Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall is located at 615 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


Leadership Tomorrow alumni mixer scheduled for April

The Duck Club

Submitted photo

Calling all Leadership Tomorrow Alumni! Come relax and enjoy the camaraderie of LT graduates at the alumni mixer on Monday, April 30 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at The Duck Club in Irvine, located in the San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary. Enjoy complimentary appetizers and a no-host bar for an admission of $10.

To make an online reservation, visit www.leadershiptomorrow.org.

For more information, contact Jeff Parker at the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce at 949.729.4408 or by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The Duck Club is located at 15 Riparian View, Irvine.


Lido House: the ultimate beach retreat

By LANA JOHNSON

Exterior Lido House

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Photos courtesy of Lido House

An exterior shot of Lido House

On Tuesday, Feb. 27, I had the pleasure to take a tour of the Lido House, scheduled to open on Tuesday, April 3 on Balboa Peninsula.

Donning our hard hats (I got the pink one!), General Manager Adam Beers graciously took me through this unique property, where I discovered what was so special about Newport Beach’s newest hotel accommodation.

What became so apparent, was the attention to details. Local developer Robert D. Olson, a true visionary, incorporated many of the elements of this Cape-Cod inspired boutique hotel from his own charming abode on Balboa Island. Elements, such as stone, wood, siding and windows, even the colors of the guestroom doors (such as Nantucket red) were reminiscent of his own residence, and they complemented one another to create a residential yet rustic welcoming sense of place.

Lido House, designed with an effortless sense of style and a definitive nautical vibe, is operated by Marriott as part of their Autograph Collection. It is poised to be Newport Beach’s guesthouse for locals and out of town visitors alike, delivering an authentic beach house retreat experience, a place you can call “home” away from home. Its location is ideal – you can valet your car, then walk to Lido Marina Village and Balboa shops, or take a short bike ride down to the surf to hit the waves.

Guestroom

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Guestrooms have a casual beach house vibe

This four-story property exudes “casual” luxury. It has 130 guestrooms, a presidential suite, several executive suites, and five charming three-story guest cottages. The 1,200-square-foot presidential suite is replete with a kitchen, fireplace and balcony with views of the ocean. The cottages are sure to allure: they each have two bedrooms and two baths, a full kitchen, living room with fireplace as well as two rooftop decks (one with a barbecue), but no two are alike. Each has a different layout and motif, thanks to the five Newport Beach design firms who extended their individual talents: Grace Blu Design, Jennifer Mehditash Design, Brooke Wagner Design, Erica Bryen Design and Blackband Design. They beckon you to stay longer.

Enter the foyer, and you view the interior courtyard with a pool and communal fire pits, a saltwater pool with private cabanas in addition to event lawns that serve as the perfect venues for weddings or private get togethers.

Hotel amenities include the full-service Boost Spa with four treatment rooms, a 24/7 state-of-the-art fitness center and the 3,000-square-foot Boathouse Ballroom that can be divided into two areas.

Boost Spa

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The Boost Spa is a pampering haven

A nod to its community roots, the hotel’s restaurant with its black brick facade, is aptly named The Mayor’s Table Pacific Pub & Kitchen, as the property is situated on the land where the old Newport Beach City Hall was. The 2,248-square-foot dining establishment has a display kitchen, seats 142 people and serves three meals daily. It opens to the outdoors, so guests can enjoy natural light and coastal breezes. It will serve Pacific Pub-style offerings, and its private dining room which accommodates 12 has a stunning brick fireplace that extends to the skylight – the ideal spot for high tea or a bridal shower. The indoor bar with its octopus mural will be the social “watering” hole.

Bar

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The indoor bar provides a convivial gathering place

Beyond the French doors, there is a long wooden deck that was constructed around two ficus trees that were on the original city hall property. It provides the perfect backdrop to enjoy a glass of Piper Heidsieck Champagne (which the hotel has partnered with), a freshly brewed coffee or an ice cream from the property’s Crew Coffee and Creamerie. The coffee/ice cream shop can be accessed from the street and offers locally roasted brews and syrups made in-house, as well as the hotel’s own specialty ice cream flavors.

Now, let’s talk about the views! The ocean vistas are magnificent from the guestrooms, but Newport Beach will now have its only hotel rooftop bar and lounge – Topside. It provides an indoor/outdoor experience and outside, guests can enjoy the views, as well as the fire pit and music.

Rootop bar

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Ocean vistas and music make the rooftop Topside bar and lounge a stand out

Let’s toast to the grand opening which is slated for May!

Champagne

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Make any occasion special with their Champagne bellinis

Lido House starting rates are $1,000 for the guest cottages and $300 for a standard guestroom. For reservations, visit www.marriott.com/reservation/availability.mi?propertyCode=NPBAK.

Lido House is located at 3300 Newport Blvd., Newport Beach. Call 949.524.8500. www.lidohousehotel.com.


Market your business at the CdM Scenic 5K

CdM 5k run

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Submitted photo

The sponsorship deadline is approaching to offer your business the opportunity to promote its products or services at the 37th Annual Corona del Mar Scenic 5K taking place on Saturday, June 2.

Your business logo will be featured on all print and online media, online marketing, social media and showcased during event day. The deadline is April 15.

To join the list of sponsors, contact the Corona del Mar Chamber at 949.673.4050, or by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

For more information, visit www.CdMChamber.com.


Newport Bay Conservancy and OC Parks volunteer training this Saturday

Birds in flight

Submitted photo

On Saturday, March 3 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., come learn about the opportunities for volunteering at Upper Newport Bay. Opportunities include kayak and outrigger tours, nature walks, Interpretive Center visitor services, habitat restoration (invasive plant removal and planting native species), leading tours with youth, judging science fairs, Earth Day and other special events. Also, participants will explore the world of interpretation through customer service, and how it relates to an open space setting.

This training is designed for adults (or teens 16 years and older), who can commit to approximately three hours per month, or 36 hours in their first 12 months of volunteering. This orientation/training event makes you eligible to volunteer in any OC Parks space, and is the site-specific training for Upper Newport Bay.

Newport Bay Conservancy and OC Parks are grateful for the enthusiasm and commitment of their roughly 200+ active volunteers. They look forward to having you join them.

To familiarize yourself with the programs and events, visit www.newportbay.org.

If you are unable to attend this event, but would like to help out, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to let their Volunteer Coordinator know you want to be notified when the next training is available, which is about every two months.

If you’re considering attending their Naturalist Training Program from September through December, this class is a prerequisite prior to joining that training program.

The training takes place at the Peter and Mary Muth Interpretive Center located at 2301 University Drive, Newport Beach.


OC Restaurant Week Launch Party this Saturday

This year’s Orange County Restaurant Week festivities will kick off with an official A DECADE OF DINING OUTLaunch Party this Saturday, March 3 at the Marriott Irvine Spectrum. VIP admission is from 1 to 5 p.m. with tickets that must be purchased directly at www.ocrestaurantweek.com/launch-party.html. General Admission is from 2 to 5 p.m.

Guests attending the launch party will have the unique opportunity to experience an array of bites prepared by some of the most innovative OC Restaurant Week participants, including these Newport Beach dining establishments: Back Bay Bistro, Cucina Enoteca, Dory Deli and Tackle Box.

Back Bay Bistro

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Submitted photo

Beautiful views from Back Bay Bistro, one of the participants in this year’s OC Restaurant Week and featured restaurant in Saturday’s Launch Party

Come celebrate 10 years of OC Restaurant Week by joining in on the fun of the red carpet for an upscale experience of food, spirits, music and wine.

Tickets for the event are $100 and in short supply. Cocktail dress code will be enforced, and guests must be 21 years or older to attend. Parking is limited.

Marriott Irvine Spectrum is located at 7905 Irvine Center Drive, Irvine.

2018 Orange County Restaurant Week will be held Sunday, March 4 - Saturday, March 10 with more than 150 restaurants participating in the weeklong event. Restaurants will offer prix-fixe menus within the following price categories: lunch for $10, $15 or $20, and dinner for $20, $30, $40 or $50, with a limited number of $80 “Luxe” dinner menus. Restaurant participants are listed at www.OrangeCountyRestaurantWeek.com.


Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Why development is good for our community

TomJohnsonWhy is responsible development important to our community? Over the years, many of the projects completed around town, including many of the City facilities and parks, have been paid for as a result of developer fees, which are included as an “add-on” to developers in the approval process.

 To give you an example of this is the Uptown Newport Development project. This mixed-use includes 1,244 residential units, 11,500 square feet of retail space and two acres of park space and is located in the airport area on Jamboree Road. 

There’s a lot of people that don’t like it or other projects like it because, as always, traffic.

The play here is that to offset the impact of this project on the community, the developer has agreed to pay $17 million in “fees” to the City.

The City then in turn can now use those funds on projects.

A great example of this working is the Corona del Mar fire department and library replacement. Council Tuesday night approved awarding TELACU Construction Management Inc. the contract for the overall project at a cost of $6,724,186. Additionally, there is an added $540,814 contingency fund and another $256,000 for construction management oversight from GKK Works Inc. The total project, all in, calls for $8,333,000.

Imagine if there were no fees and you the taxpayer had to pay your portion of that $8M. Not only for this improvement, but for all future improvements. That wouldn’t be good. The alternative would be to let projects deteriorate, also not a good look for the town.

That’s why, good responsible development is important.

We have some interesting decisions coming along in the future, most notably, with the proposed Koll Center Residences. Our council will be challenged to weigh the benefits of the project and what else it brings to the table (hence, developer fees). 

The process will be interesting to watch.

It’s what they were elected to do.

• • •

Newport Beach Police Chief Jon Lewis gave a short presentation to city council Tuesday reassuring the strong presence of officers on and around our local school campuses. Lewis discussed an increased, combined presence of school resource officers, along with full-time uniformed officers on a regular basis around campuses in vehicles, including at sporting events, dances and other events.

• • •

Kudos to Newport Beach Public Works Director David Webb and his team on being awarded the Construction Project of the Year by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ACSE) for the Little Island Bridge Project on Balboa Island.

City Councilman Jeff Herdman recognized Webb from the dais at the council meeting.

The project was complex and included building a temporary bridge for Little Island traffic while the main bridge was replaced.

• • •

Also, congrats to Jax Richards who was recognized Tuesday night, Feb. 27, as the Newport Beach Junior Lifeguard of the Year. Jax was selected from a program that annually features some 1,300 – 1,400 junior guards.

• • •

Don’t forget, next week is Toshiba Classic week out at Newport Beach Country Club. Lots of events throughout the week. We’ll give you a complete rundown in Monday’s Stu News Newport.

• • •

Finally, beginning next week after Monday’s edition, we will change our delivery dates from Monday and Thursday to Tuesday and Friday. We feel that this will allow us to do an even better job getting you your local news.

So, Thursday’s edition won’t come next week and will instead arrive Friday. 

As always, thank you for your support. We hope you’ll share Stu News with your friends. It’s free and easy.


Experience the difference at the new OC Market Place

OC Market Place

Courtesy of Orange County Market Place

Come to the new Orange County Market Place during its Grand Reopening on Saturday, March 31. Spectra, managers of the OC Market Place, are hosting this free community gathering and relaunch event from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. and all are invited!

The Grand Reopening includes a full day of activities featuring a ribbon cutting supported by the Costa Mesa Chamber of Commerce followed by a performance by the Costa Mesa High School Band. The day is dedicated to the Orange County community with a fundraiser and live entertainment event, “Taste of the Arts,” supporting the Community Outreach Alliance (COA). COA artists will perform on stage in the South Event Space, and host art installations and experiences, alongside a car show with the Cadillac Kings Car Club.

Concurrently, patrons can shop the Market Place while experiencing the vintage handmade market, “Behind the Picket Fence,” located in the East Event Space of the property. Easter activities are available for families with children, including Easter egg hunts in the Centennial Farm, face painting and an Easter Scavenger Hunt throughout the Market Place.

Take advantage of the food and beverage offerings, with a contest to name the OC Market Place’s new featured burger. Sip, shop and stroll with through the North Event Space for a wine tasting and sampling event where you can purchase a full bottle to go, and peruse and purchase fresh produce in the Farmers’ Market.

For more information, visit www.OCMarketPlace.com.

The Orange County Market Place is located on the Orange County Fair & Events Center grounds at 88 Fair Drive, Costa Mesa.


Corona del Mar update: Library, fire station and business news

By AMY SNIDER SENK

After a long and topsy-turvy ride, the Newport Beach City Council this week approved funding for a new, combined Corona del Mar Library and fire station. Construction is set to begin this spring – possibly April 10 – and Friends of the Library may hold a book sale after its closure to thin out the inventory. Construction of a temporary fire station, where firefighters will work and sleep, is already underway in the OASIS Senior Center’s auxiliary parking lot at Fifth and Marguerite.

Corona del Mar resident Joy Brenner, a City Council candidate and founder of Friends of the CdM Library, applauded the Council vote to approve more than $8 million for the Marigold Avenue project.

“All of us from the Friends of the CdM Library are thrilled to see this project commence, almost three years after we were told it would be torn down and made smaller,” Brenner said. “Because of the community, staff library board and council collaboration, we will have a beautiful and comfortable library of which we can all be proud.”

City staff confirmed four years ago that they wanted to demolish the fire station and library, both about 60 years old, and combine them into a new, modern structure. Initial plans showed a great fire station, and a box-shaped library space that would have been much smaller than the existing branch. Residents complained, held meetings and ultimately a new plan was approved. Then later, it was shelved for budget reasons.

The Central Library will take over most of the CdM branch along with some services to be offered at Grant Howald Park’s Community Youth Center and at OASIS. The new library branch will feature an outdoor reading porch and stroller parking – all community suggestions. The buildings could have a grand opening in summer 2019.

Holly Sharp

Photo by Amy Snider Senk

And as always…more business news in Corona del Mar. The Holly Sharp Boutique, which opened in 1992 at 3636 E. Coast Highway, will close permanently after holding an “everything must go sale” that ended February 28.

“It is with a bittersweet heart that we close our CdM retail location after 25 years on the Coast Highway,” according to a social media post. “We have had an amazing run and thank you for your support and friendship over the years. We are excited to turn our focus to LUCYLOVE wholesale, afternoons with our family and walks on the beach.”

Holly Sharp and her daughter launched the LUCYLOVE clothing line in 2000, according to the company website. The shop, with its frequent sidewalk sales, clean white storefront and beach cruiser bike parked in front, was a CdM staple for women and teens looking for dresses, jewelry and more.

Across town, the Cottage Colour boutique is closing its shop at 2836 E. Coast Highway and will open a “mini-boutique” across the street inside the C Dobbs shop. Cottage Colour opened in 2015 in a newly constructed storefront that had replaced a 50-year-old temporary building that held Sunny’s Photos.

C Dobbs, at 2823 E. Coast Highway, began as the Carol Rachelle boutique until it enlarged and moved into the vacated Francis-Orr stationery shop in late 2015.

The Hearthstone at 2711 E. Coast Highway, the everything fireplace store, that has been here for more than 43 years is now vacant. There is a for lease sign in the window.

Last note: The first of three 2018 Newport Beach Junior Lifeguard swim tests will take place Sunday, March 4 at Corona del Mar High School’s pool. Good luck future NBJGs!

~~~~~~~~

Amy Snider Senk has lived in Corona del Mar for 17 years and until last year was publisher of Corona del Mar Today, an online newspaper that ran daily for seven years. Senk, a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, is involved in the Corona del Mar Residents Association and the Corona del Mar High School PTA. She and her husband have two children.


Boys Hope Girls Hope 24th Annual Golfers Classic seeks volunteers

Pelican Hill ocean south course

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Courtesy of Pelican Hill

The ocean south course at Pelican Hill Golf Club

Boys Hope Girls Hope of Southern California is seeking volunteers for its 24th Annual Golfers Classic on Wednesday, May 9 at Pelican Hill Golf Club.

The high-class event, which usually raises about $250,000 for the nonprofit, is the largest fundraiser of the year for the Orange County-based agency, which provides long-term housing and academic scholarships through college to children considered homeless by the California Department of Education.

In addition to 18 holes of golf at Pelican Hill, the golf tournament features a hole-in-one contest, $10,000 putting contest, live auction, cocktail hour, post-tournament dinner and gifts for all golfers. Underwriting opportunities are also available.

Hopeful volunteers should contact Executive Director Tim Rogers at 949.515.8833 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Pelican Hill Golf Club is located at 22800 S. Pelican Hill Road, Newport Coast.


Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “Love Never Dies” comes to Segerstrom Center

Love Never Dies

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Photo by Joan Marcus

Meghan Picerno and Gardar Thor Cortes star in “Love Never Dies”

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Love Never Dies, the spellbinding sequel to The Phantom of the Opera, comes to Segerstrom Center for the Arts’ Segerstrom Hall on April 24 - May 5. It has been described by Chris Boyd in The Australian as “The best thing Lloyd Webber has written in the quarter century since The Phantom of the Opera.”

In this dazzling new production of Love Never Dies, audiences are taken on a thrilling rollercoaster ride of intrigue, obsession and romance. Attendees will be seduced by the beautiful, sometimes magical and poetic, sometimes joyful and occasionally melancholic score.

Tickets for Love Never Dies start at $29, and are on sale now. They can be purchased online at www.scfta.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa or by calling 714.556.2787. For inquiries about group ticket savings for 10 or more, call the Group Services office at 714.755.0236. The 2 p.m. performance on Saturday, May 5 will include audio description, open captioning and sign-language interpretation.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


American Vintage House opens in warehouse district

Vintage house

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Submitted photo

American Vintage House, one of Orange County’s newest, most eclectic vintage boutiques, has opened a new home furnishings and accessories showroom in the warehouse district of Newport Beach at 877 W. 16th St.

The modern rustic industrial space houses unique vintage items from the ‘40s to ‘70s – all handpicked by owner JoAnn Sarvak and artfully arranged with polished precision. A visit to the retro haven presents elevated vintage lifestyle, from rare mid-century modern furniture to short stacks of Levi’s 501 Jeans.

A self-described “second generation picker,” Sarvak discovered her passion for unique vintage pieces as a child. Hot on the flea market selling scene, she quickly realized the immense need for a brick-and-mortar shop and event space inspired by nostalgia blended with effortless modernism. Enter American Vintage House, a carefully curated collection of vintage furniture, men’s and women’s apparel, art, jewelry, collectibles, lighting, rugs and hard-to-find rarities.

American Vintage House “finds” include a colorful vintage motorcycle helmet collection, an original 1960s concert poster collection, and a handsome 1970s mechanics card catalog and parts holder cabinet. Old auto doors and macramé creations hang from the walls, while industrial shop lights strung to the high ceiling illuminate a medley of old-school vinyl, racks of flannels and cropped band tees, planters filled with succulents, and an assortment of vintage industrial stools. Alluring in its funky vibe and stunning merchandising, it’s an ever-evolving vintage wonderland unlike any in Orange County.

“I want my customers to enjoy the space and find community over a shared love of all things vintage,” Sarvak said. “Here at American Vintage House, we welcome lovers of unique vintage goods and designers. We want the person who isn’t afraid to be herself through creative expression and lifestyle.”

In addition to its retail component, American Vintage House stands as an event space for photo and video shoots, parties, and more. Staging and prop rentals are also available.

For more information, call 949.386.0111 and visit the website at www.americanvintagehouse.com.


“In Good Taste” on display at JWA 

Started in Orange County

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Photos courtesy of JWA

An exhibition providing a wide-ranging view of the many facets of culinary arts in Orange County titled “In Good Taste” is on display now at John Wayne Airport (JWA).

The exhibition is in the Vi Smith Concourse Gallery, located on the Departure (upper) Level, across from Gates 2 through 5 in Terminal A, Gates 18 through 21 in Terminal C and in the free-standing display cases across from Gate 14. Ticketed passengers can view the exhibit through June 2018.

“Orange County is home to celebrated chefs, groundbreaking dining concepts and a seemingly endless variety of food and drink from around the world” said Board Chairman Andrew Do. “This innovative display provides travelers at John Wayne Airport a glimpse into the rich local history and cultural diversity of the culinary arts in Orange County.”

Ethnic foods

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Filled with photographs, memorabilia and interesting facts, the exhibition includes a sampling of 13 different food-related topics, each intended to present a distinctly different aspect of food, drink and related culinary arts. From food trucks to food halls, to ethnic cuisine from around the world and pioneering culinary concepts that began right here, “In Good Taste” shines a bright light on the many facets of the culinary arts jewel that is Orange County.

To learn more about JWA’s Art Programs, visit www.ocair.com/terminal/artexhibits.


“Good Morning Corona del Mar” announces March meeting

The Corona del Mar Chamber of Commerce is holding its “Good Morning Corona del Mar” government and community affairs discussion group on Thursday, March 8 from 7:30 to 9 a.m.

Attendees are in for a treat, as Matt Brisbois, Life Safety Specialist with the Newport Beach Fire Department is the featured speaker.

The featured topic is the Newport Beach Fire Department Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program, whose training program is led by Brisbois.

Matt Brisbois

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Submitted photo

Matt Brisbois will speak at this month’s “Good Morning Corona del Mar” meeting

CERT is designed to prepare you to help yourself, your family and your neighbors in the event of a catastrophic disaster. Because emergency services personnel will not be able to help everyone immediately, you can make a difference by using CERT training to save lives and protect property. Learn about the program while enjoying a morning at the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club.

In addition to Brisbois, there will be legislative updates from the offices of Newport Beach Councilmember Scott Poetter, Congressman Dana Rohrabacher, Senator John Moorlach, Assemblyman Matthew Harper and Orange County Supervisor Michelle Steel.

The meeting is open to the community at large. No RSVP is necessary and the event is free of charge. Complimentary refreshments will be served.

The Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club is located at 1601 Bayside Drive, Corona del Mar.

For more information on community events, visit www.CdMChamber.com.


Newport Beach – A Look Back

Photo series courtesy of Balboa Island Museum & Historical Society

A Look Back 2.26.18

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Even before the Danny Bibbs, the Gil Forresters, the Maxine Montgomerys and the Jerry Dalebouts, there was Hal Will Smith, “licensed real estate broker.” Apparently, you just rang the bell.

Visit Balboa Island Museum and the Museum Store located at 331 Marine Ave., Balboa Island. They are open Tuesdays - Sundays from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Call 949.675.3952. www.balboaislandmuseum.organd  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


Wooden Boat Festival scheduled for June 8 - 10

Mark Your Calendar for the Wooden Boat Festival, coming June 8 - 10 to Balboa Yacht Club (BYC). This 5th annual “must-see” event is yachting’s equivalent of a Concours d’Elegance.

Chris Craft

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Photo by Lana Johnson

This Chris Craft was among those displayed at the 2017 Wooden Boat Festival

Last year, nearly 4,000 visitors attended this free event. In addition to being able to view and board nearly 50 wooden treasures, there will be live music, maritime art and exhibits, delicious food and libations, a silent auction, and the very popular kids toy boatbuilding pavilion.

The Spirit of Dana Point will be arriving at the BYC docks as this year’s featured vessel. Built by local Dennis Holland (who started building this boat in 1970 in his Costa Mesa backyard), Newport Harbor will welcome back his originally named Pilgrim of Newport on Friday, June 8. This 118-foot wooden schooner is now cared for today by the Ocean Institute in Dana Point.

There are a variety of ways to arrive at the festival. Free parking and shuttle service will be available at 1600 Newport Center Drive, or catch a water taxi from one of at least four stops throughout the harbor. And, as always, the event, parking, shuttle service and the water taxi rides are all complimentary.

The Balboa Yacht Club hosts the festival in collaboration with Discovery Cube’s Ocean Quest, the Balboa Bay Club and Resort, Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club, the City of Newport Beach, the County of Orange, and Visit Newport/Newport Beach & Co.

On Sunday, June 10, the Wooden Boat Parade will proceed around Newport Harbor for all to see by a traditional Sail By down the main channel, before the vessels leave for their home ports.

If you have a show-ready wooden boat of any size and you haven’t already applied to take part in the festival, there is still dock and on-land space available. Visit www.newportbeachwoodenboatfestival.com for details.

For more information, visit www.newportbeachwoodenboatfestival.com

 or call 949.673.3515.


Wake Up! Newport features Mayor “Duffy” Duffield

The Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce will be hosting Wake Up! Newport featuring the Mayor of Newport Beach, Duffy Duffield. The event will be held Thursday, March 1 at 7:15 a.m. at Newport Beach Central Library in the Friends Room. Come hear the Mayor discuss the State of the City, goals for 2018 and more. There will also be a continental breakfast provided by Le Pain Quotidien.

Mayor Duffy Duffield

Courtesy of Newport Beach 

Chamber of Commerce

Mayor Marshall “Duffy” Duffield is the featured breakfast speaker

Mayor Marshall “Duffy” Duffield has been a resident of Newport Beach since 1955. A graduate of Newport Harbor High School, he married his high school sweetheart, Terry. Their three children, Kelly (grandson Marshall was born in June, 2013), Tyler and Travis were all raised and live in Newport.

Duffield has spent a lifetime on the water, both as an offshore sailboat racer, designer and builder and operator of large power boats. He is founder and owner of the largest electric boat company in the world – the internationally prominent Duffy Electric Boat Company, which dominates the leisure electric boat market on every continent.

He believes in smaller government, fair taxation, and leadership which carefully considers and responds to the concerns and desires of Newport’s citizens.

This free event is open to the public. To register for the event, visit www.newportbeach.com/events/march-wake-newport-breakfast-mayor-duffy-duffield

Newport Beach Central Library is located at 1000 Avocado Ave., Newport Beach.


Tickets for Segerstrom Center’s HAMILTON go on sale today

HAMILTON 2

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Photo by Joan Marcus

HAMILTON Company from the HAMILTON National Tour

Producer Jeffrey Seller and Segerstrom Center for the Arts are pleased to bring HAMILTON to Orange County audiences for the first time on May 8 - 27 in Segerstrom Hall. Single tickets will go on sale to the public today, Monday, Feb. 26 at 9 a.m. at www.scfta.org and at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa.

There is a maximum purchase limit of four (4) tickets per account for the engagement. Tickets range from $80.75 to $200.75 with a select number of $600.75 premium seats available. There will be a lottery for all performances, with details to be announced closer to the engagement. The 2 p.m. performance on Saturday, May 19 will include audio description, open captioning and sign-language interpretation.

With book, music and lyrics by Lin-Manuel Miranda, direction by Thomas Kail, choreography by Andy Blankenbuehler and musical supervision and orchestrations by Alex Lacomoire, HAMILTON is based on Ron Chernow’s biography of Founding Father Alexander Hamilton.

HAMILTON is the story of America’s Founding Father Alexander Hamilton. An immigrant from the West Indies, Hamilton became George Washington’s right-hand man during the Revolutionary War and was the new nation’s first Treasury Secretary. Featuring a score that blends hip-hop, jazz, blues, rap, R&B and Broadway, HAMILTON is the story of America then, as told by America now.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.


THE BOOK OF MORMON returns to Segerstrom Center

Book of Mormon

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Photo by Julieta Cervantes, 2017

Cast from THE BOOK OF MORMON 

Back by popular demand, THE BOOK OF MORMON returns to Segerstrom Center for the Arts for a limited engagement from March 20 through April 1. It is the winner of nine Tony Awards, including Best Musical and Best Score.

This production features book, music and lyrics by Trey Parker, Robert Lopez and Matt Stone. Parker and Stone are the four-time Emmy Award-winning creators of the landmark animated series, South Park. Tony Award winner Lopez is co-creator of the long-running hit musical comedy, Avenue Q. The musical is choreographed by Tony Award winner Casey Nicholaw (Monty Python’s Spamalot, The Drowsy Chaperone) and is directed by Nicholaw and Parker. 

Tickets for THE BOOK OF MORMON start at $34.75, and are on sale now. They can be purchased online at www.scfta.org, at the Box Office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa or by calling 714.556. 2787. For inquiries about group ticket savings for 10 or more, call the Group Services office at 714.755.0236. The 2 p.m. performance on Saturday, March 24 will include audio description, open captioning and sign-language interpretation.

Segerstrom Center for the Arts is located at 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa.

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